Aug 15, 2020  
Graduate Record 2019-2020 
    
Graduate Record 2019-2020 [ARCHIVED RECORD]

School of Graduate Engineering and Applied Science: Academic Rules, Regulations, and Information


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Admission Requirements


The School of Engineering and Applied Science offers an exceptional educational opportunity for qualified students who seek an environment where graduate study is characterized by integrated learning experiences with highly qualified, experienced, and dedicated faculty. Graduate admissions committees are seeking well-rounded individuals who bring exceptional intellectual capabilities along with a passion for their chosen field. The admissions process looks for evidence of competitive academic performance, work and life experiences, and qualities of character such as motivation, maturity, tenacity, integrity, ability to work with others, self-reliance, and leadership. All applicants are considered without regard to race, color, religion, sex, national origin, political affiliation, disability, age, sexual orientation, or veteran status. The Engineering School welcomes applications from individuals from other countries whose diverse perspectives broaden the range of educational experience for all members of the academic community.

An applicant must have a baccalaureate degree from a recognized college or university. While this degree will normally be in the field of engineering or applied science, degrees in other fields may be acceptable. Undergraduate courses that may be required to remedy deficiencies must be taken without credit toward the graduate degree. An applicant should have at least a B average for admission into graduate studies.

Each candidate must complete the online application for admission and pay the application fee (one fee per application). A fee waiver may be granted in certain cases. For eligibility see https://graddiversity.virginia.edu/application-fee-waiver. The application requires a) an essay, b) complete transcripts of all academic work, c) three letters of recommendation, and d) a CV or resume. a) For the essay, applicants should focus on outlining their research goals and interests toward solving real-world problems and the alignment of those goals/interests with the graduate program.  For ME/MCS/MMSE applicants, the essay should describe why the applicant desires an advanced degree and what their interests are toward solving real-world engineering problems.  All essays should speak toward clear evidence of motivation, persistence, character, and the ability to overcome obstacles, and the potential for leadership and engagement.  Excellent writing skills are critical.  b) Letters of recommendation should come from an individual with meaningful knowledge of the applicant and who can speak to the applicant’s potential to succeed in graduate school.  On-line recommendations are strongly encouraged. d) CVs and resumes should clearly show the applicant’s quantity and quality of prior research experience in academia and beyond. 

Most applicants are required to take the Graduate Records Exam (GRE) general exam, but there are exceptions.  Applicants should see specific graduate program websites to confirm whether a score is required. International students must have an excellent command of the English language in order to enroll at the University. The TOEFL exam is required of all applicants if the language first learned and spoken in the home is not English. Most students admitted score 90 or better on the Internet-based test. Scores from the International English Language Test (IELTS) may be submitted in lieu of the TOEFL. Most successful applicants score in the 7.0 band or better on the IELTS. Some students may be required to complete the Summer English for Academic Purposes Program (http://caelc.virginia.edu/summer-eap) prior to admission if scores are lower. Official transcripts are not required for review purposes, but are required if the student matriculates. Transcripts should be sent to ATTN: Graduate School of Engineering and Applied Science, Room 209B, 1001 North Emmet Street, Charlottesville, VA 22903 or PO Box 401103, Charlottesville, VA 22904. 

Rescinding an Offer of Admission  It is SEAS’ expectation that all admitted students uphold the intellectual, ethical, and professional standards of the School and the University of Virginia.  All applicants offered admission to the School agree to abide by the principles laid out in the UVA Honor Code and the Standards of Conduct.  The School may rescind an offer of admission up until the date of matriculation for, but not limited to, the following reasons:

  • An admitted applicant is found to have presented misleading or fraudulent information during the application process
  • An admitted applicant fails to uphold the principles of the Honor Code and the Standards of Conduct mentioned above.

All students who wish to be considered for assistantships and fellowships should indicate so in the financial aid section on the completed application and submit by January 15 for fall admission (except for BME and CS, which have a deadline of December 15, SIE which has a deadline of January 1, and CEE and CPE which have a deadline of January 5). For U.S. citizens and permanent residents not requesting aid, deadlines for complete applications for admission in certain programs are: December 1 for spring admission, May 1 for summer admission, and August 1 for fall admission. International students on visas (other than permanent residents) must apply at least five months prior to the term for which admission is sought to allow time for the International Student Office to review and process necessary paperwork. To enroll at the University, each foreign national student must be lawfully present in the United States based on U.S. federal immigration law, and any visa status held must not prohibit the desired University enrollment. Also, all international students (other than permanent residents) must provide evidence of financial capability for the duration of their studies, unless receiving departmental aid.


Transfer Credit


SEAS grants transfer of credit based on an analysis of the content, level and comparability of the courses taken, the applicability of the courses to the student’s intended degree Program, the quality of the student’s performance in the course, and the institution where the work was completed. All requests for transfer of credit must be approved by the academic Program and the Engineering Graduate Registrar’s Office using the Request Approval of Transfer Credits Form. For any degree, a Program may require additional courses to satisfy their specific academic requirements beyond the course credits transferred. Students can request the transfer of a UVA Engineering graduate-level course taken while a UVA undergraduate student, given that is was NOT used toward the undergraduate degree, using the UVA Engineering Graduate Course Approval Form.

ME, MCS, MMSE, and VEO Students  These students may transfer a maximum of 12 graduate course credits into their Program of study (a maximum of 15 credits for VEO students). These courses must have been completed with a grade of B or better, and cannot have been used to satisfy requirements toward another degree. VEO students may transfer in graduate courses with a grade or C or better. See more information in the VEO section.

MS and PhD Students  These students may transfer a maximum of 6 graduate course credits into their Program of study. These courses must have been completed with a grade of B or better, and cannot have been used to satisfy requirements toward another degree.  PhD students who have earned a master’s degree in a STEM field will receive an automatic bulk transfer of 24 graduate course credits toward the School’s total credit requirement. PhD students who have earned a master’s degree in a non-STEM field will receive an automatic bulk transfer of 12 graduate course credits toward the School’s total credit requirement.


Financial Assistance


The School of Engineering and Applied Science offers financial aid to all PhD and some Master’s students through fellowships and assistantships ordinarily consisting of a stipend and payment of all tuition and fees including health insurance. Students must be nominated by their department to be considered for a fellowship or assistantship.

Students receiving financial assistance from the School of Engineering and Applied Science must be registered as full-time students, defined as at least 12 credits of lecture-laboratory courses and/or research during the academic year, must maintain a grade point average of 3.0 and must also maintain satisfactory progress toward a degree. Graduate research assistants must register for a minimum of 6 credits of research during the summer term. Students receiving School or graduate program funding are not permitted to have other employment without approval of the Office of Graduate Programs. Students are awarded financial assistance to enable them to devote maximum effort to graduate studies.

Graduate Research Assistantships  Graduate Research Assistants are assigned to work with a faculty member on a specific research project which should culminate in a project report, thesis, or dissertation. Full-time graduate research assistants may not carry a load of more than 9 credits of lecture-laboratory courses but must register each semester for enough additional credits of teaching/research to maintain full-time student status.

Graduate Teaching Assistantships  Graduate Teaching Assistants (GTAs) are assigned to assist a faculty member teaching a specific lecture/laboratory course. The assigned duties will depend on the course and instructor. Graduate teaching assistants may not carry a load of more than 9 credits of lecture-laboratory courses but must register each semester for enough teaching/research credit to maintain full-time student status.  GTAs must have a master’s degree or at least 18 credits of graduate work in the discipline for which he/she will be a GTA, and cannot TA a course carrying graduate credit without an exception from the Office of Graduate Programs.

