Jul 19, 2024  
Undergraduate Record 2017-2018 
    
Undergraduate Record 2017-2018 [ARCHIVED RECORD]

Course Descriptions


 

Statistics

  
  • STAT 3118 - Probability for Statistics


    This course provides an overview of basic probability required for statistics. Topics include sample spaces and events, properties of probability, conditional probability, discrete and continuous random variables, expected values, and joint distributions. Credit for this course cannot be received after receiving credit for MATH 3100 or APMA 3100.



    Credits: 1.5
  
  • STAT 3119 - Matrix Algebra for Statistics


    This course provides a basic introduction to matrix algebra required for statistics. Topics include matrix arithmetic, matrix inverses, systems of linear equations, eigenspaces, and covariance and correlation matrices. Credit for this course cannot be received after receiving credit for MATH 3350, MATH 3351, or APMA 3080.



    Credits: 1.5
  
  • STAT 3120 - Introduction to Mathematical Statistics


    This course provides a calculus-based introduction to mathematical statistics with some applications. Topics include: sampling theory, point estimation, interval estimation, testing hypotheses, linear regression, correlation, analysis of variance, and categorical data. Prerequisite: MATH 3100 or APMA 3100.



    Credits: 3
  
  • STAT 3130 - Design and Analysis of Sample Surveys


    Main designs & estimation techniques used in sample surveys; including simple random sampling, stratification, cluster sampling, double sampling, post-stratification, ratio estimation; non-response problems, measurement errors. Properties of sample surveys are developed through simulation procedures. Uses SUDAAN software package for analyzing sample surveys.



    Credits: 3
  
  • STAT 3150 - Theory of Interest


    Topics include growth and time value of money, equations of value and yield rates, annuities (including contingent payments), loan amortization schedules, bonds. Additional topics are options and derivatives, as time permits. Prerequisites: MATH 1220 or MATH 1320



    Credits: 3
  
  • STAT 3220 - Introduction to Regression Analysis


    This course provides a survey of regression analysis techniques, covering topics from simple regression, multiple regression, logistic regression, and analysis of variance. The primary focus is on model development and applications. Prerequisite: STAT 1100 or STAT 1120 or STAT 2120.



    Credits: 3
  
  • STAT 3240 - Coding in Matlab/Mathematica with Applications


    This course focuses on an introduction to programming and data manipulation, with an emphasis on applications. Students have the choice of using Matlab or Mathematica as their programming language, with course instruction spanning both languages. Topics include loops, data structures, functions and functional programming, randomness, matrices, and string manipulation, plus applications selected from chemistry, statistics, or image processing. Prerequisite: One semester of calculus is recommended but not required.



    Credits: 3
  
  • STAT 3250 - Data Analysis with Python


    This course provides an introduction to data analysis using the Python programming language. Topics include using the IPython development environment; data analysis packages NumPy and pandas; data loading, storage, cleaning, merging, transformation, and aggregation; data plotting and visualization and time series data.  No prior experience with programming or statistics is required.



    Credits: 3
  
  • STAT 3430 - Statistical Computing with SAS and R


    The course covers database management, programming, elementary statistical analysis, and report generation in SAS. Topics include: managing SAS Data Sets; DATA-step programming; data summarization and reporting using PROCs PRINT, MEANS, FREQ, UNIVARIATE, CORR, and REG; elementary graphics; introductions to the Output Delivery System, the SAS Macro language, PROC IML, and PROC SQL. Conceptual discussion in lectures is supplemented with hands-on practice in applied data-analysis tasks using SAS or R statistical software. Prerequisite: Introductory statistics course



    Credits: 4
  
  • STAT 3480 - Nonparametric and Rank-Based Statistics


    This course includes an overview of parametric vs. nonparametric methods including one-sample, two-sample, and k-sample methods; pair comparison and block designs; tests for trends and association; multivariate tests; analysis of censored data; bootstrap methods; multifactor experiments; and smoothing methods. Prerequisite: STAT 1120 or STAT 2120



    Credits: 3
  
  • STAT 3980 - Applied Statistics Laboratory


    Enrollment in STAT LAB (3980) is required for all students in the department’s 3000-level appled statistics courses (STAT 3080, 3220, 3430, 3130). STAT 3980 may be repeated for credit provided that a student is enrolled in at least one of these 3000-level applied courses; however, no more than one unit of STAT 3980 may be taken in any semester.



