Jul 24, 2024  
Undergraduate Record 2017-2018 
    
Undergraduate Record 2017-2018 [ARCHIVED RECORD]

Course Descriptions


 

Biology

  
  • BIOL 3220 - Genetics Evolution, and Behavior Laboratory


    Students apply contemporary laboratory methods, analytic tools, and experimental approaches in a series of investigations that explore important, basic concepts in the fields of genetics, evolution and behavior. Prerequisite: BIOL 2010 and 2020



    Credits: 3
  
  • BIOL 3230 - Animal Physiology


    Focuses on selected vertebrate organ systems; considers other systems where relevant. Prerequisite: BIOL 2010, 2020.



    Credits: 3
  
  • BIOL 3240 - Introduction to Immunology


    Studies the genetics and cell biology of the vertebrate immune system, with a focus on adaptive immunity. Classic and current experimental systems are emphasized. Prerequisite: Must have completed or be currently taking BIOL 2010 or BIOL 2100 or BME 2104



    Credits: 3
  
  • BIOL 3250 - Introduction to Animal Behavior


    An introduction to comparative studies of animal behavior from neuroethological and evolutionary prospectives. The first deals with proximate causes of behavior, with emphasis on motor, sensory and central aspects of the nervous system. The second deals with ultimate causes, with emphases on natural selection, natural history, and adaptive aspects of behavior. Prerequisite: Must have completed BIOL 2010 or BIOL 2100 or BME 2104 and BIOL 2020 or BIOL 2200



    Credits: 3
  
  • BIOL 3270 - General Microbiology with Laboratory


    Microbes rule. In this course, we will explore how microbes rule the world and how genomics has revolutionized the way we study them. Fundamental principles of microbiology will be introduced. Topics include microbial cell structure, metabolism, genetics, diversity, evolution and infectious disease. Laboratory work will complement lecture topics and cover the core themes & concepts, as recommended by the American Society of Microbiology.



    Credits: 4
  
  • BIOL 3280 - Ornithology


    This course is an introduction to avian biology. Major topics include evolutionary history, genetics, anatomy and physiology, behavior and communication, reproduction and development, and ecology and conservation. Through the study of birds, the most diverse lineage of terrestrial vertebrates, students learn broadly applicable concepts of organismal biology and gain insight to the scientific investigation of integrated biological systems. Prerequisite: BIOL 2010, 2020.



    Credits: 3
  
  • BIOL 3290 - Ecology and Conservation of Fishes


    A laboratory course with a significant field component, an expanded version of a similar course taught at Mt. Lake Biological Station by the same instructor. Major topics of investigation center on the composition of freshwater fish assemblages and on the factors that influence distribution of fishes on multiple scales, from within stream reaches to among basins, including; physical habitat, water quality, and water flow; drainage histories and other zoo geographic processes; morphological, physiological, and life history characters of fishes; competition, predation and other biotic interactions; natural disturbance regimes; and anthropogenic impacts. The first portion of the semester provides an introduction to fish biology and systematics. Prerequisite: BIOL 2010, 2020, 2040.



    Credits: 3
  
  • BIOL 3400 - Functional Morphology of Vertebrates


    Comparative investigations of functional morphology across major vertebrate lineages.  Lectures are organized into three units; 1) evolutionary history and patterns of development, 2) integumentary, skeletal and muscular systems, and 3) sensory systems, and neural and endocrine integrations.  Topics of investigation focus on biomechanical and physiological performance of biological structures, from cells to organ systems, and on the origins and diversification of form-function complexes among vertebrates.  Lab exercises include dissections, observation of prepared specimens and other material, and modeling/simulation of biomechanical systems.  This course serves as a 3000-level lab requirement for either the B.A. or B.S. in biology. Prerequisite: BIOL 2010, 2020, 2040.



    Credits: 4
  
  • BIOL 3410 - Human Anatomy and Physiology I


    This course explores human form & function. Integrated lectures and labs focus on systems for support & locomotion, integration & control, regulation & maintenance, reproduction & development. Labs include anatomical dissection, 3D model analysis of organs & organ systems, and computer-based physiology experiments & histological investigations. The first of a two course sequence, this course offers a meaningful single semester A&P experience.



    Credits: 4
  
  • BIOL 3420 - Human Anatomy and Physiology II


    This course builds on the material and concepts covered in Human Anatomy & Physiology I (BIOL3410). Coordinated lectures and labs explore topics in anatomy, physiology and pathophysiology across human organ systems. Lab investigations use computer-based physiology experiments, model & dissection-based anatomical studies, and clinical and biomedical case studies to illustrate and expand content presented in lecture.



    Credits: 4
  
  • BIOL 3440 - Endocrinology


    Endocrinology



    Credits: 3
  
  • BIOL 3450 - Biodiversity and Conservation


    Introduction to the fundamental principles of conservation biology (e.g., global species numbers, value of biodiversity, causes of extinction, genetic diversity, island biogeography, priority setting) and current topics of debate (including zoo versus field conservation, effects of global change on species extinction). Conservation case studies will allow students to judge the relevance of biological theory to practical problems in conservation. Prerequisite: BIOL 2010, 2020 or EVSC 3200.



