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    University of Virginia
   
 
  Nov 19, 2017
 
 
    
Graduate Record 2015-2016 [ARCHIVED RECORD]

School of Graduate Engineering and Applied Science: Information


About   Information  Departments/Programs   Courses   Faculty  

Click on a link to be taken to the entry below.


Admission Requirements

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The School of Engineering and Applied Science offers an exceptional educational opportunity for qualified students who seek an environment where graduate study is characterized by integrated learning experiences with highly qualified, experienced, and dedicated faculty. Graduate admissions committees are seeking well-rounded individuals who bring exceptional intellectual capabilities along with a passion for their chosen field. The admissions process looks for evidence of competitive academic performance, work and life experiences, and qualities of character such as motivation, maturity, tenacity, integrity, ability to work with others, self-reliance, and leadership. All applicants are considered without regard to race, color, religion, sex, national origin, political affiliation, disability, age, sexual orientation, or veteran status. The Engineering School welcomes applications from men and women from other countries whose diverse perspectives broaden the range of educational experience for all members of the academic community.

An applicant must have a baccalaureate degree from a recognized college or university. While this degree will normally be in the field of engineering or applied science, degrees in other fields may be acceptable. Undergraduate courses that may be required to remedy deficiencies must be taken without credit. An applicant should have at least a B average for admission into graduate studies.

Each candidate must complete the online Application for Admission. The application requires completion of an essay, complete transcripts of all academic work and three letters of recommendation. A non-refundable application fee must accompany the application; an application will not be considered if the fee has not been paid. All applicants are required to take the Graduate Records Exam (GRE) general exam. International students must have an excellent command of the English language in order to enroll at the University. The TOEFL exam is required of all applicants if the language first learned and spoken in the home is not English. Most students admitted score at least 250 on the computer-based test or 90 on the Internet-based test. Scores from the International English Language Test (IELTS) may be submitted in lieu of the TOEFL. Most successful applicants score in the 7.0 band or better on the IELTS. Some students may be required to complete the Summer English for Academic Purposes Program (www.virginia.edu/provost/caelc/summer.html) prior to admission.

Applications must be completed and submitted on-line (http://www.seas.virginia.edu/engineering_interest): Official transcripts should be sent to Graduate Studies, Office of the Dean, School of Engineering and Applied Science, Thornton Hall, Room A-107, 351 McCormick Road, P.O. Box 400242 Charlottesville, VA 22904-4242. On-line recommendations are strongly encouraged. Application information, including recommendations, reach the admissions committees much faster if submitted electronically.

All students who wish to be nominated for assistantships and fellowships should submit a complete application by January 15 for fall admission (except for BME, which has a deadline of January 1). For U.S. citizens and permanent residents, deadlines for complete applications for admission are: December 1 for spring admission, May 1 for summer admission, and August 1 for fall admission. However, students applying late in the process will most likely not be awarded aid. International students on visas (other than permanent residents) must apply at least five months prior to the term for which admission is sought to allow time for the International Student Office to review and process necessary paperwork. To enroll at the University, each foreign national student must be lawfully present in the United States based on U.S. federal immigration law, and any visa status held must not prohibit the desired University enrollment. Also, all international students (other than permanent residents) must provide evidence of financial capability for the duration of their studies, unless receiving departmental aid.


Affiliated Agencies

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The National Institute of Aerospace (NIA) is a research and graduate education institute initiated by NASA Langley Research Center to ensure a national capability to support NASA’s mission by expanding collaboration with academia and leveraging expertise inside and outside NASA. The institute is a non-profit corporation formed by a consortium that now includes Georgia Tech, North Carolina A&T State University, North Carolina State University, the University of Maryland, the University of Virginia, Virginia Tech, Hampton University, Old Dominion University, the College of William & Mary, and the AIAA Foundation.

NIA conducts basic, formative, and leading edge research and develops revolutionary new technologies in all areas of interest to NASA through partnerships with the Nation’s universities, industry and other government agencies. NIA performs research in a broad range of disciplines relevant to NASA Aeronautics, Space Exploration, Science and Space Operations missions. Current research focus areas include Adaptive Aircraft Technologies, Rotorcraft Aeromechanics, Aviation Safety, Air Traffic Management, Flight Systems, Cooperative Control Systems, Multifunctional Materials, Nano-materials, Sensor Technology, Systems Engineering and Analysis, Space Exploration Technologies, Planetary Science and Engineering, and Atmospheric Science.

Through NIA’s graduate education program, NIA’s member universities offer M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in fields of engineering and the sciences relevant to NASA. Student research is conducted on-site at Langley Research Center in Hampton, VA. NIA also conducts continuing education, public outreach, and technology transfer programs supported by NASA and other sponsoring organizations.

The Virginia Microelectronics Consortium (VMEC), a group of colleges and universities including George Mason University, Norfolk state University, Old Dominion University, Virginia Commonwealth University, Virginia Military Institute, the University of Virginia, Virginia Tech, and the College of William and Mary that offer a world-class program in microelectronics education and research. VMEC was created in 1997 to serve the microelectronics industry in the Commonwealth and to exploit our diverse industry and educational microelectronics resources to our mutual benefit. Member companies include Micron and BAE Systems.

The Virginia Transportation Research Council is sponsored by the Virginia Department of Transportation in cooperation with the University, and its offices and laboratories are located in the Shelburne Building about one-half mile west of Thornton Hall. The council has two primary objectives: providing training in the fundamentals of transportation engineering; and carrying out research programs to improve the economic design, construction, maintenance, and operation of highways. The council operates laboratories that study problems of highway aggregates, geological engineering, concrete, bituminous materials, soils, bridge structures, and traffic and safety.

The Virginia Transportation Research Council also provides financial assistance for graduate students whose thesis or dissertation research is in an area of interest to the council.


Air Force and Army ROTC

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Graduate students in the School of Engineering and Applied Science are eligible to participate in the Air Force and Army ROTC programs. Inquiries concerning enrollment in the Air Force ROTC should be addressed to the Unit Admissions Officer in the Astronomy Building (434-924-7101). Inquiries concerning enrollment in the Army ROTC should be addressed to the Professor of Military Science, Room B-030, New Cabell Hall. Air and Military Science courses are described in the Undergraduate Record.


Degree Programs

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The University of Virginia School of Engineering and Applied Science offers programs leading to the degree of Master of Science and Master of Engineering, as well as Master degrees in several areas of applied science, and the Doctor of Philosophy degree. The School’s 10 curricula are: biomedical engineering; chemical engineering; civil engineering; computer engineering; computer science; electrical engineering; engineering physics; materials science and engineering; mechanical and aerospace engineering; and systems engineering.

The range of studies available within the school is designed to satisfy a variety of objectives. A full list of specific courses leading to a degree is not prescribed; instead, each student prepares an individual program, with the help of a faculty advisor, tailored to particular needs and goals and then submits it for faculty approval.

Two types of master’s degrees are available. Strong emphasis is placed on research for the Master of Science (M.S.) degree. The focal point of the M.S. is a thesis describing research accomplished in close cooperation with the student’s faculty advisor. The degrees of Master of Engineering (M.E.) and Master of Applied Science are professionally oriented and do not require a thesis.

