Jun 20, 2019  
Graduate Record 2007-2008 
    
Graduate Record 2007-2008 [ARCHIVED RECORD]

Accelerated Master’s Degree in Systems and Information Engineering


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The Accelerated Master’s Degree in Systems and Information Engineering is designed to enable working professionals to become systems thinkers and problem solvers through a unique blend of formal education integrated with personal work experience. Responding to the needs of industry and individuals alike, this one-year Accelerated Master’s Program enables professionals to earn their degrees without career interruption.

The program’s focus is on information proficiency, systems thinking and decision analytics. The curriculum introduces and explores systems methodologies through real-world case studies firmly focused on problem-solving using both analytical and theoretical modeling approaches throughout.

Taught by full-time faculty of the Department of Systems and Information Engineering and the Darden Graduate School of Business Administration, the program format includes one full week in residence in late May, twenty weekends (Fridays and Saturdays) throughout the year, and a final week in residence during the following April. Tuition covers courses, books, software, lodging and meals.

The program has four core courses: Introduction to Systems Engineering (SYS 601), Systems Integration (SYS 602), Enterprise Analysis and Modeling (SYS 603) and Probabilistic Modeling (SYS 605). Additional elective courses include data analysis and forecasting, risk analysis and modeling, information systems architecture and decision analysis among others. Prerequisites include a bachelor’s degree from an accredited college or university, calculus (2 semesters), probability and statistics (calculus-based), linear algebra (or equivalent) and computer programming. Applicants must take the GRE general exam.

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