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    University of Virginia
   
 
  Oct 20, 2017
 
 
    
Undergraduate Record 2017-2018

East Asian Languages, Literatures and Culture


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The Major and Minor in East Asian Studies


The East Asian Studies major is an interdisciplinary major featuring a language core in DEALLC and additional coursework in both DEALLC and other departments. Not all concentration courses must be from within DEALLC. For instance, a course on Buddhism in Religious Studies would count towards the major. Current lists of possible concentration courses are on the DEALLC website. Students are also encouraged to take DEALLC and related courses outside their country concentration.

The Major in East Asian Studies


Prerequisites:

  • An average grade of C- or higher for the first two years of DEALLC language instruction.

Requirements:

  • 30 credits in DEAL-LC and related courses, including courses in the selected country concentration, with the
  • 1020/1060-level in a DEALLC language. A grade of C- or higher must be earned each semester;
  • at least 18 credits with the following distribution:
  • 3 credits in EAST 1010;
  • 3 credits in an East Asian History (HIEA) course;
  • 3 credits in an East Asian Humanities (Art History, Architectural History, Literature, Religion) course;
  • 3 credits in an East Asian Social Science (Anthropology, Economics, Politics, Studies in Women and Gender) course;
  • 6 credits of elective courses with East Asian content;
  • a maximum of 6 transfer credits can be used to satisfy the 18 credit requirement;
  • students are reminded that credits applied toward a minor cannot count toward a major

Following distribution:

  • 6 credits at the 3010 and 3020 level of Chinese, Japanese, Korean, or Tibetan, with the average grade of C or higher for the first two years of language instruction; language courses above the 3000 level count toward the 30 credits in the major; language courses below the 3000 level count toward university language requirements;
  • 3 credits in EAST 1010;
  • 3 credits in an East Asian History (HIEA) course (a second course is also strongly recommended.);
  • 3 credits in an East Asian Humanities (Art History, Architectural History, Literature, Religious Studies) course;
  • 3 credits in an East Asian Social Sciences (Anthropology, Economics, Politics, Studies in Women and Gender) course;
  • 3 credits of a capstone course in a 3000- or 4000- level course in which a research paper is written using the students’ target East Asian language materials; the capstone requirement form is available under “Forms” at http://eastasian.virginia.edu/programs/forms
  • 9 credits of elective courses with East Asian content;
  • Students who intend to double major are reminded that only 6 credits may be counted towards both majors; for single majors, 9 of the 30 non-language credits must come from a single academic department
  • students are reminded that USEM credits do not count toward major requirements;

A maximum of 15 study abroad and domestic transfer credits are allowed, with the permission of the major advisor; students in this major must maintain a satisfactory grade point in the major and related courses each semester, defined as an average of C (i.e., 2.0); students not maintaining this average grade point are subject to discontinuation from the major. 

The Major in Chinese Languages and Literatures


The major in Chinese language and literature prepares students to handle a wide array of Chinese language materials and to communicate in Chinese on a broad array of topics with a robust of modern and classical Chinese language courses. The literature curriculum features many of the high points of China’s literary past and present in English translation, from the ancient The Book of Odes to classic poems of Tang and Song dynasties, classic fiction like Journey to the West and Dream of the Red Chamber, to modern works like Mao Dun’s Rainbow, Eileen Chang’s Love in a Fallen City, and Yu Hua’s To Live. Through extensive coverage of language and literary culture, the Chinese major aims to produce students with the skills of cultural literacy and interpretation as well as linguistic proficiency. Students are also encouraged to demonstrate the integration of their skills and knowledge through the translation of literary works into English.

Prerequisites:

The Average grade of C- or higher for the first two years of Chinese language instruction (CHIN 1010-1020, CHIN 2010-2020, including CHIN 2060)

  • East 1010 with a grad of C or higher. 2020/2060 level or above in Chinese language.
  • A grade of C or higher must be earned each semester of language instruction.

