Jul 12, 2024  
Undergraduate Record 2017-2018 
    
Undergraduate Record 2017-2018 [ARCHIVED RECORD]

Course Descriptions


 

Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering

  
  • MAE 2000 - Introduction to Mechanical Engineering


    Overview of the mechanical engineer’s role as analyst and designer. Introduction to manufacturing tools, equipment, and processes; properties of materials relative to manufacture and design; communication through engineering graphics; engineering drawing interpretation, sectioning, auxiliary views; and analysis and design of mechanical devices. Workshop includes CAD and solid modeling. Prerequisite: PHYS 1425, Corequisite: APMA 2120



    Credits: 3
  
  • MAE 2010 - Introduction to Aerospace Engineering


    Historical introduction, standard atmosphere, basic aerodynamics, airfoils and wings, flight mechanics, stability and control, propulsion (airbreathing, rocket and space), orbital mechanics.



    Credits: 3
  
  • MAE 2090 - Applied Probability and Statistics


    Application of probability and statistical analysis to engineering decision analysis,data description, inference (confidence intervals and hypothesis tests), model building, sstatistical quality control, and designing engineering experiments Corequisite: APMA 2120 .



    Credits: 3
  
  • MAE 2100 - Thermodynamics


    Includes the formulation of the first and second laws of thermodynamics; energy conservation; concepts of equilibrium, temperature, energy, and entropy; equations of state; processes involving energy transfer as work and heat; reversibility and irreversibility; closed and open systems; and cyclic processes. Prerequisite: APMA 1110.



    Credits: 3
  
  • MAE 2300 - Statics


    Basic concepts of mechanics, systems of forces and couples: equilibrium of particles and rigid bodies; analysis of structures: trusses, frames, machines; internal forces, shear and bending moment diagrams; distributed forces; friction, centroids and moments of inertia; introduction to stress and strain; computer applications. Cross-listed as CE 2300. Prerequisite: PHYS 1425. Corequisite: APMA 2120.



    Credits: 3
  
  • MAE 2310 - Strength of Materials


    Normal stress and strain, thermal strain, shear stress, shear strain; stress and strain transformations; Mohr’s circle for plane stress and strain; stresses due to combined loading; axially loaded members; torsion of circular and thin-walled closed sections; statically indeterminate systems; deformation, strains and stresses in beams; beam deflections; column stability . Prerequisites: MAE 2300, APMA 2120.



    Credits: 3
  
  • MAE 2320 - Dynamics


    Kinematic and kinetic aspects of motion modeling applied to rigid bodies and mechanisms. Focus on free-body-analysis. Use of work-energy and impulse-momentum motion prediction methods. Use of Cartesian and simple non-Cartesian coordinate systems. Rotational motion, angular momentum, and rotational kinetic-energy modeling; body mass rotational moment of inertia. Relative-velocity and acceleration. Prerequisite: MAE 2300



    Credits: 3
  
  • MAE 2501 - Special Topics in Mechanical Engineering


    Special topics in mechanical engineering



    Credits: 3
  
  • MAE 2502 - Special Topics in Mechanical Engineering


    Special topics in mechanical engineering



    Credits: 3
  
  • MAE 2503 - Special Topics in Aerospace Engineering


    Special topics in aerospace engineering



    Credits: 3
  
  • MAE 2504 - Special Topics in Aerospace Engineering


    Special topics in aerospace engineering



    Credits: 3
  
  • MAE 3010 - Astronautics


    Discussion of the Keplerian two-body problem; elliptic, parabolic, and hyperbolic orbits; solution of Kepler’s equation and analogs; the classical orbital elements; orbit determination; prediction of future position and velocity; orbital perturbations; Lambert’s problem. Prerequisites: MAE 2320.



    Credits: 3
  
  • MAE 3120 - Thermal Systems Analysis


    Analyzes the thermodynamics of reactive and nonreactive, multi-component systems; energy cycles; and thermodynamic analysis of energy conversion systems. Prerequisite: MAE 2100.