    Credits: 1
  
  • STAT 4160 - Experimental Design


    Credits: 3
  
  • STAT 4170 - Financial Time Series and Forecasting


    This course introduces topics in time series analysis as they relate to financial data. Topics include properties of financial data, moving average and ARMA models, exponential smoothing, ARCH and GARCH models, volatility models, case studies in linear time series, high frequency financial data, and value at risk.



    Credits: 3
  
  • STAT 4210 - Big Data Tools


    This course provides an introduction to tools use for the management and analysis of big data, including Hadoop (MapReduce), parallel computing, cloud computing, and web scraping for data acquisition. Several projects are incorporated into the course.



    Credits: 3
  
  • STAT 4220 - Applied Analytics for Business


    This course focuses on applying data analytic techniques to business, including customer analytics, business analytics, and web analytics through mining of social media and other online data. Several projects are incorporated into the course.



    Credits: 3
  
  • STAT 4260 - Databases


    This course provides an introduction to databases. Topics include traditional relational databases and SQL (Structured Query Language) for retrieving information from them, and several noSQL databases built on different organizational structures, such as PostgreSQL (an open source relational database), MongoDB and CouchDB (key-document), Redis (key-value), HBase (column family), and Neo4J (graphs).



    Credits: 3
  
  • STAT 4310 - Data Visualization and Presentation


    Credits: 3
  
  • STAT 4630 - Statistical Machine Learning


    Introduces various topics in machine learning, including regression, classification, resampling methods, linear model selection and regularization, tree-based methods, support vector machines, and unsupervised learning. The statistical software R is incorporated throughout. Prerequisite: STAT 3220, STAT 5120, or ECON 3720, and previous experience with R.



    Credits: 3
  
  • STAT 4993 - Independent Study


    Reading and study programs in areas of interest to individual students. For students interested in topics not covered in regular courses. Students must obtain a faculty advisor to approve and direct the program.



    Credits: 1 to 4
  
  • STAT 4995 - Statistical Consulting


    Introduces the practice of statistical consultation. A combination of formal lectures, meetings with clients of the statistical consulting service, and sessions in the statistical computing laboratory. Students will work together with a graduate student consultant. Prerequisite: instructor permission.



    Credits: 1 to 3
  
  • STAT 4996 - Capstone


    Students will work in teams on a capstone project. The project will involve significant data preparation and analysis of data, preparation of a comprehensive project report, and presentation of results. Many projects will come from external clients who have data analysis challenges.



    Credits: 3

Studio Art

  
  • ARTS 1000 - Drawing at Sea I


    This course will focus on the fundamentals of drawing: visual perception, elements of line, gesture, proportion, spatial relationships, scale, value, and texture. It is intended for beginning students. During the semester, students will develop a range of skills that will enable them to hone their observational sensibilities and then apply them to their work.



    Credits: 3
  
  • ARTS 1010 - Drawing at Sea II


    This course is intended for students who have previously completed a college level drawing class (either Introduction to Drawing or Introduction to Figure Drawing). Building on the principles of basic drawing, students will further investigate drawing from observation and creating the illusion of 3-dimensional form and space on a 2-dimensional surface.



    Credits: 3
  
  • ARTS 1220 - Intro to Digital Media at Sea


    The course will be an introduction to digital imagery, using photography as the source for creative manipulation in Adobe Photoshop. At the beginning of the semester, questions about how to use one’s camera skillfully, how to compose an interesting photograph, how to interpret and to evaluate work will be addressed.