    Credits: 3
  
  • BIOL 3500 - Field Biology


    Application of field techniques for biological studies. Cross-listed with EVSC 3660. Prerequisite: BIOL 2040 or instructor permission.



    Credits: 1 to 3
  
  • BIOL 3510 - Field Biology at Mountain Lake Biological Station


    Field experiential courses in evolution, ecology, behavior and biology taught at the Biology Department’s Mountain Lake Biological Station (MLBS), a field research and teaching facility located in southwestern Virginia. Students may enroll for more than one section as each section is a specialized topic. Prerequisites: BIOL 2010, 2020, 2030, 2040 or AP credit or equivalent.



    Credits: 1 to 4
  
  • BIOL 3650 - Molecular Biology of Human Disease


    This course addresses molecular mechanisms of gene expression and regulation (e.g., transcription, mRNA splicing, RNA surveillance, and translation) and DNA replication in the context of infectious and genetic diseases. Prerequisites: BIOL 2010 and any two of CHEM 1410, 1420, 1810 & 1820.



    Credits: 3
  
  • BIOL 3660 - Marine Biology and Coral Reef Ecology in San Salvador


    The course will introduce students to the plants and animals found in the marine and terrestrial environments of the Caribbean and their adaptations in the context of community ecology. Fishes, invertebrates, reptiles and marine algae will be the major groups encountered and snorkeling will be used for observation and collection. Lectures, labs, discussions, and extensive field work included, plus an independent research project. Prerequisites: BIOL 2010, 2020, 2040, or EVSC 3200, or permission of the instructor.



    Credits: 4
  
  • BIOL 3665 - Tropical Ecology and Conservation in Belize


    This course is an introduction to the organisms and ecosystems of Belize, including fresh water, marine and terrestrial examples. Special emphasis will be placed on the interactions of the ecosystem components and on the conservation of specific ecosystems and locales. Prerequisites: The completed sequence BIOL 2010, 2020, 2030, 2040, or their equivalents, or permission of instructor.



    Credits: 3
  
  • BIOL 3710 - The Biology of Stress


    What exactly is stress? When is it a good thing; when & why does it become damaging? In this course, we will study how the body responds to physical and psychological stressors. And, we will examine how the physiological mechanisms by which the hypothalamic pituitary adrenal axis and corticosteroids mediate both positive and negative effects of stress. Understanding of these mechanisms, we can consider how best to prevent damage from stress.



    Credits: 3
  
  • BIOL 3900 - Independent Readings in Biology


    Tutorial or seminar course that allows intensive study of the literature in a particular area of biology under the guidance of a Biology faculty member.



    Credits: 1 to 3
  
  • BIOL 4000 - Laboratory in Molecular Biology


    Laboratory introduction to fundamental molecular techniques used in many biological research laboratories. Includes basic aseptic technique, isolation and manipulation of genetic material, electrophoresis, cloning, gene library construction/screening, Southern blot analysis, and PCR techniques. Lecture and open laboratory. Prerequisite: BIOL 3210.



    Credits: 3
  
  • BIOL 4005 - Functional Genomics Laboratory: Disease Mechanisms & Cures


    This course introduces students to scientific-based discovery of how molecular dysfunction leads to disease. It also exposes them to the most current tools used in biomedical research to find novel genes and compounds that could help treat human disease. The course includes discovery-oriented lab, workshops, and lectures. Prerequisite: BIOL 3000 and BIOL 3010.



    Credits: 3
  
  • BIOL 4015 - Neural Development Laboratory: From stem cells to neuronal circuitry


    Neural stem cells proliferate throughout development to generate the immense diversity of neuronal cell types present in our adult brains. What are the signals that drive neural stem cells to proliferate & what are the signals that terminate stem cell divisions once development is complete? Using Drosophila we will investigate these questions and address specifically the role of nutrition in regulating profileration of the stem cell population. Prerequisite: BIOL 3000, BIOL 3010



    Credits: 3
  
  • BIOL 4020 - Ecology and Evolutionary Genetics


    Examines the mechanisms of evolution within populations, molecular evolution, and the process of speciation. Topics include genetics of adaptation and speciation, natural selection, and the processes influencing the evolution of genes and genomes at the molecular level. Prerequisite: BIOL 3010.



    Credits: 3
  
  • BIOL 4030 - Evolutionary Biology Laboratory


    Analyzes important concepts in evolution, and experimental techniques used in evolutionary ecology and population genetics field research, experimental populations, molecular markers, phylogenetic reconstruction including aspects of experimental design and statistical analysis of data. Includes a weekend field trip to Mountain Lake Biological Station. Prerequisite: BIOL 3010, MATH 1310.