    Credits: 3
  
  • MAE 3130 - Nanoscale Heat Transfer


    Development of fundamentals of heat transfer from a nanoscale or atomic perspective, as applied to nanotechnology and energy applications; topics include selected relevant concepts from Kinetic Theory, Quantum Mechanics, Solid State Physics, Statistical Thermodynamics, wave vs. particle transport theory, Landauer and Boltzmann Transport Formalisms, and thermoelectricity. Prerequisite: APMA 2130



    Credits: 3
  
  • MAE 3140 - Elements of Heat and Mass Transfer


    Analysis of steady state and transient heat conduction in solids with elementary analytical and numerical solution techniques; fundamentals of radiation heat transfer, including exchange among black and diffuse gray surfaces; free and forced convective heat transfer with applications of boundary layer theory and an introduction to mass transfer by diffusion using the heat-mass transfer analogy. Prerequisite: MAE 3210.



    Credits: 3
  
  • MAE 3210 - Fluid Mechanics


    Introduction to fluid flow concepts and equations; integral and differential forms of mass, momentum, and energy conservation with emphasis on one-dimensional flow; fluid statics; Bernoulli’s equation; viscous effects; Courette flow, Poiseuille flow, and pipe flow; boundary layers; one-dimensional compressible flow; normal shock waves; flow with friction or heat addition; isothermal flow; and applications. Prerequisite: APMA 2130 and MAE 2100



    Credits: 3
  
  • MAE 3220 - Aerodynamics


    Boundary layers: similarity, Blasius and momentum integral methods. Ideal Flows: Kelvin’s circulation theorem; complex potential; superposition; Kutta-Joukowski; thin airfoils; finite wings; lifting lines. Gas dynamics: sound waves; normal and oblique shocks; Prandtl-Meyer expansion; quasi 1D flows; converging-diverging nozzles; choked flows; diffusers; Rayleigh line and Fanno line flows. Prerequiste: MAE 3210.



    Credits: 4
  
  • MAE 3310 - Aerospace Structures


    Analyzes the design of elements under combined stresses; bending and torsional stresses in thin-walled beams; energy and other methods applied to statically determinate and indeterminate aerospace structural elements; buckling of simple structural members; and matrix and finite element analysis. Prerequisite: MAE 2310.



    Credits: 3
  
  • MAE 3420 - Computational Methods in Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering


    Introduces numerical modeling concepts used in engineering simulation tools like computational fluid dynamics and structural mechanics analysis software. Topics covered include discretization methods of partial differential equations, numerical solutions of linear matrix equations, and relaxation techniques for solving stiff equation sets. As part of the course, students will use Matlab, CFD, and mechanical analysis tools.



    Credits: 3
  
  • MAE 3501 - Special Topics in Mechanical Engineering


    Special topics in mechanical engineering



    Credits: 3
  
  • MAE 3502 - Special Topics in Mechanical Engineering


    Special topics in mechanical engineering



    Credits: 3
  
  • MAE 3503 - Special Topics in Aerospace Engineering


    Special topics in aerospace engineering



    Credits: 3
  
  • MAE 3504 - Special Topics in Aerospace Engineering


    Special topics in aerospace engineering



    Credits: 3
  
  • MAE 3610 - Aerospace Materials


    Introduces physical-chemical/microstructural and working mechanical properties, along with practical applications, for materials of wide interest on aerospace materials. Includes common metal, polymer, ceramic, and composite materials. Topics include standard materials names/designations; standard forming methods; usual strengthening means; temperature and temperature-history effects.Prerequisite: CHEM 1610; corequisite: MAE 2310.



    Credits: 3
  
  • MAE 3620 - Machine Elements and Fatigue in Design


    Applies mechanical analysis to the basic design of machine elements; basic concepts in statistics and reliability analysis, advanced strength of materials, and fatigue analysis; and the practical design and applications of materials to fastening systems, weldments, power screws, springs, journal and anti-friction bearings, gears, brake clutches and flexible power transmission elements. Prerequisites: MAE 2000 and MAE 3310.



    Credits: 3
  
  • MAE 3710 - Mechanical Systems


    Presents general concepts of dynamical systems modeling and provides mathematical tools to develop and analyze models that describe input/output behaviors of physical systems. Topics include basic elements of mechanical systems, transfer functions, frequency response, stability and poles, resonance and natural frequency, transient and time constant, steady state and DC gain, block diagrams. Prerequisites: MAE 2320 and APMA 2130



    Credits: 3
  
  • MAE 3730 - Flight Vehicle Dynamics


    Introduces definitions and concepts and includes a review of longitudinal static stability; rigid body dynamics: general equations of motion, rotating coordinate systems; small disturbance theory; atmospheric flight mechanics, stability derivatives; motion analysis of aircraft; static and dynamic stability; aircraft handling qualities; and an introduction to flight control systems and automatic stabilization. Prerequisite: MAE 2010 and MAE 2320.