International Graduate Teaching Assistants  All prospective GTAs whose first language is not English are required to take the SPEAK test. Prospective GTAs must score at least 55 to begin a GTA appointment without completion of CAELC language training. Three exceptions exist:

  • A student may be appointed as a GTA with a score of at least 40 if TA duties are limited to lab set-up, grading, problem-set generation, test generation, solution sets, website maintenance, etc.
  • A student may be appointed as a GTA with a score of at least 45 if TA duties are limited to a lab section (but not as the “main” lab TA) or as a GTA who will be holding office hours (including APMA workshop GTAs)
  • A student with at least a 50 score may serve as the main/primary TA for a supervised lab, may conduct review sessions and problem sessions, so long as they are not providing substantive content as would be anticipated in class lecture.
  • UVELPE scores and GTAs: An exception to the SPEAK requirement can be made if the student has taken the UVELP and completed all training resulting from the UVELP scores. If a student passes the UVELP without needing further training but needs to TA, they can then register for ESL911; and if they complete and pass the first assignment, they may receive a SPEAK test waiver.

Masters Teaching Assistants (MTAs)  Self-pay ME, MCS, and MMSE students, or part-time students, may serve as MTAs for an hourly wage. All MTAs must be registered full-time and maintain a 3.0 GPA. All policies in place for GTAs also apply to all MTAs.

Fellowships  Fellowships are intended to allow graduate students time to devote to learning opportunities in the classroom and laboratory. No work duties, in a pay for service sense, are required, but good academic progress, including research for the thesis or dissertation, is essential. Some programs may require students with fellowship support to include research and teaching duties as part of the usual academic requirements for the degree. UVA Engineering has a large number of graduate fellowships and other funding sources for both incoming and current PhD students, based on a variety of metrics, including academic merit, research potential/success, and contribution to diversity and engagement.  Fellowships for incoming students typically cover the recipient’s stipend, tuition and fees, and health insurance for the specified period of time.  Fellowships for current graduate students typically provide additional stipend support or discretionary funds for the specified period of time.  Students are made aware of these fellowships through the recruitment process, or by email announcements throughout the academic year


Graduate Enrollment Requirements


Full-Time Enrollment  Enrollment in a PhD Program requires full-time registration each semester. Full-time enrollment in the Fall and Spring semesters is a minimum of 12 and a maximum of 15 credit hours per term. Optional full-time enrollment for Summer semester is at least 6 credit hours. Full time enrollment is required if receiving financial aid.

Research  All PhD & MS students must register for the appropriate research course. Credits are assigned to this course in such a way that the total number of credits for which the student is registered reflects the fraction of time devoted to progress toward a degree. Students must register for a minimum of 48 credits of research for a PhD degree (though in most cases, students will exceed this), and six credits for a MS degree.

Length of Study  Full-time PhD students must enroll for at least six regular semesters (Fall and Spring) of graduate study after the baccalaureate degree, or four regular semesters after a master’s degree.

Residency  Graduate degree Programs require a period of residency to fully engage in the UVA academic community and to actively contribute to intellectual discourse within the School. For students coming into a PhD program with a master’s degree, at least two regular semesters beyond the master’s degree one semester in full residence at UVA in Charlottesville.  For students coming into a PhD program with a bachelor’s degree, at least three regular semesters are required.  For a master’s degree program, at least one semester is required.  Two exceptions exists: those students enrolled in a Virginia Engineering Online degree program and those students carrying out their research at the National Institute of Aerospace (NIA). 

Consecutive Enrollment  PhD, MS, and on-Grounds ME/MCS/MMSE students must enroll in courses for all terms (fall and spring) from the matriculation term until degree conferral, including the term in which the dissertation/thesis is submitted. The only exception occurs when the student is granted an official leave of absence. Failure to enroll in courses for a term without taking an approved leave of absence results in denial of further enrollment unless and until reinstatement to the degree Program is granted.  Virginia Engineering Online students, who are off-Grounds, are not required to enroll each semester.

Time Limit for Degree  All requirements for the PhD and ME/MCS/MMSE degree must be completed within seven years after matriculation to the Program. The degree clock can be stopped during these seven years for 1) maternity or family parenting needs or 2) serious personal or family illness with approval by the Program and the Director of Graduate Education. A student may petition to extend their time-to-degree beyond the seven years to the SEAS Graduate Studies Committee with prior approval by the Advisor and their Graduate Program Director.  Such a petition must be filed within the 7-year time frame.

All requirements for the Master of Science degree must be completed within five years after matriculation to the graduate Program. The degree clock can be stopped during these five years for 1) maternity or family parenting needs or 2) serious personal or family illness with approval by the Program and the Director of Graduate Education. A student may petition to extend their time-to-degree for the MS beyond the five years to the SEAS Graduate Studies Committee with prior approval by the Advisor and their Graduate Program Director.  Such a petition must be filed within the 5-year time frame.

Good Standing A graduate student in the School of Engineering and Applied Sciences is considered to be in academic good standing when they maintain a minimum cumulative GPA of 3.0 on all graded graduate courses at the University of Virginia.

Special Enrollment Requirements

Requests for Enrolling in 16 credits: Students are permitted to enroll in 16 credits if enrolling in a departmentally required 1 credit seminar or lab puts them over the 15-credit limit, AND all other enrolled courses are departmentally required.

Students Enrolling in Courses Outside of SEAS for Satisfaction of Academic Requirements:  Students approved to enroll in courses outside of the SEAS and unable to do so in SIS must complete a UVA Engineering Graduate Course Action Form and have each course approved and form signed by the instructor and advisor. Please note that engineering students must adhere to course adding and dropping deadlines of other Schools (course drop deadlines for courses taught in Schools other than engineering are much earlier than ours). If a non-engineering course is approved to satisfy the academic course requirements at the School level, a ‘Request Requirement Change, Exception or Waiver’ form (also found on our forms website) must be completed and signed by the Program and submitted to the Engineering Graduate Registrar’s Office for final Dean’s Office approval and processing. After the SIS actions are completed, an email is sent to the Graduate Program Coordinator to advise them that they have been done and if there are also programmatic SIS actions needed to be completed, then they may do so at that time.  If a non-engineering course is approved to satisfy the academic course requirements at the Program level only (above and beyond the school’s academic course requirements), that approval process is determined however the Program sees fit and the SIS exceptions are completed by the departmental Graduate Program Coordinator. If a student is not in a University approved Interdisciplinary Program and is enrolled in a course outside of SEAS, additional tuition may be incurred as the tuition rates are imposed by the School offering the course. If a student is enrolled in a non-engineering course in the semester they graduate, the above approval form must be done as early in the semester as possible but at least two weeks prior to the degree conferral date. In addition, ensuring the final grade is posted by the deadline for degree certification processes of the Engineering Graduate Registrar is the responsibility of the student. Failure to obtain a final grade by the deadline will result in the student’s removal from the degree candidate list. 

Processing a Request to Drop/Withdraw from a Graduate Engineering Course After the SEAS “Drop with W” Deadline:  When a graduate engineering student requests to drop/withdraw beyond the “drop with a W” deadline, they must request permission via email to the Graduate Engineering Registrar or the Director of Graduate Education.  The email must provide the reason for the request explaining the extenuating circumstances with the support of their faculty advisor and either the SEAS resident Assistant Dean of Students or the SEAS resident CAPS counselor. 

Leaving the University

The University Leaving and Returning to the University form is located on the SIS Student Self Service page in a box on the lower right titled eForms.  The form is titled Leaving the University (Leaves, Withdrawals, and Returning to the University).  