    Credits: 3
  
  • ARTS 1710 - Intro to Painting at Sea


    Designed for beginning painters, the course will introduce students to color theory, color mixing, and color application. It aims to improve observational skills in both drawing and painting. Students will experiment with composition and collage construction.



    Credits: 3
  
  • ARTS 2110 - Introduction to Photography I


    Focuses on gaining a working understanding of black and white photo processes and, most importantly, opening up a dialogue about photography. Class assignments help students understand the visual language of photography using 35mm film and printing in the darkroom. In addition, lectures explore examples from the historical and contemporary worlds of fine art photography and readings range from art and philosophy to science. Prereq: ARTS 2610



    Credits: 3
  
  • ARTS 2112 - Introduction to Photography II


    Building off of 2110, this course offers an introduction to color photography, digital printing methods, and medium format cameras. Advanced skills are demonstrated and practiced with the goal of increasing the quality of the work. Further explorations into historical and contemporary art issues via presentations, visiting artists, and readings increase awareness. Students create a final portfolio. Prerequisite: ARTS 2110



    Credits: 3
  
  • ARTS 2220 - Introduction to New Media I


    This class introduces digital techniques in the context of fine art. Topics covered include digital imaging and basic interactive art. Prerequisite: ARTS 2610.



    Credits: 3
  
  • ARTS 2222 - Introduction to New Media II


    Building on the skills and concepts established in ARTS 2220, this class introduces animation techniques in the context of fine arts. Prerequisite: ARTS 2220.



    Credits: 3
  
  • ARTS 2310 - Installation and Performance Art I


    This course introduces new art genres including installation, performance, and video documentation to the student’s art practice. Includes contemporary Art History, theory, and the creation of art made with non-traditional materials, methods and formats. Prerequisite: ARTS 2610



    Credits: 3
  
  • ARTS 2312 - Installation and Performance Art II


    Prerequisite: ARTS 2310.



    Credits: 3
  
  • ARTS 2370 - Introduction to Cinematography I


    The course introduces experimental 16mm film production as a practice of visual art. These courses include technical, historical, and theoretical issues that apply to cinematography and its relationship to the traditional visual arts. Prerequisite: ARTS 2610.



    Credits: 3
  
  • ARTS 2372 - Introduction to Cinematography II


    Prerequisite: ARTS 2370



    Credits: 3
  
  • ARTS 2511 - Special Topics in Photography


    This course will focus on the topic of documentary photography, a working style that combines accurate depiction with impassioned advocacy, usually with the goal of arousing public commitment to social change. Since the 1980s this mode has expanded to include formal and iconographical investigation of social experience with a counterstain of personal images. This class will use digital photography to develop projects and portfolios.



    Credits: 3
  
  • ARTS 2560 - Special Topics in Printmaking


    An introduction to the specialized materials, methods, processes, and cultural issues as they relate to the history and practice of Printmaking



    Credits: 3 to 4
  
  • ARTS 2570 - Special Topics in Painting


    Students are introduced to specialized materials, methods and cultural issues as they relate to painting.



    Credits: 3
  
  • ARTS 2580 - Special Topics in Sculpture


    An introduction to the specialized materials, methods, processes, and cultural issues as they relate to the history and practice of Sculpture



    Credits: 3
  
  • ARTS 2610 - Introduction to Drawing I


    Drawing provides students with a foundation of skills, judgement, and observational abilities that are essential to artistic expression. ARTS2000 is required for every Studio Art major and minor and a prerequisite for all other media related courses in Studio Art.



    Credits: 3
  
  • ARTS 2620 - Introduction to Drawing II


    Continuation of ARTS 2610 with projects emphasizing on drawing skills and analytical thinking. The majority of assignments will be concept-based to encourage students to develop individual visual language. Prerequisite: ARTS 2610.