The Doctor of Philosophy degree is regarded by many as a symbol that its bearer has achieved an in-depth understanding of a segment of human knowledge and has contributed significantly to that knowledge. The Ph.D. requires a program of advanced study in courses and research, satisfactory completion of Ph.D. examinations, and submission of a dissertation based on independent, original research.


Doctor of Philosophy

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The School of Engineering and Applied Science offers instruction leading to the degree of Doctor of Philosophy in Biomedical Engineering; Chemical Engineering; Civil Engineering; Computer Engineering; Computer Science; Electrical Engineering; Engineering Physics; Materials Science and Engineering; Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering; and Systems Engineering.

An advisory committee for each doctoral student is appointed by the Office of the Dean upon recommendation of the chair of the student’s department or curriculum area. The committee meets with the student as soon as possible to assist in planning a detailed program of study and research. The committee recommends a program of formal courses, discusses research objectives and research plans with the student, and advises the student on the areas in which he or she must take Ph.D. examinations. The committee meets with the student as needed to review progress and, if necessary, to assist the student in revising the program of study.

Degree Requirements The degree of Doctor of Philosophy is conferred by the School of Engineering and Applied Science primarily in recognition of breadth of scholarship, depth of research, and ability to investigate problems independently. A candidate for the Doctor of Philosophy degree must:

  1. complete at least six regular semesters (there are only two regular semesters per year, spring and fall) of graduate study after the baccalaureate degree, or four regular semesters after the master’s degree. At least two regular semesters beyond the master’s degree must be in full residence at the University of Virginia in Charlottesville. For students who enter a Ph.D. program without a master’s degree, at least 3 regular semesters must be spent in full residence at the University of Virginia in Charlottesville;
  2. satisfactorily complete an approved program of study. Each program is tailored to the individual student in accordance with the departmental requirements approved by SEAS faculty. The program must include a combined minimum of 72 credits of research and graduate level course work beyond the baccalaureate. The program must also include a minimum of 24 credits of formal course work, with no more than nine of those credits from 5000-level courses. No more than six credits at the 5000-level may be earned within the department granting the degree. Classes at the 4000-level or below do not count toward the Ph.D. degree. Program requirements may be more restrictive. Transfer of course credit from other schools of recognized standing may be included in the program of study; however, only courses with a grade of B or better may be transferred. The student must submit the program for approval first to the department faculty and then to the Office of the Dean within one semester after the Ph.D. exam;
  3. perform satisfactorily on the departmental Ph.D. examination. The objective of the examination is to determine whether the student has assimilated and is able to integrate a body of advanced knowledge;
  4. submit a dissertation based on independent, original research that makes a significant contribution to the student’s field of study. In preparation for conducting research and writing the dissertation, students must prepare a written dissertation proposal. This proposal describes the current state of the art with bibliography, outlines the proposed method of investigation, and discusses the anticipated results. The student then makes a public, oral presentation of the proposal to the advisory committee, with all members of the faculty invited to attend.
  5. be admitted to candidacy for the degree: a student must have satisfactorily completed the Ph.D. examination and have received approval for the dissertation proposal before being admitted to candidacy. Admission to candidacy must be completed at least one semester before the degree is awarded;
  6. satisfactorily present and defend the dissertation in a public forum. The dissertation defense is conducted orally and publicly by a committee approved by the Office of the Associate Dean of Research and Graduate Programs; this committee must include the candidate’s advisory committee. The defense is held after the candidate has submitted the dissertation to the committee, and it is designed to test the student’s knowledge of a field of research. Candidates who are accepted by the examining committee and approved by the faculty are presented for degrees at the first scheduled graduation exercises of the University following completion of the requirements;
  7. apply for a degree in SIS by the date specified in the academic calendar, see Graduation Procedure (MS and PhD Candidates);
  8. submit the approved final dissertation to Libra, the online archive of University of Virginia by the date specified in the academic calendar.

National Institute of Aerospace The University of Maryland, Virginia Tech, North Carolina State University, North Carolina A&T State University, Georgia Tech, Hampton University, Old Dominion University, the College of William and Mary, and the University of Virginia are participating in a cooperative program of graduate engineering and applied science education and research centered in the Tidewater area of Virginia. This effort focuses upon research and education opportunities found at the NASA Langley Research Center. It is intended to allow students to pursue M.S. and Ph.D. degrees based upon research conducted at the NASA Langley facility. Students in the NIA program must be U.S. citizens, enroll in the graduate program of one of the participating schools (their “home institution”), reside in the Hampton Roads area, and work on a research project at NASA Langley under the guidance of a faculty member at their home institution. Using both local instruction and advanced distance learning facilities, students in the NIA program are able to take graduate classes from all participating schools (the “NIA universities”). A student’s program of study may include 50 percent transfer courses provided that those courses are taught by faculty of the NIA universities. Upon successful completion of the program, a student receives a degree from her or his home institution. Other M.S. and Ph.D. degree requirements are the same as mentioned in the Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy sections, with the exception that residency in Charlottesville is not required.


Facilities and Services

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The School of Engineering and Applied Science is located in a complex of buildings, the main one being Thornton Hall, named after the first dean of engineering. Thornton Hall houses the school’s administrative offices, the Departments of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Electrical and Computer Engineering, and Engineering and Society along with assorted research laboratories. South of Thornton Hall is Olsson Hall, which houses the Department of Systems and Information Engineering. Rice Hall houses the Department of Computer Science and other academic offices, classroom and laboratories. Adjacent to these buildings are four buildings housing the Departments of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Materials Science and Engineering, and Chemical Engineering. The Department of Biomedical Engineering is located in Building MR5, which is part of the Health Sciences Center.

The Charles L. Brown Science and Engineering Library located in Clark Hall, has research collections that support students and faculty in the Engineering and Environmental Sciences programs. The Brown Library has reservable spaces for collaborative study and teleconferencing. Brown also houses specialized research support — the Data Management Consulting group works with researchers who need data management plans for funded research, and the StatLab provides research consultations on data analysis and statistical methods.

The Center for Engineering Career Development provides comprehensive career development services for all engineering students.  In addition to individual appointments, the center serves as a resource for information on industry trends, the job market and recruiting results for engineering students, employers, parents, and faculty. The center also coordinates on-Grounds interviews in conjunction with University Career Services.

The Center for Diversity in Engineering, established in the school in 1986, is available to help students by providing academic support, motivational activities, and financial assistance. The office provides counseling, peer counseling, and other special services for both undergraduate and graduate students. The office and student societies sponsor numerous activities to support engineering students.

Computers

The University computing environment consists of resources funded and maintained by the University’s central information technology organization - Information Technology Services (ITS), the School of Engineering and Applied Science (SEAS), the University Library System, the School of Continuing and Professional Studies, individual departments, research labs and centers, and students.

The ITS organization focuses its efforts on key elements that are available to the University at large. They include the network backbone and telephone infrastructure, broadband cable and IP video, centralized data systems, high-performance research facilities, networked services including e-mail, central file storage, wired and wireless Internet access, web publishing, front-line Help Desk support.

SEAS resources include departmental computing labs and classrooms, the support of discipline specific software packages, school-wide and department computing support staff including full-time, part-time and graduate teaching assistants.