    Credits: 3
  
  • BIOL 4040 - Laboratory in Cell Biology


    Introduces students to experimental approaches, including mammalian cell culture, gel electrophoresis, western blotting and immunofluorescence microscopy, that are used to study both normal and pathological processes at the level of individual cells. The biological theme of the course will be Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and related neurodegenerative disorders. One laboratory lecture and one afternoon laboratory per week. Prerequisite: BIOL 3000



    Credits: 3
  
  • BIOL 4050 - Developmental Mechanisms of Human Disease


    This course will cover advanced principles of developmental biology and how embryonic developmental pathways impinge on human disease. Topics will include congenital organ related disease, stem cell biology and its therapeutic applications, regenerative medicine and the impact of environmental factors on disease.



    Credits: 3
  
  • BIOL 4060 - Organ Development and Tissue Engineering


    Why do most of our adult body tissues have limited regenerative capacity? How can terminally diseased organs be replaced? This course will cover the cellular mechanisms that regulate animal tissue formation, regeneration and repair in vivo. Students will gain insights into the opportunities, limitations, and risks of tissue engineering in vitro, as an emerging research field that may lead to revolutionary organ replacement strategies. Prerequisite: BIOL 3000



    Credits: 3
  
  • BIOL 4070 - Developmental Biology Laboratory


    The goal of this course is to provide an original, unknown outcome research experience in developmental biology. After training in basic methods and descriptions of selected research problems, students form teams and investigate a problem of their choosing. Team members work together in the lab, but each writes an independent research proposal, a notebook, and a final project report on which they are graded. Prerequisite: BIOL 3000 or 3010.



    Credits: 3
  
  • BIOL 4080 - Neuronal Organization of Behavior


    Lectures and discussions addressing behavior and sensory processing from the perspective of the neural elements involved. Topics include neuronal substrates (anatomical and physiological) of startle reflexes, locomotory behaviors, visual and auditory processing, echolocation mechanisms, calling song recognition, and the neuronal organization underlying some types of functional plasticity. Prerequisite: BIOL 3170 or equivalent.



    Credits: 3
  
  • BIOL 4090 - Environmental Public Health


    This is an interdisciplinary exploration of environmental public health issues. Students develop and research topics, lead small group discussions, give oral presentations, and write papers. Scope of student research in topic development includes env. science, ecology, epidemiology, toxicology, pathophysiology, gene-environment interactions, directions in clinical and translational research, and environmental and biomedical policy development.



    Credits: 2
  
  • BIOL 4100 - Management of Forest Ecosystems


    An ecosystem course that treats the ecology of forests and consequences of forest processes in natural and managed systems. The class emphasizes the “pattern & process” concept that is the central theme in modern vegetation sciences at increasing scales: from form/function of leaves and other parts of trees through population, community and landscape ecology to the role of forests in the global climate and carbon-cycling. Prerequisites: EVSC 3200



    Credits: 4
  
  • BIOL 4110 - Genetics Laboratory


    A research experience in developmental genetics that uses Drosophila melanogaster as a model system. Prerequisite: BIOL 3010.



    Credits: 3
  
  • BIOL 4120 - When Good Cells Go Bad


    This course will cover topics related to major neurodegenerative diseases including Multiple Sclerosis (MS), Muscular Dystrophy (MD), Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumor (Neurofibrosarcoma) and Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor (MPNST). Topics related to pathology and molecular mechanism of diseases, possible drug discovery targets, and therapeutic discovery approaches will be emphasized. Prerequisites: BIOL 3000 and BIOL 3010.



    Credits: 3
  
  • BIOL 4130 - Population Ecology and Conservation Biology


    The mathematical foundations of population dynamics and species interactions as applied to population and community ecology and problems in conservation biology. One semester of calculus is recommended. Prerequisite: BIOL 3020 or EVSC 3200



    Credits: 3
  
  • BIOL 4135 - Biology of Aging


    Aging is an evolutionary paradox because it decreases physiological function and increases the risk of mortality, yet aging persists in most species. We will explore the theories of aging and the diversity of the patterns of aging across species from flies to plants to humans. We will use the primary literature in the fields of evolution, genetics and cell biology to gain a comprehensive understand of the latest advances in this field.



    Credits: 3
  
  • BIOL 4140 - NextGen Sequencing and Its Applications


    Students will learn the next generation sequencing technologies and explore their applications in the studies of evolution and ecology. This course is a lecture and journal club format where primary scientific literature will be discussed. Students will also learn basic bioinformatic skills. Prerequisite: BIOL 3020



    Credits: 1
  
  • BIOL 4150 - Evolution of Sex


    Despite the many benefits of asexual reproduction, the vast majority of eukaryotic organisms reproduce sexually. How sex evolved, and how it persists despite its many associated costs, are major unanswered questions in biology. We will explore the diversity of sexual reproduction and associated evolutionary phenomena with a focus on critically evaluating current research and theory in this field. Prerequisite: BIOL 3020 or permission from Instructor



    Credits: 3
  
  • BIOL 4160 - Functional Genomics Lab


    The course serves as a hands-on introduction to genomics, proteomics, and bioinformatics. Topics that will be covered during the lectures and computer labs of this course include genome sequence analysis, genome expression analysis, and genomic circuits analysis. Prerequisites: BIOL 3010.