    Credits: 3
  
  • MAE 3810 - Experimental Methods Laboratory


    The study of basic concepts and methods in engineering measurements and data analysis. Basic topics include mechanical and electrical sensors and measurement instruments, measurement uncertainty, statistic and data analysis. Additional topics include digital signal processing and data acquisition systems using Labview. Applications are to mechanical and aero/thermofluids devices. Two lectures and two laboratory hours Prerequisite: PHYS 2415, MAE 2320; corequisite: APMA 3110



    Credits: 3
  
  • MAE 3820 - Aerodynamics Laboratory


    Application of experimental methods to the design of experiments. Hypothesis testing and uncertainty assessment. Two required experiments investigate wing aerodynamic behaviors in a low speed wind tunnel and supersonic flow over a model or through a nozzle. Two additional laboratories of optional content, selected by the student from an array of available experiments. One lecture and two laboratory hours.



    Credits: 3
  
  • MAE 3840 - Mechanical Engineering Laboratory


    Application of experimental methods to the design of experiments. Hypothesis testing and uncertainty assessment. Examination of test equipment and procedures through the operation of test facilities for heat transfer, mechanical and fluid systems including data acquisition and processing systems. One lecture and two lab hours.



    Credits: 3
  
  • MAE 4120 - Air Breathing Propulsion


    Reviews thermodynamics of compressible fluids and includes analysis of the mechanisms for thrust generation in aerospace propulsion systems; performance and cycle analysis of air-breathing engines, emphasizing turbojets, turbofans, turboprops and ramjets; aerothermodynamics of inlets, diffusers, combustors, and nozzles; performance of axial-flow and centrifugal compressors; turbines; and the matching of engine components. Prerequisite: MAE 3210.



    Credits: 3
  
  • MAE 4130 - Rocket Propulsion


    Introduces rocket-engine design and optimization problems; materials, temperature-exposure, and stress-strain issues; rocket flight mechanics and trajectories; rocket staging issues; liquid propellants; liquid-propellant engine designs; rocket thrust-chamber flow behaviors and modeling;rocket exhaust behaviors; modeling methods; maneuver, orbit-adjustment, and attitude-adjustment engines Prerequisite: MAE 2320, 3010, 3210; corequisite: MAE 3220



    Credits: 3
  
  • MAE 4280 - Motion Biomechanics


    Focuses on the study of forces (and their effects) that act on the musculoskeletal structures of the human body. Based on the foundations of functional anatomy and engineering mechanics (rigid body and deformable approaches); students are exposed to clinical problems in orthopedics and rehabilitation. Cross-listed as BIOM 4280. Prerequisite: MAE 2310 and 2320.



    Credits: 3
  
  • MAE 4501 - Special Topics in Mechanical Engineering


    Applies basic engineering science, design methods, and systems analysis to developing areas and current problems in mechanical engineering. Topics vary based on student and faculty interest. Prerequisite: 3rd or 4th year standing.



    Credits: 3
  
  • MAE 4502 - Special Topics in Mechanical Engineering


    Applies basic engineering science, design methods, and systems analysis to developing areas and current problems in mechanical engineering. Topics vary based on student and faculty interest. Prerequisite: Fourth-year standing.



    Credits: 3
  
  • MAE 4503 - Special Topics in Aerospace Engineering


    Applies basic engineering science, design methods, and systems analysis to developing areas and current problems in aerospace engineering. Topics vary based on student and faculty interest. Prerequisite: Third or Fourth-year standing.



    Credits: 3
  
  • MAE 4504 - Special Topics in Aerospace Engineering


    Applies basic engineering science, design methods, and systems analysis to developing areas and current problems in aerospace engineering. Topics vary based on student and faculty interest. Prerequisite: Third or Fourth-year standing.



    Credits: 3
  
  • MAE 4511 - Mechanical Engineering Special Project


    Individual survey, analysis, or apparatus project in the mechanical engineering field, concluded with the submission of a formal report. Subject originates with students wishing to develop a technical idea of personal interest. One hour conference per week. Prerequisite: Professional standing and prior approval by a faculty member who is project supervisor. Prerequisite: fourth year standing.