Requirements:  30 credits courses with the following distribution:

  • 18 credits must be in Chinese language courses numbered higher than 3000; at the discretion of the student’s advisor
  • 6 credits consisting of two survey courses in Chinese literature  (CHTR 3010 & CHTR 3020)
  • 3 credits in one course introducing classical Chinese (CHIN 4830 or CHIN 4840).
  • 3 credits consisting of a capstone course, a DEALLC seminar at the 3000- or 4000-level in which the student writes a research paper using primary materials in Chinese, or Modern Chinese Literary Translation.
  • a maximum of 15 study abroad credits and domestic transfer credits are allowed at the discretion of the student’s advisor.
  • students in this major must maintain a satisfactory grade point in the  courses that count toward the major, defined as an average of C (i.e., 2.0); students not maintaining this grade point are subject to discontinuation from the major.
  • students who wish to double major are reminded that only two courses may count towards both majors.

The Major in Japanese Language and Literature


The Japanese major provides a distinctive combination of analytical, interpersonal, translingual and transcultural competencies that make students sophisticated and engaged global citizens able to move between languages and cultures in a thoughtful and nuanced manner. The major offers language courses from beginning to advanced levels that develop the ability to read, write, listen and speak effectively in Japanese, as well as connect students with more specialized knowledge in their individual areas of interest, giving them the skills needed to further explore such topics in their own subsequent research or self-study outside the classroom. Students also come to develop an appreciation for contemporary Japanese social and cultural values through their engagement with the language. Content courses on Japanese literature and culture in English provide thematic breadth and historical depth to this understanding by familiarizing students with texts representing more than a millennium of writings including some of the globe’s earliest and most distinguished literary works, and by honing their appreciation of the ways in which the translation and interpretations of these texts are shaped by historical, cultural, social, and linguistic forms of difference.

Prerequisites:

  • The average grade of C- or higher for the first two years of Japanese language instruction (JAPN 1010-1020, JAPN 2010-2020).
  • EAST 1010 with a grade of C or higher.

Requirements:  30 credits with the following distribution:

  • 18 credits must be in Japanese beyond the 2020 level; 3 out of these credits on translation; at the discretion of the student’s advisor, 6 of these credits may be in two non-survey courses on Japanese literature in translation;
  • 6 credits consisting of two survey courses in Japanese literature : JPTR 3010, JPTR 3020.  3 credits in one course introducing the classical form of an East Asian Language (CHIN 4853, CHIN 4854, or JAPN 4710);3
  • 3 credits consisting of a capstone course, a DEALLC seminar at the 3000- or 4000-level in which the student writes a research paper using primary materials in Japanese; the capstone requirement form is available here: http://eastasian.virginia.edu/programs/forms
  • a maximum of 15 study abroad credits and domestic transfer credits are allowed at the discretion of the student’s advisor;
  • students in this major must maintain a satisfactory grade point in  the courses that count toward the major; satisfactory is defined as an average of C (i.e., 2.0); students not maintaining this grade point are subject to discontinuation from the major.
  • students who wish to double-major are reminded that only two courses may count towards both majors

The Distinguished Majors Program


The Distinguished Majors Program in East Asian Languages, Literatures and Cultures offers students with superior and accomplishment an opportunity to do advanced work beyond the ordinary undergraduate level in the form of a thesis based on independent research. DMP is intended for these students students who want to work with tenure-stream faculty in their areas of scholarly expertise. Sources from the target language are an essential component. If a translation is the centerpiece of the thesis, it must be annotated and accompanied by extensive analysis. Theses cannot be counted towards a second major.

To qualify, students must have a grade point average of 3.4 or better, both cumulatively and in the major, at the time of application and graduation. They must also take a two-semester sequence in their final year: EAST 4998-4999 if they are an East Asian Studies major, or EALC 4998-4999 if they are a Chinese or Japanese major. Expectations for completing these courses are described in more detail below.