    Credits: 3
  
  • ARTS 2630 - Life Drawing I


    Creations of drawings of a living model in various media. Topics include artistic anatomy, figure and portrait drawing. Prerequisite: ARTS 2610.



    Credits: 3
  
  • ARTS 2632 - Life Drawing II


    Creations of drawings of a living model in various media. Topics include artistic anatomy, figure and portrait drawing. Prerequisite: ARTS 2610.



    Credits: 3
  
  • ARTS 2670 - Introduction to Printmaking I


    Introduction to basic black and white etching techniques, basic black and white plate lithography, and techniques of stone lithography. Printmaking professors and course content vary from semester to semester. Prerequisite: ARTS 2610 and either ARTS 2620, ARTS 2630, or ARTS 2632.



    Credits: 3
  
  • ARTS 2672 - Introduction to Printmaking II


    Prerequisite: ARTS 2670.



    Credits: 3
  
  • ARTS 2710 - Introduction to Painting I


    Introduction to basic water painting techniques and materials (including acrylic, gouache, and water color), emphasizing perception and color. Assignments are designed to assist the student in understanding the creative process and interpreting the environment through a variety of subject matter expressed in painted images. Encourages individual stylistic development. Prerequisite: ARTS 2610 and either ARTS 2620, ARTS 2630, or ARTS 2632.



    Credits: 3
  
  • ARTS 2712 - Introduction to Painting II


    Prerequisite: ARTS 2710.



    Credits: 3
  
  • ARTS 2810 - Introduction to Sculpture I


    Investigates the sculptural process through modeling, carving, fabricating and casting. Examines traditional and contemporary concerns of sculpture by analyzing historical examples and work done in class. Prerequisite: ARTS 2610 and either ARTS 2620, ARTS 2630, or ARTS 2632.



    Credits: 3
  
  • ARTS 2812 - Introduction to Sculpture II


    Prerequisite: ARTS 2810.



    Credits: 3
  
  • ARTS 3110 - Intermediate Photography I


    Expands technical possibilities available to students by introducing large format cameras. Class time involves evaluating work in progress, slide presentations (sometimes by students as research projects) or discussion of reading material. Students create a final portfolio from assignments. Cameras provided. Prerequisite: ARTS 2110 and ARTS 2112



    Credits: 3
  
  • ARTS 3112 - Intermediate Photography II


    Explores intermediate-level photographic techniques and concepts. Specific course content varies according to faculty. (Spring only). Prerequisite: ARTS 2110 and ARTS 2112.



    Credits: 3
  
  • ARTS 3220 - Intermediate New Media Part I


    This class continues the investigation of digital art begun in ARTS 2220 and 2222 through the introduction of experimental video history and techniques. Prerequisite: ARTS 2220 and ARTS 2222.



    Credits: 3
  
  • ARTS 3222 - Intermediate New Media II


    This class focuses primarily on creative and conceptual development within the technical and artistic framework established in previous semesters. Prerequisite: ARTS 2220 and ARTS 2222.



    Credits: 3
  
  • ARTS 3370 - Intermediate Cinematography I


    This course continues the practice of 16mm experimental film production with an increased emphasis on audio and digital video motion picture making. Student will complete assignments based on genres of experimental film making such as expressionism, naturalism, and realism. Prerequisite: ARTS 2370 and ARTS 2372.



    Credits: 3
  
  • ARTS 3372 - Intermediate Cinematography II


    Prerequisite: ARTS 2370 and ARTS 2372.



    Credits: 3
  
  • ARTS 3670 - Intermediate Printmaking I


    Includes relief printing, advanced lithography techniques, including color lithography, color etching, monotypes, and further development of black and white imagery. Printmaking professors and course content vary from semester to semester. Prerequisite: ARTS 2670 and ARTS 2672.



    Credits: 3
  
  • ARTS 3672 - Intermediate Printmaking II


    Prerequisite: ARTS 2670, 2672.



