Jul 12, 2024  
Undergraduate Record 2017-2018 
    
Undergraduate Record 2017-2018 [ARCHIVED RECORD]

Course Descriptions


 

Systems & Information Engineering

  
  • SYS 4000 - Financial Aspects of Engineering


    Students will investigate various financial aspects of engineering. Topics will include basic economic analysis (e.g., opportunity cost, time value of money), calculation of present value, interest rates, basic principles of accounting, methods of depreciation, risk analysis, insurance, taxation, decision analysis, and legal issues.



    Credits: 3
  
  • SYS 4021 - Linear Statistical Models


    This course shows how to use linear statistical models for analysis in engineering and science. The course emphasizes the use of regression models for description, prediction, and control in a variety of applications. Building on multiple regression, the course also covers principal component analysis, analysis of variance and covariance, logistic regression, time series methods, and clustering. Course lectures concentrate on the theory and practice of model construction while laboratories provide a series of open-ended problem solving situations that illustrate the applicability of the models. Prerequisite: SYS 3060, APMA 3120, and major in systems engineering.



    Credits: 4
  
  • SYS 4024 - User Experience Design


    A case-based approach to the design of user interfaces with a focus on iterative project experiences. Display design concepts are related to ecological factors, situational awareness, attention, vision, and information processing. Project cases are tied to real-world problems of decision support on mobile platforms, large scale command and control, and data visualization, among others.
    Prerequisites: SYS 3023 or CS 3205 or Instructor Permission



    Credits: 3
  
  • SYS 4036 - Design of Experiments


    A problem-oriented approach to planning, design and analysis of experiments. A strategic selection of experimental design takes fundamental understanding of variability, and the skills to analyze and control it. The lectures cover a list of statistical methods and their relationship, including ANOVA, Regression, Factorial Designs and RSM. The final project will help gain experiences in collecting and analyzing human subject experiments.



    Credits: 3
  
  • SYS 4044 - Economics of Engineering Systems


    This course is an introduction to the theory of the industrial organization (from a game-theoretic perspective) and its applications to industries with strong engineering content (electricity, telecommunications, software & hardware etc.) Topics include: congestion pricing in networks, pricing and efficiency in electricity markets, planned obsolescence in software development, “network” effects and the dynamics of technology adoption etc. Prerequisites: ECON 2010 and APMA 3100 or APMA 3110



    Credits: 3
  
  • SYS 4053 - Systems Design I


    A design project extending throughout the fall semester. Involves the study of an actual open-ended situation, including problem formulation, data collection, analysis and interpretation, model building for the purpose of evaluating design options, model analysis, and generation of solutions. Includes an appropriate computer laboratory experience. Prerequisite: SYS 3021, 3060, and fourth-year standing in the Systems Engineering major.



    Credits: 3
  
  • SYS 4054 - Systems Design II


    A design project extending throughout the spring semester. Involves the study of an actual open-ended situation, including problem formulation, data collection, analysis and interpretation, model building for the purpose of evaluating design options, model analysis, and generation of solutions. Includes an appropriate computer laboratory experience. SYS 4053 and fourth-year standing in Systems Engineering major.



    Credits: 3
  
  • SYS 4055 - Systems Engineering Design Colloquium II


    This is a colloquium that allows fourth-year students to learn about engineering design, innovation, teamwork, technical communication, and project management in the context of their two-semester systems capstone design project. With respect to their capstone project, students define and scope their project, structure an interim report about the project, and give an oral presentation to the class. In addition, students study methods of effective time management and prepare presentations of their 5-year career plans. Prerequisite: Fourth-year standing in systems engineering.



    Credits: 1
  
  • SYS 4081 - Human-Computer Interaction


    To learn basic aspects of human factors in the design of information support systems. We will cover: (1) basic human performance issues (physiology, memory, learning, problem-solving, human error), (2) the user interface design process (task analysis, product concept, functional requirements, prototype, design, and testing.) Students will gain basic skills in the analysis and design of human-machine systems through in-class exercises and two course projects. The course is also designed to help you practice different communication skills (interviewing, written analysis, and oral presentation).