SEAS departments and research groups deploy workstations, peripherals such as high-speed printers, scanners and plotters, several clusters and workgroup servers featuring specialized, discipline-specific software. Access to this equipment and software is provided to students enrolled in the Engineering School’s courses and research programs. Our students use these facilities for a variety of computing activities including course work, projects, capstone design, and senior thesis and graduate-level research.

Some classrooms at SEAS have computers at students’ desks. These computers permit students to learn by working a problem in the classroom, individually or as part of a team, and facilitate interaction between faculty and students. There are over 100 computers located in classrooms of this type throughout the University, in addition to the training rooms, media labs, and other centers containing specialized equipment and services. U.Va. spaces including classrooms, labs, study rooms, and dormitories have wireless Ethernet coverage throughout. Also, a distributed set of high-speed, B&W and color printers with page print charges are also available that can be wirelessly accessed.

Direct support of students, faculty and research professionals in engineering and science for education, outreach, specialized consulting and curriculum development is provided through the U.Va. Advanced Computing Services and Engagement (UVACSE) http://uvacse.virginia.edu/ and the U.Va. Sciences, Humanities, and Arts Network of Technological Initiatives (SHANTI) http://shanti.virginia.edu/

The goals of UVACSE include changing the culture of computation, empowering researchers to model ever larger and more complex systems, and foster a multi-disciplinary ethos. UVACSE enables for-credit courses in computational science, short courses, high-performance computing (HPC) boot camps, and the staffing of ‘tiger teams’ that work with researchers and their existing codes to address optimization, parallelization, workflow, checkpointing, and data management issues. SHANTI promotes innovation in the humanities, social sciences and arts through supporting the application of advanced technologies in research, teaching, publication and engagement across the entire community.

Specialized facilities include the Scholars’ Lab which supports the digital research and scholarly analysis needs of faculty and advanced students in humanities and social sciences http://scholarslab.org and the Robertson Media Center and Digital Media Lab which focus on the creation of digital media, digital imaging, audiovisual production and post-production, physical interactivity, 2D/3D animation, mobile technologies, visualization and the delivery of media content. Each of these facilities have expert support staff.

Centralized Linux clusters and mounted software are available on a shared-access basis. The specifications for the systems are available at: http://uvacse.virginia.edu/resources/rivanna/rivanna. The Rivanna cluster is a collection of computing resources totaling over 6000 cores, and all nodes have access to the cluster’s 1.4PB shared file system. A Viz Lab is available that includes a high-resolution, MicroTile wall and graphics engines. Cloud-based storage from Box is provided.  Research groups can also acquire dedicated nodes on these systems. Large storage can be obtained on a yearly lease basis for use with these clusters as well as with individual researcher systems. U.Va. also licenses and distributes a host of research software packages.  For researchers who need more HPC resources, assistance with getting started using the national supercomputing centers is available through UVACSE.

More general information on computers for new students is available at:  http://its.virginia.edu/students/new/ and the Responsible Computing Handbook is at: http://its.virginia.edu/pubs/docs/RespComp/rchandbook.html

An ‘on-demand’ service, also known as virtual labs and at U.Va. called the HIVE, is the method that students access specialty, site-licensed software from their own laptops. Please see: http://its.virginia.edu/hive/ Students are able to obtain the Microsoft Office suite to install directly on their own laptops through U.Va.’s agreements such as the Microsoft Campus Agreement for free or a nominal fee. Students are also provisioned with other centralized services, including e-mail, disk storage and web publishing.

Students also have on-grounds access to an authorized repair center for leading brands of computers and printers through U.Va.’s computer reseller, Cavalier Computers http://cavaliercomputers.com/

The U.Va. Help Desk is available 24x7 and provides support by telephone (434-924-4357 or toll-free at 866-469-4866) and by e-mail (4help@virginia.edu). It can be also be reached on the web at: http://its.virginia.edu/helpdesk/

For more information about computing facilities and services, please visit http://www.seas.virginia.edu/admin/inftech.php.


Fellowships

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Fellowships are intended to allow graduate students to their time to learning opportunities in the classroom and laboratory. No work duties, in a pay for service sense, are required, but good academic progress, including research for the thesis or dissertation, is essential. Some programs, during fellowship support, will include research and teaching duties as part of the usual academic requirements for the degree.

Graduate Research Assistantships Graduate Research Assistants are assigned to work with a faculty member on a specific research project which should culminate in a project report, thesis, or dissertation. Full-time graduate research assistants may not carry a load of more than 9 credits of lecture-laboratory courses but must register each semester for enough additional credits of teaching/research to maintain full-time student status.

Graduate Teaching Assistantships Graduate Teaching Assistants are assigned to assist a faculty member teaching a specific lecture/laboratory course. The assigned duties will depend on the course and instructor. Graduate teaching assistants may not carry a load of more than 9 credits of lecture-laboratory courses but must register each semester for enough teaching/research credit to maintain full-time student status.

Special Fellowships

Engineering and Applied Science Jefferson Fellowship is awarded solely on merit, based on the candidates’ exceptional abilities and potential in the areas of scholarship, citizenship, and leadership.  Competitive nominees will have the potential to become extraordinary leaders in cutting-edge technology development in the nation and around the world.  They will possess superior intelligence and a history of academic excellence while also demonstrating creativity, integrity, and honor.  Successful candidates will be exceptional scholars with a passion for innovation.

Carlos and Esther Farrar Fellowship provides fellowships to deserving students at the University of Virginia studying in disciplines and programs pertaining to scientific investigation of the universe (i.e., aerospace engineering, astrophysics, mathematics). This fellowship is awarded on the basis of scholastic merit and financial need.

GEM Fellowships The University of Virginia is a member of the National Consortium for Graduate Degrees for Minorities in Engineering, Inc. While attending one of the member universities for graduate study leading to a master’s degree in engineering, a minority student accepted into the GEM program receives a stipend plus an allowance for tuition and fees. The School of Engineering and Applied Science supplements the stipend and tuition to equal, at a minimum, the total of the fellowships normally awarded to entering students. Application material can be obtained by contacting Executive Director, GEM, Box 537, Notre Dame, IN 46556, (219) 239-7183.

John H. and Dorothy W. Sidebottom Fellowship is offered to graduate students majoring in aerospace engineering.

John Bell McGaughy Graduate Fellowship is offered to an outstanding graduate student in the School of Engineering and Applied Science selected by the dean or his designee.

L. William Ballard, Jr., Fellowship is offered to a graduate student who has demonstrated academic excellence, leadership qualities, and financial need.

The ARCS Fellowship was established in 1984 as an annual gift from the Metropolitan Washington, D.C. Chapter of the Achievement Rewards for College Scientists Foundation. The recipients are chosen from enrolled students nominated by the departments.


Financial Assistance

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The School of Engineering and Applied Science offers financial aid to graduate students through fellowships and assistantships ordinarily consisting of a stipend and payment of all tuition and fees including health insurance. Students must be nominated by their department to be considered for a fellowship or assistantship. Most superior students can expect to receive aid of some kind for up to five years, though support will vary by department and funding source.

Students receiving financial aid from the School of Engineering and Applied Science must be registered as full-time students, defined as at least 12 credits of lecture-laboratory courses and/or research during the academic year, must maintain a grade point average of 3.0 and must also maintain satisfactory progress toward a degree. Graduate research assistants must register for a minimum of 6 credits of research during the summer term. Students receiving financial aid are not permitted to have other employment without approval of the Office of the Associate Dean of Research and Graduate Programs. Students are awarded financial assistance to enable them to devote maximum effort to graduate studies.