    Credits: 3
  
  • ARTS 3710 - Intermediate Painting I


    Exploration of contemporary painting materials, techniques, and concepts, as well as a continuation of basic oil painting processes. Assignments are designed to assist the student in developing their perceptions and imagination and translating them into painted images. Direction is given to the formation of personal original painting styles. Prerequisite: ARTS 2710, 2712.



    Credits: 3
  
  • ARTS 3712 - Intermediate Painting II


    Prerequisite: ARTS 2710, 2712.



    Credits: 3
  
  • ARTS 3810 - Sculpture I


    Continuation of ARTS 2810 and ARTS 2812 with greater emphasis on the special problems of the sculptural discipline. Prerequisite: ARTS 2810, 2812.



    Credits: 3
  
  • ARTS 3812 - Sculpture II


    Prerequisite: ARTS 2810, 2812.



    Credits: 3
  
  • ARTS 4110 - Advanced Photography I


    Group study designed to assist students in preparing their required thesis exhibitions. Meets twice a week as a group to evaluate and discuss work in progress. (Fall only.) Prerequisite: ARTS 3110 or ARTS 3112.



    Credits: 3
  
  • ARTS 4112 - Advanced Photography II


    Assists students in preparing their required thesis exhibitions. Meets twice a week as a group to evaluate and discuss work in progress. Students participate in class portfolio and acquire a print from each member of the class. One becomes part of the University collection. Graduating fourth-year students are expected to complete a quality slide portfolio, resume, and artist statement in conjunction with the thesis exhibition. (Spring only) Prerequisite: ARTS 3110 or ARTS 3112.



    Credits: 3
  
  • ARTS 4220 - Advanced New Media I


    This class encourages independent development of a semester long project that engages with the discourses and techniques around contemporary new media art. Prerequisite: ARTS 3220 or ARTS 3222.



    Credits: 3
  
  • ARTS 4222 - Advanced New Media II


    A continuation of artistic investigations begun in ARTS 4220. Prerequisite: ARTS 3220 or ARTS 3222.



    Credits: 3
  
  • ARTS 4370 - Advanced Cinematography I


    Course continues the practice of 16mm film or digital video experimental production with an emphasis on a completed piece for public screenings or exhibitions. Prerequisite: ARTS 3370 or ARTS 3372.



    Credits: 3
  
  • ARTS 4372 - Advanced Cinematography II


    Prerequisite: ARTS 3370 or ARTS 3372.



    Credits: 3
  
  • ARTS 4450 - Distinguished Major Project


    Intensive independent work using either sculpture, photography, printmaking, cinematography, or painting as the primary medium, culminating in a coherent body of work under direction of a faculty member. Prerequisite: Admission to the Distinguished Major Program.



    Credits: 3
  
  • ARTS 4452 - Distinguished Major Project


    Intensive independent work using either sculpture, photography, printmaking, cinematography, or painting as the primary medium, culminating in a coherent body of work under direction of a faculty member. Prerequisite: Admission to the Distinguished Major Program. ARTS 4450 Prerequisite: Admission to the Distinguished Major Program.



    Credits: 3
  
  • ARTS 4670 - Advanced Problems in Printmaking


    Designed for students who have completed two or more semesters of study of a specific printmaking technique (woodcut, etching, or lithography) and wish to continue their exploration of that technique. Prerequisite: ARTS 3670 or 3672.



    Credits: 3
  
  • ARTS 4672 - Advanced Problems in Printmaking


    Prerequisite: ARTS 3670 or 3672.



    Credits: 3
  
  • ARTS 4710 - Advanced Painting I


    The capstone of a three year study in painting. Continues the investigation of oil painting as an expressive medium and stresses the development of students’ ability to conceive and execute a series of thematically related paintings over the course of the semester. Painting professors and course content vary from semester to semester. Prerequisite: ARTS 3710 or 3712.



    Credits: 3
  
  • ARTS 4712 - Advanced Painting II


    Painting professors and course content vary from semester to semester. Prerequisite: ARTS 3710 or ARTS 3712.