    Credits: 3
  
  • SYS 4501 - Special Topics in Systems and Information Engineering


    A fourth-year level undergraduate course focused on a topic not normally covered in the course offerings. The topic usually reflects new developments in the systems and information engineering field. Offering is based on student and faculty interests. Prerequisites: Instructor Permission



    Credits: 0.5 to 3
  
  • SYS 4502 - Special Topics in Systems and Information Engineering


    A fourth-year level undergraduate course focused on a topic not normally covered in the course offerings. The topic usually reflects new developments in the sysems and information engineering field. Offering is based on student and faculty interests.



    Credits: 0.5 to 3
  
  • SYS 4581 - Selected Topics in Systems Engineering


    Detailed study of a selected topic determined by the current interest of faculty and students. Offered as required. Prerequisite: As specified for each offering.



    Credits: 0.5 to 3
  
  • SYS 4582 - Selected Topics in Systems Engineering


    Detailed study of a selected topic determined by the current interest of faculty and students. Prerequisite: As specified for each offering.



    Credits: 0.5 to 3
  
  • SYS 4995 - Supervised Projects in Systems Engineering


    Independent study or project research under the guidance of a faculty member. Offered as required. Prerequisite: As specified for each offering.



    Credits: 1 to 6

Tibetan

  
  • TBTN 116 - Intensive Introductory Tibetan


    This is the non-credit option for TBTN 1016.



    Credits: 0
  
  • TBTN 126 - Intensive Introductory Tibetan


    This is the non-credit option for TBTN 1026.



    Credits: 0
  
  • TBTN 216 - Intensive Intermediate Tibetan


    This is the non-credit option for TBTN 2016.



    Credits: 0
  
  • TBTN 226 - Intensive Intermediate Tibetan


    This is the non-credit option for TBTN 2026.



    Credits: 0
  
  • TBTN 1010 - Elementary Tibetan I


    An introduction to the grammar and syntax of spoken and written Tibetan for beginners with the intention of developing proficiency in listening, speaking, reading and writing. Examples are drawn from Tibetan short stories and proverbs, among other sources. Students gain knowledge of Tibetan culture to improve communication skills using a dynamic, interactive format.



    Credits: 4
  
  • TBTN 1016 - Intensive Introductory Tibetan


    This intensive course begins with instruction in basic oral expression, listening comprehension, elementary reading and writing, and continues with further development of these four skills at the intermediate level. Part of the Summer Language Institute.



    Credits: 3
  
  • TBTN 1020 - Elementary Tibetan II


    An introduction to the grammar and syntax of spoken and written Tibetan for beginners with the intention of developing proficiency in listening, speaking, reading and writing. Examples are drawn from Tibetan short stories and proverbs, among other sources. Students gain knowledge of Tibetan culture to improve communication skills using a dynamic, interactive format. Pre-Requisites: TBTN 1010 Elementary Tibetan I.



    Credits: 4
  
  • TBTN 1026 - Intensive Introductory Tibetan


    This intensive course begins with instruction in basic oral expression, listening comprehension, elementary reading and writing, and continues with further development of these four skills at the intermediate level. Part of the Summer Language Institute. Prerequisites: TBTN1016 or equivalent.



    Credits: 3
  
  • TBTN 2010 - Intermediate Tibetan I


    Intermediate skill-building in the grammar and syntax of spoken and written Tibetan, along with development of skills in listening, speaking, reading and writing through the integrated use of spoken and literary forms. Students will also enhance their knowledge of Tibetan culture in order to improve their communication skills. Pre-Requisites: TBTN 1020 Elementary Tibetan II.



    Credits: 4
  
  • TBTN 2016 - Intensive Intermediate Tibetan


    This intensive course begins with instruction in intermediate level oral expression, listening comprehension, reading and writing, and continues with further development of these four skills. Part of the Summer Language Institute. Prerequisites: TBTN 1016 & 1026 or equivalent



    Credits: 3
  
  • TBTN 2020 - Intermediate Tibetan II


    Intermediate skill-building in the grammar and syntax of spoken and written Tibetan, along with development of skills in listening, speaking, reading and writing through the integrated use of spoken and literary forms. Students will also enhance their knowledge of Tibetan culture in order to improve their communication skills. Pre-Requisites: TBTN 2010 Intermediate Tibetan I.