Voluntary Leaves of Absence:  Students who wish to take a voluntary leave of absence for either a semester or a year must obtain the approval of their advisor and the Graduate Program Director of the student’s Program (or in the case of VEO students, VEO administration).  The student then must apply for such leave via the online Leaving the University form which will be finalized by the Engineering Graduate Registrar’s Office, and processed by the Dean of Students Office and the University Registrar.

Medical Withdrawal:  Applications for withdrawal for medical reasons must be made in writing to and approved by the Director of Graduate Education in conjunction with the Office of the Dean of Students (ODOS) or Counseling and Psychological Services (CAPS).  A grade of W (Withdrawal) will be entered for each course in which the student was registered, and cannot be changed. Subsequent medical clearance from the Department of Student Health is required for readmission.  The student then must apply for such leave via the online Leaving the University form which will be finalized by the Engineering Graduate Registrar’s Office, and processed by the Dean of Students Office and the University Registrar.

Academic Withdrawal:  Students who wish to permanently withdraw from the University must complete the online Leaving the University form which will be finalized by the Engineering Graduate Registrar’s Office, and processed by the Dean of Students Office and the University Registrar. A withdrawal cannot be processed after a final grade in any class has been posted on a student’s record for that term. 

Please see the University’s section of the Graduate Record for Leaving the University 

Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, the School of Engineering & Applied Science will allow students to withdraw from the spring 2020 term up until May 8, 2020 (last day of final exams), and apply to return for the fall 2020 term by the July 1 deadline.

Returning to the University:  The student must request to return from an approved Leave of Absence via the online Returning the University form four to six weeks prior to the beginning of the semester in which they intend to enroll so their SIS account will be reactivated.  The return  will be finalized by the Engineering Graduate Registrar’s Office, and processed by the Dean of Students Office and the University Registrar.

Students who exceed the two-year limit to return to the School of Engineering must reapply for admission to the program via Slate, the online application program.

Transferring to a different Program within SEAS  A student may not transfer to a new Program within SEAS until they have spent at least one semester in their current Program.  Any student wishing to transfer after this minimal time period, must complete the Request Program Plan Change Form and have it signed by their advisor, as well as the Graduate Director of the current Program, then submit to the Engineering Graduate Registrar’s Office for final Dean’s Office approval and processing.

ESL Course Deferral & Waiver for All Graduate Students  All graduate students are required to complete ESL course requirements made by CAELC as a result of his/her UVELPE and/or SPEAK test score, and may only request a deferral of one semester for the below reasons:

  1. If a student is recommended for two or more ESL courses, the student’s program can approve a deferral to the following semester of those ESL courses in excess of one.
  2. If a student is recommended for an ESL course where all available sections of said course conflict with the student’s current academic load, the student’s Program will approve a deferral request to the following semester. It is required that students verify with the CAELC staff that there are no other possible sections that work with their academic load BEFORE requesting the deferral.
  3. If the student will be away for part or all of the semester in question for an internship or other academic purpose, the student’s Program may approve a deferral request to the following semester.

Recommended ESL courses will not be waived, with the exception of ESL 912, which is not a course, but a one-on-one experience for students currently assigned as International Teaching Assistants.

All requests for deferrals and waivers should be submitted to the student’s Graduate Coordinator no later than one week prior to the start of the ESL course(s) for current students, or as soon as the recommended course(s) are assigned for new students. Failure to request a deferral or waiver on time, and subsequent failure to attend the course(s), will result in an Unsatisfactory grade on the student’s transcript. Any deferral or waiver request outside of the above reasons must be submitted by the Program Graduate Coordinator no later than one week prior to the start of the ESL course (s) for approval by the Director of Graduate Education


Grading and GPA


Degree requirements for coursework  To obtain a graduate degree in the School, an individual must have a minimum cumulative grade point average of 3.00 on all graded graduate course work taken while a graduate student, and all graduate courses taken as an undergraduate at the University of Virginia if the courses are part of a program of study and are used to satisfy Program degree requirements.  No grade lower than a C is acceptable toward meeting degree requirements. Non-degree and visiting graduate students are also expected to maintain a minimum cumulative grade point average of 3.0.  Undergraduate courses and courses taken on a Credit/No Credit basis may not be used to meet degree requirements and are not used in computing the grade point average. Graduate degrees are not conferred merely upon the basis of the number of courses passed, nor the length of time spent in residence or in research, but primarily on the basis of the quality and scope of the student’s knowledge and power of investigation in a chosen field of study. 

Grading

Grade Changes:  No grade may be changed after it has been submitted to UREG (Office of the University Registrar) without the approval of the Director of Graduate Education, who may authorize a grade change only in accordance with the school’s grade appeal policy or when an instructor certifies that, because of an error in calculation or transcription, an incorrect grade has been submitted. Grades cannot be changed after a degree is conferred.

Incomplete: The symbol IN (incomplete) is used when additional course work is required or examinations need to be taken in order to fulfill the requirements of a given course. A student may not request an IN grade in an attempt to raise his or her grade. Prior to the last day of class, students must initiate the request for an IN and secure the instructor’s approval in accordance with School deadlines. Graduate students’ incomplete grades convert to an F 200 days after the end of the semester they receive the IN grade.

Grade Appeals: University faculty members and instructors are entrusted with all grading decisions, to be made fairly and in a manner consistent with their best professional judgement and the expectations of the discipline. Students involved in grading disputes should first attempt to resolve the matter with the Instructor. If the grading conflict cannot be resolved with the Instructor, the student may petition the SEAS Graduate Studies Committee within 30 days of the grade posting in SIS.

Academic Probation & Suspension

Academic Probation: All students (whether degree-seeking, non-degree seeking or visiting student) may incur academic probation any semester in which they fail to maintain a cumulative grade point average of a minimum of 3.0. On-grounds students on probation have one semester to increase their cumulative grade point average to 3.0 or above, or they will be placed on academic suspension. VEO, non-degree seeking, and visiting students have two semesters to increase their cumulative grade point average.

Academic Suspension: Students under suspension may not transfer any credits taken at other institutions while on suspension toward their degree from the University. Academic suspensions may be appealed within 30 days of notification once to the SEAS Graduate Studies Committee.


Degree Programs: PhD


The University of Virginia School of Engineering and Applied Science offers PhD programs leading to the degree of Doctor of Philosophy degree in nine disciplines: biomedical engineering; chemical engineering; civil engineering; computer engineering; computer science; electrical engineering; materials science and engineering; mechanical and aerospace engineering; and systems engineering.

The Doctor of Philosophy degree is regarded by many as a symbol that its bearer has achieved an in-depth understanding of a segment of human knowledge and has contributed significantly to that knowledge. The Ph.D. requires a program of advanced study in courses and research, satisfactory completion of Ph.D. examinations, and submission of a dissertation based on independent, original research.

Students work in conjunction with their advisors using departmental guidelines to determine a program of formal courses which fulfill academic requirements and support research goals. Students and their advisor choose proposal and final defense committees which are then reviewed for approval by the Office of Graduate Programs.

Program of study  All PhD students must satisfactorily complete a plan of coursework and research hours approved by their advisor and the Program. The student and the advisor will work on the Program of Study, and each Program is tailored to the individual student in accordance with Program requirements approved by SEAS faculty. The Program of Study must include a combined minimum of 72 hours of research and course credits beyond the baccalaureate, a minimum of 24 of which must be formal graded graduate level coursework. Classes at the 4000-level or below do not count toward the graduate degree requirements. Transfer of course credit from other institutions of recognized standing may be included in the Program of Study; however, only graduate level courses with a grade of B or better may be transferred. Program Requirements: Each program has its own Program of Study requirements, and therefore all Programs of Study must be approved by the Program’s Graduate Program Director.