    Credits: 3
  
  • ARTS 4810 - Advanced Sculpture I


    Continuation of the sculpture sequence with greater emphasis on developing a student’s individual voice. Advanced projects in moldmaking, metal casting, and non-traditional sculpture materials are assigned. The creation of a sculptural installation is also assigned. Sculpture professors and course content vary from semester to semester. Prerequisite: ARTS 3810 or 3812.



    Credits: 3
  
  • ARTS 4812 - Advanced Sculpture II


    Prerequisite: ARTS 3810 or 3812.



    Credits: 3
  
  • ARTS 4900 - Advanced Project in Art


    Investigation and development of a consistent idea or theme in painting, sculpture, or the graphic arts. May be taken more than once under the same course number by students who are sufficiently advanced in studio work. This course is not intended to be used for major credit. Prerequisite: Instructor permission.



    Credits: 1 to 4

Swahili

  
  • SWAH 1010 - Introductory Swahili I


    Prerequisite: limited or no previous knowledge of Swahili.



    Credits: 3
  
  • SWAH 1020 - Introductory Swahili II


    Prerequisite: SWAH 1010.



    Credits: 3
  
  • SWAH 2010 - Intermediate Swahili I


    Develops skills of speaking, listening, reading and writing, and awareness of the cultural diversity of the Swahili-speaking areas of East Africa. Readings drawn from a range of literary and journalistic materials. Prerequisite: SWAH 1020



    Credits: 3
  
  • SWAH 2020 - Intermediate Swahili II


    Further develops skills of speaking, listening, reading and writing, and awareness of the cultural diversity of the Swahili-speaking areas of East Africa. Readings drawn from a range of literary and journalistic materials.



    Credits: 3

Systems & Information Engineering

  
  • SYS 2001 - Systems Engineering Concepts


    Three major dimensions of systems engineering will be covered, and their efficacy demonstrated through case studies: (1) The history, philosophy, art, and science upon which systems engineering is grounded; including guiding principles and steps in the ‘systems engineering approach’ to problem solving; (2) The basic tools of systems engineering analysis, including; goal definition and system representation, requirements analysis, system assessment and evaluation, mathematical modeling, and decision analysis; and (3) system and project planning and management. Prerequisite: Systems Major; APMA 1110 and 2120.



    Credits: 3
  
  • SYS 2004 - Data Management and Information Management


    Introduces the integration and acquisition of information for decision-making using information technology. Discusses the impact of rapid software and hardware development on information integration, including the essential methodologies of client server and database systems. Topics include client server technology, the design and analysis of relational database systems, exposure to Microsoft Access, and the fourth-generation language SQL. This course is not intended for systems engineering majors. Students may not receive credit for both SYS 2202 and SYS 2004. Prerequisite: CS 1010 or ENGR 1620, or instructor permission



    Credits: 3
  
  • SYS 2048 - Introduction to Electromechanical Systems


    Students are introduced to several engineering subjects in electrical, computer, mechanical, and systems engineering and build integrated systems that combine topics from these disciplines. Primarily hands-on, the course develops practical knowledge of sensor circuits, amplification circuits, dynamic systems, rapid prototyping, micro controllers, and data storage. Projects are designed to draw parallels between engineering subjects. Prerequisite: either ECE 2630, ECE/CS 2330, or MAE 2000; Co-requisites: APMA 2130.



    Credits: 3
  
  • SYS 2054 - Systems Case Studies


    Focuses on the application of systems engineering methodology to an actual, open-ended situation faced by a client. Areas of emphasis will include the identification of system goals, the formulation of requirements and performance measures, the creation and evaluation of alternative solutions, and the presentation of results to clients. When offered abroad, this course also focuses on cutlural differences in engineering and business.



    Credits: 3
  
  • SYS 2055 - Technology Leaders Colloquium


    Students learn about systems integration, technical leadership, innovation, professional development, interdisciplinary teamwork, and the engineering field through a variety of experiences including industry speakers, field trips, student presentations, in-class activities, and projects.