    Credits: 4
  
  • TBTN 2026 - Intensive Intermediate Tibetan


    This intensive course begins with instruction in intermediate level oral expression, listening comprehension, reading and writing, and continues with further development of these four skills. Part of the Summer Language Institute. Prerequisites: TBTN 1016 , 1026 & 2016 or equivalent.



    Credits: 3
  
  • TBTN 3010 - Advanced Modern Tibetan I


    A continuation of the Intermediate Tibetan language sequence, focusing on advanced grammar, syntax, and structures. Emphasis is laid on mastering comprehension and communication in colloquial Tibetan, writing skills in the various scripts of literary Tibetan, and integrating comprehension of colloquial and literary forms. Pre-Requisites: TBTN 2020 Intermediate Tibetan II.



    Credits: 3
  
  • TBTN 3020 - Advanced Modern Tibetan II


    A continuation of the Advanced Modern Tibetan I language sequence, focusing on advanced grammar, syntax, and structures. Additional emphasis will be placed on mastering oral communication skills through conversation, utilizing grammatical structures introduced in Advanced Modern Tibetan I. Pre-requisites: TBTN 3010: Advanced Modern Tibetan I.



    Credits: 3
  
  • TBTN 3030 - Advanced Modern Tibetan III


    A continuation of the Advanced Tibetan I/II language sequence, focusing on advanced grammar, syntax, and structures. Additional emphasis will be placed mastering oral communications skills through conversation, utilizing grammatical structures introduced in Advanced Modern Tibetan II. Pre-Requisites: TBTN 3020 Advanced Modern Tibetan II.



    Credits: 3
  
  • TBTN 3040 - Advanced Modern Tibetan IV


    A continuation of the Advanced Tibetan language sequence, focusing on advanced grammar, syntax, and structures. Additional emphasis will be placed on mastering oral communications skills through conversation, utilizing grammatical structures introduced in previous courses. Pre-Requisites: TBTN 3030 Advanced Modern Tibetan III.



    Credits: 3
  
  • TBTN 4993 - Independent Study in Tibetan


    Independent Study in Tibetan Prerequisites: permission of instructor



    Credits: 1 to 3

Ukrainian

  
  • UKR 1210 - Introduction to Ukrainian Language


    Introduces students to the essentials of Ukrainian grammar with emphasis on speaking and reading. Prerequisite: Instructor permission; some knowledge of Russian recommended.



    Credits: 3
  
  • UKR 1220 - Introduction to Ukrainian Language


    Introduces students to the essentials of Ukrainian grammar with emphasis on speaking and reading. Prerequisite: Instructor permission; some knowledge of Russian recommended.



    Credits: 3

University Seminar

  
  • USEM 1570 - University Seminar


    Consult the University Seminars web page at www.virginia.edu/provost/USEMS.html (copy and paste Web address into browser) for specific descriptions.



    Credits: 2 to 3
  
  • USEM 1580 - University Seminar


    Consult the University Seminars web page at www.virginia.edu/provost/USEMS.html (copy and paste Web address into browser) for specific descriptions.



    Credits: 2 to 3

University Studies

  
  • UNST 1899 - Research Internship


    Undergraduate research for provost area programs.



    Credits: 0
  
  • UNST 2810 - Introduction to Academic Research


    This course is intended for participants in the Undergraduate Student Opportunities in Academic Research (USOAR) program.



    Credits: 1
  
  • UNST 2811 - Introduction to Academic Research Part II


    This course is intended for participants in the Undergraduate Student Opportunities in Academic Research (USOAR) program.



    Credits: 1
  
  • UNST 2820 - Internship for Credit


    This course is designed to support you as you complete your internship and help you reflect on and learn from your experience. Students who pursue a non-paying summer internship that requires them to receive academic credit can earn credit through this course.



    Credits: 1

Urban and Environmental Planning

  
  • PLAC 2500 - Topical Offerings in Planning


    Topical Offerings in Planning



    Credits: 3
  
  • PLAC 3500 - Topical Offerings in Planning


    Topical Offerings in Planning



    Credits: 3
  
  • PLAC 4010 - Neighborhood Planning Studio


    Explores neighborhood, planning issues from the professionals’ and citizens’ perspectives. Cross-listed with PLAC 5610.