General Requirements

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Grades The letter grade symbols used for grading graduate students in the School of Engineering and Applied Science are: A+, A, A-, B+, B, B-, C+, C, C-, D+, D, D-, F. To obtain a graduate degree in the School of Engineering and Applied Science, an individual must have a minimum cumulative grade point average of 3.00 on all graded graduate course work taken at the University of Virginia while a graduate student, and graduate courses taken as an undergraduate at the University of Virginia if the courses are listed on a program of studies and are used to satisfy requirements for a graduate degree. No grade lower than a C is acceptable toward meeting the requirements for a graduate degree. If a course is repeated, both grades are used in computing the overall grade point average. Undergraduate courses and courses taken on a Credit/No Credit basis may not be used to meet requirements for a graduate degree and are not used in computing the grade point average. A 200-day period past the end of the semester (end of the examination period) is automatically allowed to remove an Incomplete. At the end of this period an Incomplete automatically converts to an F.

Quality of Work Graduate degrees are not conferred merely upon the basis of the number of courses passed, nor the length of time spent in residence or in research, but primarily on the basis of the quality and scope of the candidate’s knowledge and power of investigation in a chosen field of study. Unsatisfactory work during any semester or an overall grade average of less than B may be considered sufficient reason for withdrawal of financial assistance, or for enforced withdrawal from the graduate program. Graduate students are considered to be on probation if their cumulative grade point average for graduate work is less than 3.0 and they are notified of this by the Office of the Associate Dean of Research and Graduate Programs. Graduate students are subject to dismissal if their cumulative grade point average is not raised to 3.0 within one semester.

Research All graduate students conducting research must register for the appropriate research course. Credits are assigned to this course in such a way that the total number of credits for which the student is registered reflects the fraction of time devoted to progress toward a degree. Students must register for a minimum of six credits of research for the Master of Science (thesis) degree and 24 credits of research for the Ph.D. degree. In many cases, research in excess of these minimum requirements, particularly for the Ph.D. degree, is desirable. Project research for the Master of Engineering or Master of Applied Science (non-thesis) degrees is encouraged and, in some curricula, required.

Advisory and Examining Committees Committees for M.S. and Ph.D. final exams and Ph.D. advisory committees are appointed by the Associate Dean of Research and Graduate Programs upon recommendation of the Graduate Program Director of the student’s department. Departments may establish additional requirements and restrictions. The committee chair must hold a faculty appointment in SEAS. All faculty with a primary appointment in Biomedical Engineering are considered SEAS faculty for this purpose. All committee members must have qualifications commensurate with that of a research faculty or equivalent rank. A current C.V. or biography must be submitted for members who are not U.Va. faculty. The C.V. or biography should include the highest degree attained, the year and institution, and any relevant experience or research which would provide expertise needed for sitting on the committee.

M.S. Examining Committee Committee must consist of at least 3 U.Va. faculty members, at least 2 of whom must be SEAS faculty.

  • All faculty with a primary appointment in Biomedical Engineering are considered SEAS faculty for this purpose. For M.S. candidates in Biomedical Engineering, one faculty member from the School of Medicine may substitute for one SEAS faculty.
  • For M.S. candidates in Engineering Physics, at least one and no more than two of the required three members must be from the Physics Department.
  • For M.S. candidates in Computer Engineering, at least one member must be from the ECE department and at least one member must be from the CS department.

One research professional from outside U.Va. or faculty member from outside SEAS may be a fourth voting member, provided that his/her qualifications are commensurate with that of a research faculty or equivalent rank. Request for Appointment of Examining Committee must be submitted to the Office of the Associate Dean of Research and Graduate Programs at least 2 weeks prior to the examination date.

Ph.D. Advisory Committee The Advisory Committee recommends a program of formal courses, advises the student on areas in which he or she must take Ph.D. examinations, discusses research objectives and plans with the student, and approves the student’s dissertation proposal. The Ph.D. Advisory Committee must include a minimum of 3 SEAS faculty, one additional U.Va. faculty member from outside the student’s home department, and a minimum of 4 total members.

  • All faculty with a primary appointment in Biomedical Engineering are considered SEAS faculty for this purpose. For Ph.D. candidates in Biomedical Engineering, one faculty member from the School of Medicine may substitute for one SEAS faculty.
  • For Ph.D. candidates in Engineering Physics, at least one member must be from the Physics Department and no more than two of the required four members may be from Physics.
  • For Ph.D. candidates in Computer Engineering at least one member must be from the ECE department and at least one member must be from the CS department. Further, the “home department” of computer engineering students is defined to be the advisor’s department; an “outside” member thus resides in a department that is different from the advisor’s department.

The purpose of the member from outside of the student’s home department is to ensure consistency across the University, to help ensure fairness to the student and to prevent conflict inside the department. The outside member must be U.Va. faculty. The Advisory Committee should be appointed early in the student’s Ph.D. program and actively participate in advising and directing the student.

Ph.D. Final Examination Committee The Final Dissertation Examining Committee must include a minimum of 3 SEAS faculty, a minimum of 4 U.Va. faculty, and a minimum of 5 total members. One of the U.Va. faculty members must be from outside the student’s home department.

  • For Ph.D. candidates in Biomedical Engineering, one faculty member from the School of Medicine may substitute for one SEAS faculty. All faculty with a primary appointment in Biomedical Engineering are considered SEAS faculty for this purpose.
  • For Ph.D. candidates in Engineering Physics, at least one member must be from the Physics Department and no more than three of the required five members may be from Physics.
  • For Ph.D. candidates in Computer Engineering at least two members must be from the ECE department and at least two members must be from the CS department. For computer engineering students the outside member must come from a department that is different from the advisor’s department.

The purpose of the member from outside of the student’s home department is to ensure consistency across the University, to help ensure fairness to the student and to prevent conflict inside the department. The outside member must be U.Va. faculty. Request for Appointment of Examining Committee must be submitted to the Office of the Associate Dean of Research and Graduate Programs at least 2 weeks prior to the examination date.

Residency M.S. and Ph.D. degree programs require a period of residency as detailed in the Degree Requirements sections. A full-time graduate student in residence at the University, whether taking courses or doing research, is expected to be fully engaged in the academic community, to participate in planned and impromptu discussions with faculty, graduate students and undergraduate students, and to actively contribute to intellectual discourse within the School. During the period of residency, a student should have no major conflicts of commitment. Substantial employment obligations, for example, would generally be in conflict with the residency requirement.

Right to Petition In certain cases there may be extenuating circumstances that cause a deviation from the requirements for the master’s or doctoral degrees. A student has the right to petition the Graduate Studies Committee requesting such a deviation from the normal requirements. This petition should be in writing and endorsed by both the student’s advisor and department chair and submitted to the Office of the Associate Dean of Research and Graduate Programs.

Time Limit For Graduate Degrees The student must complete all the requirements for a Master of Science degree within five years after admission to the graduate program, and must complete all requirements for a Master of Engineering degree within seven years after admission to the graduate program. All requirements for the Doctor of Philosophy degree must be completed within seven years after admission to the doctoral program. Expired credits may be revalidated with approval from the advisor, the appropriate department graduate committee or department chair, graduate studies committee, and the Office of the Associate Dean pf Research and Graduate Programs.