En Route Master’s Degree A doctoral student may request approval to earn a master’s degree (thesis or non-thesis) within their home department. The departmentally approved request must be submitted to the Graduate Registrar’s Office by the dates for applying to graduate (February 1 for May; June 1 for August; October 1 for December). Before requesting the en route master’s, students must verify that the master’s academic requirements will be completed by the semester they intend to earn the master’s degree.

PhD Advisory Committee Must include a minimum of three SEAS faculty, one additional UVA faculty member with 0% appointment in the student’s home department (effective for students matricualting Fall 2018 or later), and a minimum of four total members. The purpose of the member with 0% appointment in the student’s home department is to ensure consistency across the University, to help ensure fairness to the student, and to prevent conflict inside the department. The Committee Chair must hold a faculty appointment in SEAS. All Committee members must hold qualifications commensurate with that of a research faculty or equivalent rank. To avoid conflicts of interest, no committee member can be employed by or receive compensation from another committee member to avoid conflicts of interest.

One additional research professional from outside UVA or a faculty member from outside SEAS may be a fifth voting committee member, provided his/her qualifications are commensurate with that of a research faculty or equivalent rank.  Emeritus faculty are considered outside UVA for the purpose of Advisory Committees.  A CV or biography will be required and should be submitted to the SEAS Graduate Registrar, and should include the highest degree attained, the year and institution, and any relevant experience or research which would enable that member to provide expertise to the student and committee.

Biomedical Engineering (BME) advisory committees: All faculty with a primary appointment in BME are considered SEAS faculty for this purpose. For PhD students in BME, one faculty member from the School of Medicine may substitute for one SEAS faculty.

Computer Engineering (CPE) advisory committees: For PhD students in CPE, at least one member must be from the Electrical & Computer Engineering department and at least one member must be from the Computer Science department. The home department of CPE students is defined as the advisor’s home department

Civil & Environmental Engineering (CEE) and Systems & Information Engineering (SIE) advisory committees: For PhD students in CEE or SIE, the Engineering Systems & Environment (ESE) Department is considered the home department, and therefore the additional committee member with 0% appointment in the home department cannot be an ESE faculty member.

There may be additional Committee members beyond the previously mentioned five. The Doctoral Advisory Committee Form must be completed and submitted to the Engineering Graduate Registrar’s Office for final Dean’s Office approval and processing as early as possible in the student’s PhD Program. The form must be approved by the Graduate Office at least two weeks prior to any event including the Advisory Committee Form. 

PhD Qualifying Exam Each Program designs and conducts its PhD Examination or Qualifying Exam differently. All students must perform satisfactorily on this Exam, as determined by the standards of the Program. Upon completion of the PhD Examination or Qualifying Exam, the PhD Examination Report, as well as the Program-specific Qualifying Exam Assessment Form must be submitted to the Engineering Graduate Registrar’s Office for final Dean’s Office approval and processing.

PhD Thesis/Dissertation proposal All PhD students must prepare and defend a written dissertation proposal, in preparation for conducting the thesis research and writing the resulting dissertation. The Thesis proposal: a) Describes the research to date on their dissertation project, with a detailed engineering and applied science question for further inquiry, along with bibliography; b) Outlines the proposed method of investigation; and c) Discusses the anticipated results. The student must make a public, oral presentation of the proposal to their Advisory Committee, with all members of the faculty invited to attend, at least one semester prior to the semester they defend. Upon completion of the Thesis Proposal, the Dissertation Proposal Form and the Engineering Dissertation Proposal Assessment Form must be completed and submitted to the Engineering Graduate Registrar’s Office for final Dean’s Office processing. A public announcement of the oral presentation of the proposal must be sent out by the student’s graduate coordinator at least one week prior to the presentation.  Students should consult their graduate coordinator for the departmental announcement template and procedure.

Admission to PhD candidacy A student must have satisfactorily completed the PhD Examination/Qualifying Exam and successfully presented their dissertation proposal to their advisory committee before being admitted to PhD candidacy. Admission to PhD candidacy must be completed at least one semester before the degree is awarded.

PhD Final Dissertation Examining Committee This Committee must include the student’s Advisory Committee. Additionally, it must include a minimum of three SEAS faculty, a minimum of four UVA faculty, and a minimum of 5 total members. One of the UVA faculty members must have 0% appointment in the student’s home department. The purpose of the member from outside of the student’s home department is to ensure consistency across the University, to help ensure fairness to the student, and to prevent conflict inside the department. The Committee Chair must hold a faculty appointment in SEAS, and cannot be the student’s Advisor. (see above comments). All Committee members must hold qualifications commensurate with that of a research faculty or equivalent rank.

One additional research professional from outside UVA or a faculty member from outside SEAS may be a fifth voting committee member, provided his/her qualifications are commensurate with that of a research faculty or equivalent rank.  Emeritus faculty are considered outside UVA for the purpose of Advisory Committees.  A CV or biography will be required, and should include the highest degree attained, the year and institution, and any relevant experience or research which would enable that member to provide expertise to the student and committee.

Biomedical Engineering Final Dissertation Examining Committees: one faculty member from the School of Medicine may substitute for one SEAS faculty. All faculty with a primary appointment in BME are considered SEAS faculty for this purpose.

Computer Engineering Final Dissertation Examining Committees: at least two members must be from the ECE department and at least two members must be from the CS department. For CPE students, the outside member with 0% appointment in the student’s home department, the home department is considered to be that of the advisor’s home department.

Civil & Environmental Engineering (CEE) and Systems & Information Engineering (SIE) Final Dissertation Examining Committee: For PhD students in CEE or SIE, the Engineering Systems & Environment (ESE) Department is considered the home department, and therefore the additional committee member with 0% appointment in the home department cannot be an ESE faculty member.

The Final Examination Committee Form must be completed and submitted to the Engineering Graduate Registrar’s Office for final Dean’s Office approval and processing at least two weeks prior to the examination/defense date.

PhD Dissertation Defense Each PhD student must satisfactorily present and defend a dissertation based on independent original research that makes a significant contribution to the student’s field of study. The dissertation defense is conducted orally and publicly by the Final Dissertation Examining Committee previously approved by the Engineering Graduate Registrar’s Office. The defense is designed to test the student’s knowledge of his/her field of research.  In rare circumstances, and upon approval of the Director of Graduate Education, a defense may be given privately to the Examining Committee. The defense is held after the candidate has submitted the dissertation to the committee. A student who does not perform satisfactorily in the defense may, with the recommendation of two-thirds majority of the PhD Examining Committee, be granted a future dissertation defense after being given adequate time to prepare.  Upon completion of the Final Examination, the Report on Final Examination Form and the Thesis and Dissertation Assessment Form must be completed and submitted to the Engineering Graduate Registrar’s Office. The degree candidate must submit the approved final dissertation along with the Thesis/Dissertation Cover and Approval Pages Form to Libra, the online archive of UVA by the date specified in the academic calendar.  A public announcement of the oral presentation of the defense must be sent out by the student’s graduate coordinator at least one week prior to the presentation.  Students should consult their graduate coordinator for the departmental announcement template and procedure.

PhD Degree Awarding Candidates who are accepted by the Final Dissertation Examining Committee and approved by the faculty are presented for degrees at the first scheduled University graduation following completion of the degree requirements. Students must apply for a degree in SIS by the date specified in the academic calendar – February 1st for May graduation; June 1st for August graduation; October 1st for December graduation. The degree candidate must complete the UVA Engineering PhD/MS Exit Survey and the Survey of Earned Doctorates.

Co-Advisors A student may be co-advised by two advisors.  It is expected that these two advisors will be UVA faculty.  If, however, a student wishes to be co-advised by a non-UVA faculty, the non-UVA co-advisor must have a courtesy appointment as a visiting professor.  Only professors will receive such courtesy appointments.

