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Undergraduate Record 2017-2018
University of Virginia
   
 
  Nov 20, 2017
 
 
    
Undergraduate Record 2017-2018

Course Descriptions

Contract All Courses |

 

Other Courses

  
  •  

    CONC 100 - Accounting


    The course covers such critical skills as reading and analyzing annual reports, creating and maintaining a balance sheet, and measuring income and recording transactions via income and cash flow statements.



    Credits: 0
  
  •  

    CONC 101 - Finance


    The course focuses on how managers make investment and financing decisions, together with the fundamentals of financial mathematics. Students also learn how to analyze financial statements using Microsoft Excel, and how all of these tools and concepts can be used in personal financial planning.



    Credits: 0
  
  •  

    CONC 102 - Management


    The course offers lessons in business strategy and organizational behavior, with particular attention given to the relationship between the organization and the manager. Topics of instruction include the importance of an organization’s value proposition, business strategies, and competitive positioning.



    Credits: 0
  
  •  

    CONC 103 - Marketing


    Students will be exposed to such essential concepts as the marketing mix and consumer decision-making process, and will come to understand key factors influencing consumers’ purchasing decisions. The marketing segment is designed to ensure that students attain a firm understanding of the demands of the marketplace and how companies can position their products for success.



    Credits: 0
  
  •  

    CONC 104 - Communication


    The course focuses on fundamentals of business communication style, skills and metrics, including an introduction to direct style communication. Students will work to identify, and then improve, their personal speaking style; they will learn fundamentals of public speaking non-verbals, learn basic business briefing structure, and learn the importance of audience-centered business speaking.



    Credits: 0
  
  •  

    EDNC 4501 - Academy for Teachers of Struggling Readers


    This four-day academy is designed for educators working with struggling readers in grades K-12. It provides information for teaching struggling readers to read and write. Materials used focus on literacy assessment and intervention techniques. Participants complete homework assignments as part of the academy requirements. Upon successful completion, participants earn a certificate of attendance for 30 contact hours of professional development.



    Credits: 0
  
  •  

    EDNC 4502 - Effective Small Group Reading Instruction Grades K-2


    Participants will learn how to implement three lesson-planning frameworks for small groups based on the students’ literacy stage and assessed need. At the end of the workshop, participants will walk away with hands-on instructional activities suitable for students in grades K-2 who are either Emergent, Beginning, or Transitional readers.



    Credits: 0
  
  •  

    EDNC 4503 - Effective Small Group Reading Instruction Grades 3-5


    Participants will learn how to implement three lesson-planning frameworks for small groups based on the students’ literacy stage and assessed need. At the end of the workshop, participants will walk away with hands-on instructional activities suitable for students in grades 3-5 who are either Beginning, Transitional, or Intermediate readers.



    Credits: 0
  
  •  

    EDNC 4504 - Reading Application Workshops (Phonological Awareness, Phonics, Fluency)


    Each day-long training is designed for K-5 educators and provides information on phonological awareness, phonics, or fluency instruction. Materials from UVA’s Reading@Curry program are used as groups learn how to differentiate either phonological awareness, phonics, or fluency instruction and create make-take activities for use with small group instruction.



    Credits: 0
  
  •  

    EDNC 4505 - George Graham Lecture in Reading


    The George Graham Lecture in Reading is an annual event sponsored by the Reading Program at the Curry School. Begun in 1985, the lecture series has brought well over 50 nationally recognized speakers to the Curry School to share their research perspectives with our participants.



    Credits: 0
  
  •  

    EDNC 4506 - Word Study Instructional Modules


    Each 3.5-hour training module is designed for K-12 educators and provides information from one of eight available word study instruction modules. During each session, groups (maximum 30) meet with 1 instructor to learn how to plan, implement and apply effective word study instruction.



    Credits: 0
  
  •  

    EDNC 4507 - Integrating Reading & Writing Instruction with the Nonfiction ELA Standards


    Participants will discuss the research on use of nonfiction texts to promote comprehension and written response in the elementary grades and examine how to integrate best practices with the state’s revised Standards of Learning. Participants will receive a variety of hands-on activities to promote reading and writing instruction that meets the nonfiction Standards of Learning across grades 2-5.



    Credits: 0
  
  •  

    EDNC 4508 - Support for Literacy Coaches


    Literacy coaches play a significant role in leading and improving a school’s literacy program. This workshop will help coaches evaluate their reading program in terms of assessment data use and management; instructional schedules; instructional teams; texts and materials; developing a school leadership teams with clearly articulated literacy goals and vision.