The time to degree can be extended beyond its ordinary term for SEAS graduate students for: (1) maternity or family parenting, (2) serious personal or family illness upon notification to and approval of the appropriate department or program and the Associate Dean of Research and Graduate Programs. The “clock-stopping” will be for a period of up to one year. Utilization of this policy should be invoked as soon as the need for additional time becomes known.


Master of Engineering Degree

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The Master of Engineering degree is a graduate professional degree. It enhances the professional instruction of the bachelor’s program in engineering or applied science, providing greater knowledge and deeper understanding in a specific field. A full-time student should be able to complete the degree program in one calendar year. The School of Engineering and Applied Science offers instruction leading to the degree of Master of Engineering in biomedical engineering; chemical engineering; civil engineering; computer engineering, electrical engineering; mechanical and aerospace engineering; and systems engineering.

The degrees of Master of Computer Science, Master of Engineering Physics, and Master of Materials Science and Engineering are also offered.

The Graduate Program Director will appoint an advisor to each graduate student for consultation in preparing a program of study.

Degree Requirements: A candidate for the Master of Engineering degree, or for the degrees of Master of Computer Science, Master of Engineering Physics, or Master of Materials Science and Engineering must:

  1. complete an approved program that includes a minimum of 30 graduate-level credits, with at least 18 credits taken in the area of major study. This program may contain no more than nine credits of 5000-level courses; no more than six of those credits may be taken within the department conferring the degree. Classes at the 4000-level or below do not count toward the Masters degree. Program requirements may be more restrictive. The program may include a maximum of 12 transfer credits for graduate courses completed at another school of recognized standing; however, those courses must be part of the approved program of study at the University. Only courses with a grade of B or better may be transferred;
  2. apply for the degree in SIS by the date specified in the academic calendar; and
  3. submit completed assessment forms as required by the program. Each program requires at least three assessment forms.

Accelerated Master’s Degree in Systems Engineering (AMP)

The Accelerated Master’s Degree Program in Systems Engineering (AMP) enables working professionals to earn a Master of Engineering degree in one year without interrupting their careers through a unique blend of formal education integrated with personal work experience. The practice-oriented degree has a focus on systems thinking, data analytics, and evidence-based decision making, broadly applicable skills which are in strong demand. Class meetings on Grounds give students the advantage of interacting face-to-face with full-time faculty and cohort of talented classmates in a focused learning environment.

The program year runs from late May through April. A new cohort begins each May. The accelerated schedule includes one week in residence in late May, twenty alternate weekends (all day Fridays and Saturdays) over the next ten months, and a final week in residence the following April. Comprehensive tuition includes courses and fees, books, software, and meals and lodging while the cohort is on grounds for classes. Financial aid is available in the form of education loans.

The curriculum introduces and explores systems methodologies through real-world case studies firmly focused on problem-solving, using both analytical and theoretical modeling approaches throughout. The program of study has four core courses: Introduction to Systems Engineering (SYS 6001), Systems Integration (SYS 6002), Applied Optimization (SYS 6043) and Applied Probabilistic Modeling (SYS 6045). Six additional courses may include risk analysis and modeling, statistics, applied human factors engineering, and decision analysis among others. The curriculum is augmented by business topics taught by faculty from the Darden Graduate School of Business. Students attend seminars on Friday evenings earning credit for three semesters of Systems Engineering Colloquium.

Admissions requirements include a bachelor’s degree from a college or university of recognized standing and proficiency in mathematics, typically demonstrated by academic performance in the following courses: calculus (2 semesters), probability and statistics (calculus-based), linear algebra (or equivalent), and computer programming. Three letters of recommendation are required. Applicants must take the GRE revised General Test.

The Accelerated Master Program in Systems Engineering (AMP) uses a rolling admissions procedure. Applications are reviewed and admissions decisions are made as the applications are received. Class size is limited. Prospective students are encouraged to submit their applications early in the cycle. The program will continue to accept well-qualified candidates for admission until all slots are filled or the next cohort begins.

AMP students place a high value on the cohort learning experience at U.Va. Working together in small groups and sharing the perspectives of a diverse cohort of experienced engineers leads to long-lasting friendships and a strong professional network among members of the cohort and AMP alumni.

Commonwealth Graduate Engineering Program (CGEP)

In addition to the residential Master of Engineering degree program, the U.Va. School of Engineering and Applied Science offers six Master of Engineering degrees through the Commonwealth Graduate Engineering Program. These graduate level degrees are in chemical engineering, civil engineering, electrical engineering, mechanical and aerospace engineering, systems engineering, and materials science and engineering.

Through this program, graduate engineering courses are delivered via live stream video to students located across the Commonwealth of Virginia and beyond. Most courses taught are delivered simultaneously to students on-campus and online.  Our specially equipped classrooms have advanced technology to allow CGEP students to fully participate and engage during class time and with their instructors and classmates in and out of the physical classroom.

Each of the six departments in this program has an appointed advisor who consults with students on curriculum and any special circumstances that might arise with participating working professionals. Students’ programs of study must be approved by their advisors and the associated department chairs and be submitted to the Office of the Associate Dean of Research and Graduate Programs.

Degree requirements are the same as mentioned in the previous Master of Engineering section, except that an additional three pre-approved transfer credits may be included in the candidate’s program of study.

Graduate courses with grades of C or better taken for graduate credit at participating institutions may be transferred toward meeting the requirement of the Master of Engineering degree.

All graduate courses taken for degree credit through the Commonwealth Graduate Engineering Program, including transfer courses from the participating institutions, are included in the student’s grade point average.

M.E. – M.B.A. Dual Degree Program

The objective of the joint M.E.-M.B.A. degree program is the development of leaders with business administration skills and solid technical expertise. The M.E. degree provides a foundation in engineering or applied science well above the normal undergraduate level. The M.B.A. develops the functional areas of business by teaching the essential behavioral and quantitative sciences that apply to management, as well as the techniques of management decision making. The combined degrees provide the knowledge required for a wide range of business applications.

A student must apply and be admitted to both degree programs and satisfy nearly all of the requirements for both degrees. Typically, the overall program length is reduced by one semester compared to the total time for attaining both degrees separately.

In order to obtain this reduction in the number of credits, the student cannot stop after one degree but must finish both degrees. If the student decides to drop out of the joint degree program, the full requirements of one of the degree programs must be met.

Students in the M.E.-M.B.A. Joint Degree Program are required to complete 24 credits for the Master of Engineering degree in SEAS and 69 credits for the Master of Business Administration degree in the Darden Graduate School of Business Administration. Of the 24 credits in SEAS, 21 credits will be normal course work and 3 credits will be a project course taken in an appropriately numbered course. A minimum of 12 credits of course work must be taken in the major department, with a maximum of 6 credits at the 5000 level. None of the 24 credits may include a course taken in the Darden School. The project must have one advisor from SEAS and another from the Darden School.