For FORMS related to the DMP program, please click here. Please note that applications are always due on February 15th

Application and Admission:

Applications are submitted to the Chair of the Department by February 15th in the spring semester of the student’s third year. Materials should include:

1. A page-long proposal for the project that includes:

  • a preliminary title;
  • a brief explanation of: the topic’s significance, how you came to be interested in it, the questions you want to apply to it, and the means by which you will try to answer them;
  • propose 2 readers for your thesis from faculty you have already taken courses with: a primary reader who will submit your final grade for both semesters, and a secondary reader who will participate in your defense of the thesis; be sure to justify your selection sufficiently, as approval is contingent upon the agreement of both readers;
  • a brief description of how the project fits with your post-graduation plans;

2. one writing sample in the form of a research paper from a course that the student has taken;

3. one copy of the student’s most recent transcript. A minimum GPA of 3.4 is required at the time of application.

Grading:

In order to receive full credit for each half of the DMP sequence EALC 4998-4999 in the case of East Asian Languages and Literatures majors, or EAST 4998-4999 in the case of East Asian Studies majors, the following grading criteria are used:

  • EALC/EAST 4998 mid-term grade: based on a bibliography of relevant secondary language materials that briefly describes each entry’s topic, and a detailed description of the nature and sources of the primary materials in the target language that are being used. These should follow an established format with a table of contents that incorporates East Asian script after keywords, bibliographical entries, and other generic conventions particular to the topic under study and the methodology used;
  • EALC/EAST 4998 final grade: based on a research paper (thesis) and an evaluation of all of the secondary scholarship from the bibliography completed in the prior stage;
  • EALC/EAST 4999 final grade: based on a final draft of at least 20 pages incorporating all the feedback from the first and second readers and submitted on May 3.

The Deadline for submitting a bibliography with a Table of Contents in EALC/EAST 4998:  October 30

The Deadline for submitting a working draft of a research paper (thesis) in EALC/EAST 4998:  December 5

The Deadline for submitting a first draft for the thesis in EALC/EAST 4999:  April 1

The Deadline for submitting a final draft of the thesis in EALC/EAST 4999:  May 3

All DMP students are also automatically eligible for the annual Mastercard Fellowship, established by Ms. Rebecca George and Mr. H. Eugene Lockhardt, Jr. to encourage the study of Asia. Receipt of the fellowship is based on merit with a successful candidate showing excellence in language study and creative approaches to topics relating to Asia. The award will go toward the payment of tuition or fees.

Commencement honors of Distinction, High Distinction and Highest Distinction require a minimum GPA of 3.4 as well as timely completion of the DMP senior thesis. Honors are awarded on the basis of overall academic performance as well as at the recommendation of the first and second readers of the thesis.

Study Abroad Programs


Shanghai Chinese Language Program: the UVA-in-Shanghai Intensive Chinese Language Program in the Department of East Asian Languages, Literatures and Cultures at the University of Virginia is hosted by Fudan University.  It is intended to enable students who are serious about studying Chinese language in a total immersion environment to cover a year’s worth of material and to earn 8 UVA credits.  This rigorous, demanding, and rewarding language program allows the student to have first-hand experience using Chinese in real world situations as well as studying and practicing it in the classroom.  For more information, use the “Find a Program” link at http://www.studyabroad.virginia.edu.

UVA in Shanghai: Fudan University is offered through the partnership of University of Virginia, Fudan University, and The Education Abroad Network (TEAN). This program offers students the opportunity to spend a semester or year in Shanghai studying Chinese language for direct UVA credit, while choosing from a variety of English-taught electives for transfer credit.

Students will take a Chinese Language course at Fudan University, which is offered at the Beginner, Intermediate, or Advanced level. The Chinese Language program is designed and guided by DEALLC professor Hsin-hsin Liang, and students will receive direct UVA credit.