    Credits: 3
  
  • BIOL 4170 - Cellular Neurobiology


    Explores a cellular approach to the study of the nervous system. Topics include the structure and function of ionic channels in cell membranes; the electrochemical basis of the cell resting potential; the generation and conduction of nerve impulses; and synaptic transmissions. Three lecture and demonstration/discussion credits. Class meetings include lectures, discussion, student presentations, and computer simulations of neurophysiology with NeuroDynamix. Prerequisite: BIOL 3170 or equivalent; BIOL 3000.



    Credits: 3
  
  • BIOL 4180 - Behavioral Ecology


    Behavioral ecology explores the evolutionary analysis and explanations for the diversity of animal behavior, including foraging decisions, altruism, cooperation, mate choice, group living, parental care and range of other sociobiological phenomena. Prerequisite: BIOL 3020.



    Credits: 3
  
  • BIOL 4190 - Biological Clocks


    Introduces biological timekeeping as used by organisms for controlling diverse processes, including sleep-wakefulness cycles, photoperiodic induction and regression, locomotor rhythmicity, eclosion rhythmicity, and the use of the biological clock in orientation and navigation. Prerequisite: BIOL 3000 or 3010 or 3020



    Credits: 3
  
  • BIOL 4210 - Genome Sciences: The DNA Revolution in Science and Society


    This course will chronicle the meteoric rise in our ability to collect DNA sequence data & reconstruct genomes, and how this contributes to understanding evolution & the genetic basis of traits, including disease. Discussions with leading experts in science, policy or law will allow students to consider the promises & limitations of genomic research, as well as the future societal impact of having nearly ubiquitous genetic information. Prerequisite: BIOL 3010 and BIOL 3020



    Credits: 3
  
  • BIOL 4215 - Microbial Genomics


    Explores how genomics has revolutionized every aspect of microbiology. Fundamental principles of microbiology, together with the basics of genomics will be introduced. Topics include microbial cell structure, metabolism, genetics, microbial diversity and ecology, epidemiology, genome sequencing technologies and comparative genomics. Prerequisites: BIOL 3000 and BIOL 3010



    Credits: 3
  
  • BIOL 4220 - Introduction to Systems Biology


    An introduction to a new research paradigm that focuses on the systematic study of complex interactions at the molecular, network and genomic level. This course will review state-of-the-art high throughput techniques and modeling methods used to obtain, integrate and analyze complex data from biological systems. This course will be a combination of text based lectures and discussions of the current literature pertinent to Systems Biology. Prerequisites: BIOL 3010. Also recommended is BIOL 3000



    Credits: 3
  
  • BIOL 4230 - Bioinformatics and Functional Genomics


    The Genome Era has transformed modern biology, providing sequence data that records genetic changes that occur over time scales from billions of years (evolution) to months (tumor growth). This interdisciplinary course introduces the algorithms, statistics & biological concepts used to make inferences from genome datasets and will provide the computational foundation & practical experience needed to test biological questions using genome data.



    Credits: 4
  
  • BIOL 4240 - History and Philosophy of Biology


    This course will give an overview of the major conceptual and experimental advances in Biology. It will explore the relationships of Biology to mathematics and physical sciences and explore philosophical issues relevant to science in general, Biology in particular.



    Credits: 3
  
  • BIOL 4250 - Human Genetics


    Focuses on the fundamental knowledge about organization, expression, and inheritance of the human genome. Reviews classical Mendelian genetics and human genetic (pedigree) analysis. Emphasizes understanding human genetics in molecular terms. Includes gene mapping procedures, methodologies for identifying genes responsible for inherited diseases, the molecular basis of several mutant (diseased) states, the human genome project, and discussions about genetic screening and gene therapy. Prerequisite: BIOL 3010.



    Credits: 3
  
  • BIOL 4260 - Cellular Mechanisms


    The course will explore topics in cell biology that underlie mechanisms of human health and disease. Specific topics will depend on interest, but may include cancer and metastasis, metabolic syndromes or pathogen-host interactions (among others). Course materials will be research and review articles from the relevant primary literature. Students are expected to engage in and lead thoughtful discussions of assigned readings ~75% of the class time. Prerequisites: BIOL 3000 and BIOL 3010



    Credits: 3
  
  • BIOL 4270 - Animal Behavior Laboratory


    This laboratory course provides hands-on experiences with experimental approaches used to study animal behavior. The laboratory exercises explore visual and auditory sensory perception, biological clock, reproductive and aggressive behaviors using actively behaving animals such as hamsters, cichlid fish, crickets and electric fish. Students are given opportunities to design hypothesis-testing experiments in some laboratories. Prerequisite: BIOL 3250



    Credits: 3
  
  • BIOL 4280 - The Genetic Basis of Behavior


    This course studies behavior paradigms in model animals and the modern genetic tools used study and dissect the circuits underlying them. Can an animal as simple as a fly or mouse learn simple tasks, show appetitive behaviors and cravings, and inform studies of human addiction? Readings from classic and current literature will show the historical context of this field and develop critical reading skills. Prerequisites: BIOL 3000, BIOL 3010



    Credits: 3
  
  • BIOL 4290 - Hormones and Behavior


    The aspects of hormones (primarialy sex and stress) on vertebrate behavior. Prerequisites: Any two of BIOL 3000, 3010, 3020 or equivalent.