    Credits: 0
  
  •  

    EGMT 1510 - Aesthetic Engagement


    In this class students will learn to identify, describe, and analyze aesthetic phenomena, understand the social role and ongoing evolution of human creative expression, and develop their own approach to creative expression.



    Credits: 2
  
  •  

    EGMT 1520 - Empirical & Scientific Engagement


    In this class students will learn to analyze claims about the material and social worlds through formulation and testing of new questions and hypotheses based on observation and experience.



    Credits: 2
  
  •  

    EGMT 1530 - Engaging Difference


    In this class, students will learn to critically reflect on one’s own situation and perspective in relations to one’s expanding knowledge of other human experiences, seeking to cultivate a framework for informed reflection on human diversity and social complexity while developing empathy as a foundation for democratic citizenship.



    Credits: 2
  
  •  

    EGMT 1540 - Ethical Engagement


    In this class students will learn to reflect upon and evaluate human conduct and character, consider the ethical components of individual and collective behaviors, and engage in the articulation of ethical questions and moral deliberation.



    Credits: 2
  
  •  

    ENPG 3800 - Tutoring Peer Writers


    Prepares undergraduates to tutor peer writers by introducing them to theories of writing and practices of peer tutoring. Successful completion of the course will qualify students to apply for part-time paid peer tutoring positions in the Writing Center. Students may also use this course to prepare for volunteering as writing tutors in their local communities.



    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    FORU 1500 - Introduction to the Forums


    This course will introduce first-year students to their forum topic. Students should enroll in the section associated with the forum to which they were accepted. (See http://college.as.virginia.edu/forums for information on the forums.)



    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    FORU 1510 - Continuing the Forum


    This course follows the first-semester introductory forum class and keeps students engaged in the content of their forum. Students should enroll in the section associated with the forum to which they were accepted. (See http://college.as.virginia.edu/forums for information on the forums.)



    Credits: 1
  
  •  

    GSMS 3010 - The Global in Situ: Perspectives from the Middle East and South Asia


    The Middle East and South Asia as locations within the “Global South.” This class will de-center Euro-American spaces and intellectual histories, and work toward a grounded re-centering of attention on place-particular histories and intellectual contributions. We will also examine what globalization, as concept and as a set of semi-coherent processes, has meant in particular local and regional spaces in the Middle East and South Asia.



    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    GSMS 4991 - Fourth-year Seminar


    In this seminar, GSMS majors complete their GSMS research paper.



    Credits: 3

Accounting

  
  •  

    ACCT 2010 - Introductory Accounting I


    Designed to introduce students to the language of business, the course begins with the role of financial data in contemporary society, proceeds to develop the accounting model for capturing financial data, and finishes with the problems of measuring and reporting income, assets, liabilities, and equities.



    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ACCT 2020 - Introductory Accounting II


    Continuation of ACCT 2010. Approximately one third of the course deals with additional financial accounting topics, emphasizing managerial considerations and financial analysis. Cost accumulation, allocation, and product cost methods are studied in a manufacturing setting. Matters such as evaluation of performance planning, cost behavior, and special decisions are emphasized. Prerequisite: ACCT 2010.



    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ACCT 3110 - Intermediate Accounting I


    An intensive study of the generally accepted accounting principles for asset valuation, income measurement, and financial statement presentation for business organizations, and the processes through which these principles evolve. Prerequisite: ACCT 2020.



    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ACCT 3120 - Intermediate Accounting II


    Continuation of ACCT 3110, emphasizing accounting for the equities of a firm’s investors and creditors. Covers special problem areas in financial accounting including accounting for leases, pensions, and income taxes. Prerequisite: ACCT 3110.



    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ACCT 3140 - Cost Accounting


    Addresses analysis of cost behavior and volume profit relationships; responsibility accounting and reporting flexible budgets; and the use of standard costs to guide and control performance. Prerequisite: ACCT 2020.



    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ACCT 4450 - Federal Taxation I


    An analysis of the federal income tax law and its application to individuals. A study is made of problems covering personal and business tax situations. Several cases are assigned for which the student prepares illustrative tax returns. Prerequisite: ACCT 2020 or instructor permission.