    Credits: 1.5
  
  • MAE 4512 - Mechanical Engineering Special Project


    Individual survey, analysis, or apparatus project in the mechanical engineering field, concluded with the submission of a formal report. Subject originates with students wishing to develop a technical idea of personal interest. One hour conference per week. Prerequisite: Professional standing and prior approval by a faculty member who is project supervisor. Prerequisite: fourth year standing.



    Credits: 1.5
  
  • MAE 4513 - Aerospace Engineering Special Projects


    Applied research in areas pertinent to aerospace engineering; conducted in close consultation with a departmental faculty advisor. Includes the design and construction of experiments, analysis, or the investigation of physical phenomena. The research may be related to ongoing faculty research and may be the topic of the senior thesis, but its scope must be significantly beyond that required for the thesis. Prerequisite Fourth yr. standing.



    Credits: 1.5
  
  • MAE 4514 - Aerospace Engineering Special Projects


    Applied research in areas pertinent to aerospace engineering; conducted in close consultation with a departmental faculty advisor. Includes the design and construction of experiments, analysis, or the investigation of physical phenomena. The research may be related to ongoing faculty research and may be the topic of the senior thesis, but its scope must be significantly beyond that required for the thesis. Prerequisite Fourth yr. standing



    Credits: 1.5
  
  • MAE 4605 - Manufacturing and Process Technology


    Includes familiarization with concepts of mass production tooling and automation; metallurgical and mechanical aspects of machining and metal forming; and experiments with machine tools. Prerequisite: MAE 2000, MAE 3620.



    Credits: 3
  
  • MAE 4610 - Machine Design I


    Coverage of the design process including project management, specifications, budgeting and case histories, Conceptual, preliminary, and detailed design phases. Technical proposal and report preparation and technical presentations. Organization of design teams to work on specific semester long mechanical design projects selected to illustrate the design process. Prerequisite: MAE 3620.



    Credits: 3
  
  • MAE 4620 - Machine Design II


    A continuation of MAE 4610 that applies the design process to projects. Organization of design teams to work on specific semester-long design projects, including oral presentations and written reports. Prerequisite: MAE 3620.



    Credits: 3
  
  • MAE 4630 - Energy Systems Design I


    Design of systems for the useful conversion of energy. Applications include various combustion systems that generate electricity and the control of air pollutant emissions from combustion systems. Considers the control and performance features present in such operating systems, as well as the economic optimization of capital and operating expense. Y) Prerequisite: MAE 3140



    Credits: 3
  
  • MAE 4640 - Energy Systems Design II


    Design of systems for the useful conversion of energy. Applications include various combustion systems that generate electricity and the control of air pollutant emissions from combustion systems. Considers the control and performance features present in such operating systems, as well as the economic optimization of capital and operating expense. Prerequisite: MAE 3140



    Credits: 3
  
  • MAE 4650 - Aircraft Design I


    Analyze design requirements for and produce conceptual design of an aircraft. Includes synthesis of materials, structures, propulsion, flight mechanics, stability and control, interior and external configuration, cockpit design and all systems. Work in teams. Trade studies and optimization. State-of-the-art report, presentations and interimreport. Prerequisite: MAE 2010, MAE 3220, MAE 3310, MAE 3610, MAE 3730; Corequisite: MAE 4120.



    Credits: 3
  
  • MAE 4660 - Aircraft Design II


    A continuation of MAE 4650. Completion of preliminary aircraft design, with cost analysis and manufacturability considerations. Submission of final report. Prerequisite: MAE 4650.



    Credits: 3
  
  • MAE 4670 - Creativity and New Product Development I


    Engineering design process by engaging teams of students in design activities that results in useful and novel products. Stages of the typical product design process, concepts of intellectual property and its protection through patents, copyrights, trademarks, and trade secrets, and the technical tools of modern engineering practice, including solids modeling and rapid prototyping. Prerequisite: 4th year standing - ENU



    Credits: 3
  
  • MAE 4680 - Creativity and New Product Development II


    Creating working prototypes, development of business plans for commercialization, and writing of proposals for external funding.Prerequisite: MAE 4670.