    Credits: 3
  
  • BIOL 4310 - Sensory Neurobiology


    This two-lectures-per-week course explores the basic principles of sensory neurobiology. The course consists of four modules. Each module represents one of the senses and consists of an introductory lecture, one or several lectures that will delve into the details of that sense, a current topic lecture on some recent finding, and finally, a guest lecture from a UVa researcher. Prerequisites: BIOL 3050 or PSYC 2200



    Credits: 3
  
  • BIOL 4320 - Signal Transduction: How cells talk to each other


    This advanced undergraduate course explores how cells communicate with each other and respond to their environment. This area of biology is referred to as signal transduction and is the basis for most if not all normal and disease processes in humans. Therefore, significant time is spent on defining archetypal signaling modules that all cells use to receive and communicate information to and from their environment. Prerequisites: BIOL 3000 & BIOL 3010



    Credits: 3
  
  • BIOL 4330 - Wiring the Brain


    This course will cover the current state of knowledge for how neurons form connections in the brain. The course will initially focus on how relatively simple model systems have provided the critical clues as to how specific synaptic connections form. This will be followed by a discussion of how this knowledge can be applied to the understanding and treatment of human neural disorders. About a quarter of the course will be standard lectures and the remainder student-led discussion of primary literature. Prerequisites: BIOL 3000 and BIOL 3010; BIOL 3170 or Psych 2200.



    Credits: 3
  
  • BIOL 4335 - Functional Organization of Sensory Systems


    How do variations in the design of sensory structures and central nervous circuits lead to specialized behaviors as diverse as echolocation, acoustic perception of species-specific mating songs and spatial navigation? Throughout the course, we will examine the scientific literature that relates to the functional design of vertebrate and invertebrate sensory systems through classroom presentations and discussion.



    Credits: 3
  
  • BIOL 4340 - Experimental Foundations of Neurobiology


    The course content will focus on three areas of neurobiological research: conduction of the nervous impulse, sensory physiology, and synaptic physiology. Prerequisites: Must have completed BIOL 3050 or BIOL 3170 or PSYC 4200



    Credits: 3
  
  • BIOL 4350 - Metabolism: In Sickness and in Health


    A worldwide obesity epidemic exists. With it comes increased risk of chronic disease, such as Type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and certain cancers. This course will survey the molecular, genetic, physiologic and behavioral paths that lead to obesity and that contribute to prevalent chronic diseases. Through discussions of scientific literature, we will gain an integrated view of the factors that influence our energy homeostasis. Prerequiste: BIOL 3000, 3010.



    Credits: 3
  
  • BIOL 4360 - Cytokine Signaling and Neural Development


    This is a journal club format seminar where we perform an in depth analysis of the papers listed below. One paper will be covered per week with a review article also assigned for background. There are no presenters; rather we will have discussion leaders. All participants should be prepared to present any of the panels in the week’s paper.



    Credits: 1
  
  • BIOL 4365 - How to Map a Brain


    If you want to understand how our brain works, this is the course for you! In this student-driven Journal Club-style seminar series, we will consider recent neuroscience literature for discussion of the most innovative discoveries. A broad range of outstanding neuroscience issues will be considered; topics could include, for example, strategies for gene therapy for human neurological diseases, or the remote control of learning and memory. Prerequisite: Instructor Permission



    Credits: 1
  
  • BIOL 4370 - Epigenetics


    Explores the emerging science, Epigenetics. Topics include epigenetics in model organisms and molecular mechanisms such as the Polycomb and Trithorax Group proteins, histone modifications and variants, dosage compensation, DNA methylation, nuclear reprogramming and stem cell pluripotency. Prerequisites: Genetics and Molecular Biology, Cell Biology and Biochemistry strongly recomended.



    Credits: 3
  
  • BIOL 4380 - Evolution and Ecology of Development


    From the seahorse’s body to the venus flytrap’s jaws to the human brain, nature abounds with amazing adaptations. This interdisciplinary course explores how and why such biodiversity evolves as well as what limits diversity. Lectures and case studies will focus on core concepts, recent advances, and integrative approaches, placing special emphasis on the interplay between gene regulatory networks, the environment, and population genetics. Prerequisites: BIOL 3010, BIOL 3020



    Credits: 3
  
  • BIOL 4390 - Biological Therapy of Cancer


    This seminar course revolves around weekly two-hour student-led presentations of primary literature in the field of cancer therapy using novel approaches including immunotherapies. Objectives include providing the student with significant exposure to primary literature and the development of critical thinking skills. Prerequisite: May not take if previously completed BIOL 3360.