Part-time Master’s of Engineering Graduate Students

Those students who wish to pursue a graduate degree in the School of Engineering and Applied Science on a part-time basis must be approved for admission to the degree program by the department or program offering the degree, and they must meet all admission requirements for full-time degree students. Part-time students taking on-Grounds courses for degree credit, except those taking courses through the Commonwealth Graduate Engineering Program (CGEP), must register through the School of Engineering and Applied Science, not through the School of Continuing and Professional Studies. A maximum of six credits of graduate course work taken on-Grounds through continuing and professional studies prior to admission to a graduate degree program may be accepted as credit toward degree requirements.


Master of Science Degree

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The Master of Science degree is a graduate research degree that introduces students to research at the graduate level. A full-time student may be able to complete the program in one and one-half calendar years. The School of Engineering and Applied Science offers instruction leading to the degrees of Master of Science in the following fields: biomedical engineering, chemical engineering, civil engineering, computer engineering, computer science, electrical engineering, engineering physics, materials science and engineering, mechanical and aerospace engineering, and systems engineering.

The Graduate Program Director appoints an advisor to each graduate student for consultation in planning a program of study. In collaboration with the advisor, each student should develop a program of study including all courses required for the degree as well as additional courses to prepare the student for research in his/her chosen topic. Candidates who complete the degree requirements and are approved by the faculty are presented for degrees at the University’s first scheduled graduation exercise following completion of the requirements.

A complete listing of all graduate forms and corresponding assessment forms can be found online.

Degree Requirements A candidate for the Master of Science degree must:

  1. complete an approved program of study that includes a minimum of 24 graduate-level credits, with at least 12 credits taken in the area of major study. This program may contain no more than a total of nine credits of 5000-level courses, and no more than six of those credits may be taken within the department conferring the degree. Classes at the 4000-level or below do not count toward the Master’s degree. Departmental requirements may be more restrictive. The program may include a maximum of six transfer credits for graduate courses completed at another school of recognized standing; however, those courses must be part of the approved program of study at the University. Only courses with a grade of B or better may be transferred;
  2. complete an acceptable research project, accomplished under the close direction of a faculty advisor. The research is documented in a written thesis.
  3. perform satisfactorily in a final examination of the thesis conducted by an examining committee appointed by the Office of the Associate Dean of Research and Graduate Programs. A student who does not perform satisfactorily on the examination may, with the recommendation of two-thirds majority of the examining committee, be granted a further examination after being given adequate time to prepare;
  4. submit the approved final thesis to Libra, the online archive of the University of Virginia, by the date specified in the academic calendar, see Graduation Procedure (MS and PhD Candidates);
  5. apply for the degree, in SIS by the date specified on the academic calendar;
  6. complete at least one semester in residence at the University of Virginia as a full-time student; and
  7. complete a comprehensive examination (if required by the student’s department).

Research Centers and Institutes

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The U.Va. Engineering School’s research centers, consortia and laboratories are on the leading edge of technology. We place a high priority on collaboration, technology transfer and opportunities that allow our faculty and graduate students to create solutions to the problems and challenges facing the world today.

Some of the finest engineering research centers, consortia and laboratories are located on the Grounds of the University of Virginia. Detailed information about all research centers and individual laboratories can be found at the following website. Selected locations are detailed below. http://www.seas.virginia.edu/research

Aerogel Research Laboratory was established in 1996 to investigate fundamental properties as well as cutting-edge applications of aerogels. Aerogel materials have the lowest thermal conductivity, lowest dieletric constant, lowest speed of sound, and lowest density of any solid material. Applications include: thermal/acoustic/electrical insulation, microanalytical instrumentation, sensors, and sub-atomic collection media.

Aerospace Research Laboratory conducts basic and applied research in advanced aerospace technologies. Research interests have expanded to include high-speed mixing and combustion, aeroacoustics, structures and materials, optical techniques, and computational modeling.

Cardiac Systems Biology Lab focuses on the study of cell signaling networks. Perturbations in these signaling networks contribute to the pathogenesis of many diseases, including cardiovascular disease, cancer and diabetes. One explanation for the remarkable ability of complex signaling networks to control the cell is the use of temporal and spatial strategies, such as feedback and compartmentation. Understanding of these sophisticated control mechanisms will require an integration of experimental and computational systems biology.

Center for Applied Biomechanics is dedicated to vehicle safety testing with a major emphasis on studying impact and injury biomechanics. The focal point of the 30,000 square foot facility is a test sled mounted on a 66-foot track which allows simulation of high speed automobile crashes. In addition to the sled system, the CAB has a number of pneumatic and gravity driven impactors as well as state-of-the-art high speed data acquisition and digital video systems. Major research efforts at the laboratory include the study of advanced occupant restraint systems including air bag and seat belt systems. In particular, the CAB is establishing guidelines and criteria for the mitigation of airbag induced injuries.

Center for Electrochemical Science and Engineering (CESE) is a multi-disciplinary research effort that incorporates the departments of Materials Science and Engineering, and Chemical Engineering, as well as interactions with Electrical and Computer Engineering, Computer Science, and Physics. One of the nation’s leading research groups of its kind, its research affects the performance and reliability of most products manufactured in the world today.

The Center for Safe and Secure Nuclear Energy conducts both basic and applied research in nuclear system safety and security including instrumentation and control systems, human performance, human machine interfaces, and reactor modeling and simulation. The CSSNE is housed in a unique 32,000 square-foot research facility that includes a full-scale, modular reactor control room fully integrated with commercial instrumentation and control systems and commercial reactor models. The research environment allows for full-scale experiments on human and machine response to disruptive events due to hardware, software, system, or human failure. CSSNE is a partnership between the University of Virginia, Virginia Tech, and the Center for Advanced Engineering Research.

Center for Risk Management of Engineering Systems was founded by the University of Virginia in 1987 by the CHEV as a University-wide resource. It develops theory, methodology, and technology to assist in the management of risk for a variety of engineering systems. Working closely with faculty and students at the Center, industry and government sponsors of research contribute their unique strengths and interests.

Center for Semicustom Integrated Systems is an internationally respected research group in the areas of computer engineering and digital systems. The Center’s ultimate missions are to accelerate economic growth, to improve products and processes, and to integrate the results of academic research into Very Large-Scale Integration (VLSI) industry developments. Its research and education programs help satisfy the growing need for leading-edge design tools and methods in the VLSI industry.

Center for Transportation Studies focuses on issues and problems related to the development, operation, and maintenance of a safe, efficient intermodal transportation system for the Commonwealth of Virginia and the nation. The Center’s research program is noted for being responsive to emerging challenges from the transportation sector and for continually probing into new areas of transportation-related research. The Center’s comprehensive research program covers areas such as intelligent transportation systems, transportation planning and logistics, traffic simulation, highway safety, transportation pavements, and freight and traffic operations.

The Commonwealth Center for Advanced Logistics Systems (CCALS) is a public-private research partnership created by the University of Virginia, Virginia State University, Longwood University, and Virginia Commonwealth University. Additional members currently include LMI, LMR, the Combined Arms Support Command, the Virginia Port Authority, and the Crater Planning District Commission. The CCALS research is focused on complex logistics systems and includes data integration, management, and analysis; cyber and physical security threats; system reliability and trust; supply chain and risk management; modeling and simulation; human factors, behavior, and performance; and enterprise system integration, application and customization. CCALS is developing a test bed for logistics applications of new technologies created as part of the Industrial Internet (“Internet of Things”).  