    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ACCT 4700 - Federal Accounting


    Provides a comprehensive overview of accounting principles, terminology, concepts, and standards unique to federal accounting to include an analysis and discussion of the laws, regulations, rule-setting organizations, and policies leading to current day federal accounting and reporting practices. Requisite: ACCT 2020



    Credits: 3

African-American and African Studies

  
  •  

    AAS 1010 - Introduction to African-American and African Studies I


    This introductory course surveys the histories of people of African descent in Africa, the Americas, and the Caribbean from approximately the Middle Ages to the 1880s. Emphases include the Atlantic slave trade and its complex relationship to Africa; the economic systems, cultures, and communities of Africans and African-Americans in the New World, in slavery and in freedom; the rise of anti-slavery movements; and the socio-economic systems that replaced slavery in the late 19th century.



    Credits: 4
  
  •  

    AAS 1020 - Introduction to African-American and African Studies II


    This introductory course builds upon the histories of people of African descent in Africa, the Americas, and the Caribbean surveyed in AAS 1010. Drawing on disciplines such as Anthropology, History, Religious Studies, Political Science and Sociology, the course focuses on the period from the late 19th century to the present and is comparative in perspective. It examines the links and disjunctions between communities of African descent in the United States and in Latin America, the Caribbean, and Africa. The course begins with an overview of AAS, its history, assumptions, boundaries, and topics of inquiry, and then proceeds to focus on a number of inter-related themes: patterns of cultural experience; community formation; comparative racial classification; language and society; family and kinship; religion; social and political movements; arts and aesthetics; and archaeology of the African Diaspora.



    Credits: 4
  
  •  

    AAS 2224 - Black Femininities and Masculinities in the US Media


    This course, taught as a lower-level seminar, will address the role the media has played in creating images and understandings of ‘Blackness’ in the United States, particularly where it converges with popular ideologies about gender.



    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    AAS 2450 - The Health of Black Folks


    An interdisciplinary course analyzing the relationship between black bodies and biomedicine both historically and in the present. The course is co-taught by Norm Oliver, M.D. (UVa Department of Family Medicine), and offers political, economic, and post-structuralist lenses with which to interpret the individual and socio/cultural health and disease of African-Americans. Readings range across several disciplines including anthropology, epidemiology/public health, folklore, history, science studies, political science, sociology and literary criticism. Topics will vary and may include: HIV/AIDS; reproductive issues; prison, crime and drugs; and body size/image and obesity; the legacy of the Tuskegee Syphilis Trials. Cross listed as ANTH 2450.



    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    AAS 2700 - Festivals of the Americas


    Communities throughout the Caribbean, and South, Central and North America celebrate festivals which are rooted in religious devotion, and which serve to mark sacred time and and to assert claims about religious, ethnic, and national identities. The class will read ethnographic accounts and listen to musical recordings of signature religious festivals–such as Saint Patrick’s Day in Boston, Mardi Gras in New Orleans, and Carnival in Brazil.



    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    AAS 3000 - Women and Religion in Africa


    This course examines women’s religious activities, traditions and spirituality in a number of different African contexts. Drawing on ethnographic, historical, literary, and religious studies scholarship, we will explore a variety of themes and debates that have emerged in the study of gender and religion in Africa. Topics will include gendered images of sacred power; the construction of gender through ritual; sexuality and fertility; and women



    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    AAS 3157 - Caribbean Perspectives


    Breaking with popular constructions of the region as a timeless tropical paradise, this course will re-define the Caribbean as the birthplace of modern forms of capitalism, globalization, and trans-nationalism. We will survey the founding moments of Caribbean history, including the imposition of slavery, the rise of plantation economies, and the development of global networks of goods and peoples.



    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    AAS 3200 - Martin, Malcolm and America


    An intensive examination of African-American social criticism centered upon, but not limited to, the life and thought of Martin Luther King, Jr. and Malcolm X. We will come to grips with the American legacy of racial hatred and oppression systematized in the institutions of antebellum chattel slavery and post-bellum racial segregation and analyze the array of critical responses to, and social struggles against, this legacy.



    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    AAS 3231 - Rise and Fall of the Slave South


    A history of the American South from the arrival of the first English settlers through the end of Reconstruction in 1877. Cross-listed with HIUS 3231.



    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    AAS 3240 - Plantations in Africa and the Americas


    Comparative analysis of plantation culture, economy and polity in Africa, the US, and the Caribbean. Prerequisite: ANTH 1010 or permission of instructor.



    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    AAS 3250 - MotherLands: Landscapes of Hunger, Futures of Plenty


    This course explores the legacy of the “hidden wounds” left upon the landscape by plantation slavery along with the visionary work of ecofeminist scholars and activists daring to imagine an alternative future. Readings, guest lectures, and field trips illumine the ways in which gender, race, and power are encoded in historical, cultural, and physical landscapes associated with planting/extraction regimes such as tobacco, mining, sugar, and corn.