    Credits: 2
  
  • BIOL 4410 - Molecular Biology and Genetics


    A survey of contemporary issues in molecular biology and genetics. The course will be a combination of text based lectures and discussions of the current literature emphasizing the development of critical reading techniques. Prerequisites: BIOL 3000, 3010



    Credits: 3
  
  • BIOL 4430 - Experimental Plant Biology Laboratory: Drugs & Infectious Diseases


    We can’t live without plants. Plants make our existence possible, and they hold secrets for a better future. Our experimental approach in this lab will combine genetics and genomics strategies to uncover some of those secrets. We’ll search for genes and biosynthetic pathways that contribute to the success of plants at fighting off microbial infections. Ultimately, studies like these will lead to new, highly effective antimicrobial therapies. Prerequisite: BIOL 3010, BIOL 3150



    Credits: 3
  
  • BIOL 4440 - Cell Biology of Lipids and Membranes


    Life requires lipids. Discussion of the literature will integrate lipids into our current protein-centric view of cell biology. Topics considered are current models of membrane structure and its effect on metabolism; synthesis and distribution of lipids to regulate cell communication, gene expression, and the coding of identity; how pathogens turn lipids against host cells; and how common pharmaceuticals affect lipid biology to treat disease.



    Credits: 3
  
  • BIOL 4450 - Plant-Animal Interactions


    Plants & animals have a long co-evolutionary history, with their interactions shaping natural ecosystems, as well as our own daily lives. We’ll emphasize the evolutionary and ecological implications of these interactions to consider topics, such as pollination, herbivory and dispersal. We’ll also address questions like: Why is flower color, shape and scent so diverse? How do animals eat toxic plants? How do fruit help plants finds new habitat?



    Credits: 3
  
  • BIOL 4460 - Forest Sampling


    Study of quantitative methods for sampling forest ecosystems



    Credits: 3
  
  • BIOL 4480 - Macromolecular Structure


    Exploration, in depth, of principles underlying protein and nucleic acid structures and the techniques used to determine those structures. Prerequisite: CHEM2410 and 2420 or BIOL3000 or permission of instructor



    Credits: 3
  
  • BIOL 4490 - Neural Systems and Behavior


    This is an upper level lecture/discussion course for students interested in pursuing additional studies in neurobiology beyond the introductory level. Prerequisites: BIOL 3170 and BIOL 3250.



    Credits: 3
  
  • BIOL 4510 - Field Biology at Mountain Lake Biological Station


    Field experiential courses in evolution, ecology, behavior and biology taught at the Biology Department’s Mountain Lake Biological Station (MLBS), a field research and teaching facility located in southwestern Virginia. Students may enroll for more than one section as each section is a specialized topic. Prerequisites: BIOL 3020 Evolution & Ecology or equivalent.



    Credits: 1 to 4
  
  • BIOL 4560 - Electric Crayfish: Elements of Neurophysiology


    Course uses electrophysiological techniques with living crayfish material to examine principles of neurobiological function, including cellular resting potentials, propagated action potentials, neuromuscular physiology, aspects of neuromuscular organization, and sensory neuron physiology and organization. A lab lecture will precede each lab session. Grading will be based upon written laboratory reports and two midterm laboratory exams. Prerequisite: BIOL 3170



    Credits: 3
  
  • BIOL 4585 - Selected Topics in Biology


    Periodic seminar offerings to provide intensive study of the scientific literature in focused areas of Biology.



    Credits: 2
  
  • BIOL 4610 - Molecular Evolution: Diversity, Mutants, and the Biological Myth of Race


    Through the analysis of patterns of genetic variation in DNA, the field of Molecular Evolution seeks to gain insight into the fundamental evolutionary forces that generate, maintain, and remove genetic diversity. These forces shape the abundance of deleterious and beneficial mutations and reflect physical and behavioral differences between populations. In this course, we will dive into theoretical population genetics as a framework to develop an intuitive understanding of these evolutionary processes. We will apply this understanding to diversity among humans and all other life on earth. Prerequisite: BIOL3010, BIOL3020 required; STAT 2020 and calculus (MATH 1210, 1220, 1310, or 1320) suggested.



    Credits: 3
  
  • BIOL 4660 - How do they do it? Method and Logic in Biomedical Science


    How has a bioluminescent jellyfish saved lives? What does a Himalayan pond fish have to do with research into the origins of psychiatric disorders? Innovative methods in biomedical research have played a significant part in the development of revolutionary disease cures, treatments and diagnostics. This course will examine many of these technical approaches and how they have led to such significant discoveries in basic biomedical research. Prerequisite: BIOL 3010



    Credits: 3
  
  • BIOL 4751 - Plant Diversity& Conservation: Bioinformatics and Systematics


    The extraordinary diversity of the southern Appalachians will be used to explore the world of plants. We will visit unique mountain habitats to study the different species assemblages in these ecologically wide-ranging sites. Based upon our observations and analyses, we will critique contemporary views of the most effective conservation units (individual, population, species, family, habitat) and the methods used to achieve conservation goals.