    Credits: 3
  
  • MAE 4690 - Spacecraft Design I


    This course will examine the multidisciplinary aspects of spacecraft design for a NASA mission. Students will work in teams on an open ended multidisciplinary design problem using industrial methodologies. Students will be introduced to space mission engineering and spacecraft design. Students will conduct mission concept definition and exploration, requirements definition and conceptual design of the spacecraft. Requisite: 4th-Year Standing



    Credits: 3
  
  • MAE 4700 - Spacecraft Design II


    The course will result in the detailed design of the spacecraft, the fabrication of a full scale prototype and a proposal to NASA for funding of the real spacecraft and mission. The spacecraft will be designed to conform to the small satellite class, with a weight under 100 kg and a size less than 1 m. It will be designed for low-Earth orbit, geosynchronous orbit or a space exploration mission. Requisite: MAE 4690



    Credits: 3
  
  • MAE 4710 - Mechatronics


    Presents the synergistic integration of mechanical engineering with electronics and computer control in the design of industrial products and processes. Surveys basic electronics, electromechanical actuators, analog and digital signals, sensors, basic control algorithms, and microcontrol programming. Weekly laboratory exercises and a final design project. Prerequisites: MAE 2320 and MAE 3810 or instructor permission.



    Credits: 4
  
  • MAE 4730 - Introduction to Automatic Controls


    Discusses the mathematics of feedback control systems; transfer functions; basic servo theory; stability analysis; root locus techniques; and graphical methods. Applications to analysis and design of mechanical systems, emphasizing hydraulic, pneumatic, and electromechanical devices. Prerequisite: MAE 2320 and 3710.



    Credits: 3
  
  • MAE 4740 - Mechanical Vibrations


    Studies free and forced vibration of damped and undamped single and multiple degree of freedom systems. Includes modeling of discrete and continuous mass systems; application to vibration measurement instruments; analysis of concepts of modal analysis; concepts of linear stability; application to rotating machinery, Prerequisite MAE 2320, corequisite MAE 3710



    Credits: 3
  
  • MAE 4760 - Automobile Dynamics


    Fundamentals of automobile power train performance. Dynamics of straight-line motion including acceleration and braking. Fundamentals of suspension design, operation, and application to automobile dynamics including geometry, kinematic motion. Static analysis of automobile weight, balance, and load transfer and application to cornering. Prerequisite MAE 2320



    Credits: 3
  
  • MAE 4990 - Professional Development in Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering


    Review of the fundamental topics in Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering covered on the Fundamentals of Engineering licensure examination. Prerequisites: MAE 3140, 4710, 3620.



    Credits: 1

Media Studies

  
  • MDST 2000 - Introduction to Media Studies


    Introduces students to the topics, themes, and areas of study that are central to an understanding of media in contemporary society. Focuses on the forms, institutions, functions, and impact of media on local, national, and global communities. Prerequisite: 1st or 2nd year ASU undergrad or MDST major



    Credits: 3 to 4
  
  • MDST 2010 - Introduction to Digital Media


    The history, theory, practice and understanding of digital media.  Provides a foundation for interrogating the relation of digital media to contemporary culture and understanding the function, design, and use of computers. 



    Credits: 3 to 4
  
  • MDST 2100 - Media, Culture and Society


    Explores the relationships among various forms of mass communication, social institutions and other dimensions of social life from a sociological perspective.



    Credits: 3
  
  • MDST 2200 - Introduction to Film


    The purpose of this course is to introduce the student to the variety of cinematic forms and genres as well as the history and theories behind them. Class work will include lecture and discussion groups. There will be two papers of approximately 4-5 pages and an online final exam. Papers will count for approximately 75% of the final grade, the final exam approximately 25%.



    Credits: 3
  
  • MDST 2280 - Public Affairs Production I


    In this class, students will take on active roles as “associate producers” in the production of “American Forum,” a weekly, one-hour public affairs interview & conversation program produced and recorded at the U.Va. Miller Center. Students will assist in technical production, development of show content, marketing, & creating online components. Students will research potential guests, read books & produce memos on the scholarship of guests.



    Credits: 3
  
  • MDST 2305 - Podcasting, Radio and Sound Production


    Students will learn the practical components of radio production including: story development, script writing, interview techniques, audio recording, editing of sound, mixing, and final production for broadcast. In addition, students will critically analyze the components of radio/podcast features. The course includes a lecture component and lab time where the instructor will consult with students about their projects. Prerequisite: Media Studies Major



    Credits: 3
  
  • MDST 2440 - Language and Cinema


    Looks historically at speech and language in Hollywood movies, including the technological challenges and artistic theories and controversies attending the transition from silent to sound films. Focuses on the ways that gender, racial, ethnic, and national identities are constructed through the representation of speech, dialect, and accent. Introduces semiotics but requires no knowledge of linguistics, or film studies.