The Commonwealth Center for Advanced Manufacturing (CCAM) is a public-private research partnership created by the University of Virginia, Virginia Tech, Virginia State University, Old Dominion University, Canon, Chromalloy, Newport News Shipbuilding, Rolls-Royce, Sandvik Coromant, Siemens, and Sulzer Metco. CCAM currently has 17 industry members, and NASA is the Government Member. The CCAM research activities are focused on surface engineering, manufacturing systems, machining technologies, welding and joining, additive manufacturing, and composite materials and processing.  The overall goal is to accelerate new technologies from initial creation through application and proof of concept and into commercial practice by bringing researchers from the universities and industry into a shared collaborative environment. CCAM operates in a new 62,000 square-foot research facility that provides researchers access to production quality, state-of-the-art advanced manufacturing equipment and software for proof-of-concept experiments for new research results. CCAM provides research and internship opportunities for both graduate and undergraduate students.

The Commonwealth Center for Aerospace Propulsion Systems (CCAPS) is a public-private research partnership created by the University of Virginia, Virginia Tech, and Rolls-Royce. The CCAPS research activities are focused on gas turbine technologies including advanced surface coatings, combustion, ceramic matrix composites, fluid dynamics, turbo-machinery, and power electronics. CCAPS is focused on fundamental research whereas CCAM focuses on applied research. Together CCAPS and CCAM allow new ideas to be created in university laboratories and then flow seamlessly to commercial applications. CCAPS research is conducted in multiple laboratories at both the University of Virginia and Virginia Tech.

Computational Systems Biology Laboratory (CSBL) at the University of Virginia develops methods for integrating high-throughput data of biological systems and characterizing cellular network properties relevant to human disease. In particular, we reconstruct integrated cellular signaling networks and develop tools to analyze their properties. The analysis of these networks requires high-performance computing capabilities and sophisticated mathematical techniques.

Dependability Research Group studies the survivability of critical information systems-air traffic control, telecommunications, nationwide control of power distribution, and the financial system. Societal dependence on these systems is growing and will continue to do so for the foreseeable future. The Center’s research focuses on designing software which can be tailored to information systems to ensure the intended operation of their existing components.

The Energy Initiative at the University of Virginia is dedicated to developing and commercializing new sources of energy and new techniques to preserve and reclaim vital resources. The University of Virginia’s School of Engineering and Applied Science is partnering with other U.Va. schools to facilitate this innovation. University faculty, researchers and students are contributing to energy technology research — research that includes work in the areas of alternative renewable resources, ethics, policy, fuel cell efficiencies, nanotechnology, solar energy, and sustainable and efficient housing.

High-Performance Low-Power (HPLP) VLSI Laboratory focuses primarily on original research in the field of low power and high performance electronics, spanning digital VLSI and analog systems, architectures, circuits, and algorithms. HPLP currently has eight active researchers, as well as a new lab facility containing PCs and workstations donated by IBM and Intel.

Human Computer Interaction develops decision-aiding systems, training systems and models of human performance in a wide variety of domains such as process control, medical, military and transportation. Teams of people typically work together and with a variety of computational systems to meet objectives within a complex set of constraints using both well-defined strategies and ad-hoc reasoning. Typical tasks to be supported, trained, or modeled include monitoring, diagnosis, control, scheduling, planning, and problem-solving for individuals, teams, and organizations.

The Institute for Nanoscale and Quantum Scientific and Technological Advanced Research (nanoSTAR) is an inter-disciplinary institute at the University of Virginia involving faculty from engineering, science, medicine, education, and business who work together to provide a very competitive environment for the advancement of the science and technology of nanoscale and quantum systems. Approximately 80 faculty members from departments across Grounds are actively engaged in the institute. Outreach and education are also a major function of nanoSTAR. Students can get involved through related coursework and research opportunities as well as by participating in meetings and events. Our vision is to encourage, facilitate, and support collaborative research, development and commercialization in the key areas of nanoelectronics, medicine, and energy and the environment through partnerships with academia, industry and national laboratories.

Intelligent Processing of Materials Laboratory (IPML) is one of the nation’s premier centers for research on the processing of advanced materials. Affiliated with the University’s School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, the laboratory incorporates both the synthesis and processing of materials along with their modeling, sensing, and control. Goals of IPML’s research include development of innovative process technologies, creating models for predicting materials evolution during processing, designing advanced in-situ sensors for tracking material changes during processing, and creating model-based path optimization and feedback control.

Keck Center for Cellular Imaging (KCCI) the primary goal of the imaging center is to provide a state of the art optical imaging facility to enhance both the research and teaching environments of the University. Concomitant with the goal is the continual development and implementation of novel optical imaging methods that interface expertise in biology, optics, and electronic engineering.

Laboratory for Atomic and Surface Physics (LASP) is one of the world’s leading laboratories studying the interaction of energetic particles (ions, electrons); UV photons and laser beams with surfaces. It seeks to understand the mechanisms leading to electronic excitations, luminescence, emission of electrons, radiation, atoms and molecules (sputtering), and to radiation damage, chemical changes or heat. The studies use a wide array of experimental techniques such as infrared spectroscopy, microbalance, mass spectrometry, and surface analysis and also computer simulations. The research has applications in semiconductor processing, nuclear fusion, gas discharges, biology, astrophysics, and space exploration. A substantial part of the laboratory’s work consists in modeling and simulations of surface processes in icy satellites, planetary atmospheres and magnetospheres, and interstellar grains.

Laboratory for Computer Architecture at Virginia (LAVA) focuses on processor-design issues, especially multi-core and multi-threaded chip architectures, architectures for temperature-aware and power-aware computing; applications of control theory to computer architecture; graphics architecture; novel processor organizations; and associated questions of modeling technique.

MAE Design Lab and Rapid Prototyping Lab contains 30 computer workstations with engineering design, analysis, and simulation software.  We also operate, maintain, and provide hand’s-on experiential learning using additive and subtractive manufacturing machines. The additive manufacturing machines are nine Stratasys fused-deposition modeling 3D printers and one Poly-Jet 3D printer.  Specifically, we have eight uPrint Plus 3D printers, one Fortus 400 mc large 3D printer, and one Objet Connex 500 3D printer. The subtractive manufacturing machines are computer numeric controlled (CNC) routers, a mill, and a laser cutter. CNC machines in the lab are a Shop-Bot router, a Roland mdx-650 router, a Haas OM-2A 3-axis mill, and a Universal Laser Systems, 75-watt carbon dioxide laser cutter. These machines are used to complete research, enhance curriculum, provide prototypes for students, faculty, staff, and external clients

MAXNET Energy, a new initiative of Germany’s Max Planck Society (MPS).  MAXNET Energy is comprised of seven Max Planck Institutes, and U.Va. joins Cardiff University as the only external members.  This partnership will enable U.Va. faculty and students to conduct collaborative research on new energy processes. Initially funded seed projects include solar process heat, photo-electrocalalyais (sunlight to fuels) and natural gas to liquid fuels.

Molecular Biomechanics Laboratory, part of the Department of Biomedical Engineering, is dedicated to understanding the molecular mechanisms by which cells move, and the application of this knowledge to the improvement of American public health.