    Credits: 3
  
  • BIOL 4752 - Stream Ecology


    Students will integrate principles of stream and watershed ecology to gain insight into stream-dwelling organisms and their environments. Participants will be introduced to the physical, chemical and biological organization of aquatic ecosystems, current theories in stream and watershed ecology, and lab and field methods for conducting stream research, and will participate in field/lab explorations and student-led discussions.



    Credits: 3
  
  • BIOL 4753 - Field Biology of Fungi


    The southern Appalachians provide an ideal setting to explore the biology of fungi. This class provides an introduction with emphasis on fieldID and current experimental methods used to study fungal genetics, ecology, and evolution. Lab exercises will use filamentous fungi to demonstrate methods for identification, culture techniques, breeding systems, genetic analysis, and interaction biology. Field trips will survey the taxonomic diversity.



    Credits: 3
  
  • BIOL 4754 - Field Herpetology


    We will focus on the ecology and evolution of reptiles and amphibians, leveraging their diversity in the southeastern US. In both the field and laboratory, we will study 1) the evolutionary relationships among reptiles and amphibians, 2) key evolutionary innovations that characterize each major lineage, 3) reptile and amphibian systems in ecological and evolutionary research, and 4) location and identification of reptiles and amphibians.



    Credits: 3
  
  • BIOL 4755 - Field Biology of Fishes


    MLBS sits on the Eastern Continental Divide providing an incredible diversity of freshwater habitats. Proficiency in ichthyology will be developed through field trips and lab work. Themes include: fish ID; patterns and drivers of diversity; interactions on individual, population, community and ecosystem levels; evolution; and influences of human activities. Students will design and conduct a research project and present at a class symposium.



    Credits: 3
  
  • BIOL 4756 - Field Ornithology


    Students will be exposed to the biology, ecology, and evolutionary biology of birds through hands-on experience. Field exercises will teach how to identify birds by sight and sound, measure birds in hand, and monitor birds and their behaviors. These opportunities will be augmented with lectures on bird physiology, morphology, and diversity. Independent research projects will enable students to further develop their skills.



    Credits: 3
  
  • BIOL 4757 - GIS for Field Biologists


    This course will cover the fundamentals of Geographic Information Systems as applied to biological questions with application in ecology, evolution, conservation, disease ecology, and human land-use. Students will learn spatial theory, analysis, and hands-on use of GIS software (including ArcGIS). Field laboratories will allow students to use Global Positioning Systems (GPS) and learn to incorporate this technology into spatial analyses.



    Credits: 3
  
  • BIOL 4758 - Field Biology of Insects


    Insects are perhaps the most important animal group on the face of the earth. Their enormous diversity makes them important models for understanding many concepts in biology. Students will observe the bits and pieces of an insect, they will discover how adaptation relates to diversity, and they will learn to identify the major insect groups. Field trips to varied habitats allow students to collect insects and understand their natural history.



    Credits: 3
  
  • BIOL 4759 - Field Methods in Wildlife Ecology


    An introduction to field research methods for measuring and monitoring animals with an emphasis on testing biological and wildlife management hypotheses. We will survey small mammals, birds, reptiles and amphibians. Students will learn sampling designs, protocols, and types of studies. Exercises will include surveying, trapping, marking, and measuring animals. Skills learned will be used in hypothesis-driven group projects.



    Credits: 3
  
  • BIOL 4760 - Hormones and Behavior


    Hormones alter the development and expression of animal behavior. Behavior in turn changes the effects of hormones. We’ll take an evolutionary approach in exploring the causation and mechanism of hormone-mediated behaviors. We will use endocrinological techniques to examine behavior and hormone variation in wild populations. Students will help design and conduct a class research project with the goal of publishing our results.



    Credits: 3
  
  • BIOL 4770 - Synthetic Biology


    By applying the principles of engineering to biology, students will design molecules, viruses, and cells to solve global problems in public health, food security, manufacturing, information processing, and the environment, changing the traditional question of ‘How do cells work?’ to ‘How can I get a cell to work for me?’ Students will gain experience in writing internationally competitive research project proposals. Prerequisite: Instructor Permission



    Credits: 3
  
  • BIOL 4810 - Distinguished Major Seminar in Biological Research I


    Two-hour, weekly discussion of recent advances in biology; attend biology seminars, interact with seminar speakers, explore the philosophy and practice of science, and learn skills in oral and written research presentation. Prerequisite: Fourth-year DMP in Biology.



    Credits: 2
  
  • BIOL 4820 - Distinguished Major Seminar in Biological Research II


    Two-hour, weekly discussion of recent advances in biology; attend biology seminars, interact with seminar speakers, explore the philosophy and practice of science, and learn skills in oral and written research presentation. Prerequisite: Fourth-year DMP in Biology.