    Credits: 3
  
  • MDST 2502 - Special Topics in Film Genre


    This course will offer historical and critical perspectives on a selected film genre each semester. Genres might include Noir, war, romance, musicals, gangster, New Wave, etc.



    Credits: 3
  
  • MDST 2508 - Topics in Media Practice


    This course will provide practice-based learning opportunities for students in various forms of media, including video, podcasting, film, etc.



    Credits: 1 to 4
  
  • MDST 2660 - The Internet Is Another Country: Community, Power, and Social Media


    Explores the concepts of community, nationalism, the public sphere, and social action in the context of the Internet and social media. Begins with a cultural history of the Internet and virtual community and then explores several ethnographic case studies of communities and social movements from around the world. Concludes with a consideration of the Internet as a political economic system. Students blog and conduct collaborative research.



    Credits: 3
  
  • MDST 2700 - News Writing


    Introductory course in news writing, emphasizing editorials, features, and reporting.



    Credits: 3
  
  • MDST 2810 - Cinema As An Art Form


    A course in visual thinking; introduces film criticism, concentrating on classic and current American and non-American films.



    Credits: 3
  
  • MDST 3000 - Theory and Criticism of Media


    This course introduces students at the beginning of the major to theoretical and critical literature in the field. Topics range from the psychological and sociological experience of media, interpretation and analysis of media forms and aesthetics, theories of audience and reception, anthropological approaches to media as a cultural force, and contemporary theories of media from humanities and social sciences perspectives. The goal of the course is to provide a foundation for thinking critically about media and to give them a sense of media studies as a critical and theoretical field. Restricted to Media Studies majors.



    Credits: 3
  
  • MDST 3050 - History of Media


    This is a survey, lecture-format, course on the history of media forms, institutions, and technology from the origins of writing, invention of print technology, through the development of digital media. Attention to the specific characteristics of individual media, the changing role of media as a force in culture, and the continually transforming institutions and business of media will all be touched on. The role of media forms in the creation of public discourse and the social controls on media through censorship, legal constraints, and economic policies will also be examined, largely from within the context of the United States. Students will create a case study of a media work or artifact from a historical perspective.



    Credits: 3
  
  • MDST 3100 - Film and Television in the 1960s


    This is a course on film and television in the United States in the 1960s meant to introduce students to the specific problems attached to understanding media as force for social change within a particular decade of American life. The course has a strong emphasis on cultural history and theory as well as on the close reading of media artifacts in film and television from the 1960s. The course requires considerable commitment to viewing time as well as readings, writing, and research. Prerequisite: MDST 2000 or permission of instructor.



    Credits: 3
  
  • MDST 3102 - Copyright, Culture and Commerce


    In this course, we will discuss one of the most powerful social, cultural, economic and political institutions of our day: intellectual property (IP). How did we arrive at the notion that creative works and ideas can be owned, bought and sold like tangible commodities? What impact does this concept have on the way we view the world? How does it help us achieve our social goals, and how does it present obstacles to reaching those goals?



    Credits: 3
  
  • MDST 3104 - News and the Construction of Reality


    The course examines the relationship between news and reality, utilizing theories of social construction. With this as our framework, we will then use various critical perspectives to examine the way news ‘reality’ is constructed, from the discursive and semiotic frameworks used to present current events as ‘stories’ to how journalists make decisions about what is news, to the political economic factors that structure news form and content.



    Credits: 3
  
  • MDST 3105 - Latina/o Media Studies


    This course is designed to introduce students to critical analyses of media texts, media industries, and media audiences that help explain the social, political, economic, and cultural locations of Latinas/os in America.



    Credits: 3
  
  • MDST 3106 - History of U.S. Broadcasting


    This course examines U.S. broadcasting in historical perspective, not only as an industry, but as a vital component of American culture and everyday life. We will examine the technological, social, political, industrial and cultural forces influencing the development of broadcast media and we will link these forces to the programs created and the audiences served. Prerequisite: MDST 2000 and restricted to Media Studies Majors and Minors



    Credits: 3
  
  • MDST 3107 - Evolution of Media in Italy: From Unification to the Present


    The course will explore the specific features of Italian mass media from the Unification to the present, considering how the press, cinema, radio, television and the Internet have affected and shaped Italian society. It will trace the evolution of Italian media in relation to key events such as the Risorgimento, Fascism, both World Wars, reconstruction and industrialization, and the political rise of media tycoon Silvio Berlusconi.