    Credits: 4
  
  • PLAC 4041 - Real Estate Development and Finance


    The course will examine the dialogue between economic forces and design decisions in the real estate development process. The course will emphasize the ability of intelligent design to create lasting economic value and the utilization of marketing and finance strategy to augment project viability and profitability.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PLAC 4500 - Topical Offerings in Planning


    Topical Offerings in Planning



    Credits: 3
  
  • PLAC 4993 - Applied Independent Study


    Elective courses offered at the request of faculty or students to provide an opportunity for internships, fieldwork, or independent study. Prerequisite: Planning faculty approval of topic.



    Credits: 1 to 4
  
  • PLAN 1010 - Introduction to Urban and Environmental Planning


    Analyzes community and environmental planning in the United States; the planning process; and sustainable communities.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PLAN 2020 - Planning Design


    Studies the principles of design; the architecture of cities and urban design; perception of space and visual analysis; graphic presentation, including mapping techniques; and inventories, information storage, retrieval and use.



    Credits: 4
  
  • PLAN 2110 - Digital Visualization for Planners


    Digital technology for representing and analyzing planning data will include photo-editing, web page design, geographic information system mapping, spreadsheet modeling, and document layout and production. The major emphasis will be on two- and three- dimensional representation of spaces common to planning: streetscape, neighborhoods, communities and regions. Representation of the past, the present and prospective futures to both professional and citizen audiences will receive critical attention.



    Credits: 4
  
  • PLAN 2500 - Special Topics in Planning


    Topical offerings in planning.



    Credits: 1 to 3
  
  • PLAN 3010 - Research Studio 1


    Advanced vertical studio, exploring complex issues and sites, often through interdisciplinary design research.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PLAN 3030 - Neighborhoods, Community and Regions


    Explores theories and concepts of economic, social, and cultural forces that influence urban and regional spatial structure.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PLAN 3040 - Metropolis


    This lecture course focuses on cities as centers of cultural, social, and artistic activity. It considers how we define cities, the forces that create and sustain them, and what makes them culturally distinctive. It looks at several cities at their moments of cultural, political, and architectural glory: Istanbul in the 16thcentury, London in the late 17th and 18th centuries, Paris in the 19th century, New York in the 20th century, and Shanghai in the 21st century.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PLAN 3050 - Planning Methods


    Analyzes methods used in quantitative and qualitative investigations of urban and regional settings for planning purposes.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PLAN 3060 - Law, Land and the Environment


    This course introduces major legal issues surrounding land-use and environmental issues, focusing on the most notable U.S. Supreme Court decisions related to land use and environmental law, as well as the legal framework for land use law and environmental law.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PLAN 3140 - Design Themes of Great Cities


    This course discusses the design qualities of the world’s great cities. Each session focuses on the defining characteristics of different cities such as their natural settings, public spaces, transportation systems, types of buildings, and everyday details.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PLAN 3250 - Mediation Theory and Skills


    This highly engaging one-credit, pass-fail course will introduce students to the principles and practices of mediation, with an emphasis on inter-personal conflict.



    Credits: 1
  
  • PLAN 3310 - History of Cities and Planning


    An overview of the planning profession with emphasis on 19th- and 20th-century American urban history.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PLAN 3500 - Special Topics in Planning


    Topical offerings in planning.



    Credits: 1 to 3
  
  • PLAN 3640 - Town Design


    This course will investigate the generic principles and strategies that shape the form and character of towns and discuss influential towns that over the past several generations have, at least to their advocates, represented ‘good’ planning and design. While recognizing the importance of social and economic factors, the course will emphasize the physical, visual, and experiential qualities of towns.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PLAN 3811 - Gender & Built Environment


    This class explores the wide range of approaches that have been taken to the complex relationships between body, sex, gender, and the built environment. Some see buildings as a direct expression of sexed bodies (phallic towers and breast-like domes), while others see buildings and settlements as expressions and reiterations of the gender structures of a culture.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PLAN 3860 - Cities and Nature


    This class begins with the premise that contact with nature is essential to modern life.The class will examine the evidence for why nature in important,and the many creative ways in which cities can plan for,and design-in nature, and foster meaningful and everyday connections with the natural world.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PLAN 4040 - Planning in Government