Requesting Changes, Exceptions, or Waivers Students can request changes, exceptions, or waivers to the UVA Engineering academic requirements using the Request Requirement Change, Exception, or Waiver Form.


Degree Programs: MS


The Master of Science degree is a graduate research degree that introduces students to research at the graduate level. A student can typically complete the program in 2 years. The School of Engineering and Applied Science offers instruction leading to the degrees of Master of Science in the following fields: biomedical engineering, chemical engineering, civil engineering, computer engineering, computer science, electrical engineering, engineering physics, materials science and engineering, mechanical and aerospace engineering, and systems engineering.

The Graduate Program Director appoints an advisor to each graduate student for consultation in planning a program of study. In collaboration with the advisor, each student should develop a program of study including all courses required for the degree as well as additional courses to prepare the student for research in his/her chosen topic. Candidates who complete the degree requirements and are approved by the faculty are presented for degrees at the University’s first scheduled graduation exercise following completion of the requirements.

A complete listing of all graduate forms and corresponding assessment forms can be found online.

Program of study All MS students must satisfactorily complete a plan of coursework and research hours approved by their advisor and the Program. The Student’s Program appoints an advisor to each MS student for consultation in completing the Program of Study, and each Program is tailored to the individual student in accordance with Program requirements approved by SEAS faculty. The Program of Study must include a minimum of 24 hours of graduate level credits beyond the baccalaureate, a minimum of 12 of which must be formal graded graduate level coursework in the area of major study. Classes at the 4000-level or below do not count toward the graduate degree requirements. The Program of Study may include a maximum of six transfer credits from other institutions of recognized standing; however, only graduate level courses with a grade of B or better may be transferred. Each Program has its own Program of Study requirements, and therefore all Programs of Study must be approved by the Program’s Graduate Program Director.

MS Examining Committee Must include a minimum of three UVA faculty, at least two of whom must be SEAS faculty. The Committee Chair must hold a faculty appointment in SEAS. (See above comments related to PhD committee chairs.) All Committee members must hold qualifications commensurate with that of a research faculty or equivalent rank.

One additional research professional from outside UVA or a faculty member from outside SEAS may be a fourth voting committee member, provided his/her qualifications are commensurate with that of a research faculty or equivalent rank. A CV or biography will be required, and should include the highest degree attained, the year and institution, and any relevant experience or research which would enable that member to provide expertise to the student and committee.

Biomedical Engineering (BME) MS examining committees: All faculty with a primary appointment in BME are considered SEAS faculty for this purpose. For MS students in BME, one faculty member from the School of Medicine may substitute for one SEAS faculty.

Computer Engineering (CPE) MS examining committees: For MS students in CPE, at least one member must be from the Electrical & Computer Engineering department and at least one member must be from the Computer Science department.

Civil & Environmental Engineering (CEE) and Systems & Information Engineering (SIE) advisory committees: For MS students in CEE or SIE, the Engineering Systems & Environment (ESE) Department is considered the home department, and therefore the additional committee member with 0% appointment in the home department cannot be an ESE faculty member.

The Final Examination Committee Form must be completed and submitted to the Engineering Graduate Registrar’s Office for final Dean’s Office approval and processing at least two weeks prior to the examination/defense date.

MS Thesis defense Each MS student must satisfactorily present and defend a thesis based on independent research. The thesis defense is conducted orally and publicly by the MS Examining Committee previously approved by the Engineering Graduate Registrar’s Office. The defense is designed to test the student’s knowledge of his/her field of research. The defense is held after the student has submitted the thesis to the committee. A student who does not perform satisfactorily in the defense may, with the recommendation of two-thirds majority of the MS Examining Committee, be granted a future thesis defense after being given adequate time to prepare.  Upon completion of the Final Examination, the Report on Final Examination Form and the Thesis and Dissertation Assessment Form must be completed and submitted to the Engineering Graduate Registrar’s Office for final Dean’s Office approval and processing. The degree candidate must submit the approved final thesis along with the Thesis/Dissertation Cover and Approval Pages Form to Libra, the online archive of UVA by the date specified in the academic calendar.

NOTE: see PhD proposal and defense note regarding public announcement.

MS Degree Awarding Students who are accepted by the MS Examining Committee and approved by the faculty are presented for degrees at the first scheduled University graduation following completion of the degree requirements. Students must apply for a degree in SIS by the date specified in the academic calendar -February 1st for May graduation; June 1st for August graduation; October 1st for December graduation. The degree candidate must submit the approved final thesis to Libra, the online archive of UVA by the date specified in the academic calendar. The degree candidate must complete the UVA Engineering PhD/MS Exit Survey.

Requesting Changes, Exceptions, or Waivers Students can request changes, exceptions, or waivers to the UVA Engineering academic requirements using the Request Requirement Change, Exception, or Waiver Form.


Degree Requirements: ME


The Master of Engineering degree is a graduate professional degree. It enhances the professional instruction of the bachelor’s program in engineering or applied science, providing greater knowledge and deeper understanding in a specific field. A student can complete the degree program in as little as  one year. The School of Engineering and Applied Science offers instruction leading to the degree of Master of Engineering in biomedical engineering; chemical engineering; civil engineering; computer engineering, electrical engineering; mechanical and aerospace engineering; and systems engineering.

The degrees of Master of Computer Science, Master of Engineering Physics, and Master of Materials Science and Engineering are also offered. Project research for the Master of Engineering or Master of Applied Science (non-thesis) degrees is encouraged and, in some curricula, required.

The Graduate Program Director will appoint an advisor to each graduate student for consultation in preparing a program of study.

Program of study All ME, MCS, and MMSE students must satisfactorily complete a plan of coursework approved by their advisor and the Program. The student’s Program appoints an advisor to each student for consultation in completing the Program of Study, and each Program is tailored to the individual student in accordance with Program requirements approved by SEAS faculty. The Program of Study must include a minimum of 30 hours of graduate level credits beyond the baccalaureate, a minimum of 18 of which must be formal graded graduate level coursework in the area of major study. Classes at the 4000-level or below do not count toward the graduate degree requirements. The Program of Study may include a maximum of 12 transfer credit from other institutions of recognized standing; however, only graduate level courses with a grade of B or better may be transferred. VEO ME students may transfer a maximum of 15 credits with a C or better. Each Program has its own Program of Study requirements, and therefore all Programs of Study must be approved by the Program’s Graduate Program Director.

ME, MCS, and MMSE Degree Awarding Upon successful completion of all courses in the Program of Study, students must apply for a degree in SIS by the date specified in the academic calendar- February 1st for May graduation; June 1st for August graduation; October 1st for December graduation. The student must submit completed assessment forms as required by the Program. Each Program requires at least three of these forms. The forms must be submitted to the Engineering Graduate Registrar’s Office for final Dean’s Office approval and processing. The degree candidate must complete the UVA Engineering ME/MCS/MMSE Exit Survey.

Requesting Changes, Exceptions, or Waivers Students can request changes, exceptions, or waivers to the UVA Engineering academic requirements using the Request Requirement Change, Exception, or Waiver Form.

Accelerated Master’s Degree in Systems Engineering (AMP)

The Accelerated Master’s Degree Program in Systems Engineering (AMP) enables working professionals to earn a Master of Engineering degree in one year without interrupting their careers through a unique blend of formal education integrated with personal work experience. The practice-oriented degree has a focus on systems thinking, data analytics, and evidence-based decision making, broadly applicable skills which are in strong demand. Class meetings on Grounds give AMP students the advantage of interacting face-to-face with full-time faculty and cohort of talented classmates in a focused learning environment.