    Credits: 3
  
  • MDST 3110 - Hollywood Goes to Asia


    Film production between Asian and Euro-American companies is rapidly on the rise. The fundamental objective of the course is to cultivate a rigorous theoretical understanding of the media industries within a global Asian network. We will ask: What are the cultural, political and economic implications of transnational co-productions both for global and domestic film markets?



    Credits: 3
  
  • MDST 3115 - Breaking Bad: Once Upon a Time with the Pests


    The course explores Breaking Bad through study of the show’s narrative, characters, and formal design. Topics examined include: socio-economic anxieties and spiritual longings in contemporary America; the political and religious implications of addiction to speed (technological and pharmacutical); the show as revisionary Puritan narrative and revisionary Western; the problem of being bugged; the desire to get away with it; the poetry of W.W.



    Credits: 3
  
  • MDST 3120 - Global Media & Cybersecurity


    This course will use cases from around the world to examine the relationship between media and cybersecurity. The course will analyze criminal hacks of media production companies, how cybercrimes are represented in popular media, and how media use exposes users to risk of cybercrimes.



    Credits: 3
  
  • MDST 3140 - Mass Media and American Politics


    Examines the role of mass media in the political process including such topics as print and broadcast news, media and election campaigns, political advertising, and media effects on public opinion and political participation.



    Credits: 3
  
  • MDST 3201 - New German Cinema


    Examines German art cinema from the 1960s-1980s, focusing on modernist aesthetics and filmic responses to major historical events in post-war Germany. Films by Fassbinder, Herzog, Wenders, Kluge, Sander, von Trotta, and others.



    Credits: 3
  
  • MDST 3202 - Digital Media and Publishing


    This course examines current best practices in digital media and publishing, and calls on students to write, edit, and curate meaningful content using industry recognized tools, such as Wordpress and Tumblr, as well as experiment with new and experimental platforms. Students will learn how to develop an online content strategy by analyzing the target audience, determining the message to be conveyed, and presenting user-friendly content.



    Credits: 3
  
  • MDST 3205 - New Latin American Cinema


    This course provides a historical and critical perspective on Latin American Cinema (LAC), with an emphasis on LAC’s relationship to Third Cinema, revolutionary cinema, and contemporary progressive filmic cinematic forms and traditions.



    Credits: 3
  
  • MDST 3206 - Documentary Film


    The course examines the different ways documentary filmmakers have attempted to represent reality. The course surveys the development of different ‘modes’ of documentary and the different ways these modes claim representational authority. Throughout, we will be conscious of the particular truth claims of documentary and the ethical issues involved in filming real people.



    Credits: 3
  
  • MDST 3230 - Basic Multimedia Reporting


    Basic Multimedia Reporting asks that students prepare 6 news stories for web publication. Students will be the principal reporter for three of those stories, and the video editor or photographer for the other three stories.The course is designed to expose students to the highest professional standards in research, writing, ethics, the treatment of sources and broadcast presentation skills. Camera, sound and editing skills are also included.



    Credits: 4
  
  • MDST 3280 - Public Affairs Production II


    Students (maxium of two) take on active roles as credited “senior associate producers” (SAPs) in production of “American Forum,” a weekly, one-hour public affairs interview & conversation program produced and recorded at the U.Va. Miller Center. SAPs coordinate and work with 7-member teams of “associate” level students taking MDST 2280 in technical production, development of show content, marketing & creating online components.



    Credits: 3
  
  • MDST 3300 - Global Media


    Examines the dynamic global transformations in print, broadcast, and digital media in an international and comparative context. Considers historical, institutional, and textual factors that impact media in local and global contexts. Examines the critical role of media in the long history of globalization and focuses on a number of cultural, technological, and economic issues addressed by media and globalization at the turn of the twenty-first century. Prerequisite: MDST 2000 or instructor permission.



    Credits: 3
  
  • MDST 3306 - Sexuality, Gender, Class and Race in the Teen Film


    The focus of this class will be on viewings and analyses of films featuring images of teens produced between 1930 and the present, focusing on the following questions: what is adolescence (and how has it been defined in American film)? What is the range of experience that characterizes American adolescence across gender, race, and class lines? How does it make sense to think about the social influence of films on individuals and society?