    Examines the role of planning in government decision-making. Focuses on local government, but intergovernmental aspects of planning that influence local decisions are also stressed. Studies planning processes, such as transportation, community development, and social planning.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PLAN 4500 - Special Topics in Planning


    Elective courses offered at the request of faculty or students to provide an opportunity for internships, fieldwork, and independent study.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PLAN 4510 - J-Term Courses


    January Term courses provide students with unique opportunities: new courses that address topics of current interest, study abroad programs, undergraduate research seminars, and interdisciplinary courses. The intensive format of “J-term” classes encourages extensive student-faculty contact and allows students and faculty to immerse he topics of “J-term” courses change each semester and offer focused study, often related travel or current events.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PLAN 4600 - Urban Research


    This is a component of the Design studio, focused on local, on site research. The Urban Research component may be taken independently by History and Planning students.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PLAN 4800 - Professional Practice


    Structured internship experience and reporting as a reflective practitioner for ten weeks or 200 hours of experience.



    Credits: 1 to 3
  
  • PLAN 4993 - Independent Study


    Elective courses offered at the request of faculty or students to provide an opportunity for internships, fieldwork, and independent study.



    Credits: 1 to 4
  
  • PLAN 4999 - Planning Senior Project


    Note: Third- and fourth-year undergraduate students may, with instructor permission, enroll in selected 5000-level courses.



    Credits: 3

Urdu

  
  • URDU 2010 - Intermediate Urdu


    Introduces various types of written and spoken Urdu; vocabulary building, idioms, and problems of syntax; and conversation. Prerequisite: for URDU 2010: HIND 1020 or equivalent.



    Credits: 4
  
  • URDU 2020 - Intermediate Urdu


    Prerequisite: for URDU 2020: URDU 2010 or equivalent.



    Credits: 4
  
  • URDU 3010 - Advanced Urdu I


    This course is designed to expand and to consolidate the structures the student has learned through URDU 2020 by reading original Urdu texts, ranging from literary prose fiction to news media excerpts to poetry (both classical and modern). We will discuss these texts in Urdu in class, and the students will be responsible for a series of short essays throughout the semester in Urdu pertaining both to the texts and to other topics. Pre-requisites: URDU 2020 or equivalent, or instructor permission.



    Credits: 3
  
  • URDU 3020 - Advanced Urdu II


    This course is designed to expand and to consolidate the structures the student has learned through URDU 2020 by reading original Urdu texts, ranging from literary prose fiction to news media excerpts to poetry (both classical and modern). We will discuss these texts in Urdu in class, and the students will be responsible for a series of short essays throughout the semester in Urdu pertaining both to the texts and to other topics. Pre-requisites: URDU 2020 or equivalent, or instructor permission.



    Credits: 3
  
  • URDU 3300 - Readings in Urdu Poetry: An Ongoing Mahfil


    This course will introduce advanced Urdu and Hindi students to some of the finest poetry in Urdu. Those who cannot read the Urdu script will have the option of reading the texts in Devanagari (the Hindi script). Some of the poets we will read are Mir, Ghalib, Dagh and Faiz. Course work will include brief analytical papers, as well as in-class presentations. Prerequisites: URDU 3010 or 3020; or HIND 3010 or 3020; or instructor permission.



    Credits: 3
  
  • URDU 4993 - Independent Study in Urdu


    Independent Study in Urdu



    Credits: 1 to 3

Yiddish

  
  • YIDD 1050 - Elementary Yiddish Language and Culture


    For more details on this class, please visit the department website at: http://www.virginia.edu/german/Undergraduate/Courses.



    Credits: 3
  
  • YIDD 1060 - Elementary Yiddish Language and Culture


    Elementary Yiddish Language and Culture



    Credits: 3

Yiddish in Translation

  
  • YITR 3452 - Jewish Culture and History in Eastern Europe


    Studies major trends in Yiddish, East European, and North American Jewish culture, with special focus on the interaction between cultural forms and historical developments in Eastern Europe and North American. Topics vary.