The program year runs from late May through April. A new cohort begins each May. The accelerated schedule includes one week in residence in late May, twenty alternate weekends (all day Fridays and Saturdays) over the next ten months, and a final week in residence the following April. Comprehensive tuition includes courses and fees, books, software, and meals and lodging while the cohort is on grounds for classes. Financial aid is available in the form of education loans.

The curriculum introduces and explores systems methodologies through real-world case studies. It is firmly focused on problem-solving, using both analytical and theoretical modeling approaches throughout. The program of study has four core courses: Introduction to Systems Analysis and Design (SYS 6001), Systems Integration (SYS 6002), Applied Optimization (SYS 6043) and Applied Probabilistic Modeling (SYS 6045). Six additional courses may include risk analysis and modeling, statistics, applied human factors engineering, and decision analysis among others. The curriculum is augmented by business topics taught by faculty from the Darden Graduate School of Business. Students attend seminars on Friday evenings earning credit for three semesters of Systems Engineering Colloquium.

Admissions requirements include a bachelor’s degree from a college or university of recognized standing and proficiency in mathematics, typically demonstrated by academic performance in the following courses: calculus (2 semesters), linear algebra (or equivalent), and computer programming. Three letters of recommendation are required. 

The Accelerated Master’s Program in Systems Engineering (AMP) uses a rolling admissions procedure. Applications are reviewed and admissions decisions are made as the applications are received. Class size is limited. Prospective students are encouraged to submit their applications early in the cycle. The program will continue to accept well-qualified candidates for admission until all slots are filled or the next cohort begins.

AMP students place a high value on the cohort learning experience at UVA. Working together in small groups and sharing the perspectives of a diverse cohort of experienced engineers leads to long-lasting friendships and a strong professional network among members of the cohort and AMP alumni.

Virginia Engineering Online (VEO)

The UVA School of Engineering and Applied Science offers six online professional master degrees in Engineering. These graduate level degrees are in chemical engineering, civil engineering, electrical engineering, mechanical and aerospace engineering, systems engineering, and materials science and engineering.  Through Virginia Engineering Online (VEO), UVA engineering students benefit from the long-standing partnership between the State Council on Higher Education in Virginia (SCHEV) and five other Virginia schools. This higher education partnership is known as the Commonwealth Graduate Engineering Program (CGEP). Students in VEO and CGEP advance their education without leaving their jobs, by taking advantage of a flexible and interactive learning environment.

Virginia Engineering Online courses are delivered live stream to students with reliable internet access, wherever those students are located. Most courses are taught simultaneously to students in the physical classroom at UVA and those participating online.  Our specially equipped classrooms have advanced technology to allow VEO students to participate during class time with their instructors and classmates.  Students also benefit from class recordings, to view or review the material covered in each class session.

Students may apply to take classes individually, or may apply to one of our degree programs. Classes taken before being admitted to one of our degree programs can count towards the student’s degree requirements, if the student choses later to pursue a degree.  Moreover, the GRE - required of all graduate engineering school applicants - can be waived in some of these cases. The GRE waiver terms are described on the VEO website.

Each of the six departments in this program has an appointed advisor who consults with students on curriculum and any special circumstances that might arise with participating working professionals. Students’ planned courses, or programs of study, are created with their advisor and submitted for final approval to their department chair and the Office of Graduate Programs.

Degree requirements are the same as mentioned in the previous Master of Engineering section, with an extra allowance for transfer credits: UVA VEO students are allowed an additional three pre-approved transfer credits (15 total transfer credits) to count towards the program of study.  Graduate courses from other schools with grades of C or better may be transferred toward meeting the requirement of the Master of Engineering degree.  All courses taken at other institutions must be pre-approved.

All graduate course grades taken for degree credit through Virginia Engineering Online, including transfer courses from the participating institutions, are calculated in the student’s grade point average. Students are expected to maintain a B (3.0) grade point average.

Cyber-Physical Systems

Cyber-Physical Systems (CPS) is an interdisciplinary approach to education at UVA which includes faculty and students from six different degree programs: Civil and Environmental Engineering, Computer Engineering, Computer Science, Electrical and Computer Engineering, Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering and Systems and Information Engineering. 

CPS education and research focuses on a deep understanding of the interfaces between the cyber and physical worlds - driving discovery, innovation and education forward in the areas of smart health, smart cities and autonomous systems.  Overall, the key technical principles that underlie a CPS education span both the physical side (physics, digital signal processing, embedded hardware such as sensors and actuators, control and hybrid systems, wireless communication and dynamic systems modeling) and the cyber side (networking, embedded systems programming, machine learning, model-based design and formal methods, privacy and security, real-time systems and software engineering).

The National Science Foundation awarded UVA a five-year NRT grant to build out a Cyber-Physical Systems (CPS) education program. The program will launch in Fall 2019. The CPS NRT Program is not a degree program. As such, students will receive their ME or PhD in their selected degree program and must satisfy those degree requirements.  Students who participate in the program will be a part of the cohort which will include taking CPS courses, participating in CPS research (PhD students), and professional development. Courses and research will count toward the degree requirements for the student’s program – with a focus/emphasis on CPS. Additional information can be found on the Education page of the Link Lab website: http://www.linklab.virginia.edu.

M.E.-M.B.A. Dual Degree Program

The objective of the joint M.E.-M.B.A. degree program is the development of leaders with business administration skills and solid technical expertise. The M.E. degree provides a foundation in engineering or applied science well above the normal undergraduate level. The M.B.A. develops the functional areas of business by teaching the essential behavioral and quantitative sciences that apply to management, as well as the techniques of management decision making. The combined degrees provide the knowledge required for a wide range of business applications.

A student must apply and be admitted to both degree programs and satisfy nearly all of the requirements for both degrees. Typically, the overall program length is reduced by one semester compared to the total time for attaining both degrees separately.

In order to obtain this reduction in the number of credits, the student cannot stop after one degree but must finish both degrees. If the student decides to drop out of the joint degree program, the full requirements of one of the degree programs must be met.

Students in the M.E.-M.B.A. Joint Degree Program are required to complete 24 credits for the Master of Engineering degree in SEAS and 69 credits for the Master of Business Administration degree in the Darden Graduate School of Business Administration. Of the 24 credits in SEAS, 21 credits will be normal course work and 3 credits will be a project course taken in an appropriately numbered course. A minimum of 12 credits of course work must be taken in the major department. None of the 24 credits may include a course taken in the Darden School. The project must have one advisor from SEAS and another from the Darden School.

Part-time Master of Engineering Graduate Students

Those students who wish to pursue a graduate degree in the School of Engineering and Applied Science on a part-time basis must be approved for admission to the degree program by the department or program offering the degree, and they must meet all admission requirements for full-time degree students. Part-time, non-degree, and visiting students taking on-Grounds or online courses for degree credit must register through the School of Engineering and Applied Science. 


Affiliated Organizations


The National Institute of Aerospace (NIA) is a research and graduate education institute initiated by NASA Langley Research Center to ensure a national capability to support NASA’s mission by expanding collaboration with academia and leveraging expertise inside and outside NASA. The institute is a non-profit corporation formed by a consortium that now includes Georgia Tech, North Carolina A&T State University, North Carolina State University, the University of Maryland, the University of Virginia, Virginia Tech, Hampton University, Old Dominion University, the College of William & Mary, and the AIAA Foundation.