Multiscale Muscle Mechanics Lab identifies the principles of muscle design by characterizing the relationships between muscle structure, mechanical properties, biology, and function. The lab integrates a variety of computational and experimental approaches to achieve this goal, and applies these findings to understanding and improving treatments for musculoskeletal impairments.

Nanoscale Materials Characterization Facility (NMCF) provides imaging, diffraction and chemical analysis of materials from atomic to microscopic levels, and offers guidance to individuals wanting to conduct their own analyses. The NMCF houses three transmission electron microscopes (TEMs), two scanning electron microscopes (SEMs), a focused Ga+ ion beam (FIB) microscope, extensive hardware/software for image simulation, processing and analysis, and a variety of specimen preparation equipment. The facility also has three X-ray diffractometers (XRD’s) with a variety of capabilities and software for data analysis.

Nanoscale Thermal Transfer Laboratory is dedicated to developing new techniques to assist in measuring, understanding, and utilizing nanoscale thermal phenomena. The laboratory’s research is aimed at developing a fundamental understanding of energy transport on ultra short time and length scales

National Center for Hypersonic Combined Cycle Propulsion is led by Professor James McDaniel. The center is working to develop the analytical tools needed to design the engines for a future hypersonic aircraft — one that could fly up to 12 times the speed of sound. It was established in 2009 under a $10 million grant from NASA and the U.S. Air Force.

NSF Industry/University Cooperative Research Center for Laser Applications (LAM) aims to develop a science, engineering, and technology base for laser and plasma processing of materials, devices, and systems. The Center is building on existing research being conducted in plasma and photon processing. The Multi-University team has the requisite expertise and equipment, valued in excess of more than $5 million, to pursue research and development in this area. The Center provides a core technology base in lasers and plasma, support for the creation and growth of innovative collaborations among industry partners, and the opportunity to enhance existing research relationships with federal laboratories.

Robert M. Berne Cardiovascular Research Center is an evolving organization based on the voluntary scientific interactions of investigative faculty with a broad interest in research in diseases of the cardiovascular system. It is a lightning rod, attracting ongoing research in cardiovascular function, as well as stimulating new initiatives. The Center is designed to be able to respond quickly to exciting new research opportunities, by providing financial and administrative assistance. Such assistance offers innovative investigators the possibility to adapt rapidly to new directions in their research programs, a capability that becomes ever more important as the pace of technology places greater importance on rapid reaction to scientific opportunity. The Center is also dedicated to working with the faculty in making the University a center of state-of-the-art technological excellence.

The Rolls-Royce University Technology Center (UTC) conducts basic research on advanced materials, Ceramic Matrix Composites, material coatings, coating systems, particle flow, soot modeling in combustion process, and manufacturing systems technologies. The UTC is a partnership between Rolls-Royce and the University of Virginia and is one of a global network of approximately 25 UTCs that have been designated by Rolls-Royce. Rolls-Royce has designated only three UTCs in the United States.

Rotating Machinery and Controls Laboratory (ROMAC) conducts research in the areas of rotor dynamics, turbomachinery, structural dynamics, magnetic bearings, automatic controls, turbomachinery flows, fluid film bearings, and seals. The Laboratory’s research is supported by a consortium of industries through the ROMAC Industrial Research Program.

Space Physics and Surface Physics Theory Program studies the physics and chemistry of energetic ion, electron and uv-photon interactions with surfaces and gases. The processes of interest are desorption and sputtering, as well as the radiolysis and photolysis of surfaces and gases. The motivation for the program’s research is to understand problems in space physics and astronomy.

University of Virginia Microfabrication Laboratories (UVML) serves as the University’s center for research and development in solid-state materials, devices, and circuits. This laboratory, formed from the AEpL laboratories (which was founded in 1967), has a 3,500 square-foot clean room facility for device fabrication and materials growth, as well as a variety of other facilities for microwave and optical analysis, device design, testing and packaging. The UVML operates out of the Charles Brown Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, but is open to and used by numerous other Departments in the University.

The U.Va. Center for Wireless Health was established in 2009 to coordinate research efforts in this area across the University and with collaborators at other institutions. Ongoing projects include in-home sensors for identifying signs of depression, body-worn sensors for fall risk assessment, and an artificial pancreas that combines blood glucose sensing and insulin pumping for Type I diabetics. All of the Center’s projects include the use of novel wireless technologies to collect data on real patients. The results and experiences from these deployments inform the engineering research that yields subsequent technology generations and enables additional medical applications.

University of Virginia Alliance for Computational Science & Engineering (UVACSE) was established in 2008 to serve researchers through education, consultation, and manage shared computer resources.

The University of Virginia Applied Research Institute (ARI) focuses on understanding the problems of the defense and national intelligence community and assembling teams of interdisciplinary faculty to address those problems. Research projects to date have included faculty from the School of Engineering and Applied Science, School of Medicine, College of Arts and Sciences, and the School of Law and have addressed bioinformatics, infectious diseases, unmanned aerial vehicles, 3D printing, as well as specialized training of intelligence officials. The ARI facilitates translation of basic research concepts into applications and commercial solutions. The ARI is located in the University of Virginia Research Park.

Virginia Center for Transportation Innovation and Research (VCTIR) is one of the nation’s leading transportation research centers. The organization, founded in 1948, is a partnership of the Virginia Department of Transportation and the University of Virginia. It specializes in basic and applied research in the areas of structures, materials, pavements, safety, system operations, traffic engineering, transportation planning, environmental, and business practices. VCTIR maintains and operates state-of-the-art laboratories to support research in highway aggregates, geological engineering, concrete, bituminous materials, soils, bridge structures, and traffic safety. VCTIR’s offices and laboratories are located in the Shelburne Building, about one-half mile west of Thornton Hall.

Virginia Image & Video Analysis Group (VINO) specialized in image analysis techniques such as image segmentation and motion tracking.

Virginia NanoComputing Group (ViNO) focuses on understanding non-equilibrium properties of nano-scale materials structures-spanning carbon based electronics such as molecules and graphene, spintronics, nano-magnetic memory and logic, quantum dots, nano-mechanical relays, single molecule sensors, telegraph noise, bio-inspired computing and nanoscale thermal transport.


Transfer Credit

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The Graduate School of Engineering and Applied Science grants transfer credit based on an analysis of the content, level and comparability of the course taken, the applicability of the courses to the student’s intended degree program, the quality of the student’s performance in the course, and the institution at which the work was completed. Transfer credit, as described below, will be considered for acceptance toward a degree in the School of Engineering and Applied Science.

Master of Engineering Candidates may include a maximum of 12 credits of graduate course transfer credit in their program of study at the University of Virginia. These graduate courses must have been completed at another school of recognized standing, and cannot have been used to satisfy requirements for another degree, and only courses with a grade of B or better may be transferred. All requests for the inclusion of transfer credit in the University of Virginia program of study are subject to the approval of the candidate’s academic department and the Office of the Associate Dean of Research and Graduate Programs.

Master of Science and Ph.D. Candidates may include a maximum of six credits of graduate course transfer credit on their program of study at the University of Virginia. These graduate courses must have been completed at another school of recognized standing, and cannot have been used to satisfy requirements for another degree. Only courses with a grade of B or better may be transferred. All requests for the inclusion of transfer credit in the University of Virginia program of study are subject to the approval of the candidate’s academic department and the Office of the Associate Dean of Research and Graduate Programs.