    Credits: 3
  
  • YITR 3560 - Topics in Yiddish Literature


    Surveys important developments in Yiddish literature from the eighteenth century to the present. Special attention is paid to the innovations Yiddish writers produced in response to historical and cultural change.



    Credits: 3

Women, Gender & Sexuality

  
  • WGS 1510 - Topics in Women, Gender & Sexuality


    Credits: 1 to 4
  
  • WGS 2100 - Introduction to Gender and Sexuality Studies


    An introduction to gender studies, including the fields of women’s studies, feminist studies, LGBT studies, & masculinity studies. Students will examine historical movements, theoretical issues, & contemporary debates, especially as they pertain to issues of inequality & to the intersection of gender with race, class, sexuality, & nationalism. Topics will vary according to the interdisciplinary expertise & research focus of the instructor.



    Credits: 3
  
  • WGS 2224 - Black Femininities and Masculinities in Media


    Addresses the role the media has played in creating images and understandings of “Blackness” in the United States, particularly where it converges with popular ideologies about gender.



    Credits: 3
  
  • WGS 2300 - Women and Gender in the Deaf World


    Examines the roles of deaf women inside and outside of the signing Deaf community. Using an interdisciplinary approach, considers such topics as language and cultural barriers, violence against women, sexuality, race, class, education, and work. Investigates disparities between deaf and hearing women and the choices available to d/Deaf women, individually and collectively, in contemporary culture.



    Credits: 3
  
  • WGS 2400 - Gender Death & Dying


    This course takes an interdisciplinary approach to exploring ways that gender and sexuality impact death and dying. Aries’ The Hour of Our Death and Seremetakis’ The Last Word will be brought into conversation with Malson and Ussher’s work on anorexia and Crimp’s and Owen’s theorizing representations of AIDS. We will explore photography’s role in “capturing” the image of death, from 19th c. spirit photographs to 20th c. documentaries.



    Credits: 3
  
  • WGS 2450 - Gender and Environmental Justice


    Examines different ways of integrating gender into environmental analysis and organizing around the world, with a focus on power and links to race/class/nation. Topics include women’s leadership in environmental movements; ecofeminism vs. feminist environmentalism; gendering of ecological knowledge and restoration; the impact of gendered divisions of labor on ecology; environmental violence; unequal health impacts; intimacy and sustainability.



    Credits: 3
  
  • WGS 2500 - Topics in Women, Gender & Sexuality


    Special Topics in Women, Gender & Sexuality vary by semester.



    Credits: 1 to 4
  
  • WGS 2848 - Reproductive Technology


    This course will focus on issues in technology and reproduction from historical and cross-cultural perspectives. We will examine critical perspectives on science, power, gender, and inequality as they influence cultural constructions of reproductive processes such as pregnancy, childbirth, infertility, and debates about the enhancement and limitation of human fertility. Prerequisite: Course in WGS, ANTH, Bioethics preferred



    Credits: 3
  
  • WGS 2891 - Issues Facing Adolescent Girls I


    Students will explore the psychological, social, and cultural issues affecting adolescent girls and apply this understanding through service with the Young Women Leaders Program (YWLP). As we delve into theory and research on adolescent development, effective mentoring practices, and leadership development, students will test their theoretical knowledge and its application by serving as a Big Sister to an area middle school girl. Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor



    Credits: 3
  
  • WGS 2893 - Fostering Leadership in Women and Girls I


    This seminar is designed to support the YWLP (Young Women Leaders Program) group facilitators as leaders of YWLP mentoring groups. The content of instruction and discussion will focus on facilitation skills, small group development, and other topics relating to group dynamics, with particular attention to issues related to promoting leadership among adolescent girls and college women. There is an emphasis placed on multicultural issues.



    Credits: 3
  
  • WGS 2895 - Front Lines of Social Change: Through the Lens of Gender, Race and Class


    This course is for students who have committed to an internship with the Women’s Center. While analyzing the intersectionality of race, class and gender and the deep connection to advocating for social change, interns will be exposed to experiential learning on Grounds in the community and abroad. We see our interns as ambassadors for the university. This course was designed to help students develop into the most well-informed interns possible.