NIA conducts basic, formative, and leading edge research and develops revolutionary new technologies in all areas of interest to NASA through partnerships with the Nation’s universities, industry and other government agencies. NIA performs research in a broad range of disciplines relevant to NASA Aeronautics, Space Exploration, Science and Space Operations missions. Current research focus areas include Adaptive Aircraft Technologies, Rotorcraft Aeromechanics, Aviation Safety, Air Traffic Management, Flight Systems, Cooperative Control Systems, Multifunctional Materials, Nano-materials, Sensor Technology, Systems Engineering and Analysis, Space Exploration Technologies, Planetary Science and Engineering, and Atmospheric Science.

Through NIA’s graduate education program, NIA’s member universities offer M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in fields of engineering and the sciences relevant to NASA. Student research is conducted on-site at Langley Research Center in Hampton, VA. NIA also conducts continuing education, public outreach, and technology transfer programs supported by NASA and other sponsoring organizations.

The Virginia Transportation Research Council is sponsored by the Virginia Department of Transportation in cooperation with the University, and its offices and laboratories are located in the Shelburne Building about one-half mile west of Thornton Hall. The council has two primary objectives: providing training in the fundamentals of transportation engineering; and carrying out research programs to improve the economic design, construction, maintenance, and operation of highways. The council operates laboratories that study problems of highway aggregates, geological engineering, concrete, bituminous materials, soils, bridge structures, and traffic and safety.

The Virginia Transportation Research Council also provides financial assistance for graduate students whose thesis or dissertation research is in an area of interest to the council.


Research Centers and Cross Cutting Initiatives


The UVA Engineering School’s research centers, consortia and laboratories are on the leading edge of technology. We place a high priority on collaboration, technology transfer and opportunities that allow our faculty and graduate students to create solutions to the problems and challenges facing the world today.

Some of the finest engineering research centers, consortia and laboratories are located on the Grounds of the University of Virginia. Detailed information about all research centers and individual laboratories can be found at the following website. Selected locations are detailed below. https://engineering.virginia.edu/research/centers

The Brain Institute The University of Virginia Brain Institute was founded in the Spring of 2016 as part of the Cornerstone Plan, with the mission to create a network of closely interacting basic, translational, data and clinical neuroscientists at multiple schools at UVA to address key problems in neuroscience for the benefit of society.

Center for Advanced Biomanufacturing The UVA Center for Advanced Biomanufacturing supports collaborative research focused on developing innovative regenerative materials for use in advanced biomanufacturing, rapid proto-typing platforms amenable to scale-up, and integration and patterning for construction of hierarchical tissue systems. The center brings together UVA’s technical expertise in advanced manufacturing, biomaterials synthesis, biomechanics, mechanobiology, multiscale modeling, imaging, orthopedic clinical translation, and rehabilitation. A central application focus is the improved treatment of the otherwise irrecoverable muscle injuries that result from trauma or congenital defects (e.g., cleft lip/palate) and acquired conditions (e.g. muscle tissue loss due to tumor excision or infection). 

Center for Applied Biomechanics As the largest university-based injury biomechanics laboratory in the world, the center specializes in impact biomechanics for injury prevention. Started by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration in 1989, the center now operates out of a 30,000-square-foot facility located in the University of Virginia Research Park. It is recognized as one of the world's leading research groups in the field, using state-of-the-art equipment to analyze the intricacies of how the human body responds to injury. The center is where crash survival becomes a science.

Center for Automata Processing The University of Virginia and Micron Technology, Inc., co-founded the Center for Automata Processing (CAP) to catalyze the growth of an ecosystem around automata processing. Micron's Automata Processor, a hardware implementation of automata computing, is poised to dramatically accelerate solutions aimed at big data challenges. The center is a collaboration of universities, companies and government agencies. The center's objectives are to develop innovative technologies and applications that address industry, government and societal needs, and to train future data scientists and engineers in this groundbreaking approach to computing.

Center for Electrochemical Science and Engineering (CESE) This center addresses a technologically critical field. It encompasses the broad field of electrochemical science and engineering, which affects the performance and reliability of most products manufactured in the world today. The center is a multi-disciplinary research effort that includes activities in the Departments of Materials Science and Engineering and Chemical Engineering, as well as interactions with Electrical Engineering, Computer Science, and Physics. It is one of the nation's leading research centers of its kind.

The Center for Engineering in Medicine The mission of the UVA Center for Engineering in Medicine is to create the nation's best ecosystem for generating, developing, and translating innovative ideas at the engineering-medicine interface to improve prevention, diagnosis, monitoring, and treatment of disease.

Center for Transportation Studies Since its establishment following the federal Surface Transportation Act of 1987, the UVA Center for Transportation Studies has become one of the foremost university sites for research dealing with information technology, highway safety, transportation planning, management, and policy. The center oversees a comprehensive transportation program that includes education, research, and professional training. Thanks to longstanding ties with such organizations as the Virginia Center for Transportation Innovation and Research, the Mid-Atlantic Universities Transportation Center and the Federal Highway Administration, the center offers a comprehensive research program, covering areas such as intelligent transportation systems, transportation planning and logistics, traffic simulation, highway safety, sustainable transportation, infrastructure management, and freight and traffic operations. In the area of professional training, the center's initiatives include the UVA Transportation Training Academy and the Transportation Project Management Institute.

Center for Visual and Decision Informatics This is a National Science Foundation Industry/University Cooperative Research Center. The center's mission is to research and develop next-generation technologies in data science, big data analytics, including visual analytics, augmented intelligence, and decision informatics to enable decision makers in government and industry to fundamentally improve the way their organization's information is interpreted and analyzed. Its goals are to: become a world leader in big data and data science; create a network of diverse and complementary research sites in the United States and abroad; accelerate the creation and transfer of technology to industry and commercial products; attract high-quality student talent; and produce a future workforce that has the potential to benefit local and global economy.

The Commonwealth Center for Advanced Logistics Systems (CCALS) CCALS is a consortium of industry, government and universities that adapts and transforms advanced logistics systems for market-ready solutions. CCALS engages and benefits its members through applied research and innovation in data analytics, cyber-physical systems, and strategic investments. The University of Virginia and other university members of CCALS bring outstanding capabilities and research depth in logistics-related disciplines. They also provide access to the best and brightest engineering, business and IT students who will compose tomorrow's logistics workforce. Industry sets the agenda at CCALS, leveraging university expertise and real-world experience to solve logistics challenges that arise as complex technological, mechanical and human systems interact. With multiple perspectives at the table and favorable intellectual property policies, CCALS ensures that promising discoveries become effective business solutions faster than ever.

The Commonwealth Center for Advanced Manufacturing (CCAM) CCAM is a public-private research partnership created by the University of Virginia, Virginia Tech, Virginia State University, Canon, Chromalloy, Newport News Shipbuilding, Rolls-Royce, Sandvik Coromant, Siemens, and Sulzer Metco. The center's overall goal is to accelerate new technologies from initial creation through application and proof of concept and into commercial practice by bringing researchers from the universities and industry into a shared collaborative environment. CCAM is housed in a 60,000 square-foot research facility near Richmond, Va., providing researchers access to production quality, state-of-the-art advanced manufacturing equipment for proof-of-concept experiments for new research results. CCAM provides research and internship opportunities for both graduate and undergraduate students.

Data Science Institute Since 2013, the University of Virginia Data Science Institute has pursued a dual mission to educate students and to enable researchers to solve real-world problems using data science in collaboration with academic, government, industry and community partners.  On January 18, 2019, UVA proposed plans to establish a new School of Data Science through a generous gift from the Quantitative Foundation. Still in the design phase, the University continues to seek input and necessary approvals from multiple groups, including the Faculty Senate, Board of Visitors, and ultimately, the State Council of Higher Education for Virginia.