    Credits: 0.5
  
  • SYS 2056 - Technology Leaders Internship Colloquium


    Students learn about systems integration, technical leadership, innovation, professional development, interdisciplinary teamwork, and the engineering field through a variety of experiences including industry speakers, field trips, student presentations, in-class activities, and projects. As distinguished from SYS 2055, students must also complete assignments relating their summer internship work to their field of study.



    Credits: 0.5
  
  • SYS 2057 - Management of E-Commerce Systems


    An introduction to the management, technology and performance assessment of electronic business systems. The course emphasizes the intimate relationship between business planning and technology planning for e-businesses. Details of specific e-commerce technologies will be covered as well as approaches to e-business planning. Topics include: technologies, architectures, and infrastructures; information security and privacy; supply-chain management and customer relationship management; requirements definition and analysis; development lifecycles; customer behaviors; performance models; service metrics; waiting and response times; traffic characteristics; load forecasts and scenarios; resources and costs estimation; risk analysis; optimization; capacity planning; and e-business financial planning and deployment. Prerequisite: CS 1010 or ENGR 1620, or instructor permission.



    Credits: 3
  
  • SYS 2202 - Data and Information Engineering


    This course provides students with the background necessary to model, store, manipulate, and exchange information to support decision making. It covers Unified Modeling Language (UML), SQL, and XML; the development of semantic models for describing data and their relationships; effective use of SQL; web-based technologies for disseminating information; and application of these technologies through web-enabled database systems. Prerequisite: Systems Major; SYS 2001 and  CS 2110, or Instructor Permission



    Credits: 3
  
  • SYS 2501 - Special Topics in Systems and Information Engineering


    A second-year level undergraduate course focused on a topic not normally covered in the course offerings. The topic usually reflects new developments in the systems and information engineering field. Offering is based on student and faculty interests. Prerequisites: Instructor Permission



    Credits: 1 to 3
  
  • SYS 2502 - Special Topics in Systems and Information Engineering


    A second-year level undergraduate course focused on a topic not normally covered in the course offerings. The topic usually reflects new developments in the systems and information engineering field. Offering is based on student and faculty interests. Prerequisites: Instructor Permission



    Credits: 1 to 3
  
  • SYS 2620 - Engineered Systems Public Policy


    This course examines the lifecycle of engineered systems (ES) and the public policies developed to regulate them. It covers risks, costs, benefits, and equity as common evaluation criteria for ES and their regulatory policies. It uses case studies from current events and basic tools of decision analysis to enable students to critically evaluate the tradeoffs involved in developing and regulating ES through public policy. Prerequisite: STS 1500, APMA 1110, CHEM 1410, PHYS 1610



    Credits: 3
  
  • SYS 3001 - The Art and Science of Systems Modeling


    This course will introduce the students to the systemic process of model building and to the richness of the plethora of classes of models, spanning linear vs. nonlinear; static vs. dynamic; deterministic vs. probabilistic; discrete vs. continuous; single-objective vs. multi-objective. In particular, the central role of state space and state variables in system modeling will be the focus of model building. All models developed in class will be introduced with example problems and the students’ learning experience in model building will be codified through group homework assignments, exams and a term project.



    Credits: 3
  
  • SYS 3021 - Deterministic Decision Models


    Introduction to deterministic optimization models: theory, algorithms, and applications. Coverage begins with highly structured network optimization models (e.g. shortest path models) and ends with unstructured linear optimization models (e.g. linear programing and integer programming). Applications include (1) telecommunications network planning and design, (2) design and utilization of transportation and distribution networks, and (3) project management and scheduling. Prerequisite: SYS 2001; corequisite: APMA 3080.