    Credits: 2
  
  • BIOL 4850 - Seminar in Environmental and Conservation Biology


    In-depth investigation of current research & practice in environmental and biological conservation. Format will include the discussion of fundamental & recent readings in conservation and guest speakers from the local scientific and conservation communities. Prerequisites for this class are BIOL 3450 and 3020. If interested students have taken EVSC 3020 instead of BIOL 3020, or other equivalent classes, contact the instructor for permission.



    Credits: 2
  
  • BIOL 4900 - Independent Readings in Biology


    Tutorial or seminar course that allows intensive study of the literature in a particular area of biology under the guidance of a Biology faculty member.



    Credits: 1 to 3
  
  • BIOL 4910 - Independent Research in the Life Sciences


    Independent research for qualified undergraduates under the direction of a faculty member OUTSIDE of the Biology Department. Prerequisite: Instructor Permission



    Credits: 2
  
  • BIOL 4920 - Independent Research in Biology


    Independent research for qualified undergraduates under the direction of a faculty member within the Biology Department. Prerequisite: Instructor Permission



    Credits: 2
  
  • BIOL 4930 - Distinguished Major Thesis Research


    This course is the final semester of Independent Research for participants of the Biology Distinguished Majors Program. During this semester, students will complete their laboratory investigations, ultimately presenting the sum of their work in a written thesis. Prerequisite: Instructor Permission



    Credits: 2

Biomedical Engineering

  
  • BME 1501 - Special Topics


    Student led special topic courses which vary by semester



    Credits: 1
  
  • BME 2000 - Biomedical Engineering Design and Discovery


    Provides overview of the BME discipline and major sub-disciplines (biomechanics, genetic engineering, tissue engineering, bioelectricity, imaging, cellular engineering, computational systems biology), covers conceptual and detail design processes, and introduces quantitative tools utilized throughout the BIOM curriculum. A major focus of the class will be formulation and execution of a design project. Prerequisite: BME 2101, BME 3315, AND second-year status in Biomedical Engineering OR instructor permission.



    Credits: 3
  
  • BME 2101 - Physiology I for Engineers


    We learn how excitable tissue, nerves and muscle, and the cardiovascular and respiratory systems function. You will develop an understanding of mechanisms, with an introduction to structure, an emphasis on quantitative analysis, and integration of hormonal and neural regulation and control. Prerequisites: intro courses in biology, chemistry, physics & calculus (BIOL 2010, CHEM 1610, PHYS 1425, APMA 1110 or similar) or instructor permission.



    Credits: 3
  
  • BME 2102 - Physiology II


    Introduces the physiology of the kidney, salt and water balance, gastrointestinal system, endocrine system, and central nervous system, with reference to diseases and their pathophysiology. (Circulation and respiration are covered in the fall semester course, BME 2101). Prerequisite: BME 2101 or instructor permission.



    Credits: 3
  
  • BME 2104 - Cell and Molecular Biology for Engineers


    Introduces the fundamentals of cell structure and function, emphasizing the techniques and technologies available for the study of cell biology. A problem-based approach is used to motivate each topic. Divided into three general sections: cell structure and function includes cell chemistry, organelles, enzymes, membranes, membrane transport, intracellular compartments and adhesion structures; energy flow in cells concentrates on the pathways of glycolysis and aerobic respiration; information flow in cells focuses on modern molecular biology and genetic engineering, and includes DNA replication, the cell cycle, gene expression, gene regulation, and protein synthesis. Also presents specific cell functions, including movement, the cytoskeleton and signal transduction. Prerequisite: CHEM 1610 or instructor permission.



    Credits: 3
  
  • BME 2220 - Biomechanics


    Introduction to principles of continuum mechanics of biological tissues and systems. Topics include development of selected fundamental methods and results from statics and strength of materials, continuum mechanics, free-body diagrams, and constitutive equations of biological materials. Properties of blood vessels, heart, bone, cartilage, ligaments, tendons, blood, and other tissues. Mechanical basis and effects of pathology and trauma. Prerequisites: APMA 2130, BME 2101, or permission of instructor



    Credits: 3
  
  • BME 2315 - Computational Biomedical Engineering


    Introduces computational techniques for solving biomedical engineering problems & constructing models of biologic processes. Numerical techniques include regression, interpolation, differentiation, integration, root finding, systems of equations, optimization and approaches to ordinary differential equations. Applications include bioreactors, biotransport, pharmacokinetics & biomechanics. Prereq: APMA 2120 & CS 1110; recommended co-req APMA 2130.



    Credits: 3
  
  • BME 3030 - Design and Innovation in Medicine


    A project-based grounding in biomedical product design, with emphasis on clinical immersion and topics including design fundamentals, problem/needs identification, delineation of realistic constraints and product specifications, intellectual property, market analysis, entrepreneurship, specific advanced design topics, business plan development, venture funding, and medical product testing methods.REQ: instructor permission .



    Credits: 3
 

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