Environmental Resilience Institute The pace and dimensions of environmental change are now greater than in any other period in human history. Climate and land-use change, population growth, and urbanization are putting people, infrastructure, and environments at risk and affecting critical resources such as water, food, and energy. Disruptions − natural and human-caused − have now become the new norm. The Environmental Resilience Institute brings together UVA faculty, students, and external partners to conduct trans-disciplinary research at the intersection of environmental change and human wellbeing. The institute's overarching goal is to identify solutions to some of society's most challenging and complex social-environmental problems. These grand challenges are complex, often global, and thus multicultural. Solutions require a new paradigm of trans-disciplinary research that merges theories, methods, and data across human, natural, and infrastructure systems to both enhance resilience and to understand future scenarios of change.

Global Infectious Diseases Institute UVA's Global Infectious Diseases Institute aims to address three major 21st-century concerns: diarrheal disease in children, pandemic threats and the most resistant and urgent infectious organisms known as superbugs. The institute takes an interdisciplinary approach, from the identification and diagnosis of disease to intervention to evaluation, in order to understand the mechanisms of disease and intervene medically, socially and through policy. The institute will involve faculty and students from the UVA schools for engineering, medicine, arts and sciences, public policy, education, nursing, business and law.

Institute for Nanoscale and Quantum Scientific and Technological Advanced Research (NanoSTAR) NanoSTAR encourages, facilitates, and supports collaborative research, education, and commercialization in the key areas of electronics, biomedicine, and energy and the environment through partnerships with academia, industry, and national laboratories. Nanoscale research at UVa encompasses three broad theme areas: electronics, biomedicine, and energy & the environment, and the university has several core facilities that support the research community.

Link Lab The Link Lab is a collaborative, interdisciplinary initiative focused on world-class research in cyber-physical systems. The lab's faculty are dedicated to creating new knowledge and technologies at the intersection of the cyber and physical worlds, such as body sensors, smart buildings, wireless health, bio-inspired platforms and intelligent transportation systems. 

NSF I/UCRC Center for Laser & Plasma For Advanced Manufacturing (LAM) The mission of the center is to develop a science, engineering and technology base for laser and plasma processing of materials, devices and systems for advanced manufacturing. LAM provides a unique environment for industry partners to stay abreast of the latest developments in advanced manufacturing technologies and access an outstanding team of scientists with top class facilities for research projects while offering excellent networking opportunities with key government personnel, industry peers, and potential future employees.

Mid-Atlantic Transportation Sustainability University Transportation Center (MATS UTC) The U.S. Department of Transportation invests in the future of transportation through its University Transportation Centers (UTC) Program, which awards and administers grants to consortia of colleges and universities across the United States. The UTC Program advances the state-of-the-art in transportation research and technology, and develops the next generation of transportation professionals. The University of Virginia is the lead university of the Mid-Atlantic Transportation Sustainability University Transportation Center (MATS UTC), which serves as a regional focal point to accelerate adoption of sustainable practices in the provision of transportation services. The MATS UTC serves the region through applied research, education, workforce development, and technology transfer focused on environmental sustainability, an area that is not mature in existing regional transportation research and education resources.

Multi-Functional Integrated System Technology (MIST) Center This is a National Science Foundation Industry/University Cooperative Research Center. The center's mission is to facilitate integration of novel materials, processes, devices and circuits into multi-functional systems through research partnerships between university, industry and government stakeholders. While there is a lot of effort in Internet of Things (IoT) applications at the software level, the focus of the MIST center is to develop the hardware base for the IoT. The UVA site adds expertise in functional materials, solid-state devices, photonics, Terahertz sensing, thermal characterization, multiscale modeling and heterogeneous integration.

Multi-Functional Materials Integration Initiative The Multifunctional Materials Integration Initiative (MMI) at the University of Virginia brings researchers from across the School of Engineering to develop ways to tightly co-design multiple technologies across length scales, enabling the next generation of integrated systems. These systems will be capable of achieving "more than Moore" and of interacting with a variety of carriers and environments by coupling multiple disparate materials and integrated processes to create hybrid technologies that enable performance, functionalities, and applications that are not possible with a single, homogeneous, monolithically integrated process.

NSF Nanosystems Engineering Research Center for Advanced Self-Powered Systems of Integrated Sensors and Technologies (ASSIST) The Center for Advanced Self-Powered Systems of Integrated Sensors and Technologies (ASSIST) is a National Science Foundation sponsored Nanosystems Engineering Research Center (NERC). ASSIST develops and employs nanotechnology enabled energy harvesting and storage, ultra-low power electronics, and sensors to create innovative, battery-free, body-powered, and wearable health monitoring systems. The center's mission is to use nanotechnology to improve global health by enabling a correlation between personal health and personal environment, empowering individuals and doctors to manage wellness and improve quality of life. The center received funding from the National Science Foundation (NSF) in 2012 for five years of research, renewable out to 2022. The University of Virginia is one of the university partners.

The Rolls-Royce University Technology Center (UTC)  The University of Virginia is one of only three universities in the United States chosen to join the global Rolls-Royce University Technology Centers network, comprising research groups in world-class universities identified to develop long-term research and technology programs. The centers provide mutual benefits through funding of fundamental, collaborative research to advance key aerospace technologies critical to Rolls-Royce. UVA's center specializes in the study of advanced material systems, flow modelling and other fields. UVA works closely with Rolls-Royce to investigate ceramic matrix composite materials for use in aerospace and other high-technology markets. CMCs offer high strength at the extreme temperatures and pressures encountered in aerospace applications, but with significantly reduced weight. UVA also provides cutting-edge capability in advanced coatings, including novel compositions and application methods. Advanced coating technology is required to take full advantage of CMCs, so the center takes advantage of the synergy of both capabilities existing at the same institution. Complementary areas of research at UVA include catalytic coatings, soot emissions, aqueous corrosion and manufacturing technology development.

Rotating Machinery and Controls Laboratory (ROMAC) ROMAC conducts research in the areas of rotor dynamics, turbomachinery, structural dynamics, magnetic bearings, automatic controls, turbomachinery flows, fluid film bearings, and seals. The Laboratory's research is supported by a consortium of industries through the ROMAC Industrial Research Program.

Virginia Center for Grid Research The Virginia Center for Grid Research is dedicated to performing research and solving issues surrounding the operation, deployment, and use of large distributed data and computing systems. The center's overriding objective is to advance the science and application of grid computing so that it is more useful and readily available to those end users that can benefit from its power. Our goal is not to simply solve a few pieces of the overall grid computing puzzle, but also to promote the use of grid computing systems to improve the capabilities of other areas of science and to perform research and share information and ideas.

The U.Va. Center for Wireless Health Wireless Health is an emerging field that seeks to infuse wireless technologies in healthcare and medical research with the goals of improving patient care and quality of life while reducing healthcare costs. Efforts in this field are necessarily interdisciplinary, bringing together engineers with doctors, nurses, psychologists, medical researchers, caretakers, family members and patients themselves. The UVA Center for Wireless Health was established in 2009 to coordinate research efforts in this area across the University and with collaborators at other institutions. Ongoing projects include in-home sensors for identifying signs of depression, body-worn sensors for fall risk assessment, and an artificial pancreas that combines blood glucose sensing and insulin pumping for Type I diabetics.

The Virginia Microelectronics Consortium (VMEC), a group of colleges and universities including George Mason University, Norfolk state University, Old Dominion University, Virginia Commonwealth University, Virginia Military Institute, the University of Virginia, Virginia Tech, and the College of William and Mary that offer a world-class program in microelectronics education and research. VMEC was created in 1997 to serve the microelectronics industry in the Commonwealth and to exploit our diverse industry and educational microelectronics resources to our mutual benefit. Member companies include Micron and BAE Systems.