    Credits: 3
  
  • MDST 3310 - Sound and Cinema


    This is a cinema history class that will proceed roughly chronologically from the dawn of the sound era to the early 1970s. This course will look at and listen to the ways that sound technologies shaped global filmmaking in this period, while also introducing students to various theoretical and critical perspectives on the relationship between the visual and the aural.



    Credits: 3
  
  • MDST 3355 - Border Media


    In this course we consider the depiction of the U.S.-Mexico border from the perspective of popular and mass media cultures. We examine the border as a site of cultural exchanges, resistance and critical negotiation; interchanges that impact the construction of race, ethnicity, sexuality and gender from both sides of the border.



    Credits: 3
  
  • MDST 3375 - History of Music and Broadcasting in the US


    The history of popular music in the U.S. is intimately intertwined with broadcasting. The relationship between “radio and records” has been one of mutual dependence and abiding antagonism. Students will learn how this relationship developed historically, and will consider its continuing evolution. Our narrative will include the effects of legal decisions and technological innovations on music-making; on broadcasting; and on music consumption.



    Credits: 3
  
  • MDST 3402 - War and the Media


    This course examines media coverage of American wars from World War I to the present. Study of the evolution in media coverage of war provides an ideal vantage point for understanding the changing nature of warfare in the 20th and 21st centuries, war’s impact on American society, and the ways in which political elites have attempted to mobilize public support for foreign conflicts. Prerequisite: MDST 2000 or instructor permission.



    Credits: 3
  
  • MDST 3404 - Democratic Politics in the New Media Environment


    This course examines the ways a changing media system is altering the dynamics of public discourse and democratic politics in the United States. Throughout the course we will critically analyze the ways in which scholars from a wide range of disciplines have studied the connection between media and politics, the methods they have employed, and the validity of their findings and approaches in the new media environment in which we now live. Prerequisite: MDST 2000 or instructor permission.



    Credits: 3
  
  • MDST 3405 - Media Policy and Law


    This course examines the constitutional, legal and regulatory foundations common to print, broadcast media and the Internet. An overview of topics such as libel, invasion of privacy, obscenity and copyright helps students understand forces that shape news and information they receive and prepares them to use media more effectively as citizens, voters and entrepreneurs in an increasingly complex multimedia world.



    Credits: 3
  
  • MDST 3406 - The Wire: Understanding Urban America Through Television at Its Best


    This class explores HBO’s The Wire as an examination of race, class, and economic change in urban America. We examine the series as a creative work which balances a commitment to realism with the demands of television drama. Students will view episodes of The Wire and read material on urban America, the changing contours of television, and the series itself. Requisites: Permission of Instructor



    Credits: 3
  
  • MDST 3407 - Racial Borders & American Cinema


    The history of American cinema is inextricably and controversially tied to the racial politics of the U.S. This course will explore how images of racial and ethnic minorities such as African Americans, Jews, Asians, Native Americans and Latino/as are reflected on screen and the ways that minorities in the entertainment industry have responded to often limiting representations. Prerequisite: MDST Major



    Credits: 3
  
  • MDST 3409 - LGBTQ Issues in the Media


    This course will explore the complex cultural dynamics of LGBTQ media visibility, along with its social, political, and psychological implications for LGBTQ audiences. It explores four domains: (1) the question of LGBT media visibility (2) the complex processes of inclusion, normalization, and assimilation in popular culture (3) media industries and the LGBT market (4) the relationship between digital media, LGBT audiences, and everyday life.



    Credits: 3
  
  • MDST 3410 - Media Ethics


    This course provides students a familiarity with the terrain of moral philosophy, improves students’ awareness of the complex ethical issues and dilemmas in journalism and other areas of mass media, and engages students in the process of critical thinking, moral reasoning and problem solving in media communications. Prerequisite: MDST 2000 or instructor permission.



    Credits: 3
  
  • MDST 3420 - Media and Power in Iran


    Successive Iranian leaders have struggled to navigate the fraught political-cultural space of media in the Islamic Republic, skirting the line between embracing Western communications technologies & rejecting them, between condemning social networking sites & promoting themselves on Facebook. What is the role of media in political power construction in Iran? This class will consider this question through a number of inflection points in history.



    Credits: 3
 

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