    Credits: 3
  
  • SYS 3023 - Human Machine Interface


    An introduction to the fundamentals for the analysis, design and evaluation of human-centered systems. For example, user interaction can be designed to leverage the strengths of people in controlling automation and analyzing data. Course topics include Task, User and Work Domain Analysis, User Interface Design Principles, Human Cognition and Information Processing (Top-Down Design), Human Perception (Bottom-Up Design), and Usability Testing. Prerequisite: SYS 2001 and major in Systems Engineering



    Credits: 3
  
  • SYS 3034 - System Evaluation


    Focuses on the evaluation of candidate system designs and design performance measures. Includes identification of system goals; requirements and performance measures; design of experiments for performance evaluation; techniques of decision analysis for trade-studies (ranking of alternatives); presentation of system evaluation and analysis results. Illustrates the concepts and processes of systems evaluations using case studies. Prerequisite: APMA 3120, SYS 2001, 3021, and major in systems engineering.



    Credits: 3
  
  • SYS 3048 - Integrated Systems Design


    In this project-based course, students synthesize domain-specific knowledge from several engineering disciplines to produce integrated systems. Problems are approached utilizing both a top-down integration approach and a bottom-up component approach, and substantial focus is put on the interactions and interfaces between system components. Students get hands-on experience with prototyping, design evaluation, and iterative design. Prerequisite: SYS 2001, SYS 2048 and MAE 4710.



    Credits: 3
  
  • SYS 3054 - Systems Case Studies


    Focuses on the application of systems engineering methodology to an actual, open-ended situation faced by a client. Areas of emphasis will include the identification of system goals, the formulation of requirements and performance measures, the creation and evaluation of alternative solutions, and the presentation of results to clients. When offered abroad, this course also focuses on cultural differences in engineering and business. Prerequisites: SYS 2001, APMA 3100, APMA 3110, APMA 3120, or instructor permission.



    Credits: 3
  
  • SYS 3055 - Systems Engineering Design Colloquium I


    Students learn about the practice of systems engineering directly from practicing systems engineers. A variety of topics are covered by invited speakers from industry, government, and the academy (many of whom are alumni of our undergraduate program). Discussions include engineering design projects, alternative career paths, graduate studies, professional development and advancement strategies, and more immediate options and opportunities for summer internships and capstone projects. Prerequisite: Third-year standing in systems engineering.



    Credits: 1
  
  • SYS 3060 - Stochastic Decision Models


    Introduction to mathematical modeling of forecasts and decisions under uncertainty using principles of statistical decision theory; judgmental and Bayesian techniques for probabilistic forecasting; forecast verification methods; static and sequential decision models for quality control, inventory control, queue management, hazard warnings; and economic, investment, and weather-sensitive decisions. Prerequisite: APMA 3100 and 3120, or instructor permission.



    Credits: 3
  
  • SYS 3062 - Discrete Event Simulation


    A first course in the theory and practice of discrete-event simulation. Monte Carlo methods, generating random numbers and variates, spreadsheet add-ins and applications, sampling distributions and confidence intervals, input analysis and distribution fitting. Discrete-event dynamic systems, modeling, simulation logic and data structures, output analysis, model verification and validation, comparing alternative systems, simulation optimization, case studies. Applications span communication, computer, distribution, health-care, manufacturing, service, and transportation systems. Modern simulation software tools, including animation. Prerequisite: CS 2110, APMA 3100, 3120, and major in systems engineering.



    Credits: 4
  
  • SYS 3501 - Special Topics in Systems and Information Engineering


    A third-year level undergraduate course focused on a topic not normally covered in the course offerings. The topic usually reflects new developments in the systems and information engineering field. Offering is based on student and faculty interests. Prerequisites: Instructor Permission



    Credits: 1 to 4
  
  • SYS 3502 - Special Topics in Systems and Information Engineering


    A third-year level undergraduate course focused on a topic not normally covered in the course offerings. The topic usually reflects new developments in the systems and information engineering field. Offering is based on student and faculty interests. Prerequisites: Instructor Permission



    Credits: 0.5 to 3
 

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