Students will take non-language elective courses taught in English for transfer credit. Elective courses are available in areas such as Marketing, Economics, Management, Accounting, Finance, Sociology, Journalism, History and Political Science. Visit the Academics page on the TEAN website for course listings. Students will also have the option to participate in a part-time internship at a multinational or Chinese organization. Please visit the ISO Education Abroad website and select Program Search for detailed information: https://www.programs.studyabroad.virginia.edu/.

Kyoto Consortium for Japanese Studies (KCJS): the University of Virginia joins Harvard, Stanford, the University of Michigan and about a dozen other Ivy Leagues in running KCJS, a well-regarded study abroad program based in Japan’s historic capital city available for one semester, an entire academic year, or the summer, or the combination of the summer and the fall.  KCJS’s summer program offers classical and advanced modern Japanese, details for which can be found on the website below.  The program requires students to have two full years of college-level Japanese language coursework as a prerequisite, and it works to improve students’ language abilities through small-group instruction tailored to each student’s ability level. Content courses on Japan in the social sciences and humanities are also offered and are typically taught in English. KCJS also facilitates daily use of the language outside the classroom by placing all students who want to take advantage of this opportunity with host families and the community. For more information on the program, application deadlines, and financial aid opportunities, please visit  www.ogp.columbia.edu.  

The Inter-University Program for Chinese Language Studies (IUP) is also a consortia program jointly administered by the 14 North American universities distinguished in Chinese studies. Established in Taipei, Taiwan in 1963, IUP has for more than a half century been the gold standard for advanced Chinese instruction, and attracts more graduate and professional school students with China-related career plans than any other language program. Located at Tsinghua University in Beijing since 1997, IUP is headquartered at the University of California at Berkeley. The University of Virginia joined the consortium in 2010. IUP is a purely language instruction program with a proficiency threshold for admission of approximately the completion of third year college-level Chinese. Students are in classes no larger than 3, with daily one-on-one sessions, and enjoy a student-teacher ratio well under 2:1. The basic program is one academic year, but qualified students may attend for the summer, fall, or spring terms only, or any combination thereof. For application, fees, schedule, and other program information, please visit http://ieas.berkeley.edu/iup/.

In addition to study abroad programs administered by U.Va., students are encouraged to develop their language skills at the many other study-abroad programs that are available throughout East Asia. Please note that in order to receive transfer credit for language courses offered at such programs, students must first consult with our faculty and the International Studies Office in Minor Hall.

Scholarships


East Asia Center Scholarship: A generous endowment from the Weedon family allows the East Asia Center to award travel grants to undergraduates enrolled in language programs in East Asia as well as research travel grants to graduate students and faculty. Applications are due in mid-March.

Mastercard Asian Studies Scholarship: This scholarship is awarded annually to a rising fourth-year major in Asian Studies, be it in the East Asian Studies Major or Chinese or Japanese Language and Literature. To be competitive, students applying for this scholarship should also be applying for the Distinguished Majors Program. This scholarship is in the amount of approximately $4000 for tuition, and it carries with it the possibility to apply for a paid summer internship with Mastercard. Unless we are informed otherwise, we assume that all applicants for the DMP are also applying for this scholarship.

Centers and Programs


Arts and Sciences Center for Instructional Technology (ASCIT): A resource containing many audio-visual materials which are used to help bring the culture surrounding our different languages alive for students. It is conveniently located in Cabell Hall along with most DEALLC classrooms and offices. The language laboratory is used to help students practice and reinforce their speaking and listening skills.

East Asia Center: For more than thirty years the East Asia Center has promoted activities and events that enhance the study of East Asia at the University of Virginia. The Center sponsors more than twenty lectures and other events each year. It also manages graduate programs granting an M.A., in East Asian Studies as well as an MA/MBA in conjunction with the Darden School of Business.

For a comprehensive list of funding available for study abroad, please visit the East Asia Center website, www.virginia.edu/eastasia.

Additional Information


For more information, contact DEALLC@virginia.edu; http://eastasian.virginia.edu.

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