    Credits: 3
  
  • WGS 2896 - Front Lines of Social Change Part II: Social Justice in Our Community


    The course is designed to increase students insight into social problems. The course is divided into two parts. The first half of the semester we will focus in class on four problem areas that have a local and/or global focus: sex trafficking, gender and immigrant status, minority women and mental health, and transgender oppression. The second half of the semester will consist of an externship to local organizations.



    Credits: 2
  
  • WGS 2897 - Gender Violence and Social Justice


    Introduction to dynamics of gender-based violence, the political and cultural structures that perpetuate it, and avenues for achieving social justice. Students will think critically about the (largely) domestic impact of this violence, and develop a practical understanding of how it intersects with other forms of oppression, by applying theory to real-world problems through experiential learning projects in the community and at the University.



    Credits: 3
  
  • WGS 3100 - Women and Freedom of Movement: A Cross-Cultural Perspective


    The course focuses on the complex interconnectedness between the allocation of space and power. It studies how in the last few decades women in motion desegregated predominantly masculine spaces, reconfigured the boundaries and hierarchies between the sexes, modified definitions of beauty, and altered gender relations. It examines the rhetoric and poetics of sex segregation, voice, visibility, and mobility in a spectrum of genres. Prerequisites: 2000 level course in the humanities.



    Credits: 3
  
  • WGS 3105 - Issues in LGBTQ Studies


    This course is an interdisciplinary analysis of LGBT (lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and queer) Studies. We will study historical events and political, literary and artistic figures and works; contemporary social and political issues; the meaning and development of sexual and gender identities; and different disciplinary definitions of meaning and knowledge.



    Credits: 3
  
  • WGS 3110 - Queer American History


    Course focuses on 20th century history of LGBTQ activism, but will include formation of heterosexual and homosexual identities and historical constructions of sexual practices prior to the 1900s. From 20th c. the course will focus on the Homophile Movement, Gay Liberation, and ACT UP, among other activist movements. Although primary emphasis will be placed on historical activism, contemporary movements regarding LGBTQ-rights will be included.



    Credits: 3
  
  • WGS 3115 - Work, Women’s Work and Women Workers in South Asia


    Credits: 3
  
  • WGS 3120 - Women and Islam


    This course is an introduction to Islam through issues related to women and gender. Beginning with the portrayal of women in the Qur’an and the active role they played in the early years of Islam, it examines the growing body of literature on women and Islam. Through a variety of sources religious texts and commentaries, literary pieces and movies it explores a variety of questions. How does Islam treat women? What is ‘Islamic’ with respect to ideas about women? How are Muslim women represented in the Western media, literature and the arts? In what ways do they participate in cultural production of themselves? Why for centuries have they been the object of such intense curiosity and misunderstanding?



    Credits: 3
  
  • WGS 3140 - Border Crossings: Women, Islam and Literature in the Middle East and North Africa


    A focus on a bloodless, non-violent revolution that is shaking the foundation of the Islamic Middle East and North Africa, a revolution with women writers at the forefront.  An examination of the rhetoric and poetics of sex segregation, voice, visibility, and mobility in a spectrum of genres that includes folklore, novel, short story, poetry, biography, autobiography, and essay. Prerequisite: Previous 2000 level course in the humanities or social sciences.



    Credits: 3
  
  • WGS 3200 - Women, Gender and Sports


    This course traces the history of American female athletes from the late 1800s through the early 21st century. We will use gender as a means of understanding the evolution of the female athlete, and will also trace the manner by which issues of class and race inform sportswomen’s journeys over time, particularly with regard to issues of femininity and homophobia.



    Credits: 3
  
  • WGS 3210 - Gender, Sport and Film


    This course will examine how film has portrayed women’s sports and female athletes. We will explore how well the film industry has documented the history of women’s sports, issues important to female athletes such as race, sexuality, equality and issues of femininity, and we will look to see how well these productions stack up against films portraying male athletes and men’s sports.



    Credits: 3
  
  • WGS 3220 - Global Perspectives on Gender & Sport


    This course will examine female athletes from a global perspective, comparing and contrasting their experiences, and placing them in historical perspective. Among the topics considered will be the Olympic Games, Chinese sports schools, the post-apartheid athletic landscape of South Africa, and Iranian women athlete’s struggle against clothing restrictions.



    Credits: 3
 

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