Skip to Navigation
    University of Virginia
   
 
  Nov 19, 2017
 
 
    
Undergraduate Record 2006-2007 [ARCHIVED RECORD]

Biomedical Engineering


Return to School of Engineering and Applied Science Return to: School of Engineering and Applied Science

Program Objective Our objective is to impart the knowledge and skills students need to excel during graduate training in biomedical engineering, medicine, law, business, or other disciplines; establish a fulfilling career in industry; contribute in areas that rely on their unique integrative abilities; and ultimately become society’s leaders.

Program Description Biomedical engineering is built upon the premise that the tools and methods of engineering can be used to improve human health and enhance our understanding of the biological world. Biomedical engineering education integrates mathematics, science, engineering methodology, and engineering design to train individuals who are uniquely prepared for the collaborative challenges of this field. The end result of this type of training is knowledge, devices, materials, techniques and treatments to enhance human health. The foundation for these applications is the steady stream of discovery emerging from our nation’s academic and industrial research programs.

The Department of Biomedical Engineering (BME) has offered degrees at the master’s and doctoral level since 1967. BME introduced a new bachelor’s of science degree in biomedical engineering in 2003. The major begins with an early, sound underpinning in the life sciences via two semesters of quantitative mammalian physiology and one semester of cell and molecular biology. Engineering fundamentals follow, taught in the context of biomedical engineering examples in systems analysis, biomechanics and biotransport, and computational systems. In the 3rd year BME majors complete a two-semester IDEAS Lab, integrating concepts and skills from prior BME and other engineering course work. The BME major culminates in the 4th year with a capstone design project where students undertake a year-long “design-and-build” or “design-of-experiment” project. Throughout all four years, electives offer additional breadth and depth.

Exceptionally prepared students can graduate in five years with both a B.S. and an M.S. in biomedical engineering. These students should plan early to design a senior thesis topic that can continue on to a master’s of science thesis. Students interested in this option are strongly urged to plan early in their 3rd year and discuss this plan with appropriate faculty in biomedical engineering.

The department encourages students to participate in research and inquiry-based learning above and beyond what is required by the curriculum. In the past students have pursued paid or volunteer positions in research labs, “for-credit” independent research projects, and industry or research internships. Research areas in the department include tissue engineering and genetic engineering targeting vascular disease; adhesion biomechanics, molecular bioengineering, cellular mechanics, and vascular remodeling; cellular mechanisms of wound healing; biomechanics; bioelectricity; biotransport; cardiovascular, respiratory, orthopedic, and neurological systems; and medical imaging, particularly ultrasound, X-ray, and MR imaging. Interdepartmental research collaboration links BME with most other School of Engineering and Applied Science departments and many clinical and basic science departments in the School of Medicine and the College of Arts and Sciences.

Biomedical engineers contribute to society from positions in universities, hospitals, government, the medical device and pharmaceutical industries, and a broad range of research enterprises. As the discipline grows, BME graduates are finding that their broad education provides an excellent platform from which to launch rewarding careers; begin graduate studies in biomedical engineering, biotechnology, or biophysics; or pursue advanced degrees in medicine, law, and business.

Because of the great demand for the biomedical engineering major and the need to maintain an excellent laboratory experience for each student, enrollment in the program is limited to 60 students per year. Admission is based on space availability, academic performance, a personal essay, and diversity. Application forms are available in the department office (Room 2010) in the Biomedical Engineering and Medical Science Building (MR5) in the School of Medicine, on the department website, and in the Office of the Associate Dean for Undergraduate Programs (Room A-122) of Thornton Hall.

Minor


The department also offers an undergraduate minor in conjunction with any of the majors in the School of Engineering and Applied Science. The 18-credit minor in biomedical engineering consists of BIOM 201 and 204, plus 4 approved electives that may include BIOM 310, 315, 322, 406, 411, 428, 441, 483, 484, 490, 495, 496, CHE 347, and MSE 512. One elective may be chosen from BIOM 202 or BIOL 301, 309, 417, 465, or 501.

Biomedical Engineering Curriculum (126 credits)


Second Semester Credits: 17


  • Science elective I Credits: 3
    Chosen from: BIOL 201, BIOL 202 (if premed), CHEM 152, ECE 200, & MSE 209.
  • HSS elective Credits: 3
    Chosen from the approved list available in A122 Thornton Hall.

Third Semester Credits: 17


  • PHYS 241L - General Physics Lab I Credits: 1
  • Unrestricted elective Credits: 3
    (See footnote 3 below)

Fourth Semester Credits: 15


  • STS ___ STS 2xx, 3xx elective Credits: 3

Fifth Semester Credits: 16


  • HSS elective Credits: 3
    (See footnote 2 below)
  • Engineering elective Credits: 3
    (See footnote 4 below)
  • Technical elective Credits: 3
    (See footnote 5 below)

Sixth Semester Credits: 16


  • Unrestricted elective Credits: 3
    (See footnote 3 below)
  • Engineering elective Credits: 3
    (See footnote 4 below)
  • Technical elective Credits: 3
    (See footnote 5 below)

Seventh Semester Credits: 15


  • HSS elective Credits: 3
    (See footnote 2 below)
  • Unrestricted elective Credits: 3
    (See footnote 3 below)
  • BIOM elective Credits: 3
    (See footnote 6 below)

Eighth Semester Credits: 15


  • Unrestrictive elective Credits: 3
    (See footnote 3 below)
  • BIOM elective Credits: 3
    (See footnote 6 below)
  • Bioengineering elective Credits: 3
    (See footnote 7 below)

Footnotes


(1)    Chosen from:  BIOL 201, BIOL 202 (if premed), CHEM 152, ECE 200, & MSE 209.

(2)    Chosen from the approved list available in A122 Thornton Hall.

(3)    Chosen from any graded course in the University except mathematics courses below MATH 131 and courses that substantially duplicate any others offered for the degree, including PHYS 201, 202; CS 110, 120; or any intro programming course.  APMA 109 counts as a 3-credit unrestricted elective.

(4)    200-level or higher engineering courses in a single area of concentration.  One course is usually, but not always, a prerequisite for the other.  A list of suggested course sequences is available in MR5 2010 (BME main office)

(5)    Chosen from any 200-level or higher science, math, or engineering course, unless it is a course for non-science majors, it duplicates required BME class work, or it is a “research-for-credit” or “capstone design” course.  Only 3 credits from the BIOL 201-202 (or AP credit) sequence will count as a tech elective.

(6)    Chosen from any 300-level or higher BIOM elective, except BIOM 411.  Only 3 credits of BIOM 453, 454 will count as either a BIOM or Bioengineering elective.

(7)    Chosen from an approved list of engineering electives, 300-level or higher, with a substantial bioengineering component.  Typically chosen from MSE 512, CHE 347, CHE 448, or any 300-level or higher BIOM 453, 454 will count as either a BIOM or Bioengineering elective.

Return to School of Engineering and Applied Science Return to: School of Engineering and Applied Science