    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    AAS 3280 - Reading the Black College Campus


    Historically Black Colleges and University campuses are records of the process of democratizing (extending to excluded social groups such as African-Americans) opportunities for higher education in America. Through landscapes, we trace this record, unearthing the politics of landscapes via direct experience as well as via interpretations of representations of landscapes in literature, visual arts, maps, plans, and photographs.



    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    AAS 3351 - African Diaspora Religions


    This seminar examines changes in ethnographic accounts of African diaspora religions, with particular attention to the conceptions of religion, race, nation, and modernity found in different research paradigms. Prerequisite: previous course in one of the following: religious studies, anthropology, AAS, or Latin American studies.



    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    AAS 3356 - Culture, Race and World Politics


    This course explores the role of culture and race in international politics. Cultural and ethnic factors have long influenced international relations, especially in the post Cold War era. These “identity” issues raise new questions about the role of national sovereighty and the prospects for democracy in countries around the world. We focus on several broad themes structured around the pivot of identity and otherness.



    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    AAS 3400 - Changing Worlds, Making Tradition: Culture and Identity in South Africa


    Students will have a unique opportunity to explore another culture that of the Venda region in South Africa with linguists from that region. Students will work with visiting faculty to consider the forces shaping Venda culture today. In particular, we will discuss the ways in which indigenous knowledge is constructed and contested in contemporary Africa, and the intersections of this practice with post-colonial thought.



    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    AAS 3456 - The Supreme Court and the Civil Rights Movement


    This course explores the role of the United States Supreme Court in defining the legality of racial distinctions in the United States in the post-Civil War era. Special attention is paid to the role of the court’s landmark 1954 decision, Brown v. Board of Education. The class will be taught in a discussion format based upon assigned readings.



    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    AAS 3457 - Issues in Civil Rights Law


    An exploration of critical issues in modern civil rights law. We engage competing visions of racial equality through law by examining topics such as school desegregation, affirmative action, urban policymaking, and the crisis of mass incarceration. This course will also highlight the limitations of civil rights law and consider the ways in which the law is often complicit in perpetuating race, gender and class hierarchies.



    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    AAS 3471 - History of American Labor


    This course examines the economic, cultural, and political lives of the US working classes from the end of the Civil War to the present.



    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    AAS 3500 - Intermediate Seminar in African-American & African Studies


    Reading, class discussion, and written assignments on a special topic in African-American and African Studies Topics change from term to term, and vary with the instructor. Primarily for fourth-year students but open to others.



    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    AAS 3652 - African American History since 1865


    This course surveys the major political, economic, and cultural developments in black America from the end of the Civil War to the present. Through an engagement with various primary and secondary texts, and multimedia, students examine African Americans’ endeavors to build strong families and communities, create socially meaningful art, and establish a political infrastructure capable of bringing into existence a more just and humane world.



    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    AAS 3749 - Food and Meaning in Africa and the Diaspora


    This course investigates the traditions and symbolics of food and eating in Africa and throughout the African Diaspora – wherever people of African descent have migrated or have been forced to move. This course will help students to investigate the way the foods people eat’ or don’t eat’ hold meaning for people within a variety of cultural contexts.Topics will include symbol, taboo, sexuality, bodies, ritual, kinship & beauty, among others.



    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    AAS 4070 - Directed Reading and Research


    Students in the Distinguished Majors Program should enroll in this course for their first semester of thesis research.



    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    AAS 4080 - Thesis


    Second-semester DMP students should enroll in this course to complete their theses.



    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    AAS 4109 - Civil Rights Movement and the Media


    Course examines the crucial relationship between the Civil Rights Movement and mass media from 1950s through early 1970s, looking at a variety of media forms: Hollywood cinema, network television, mainstream newspapers, photojournalism, the black press, and news as primary documents that can tell us something about American race relations during this period and how the nation responded to challenges posed by a powerful social change movement.



    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    AAS 4500 - Advanced Seminar in African-American and African Studies


    Reading, class discussion, and research on a special topic in African-American and African Studies culminatiing in the composition of a research paper. Topics change from term to term, and vary with the instructor. Primarily for fourth-year students but open to others.



    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    AAS 4501 - Advanced Research Seminar in History & AAS


    Reading, class discussion, and research on a special topic in African-American and African Studies culminating in the composition of a research paper. Topics change from term to term, and vary with the instructor. Primarily for fourth-year AAS and History students–double majors and others. Crosslisted with the History major seminar.



    Credits: 4
  
  •  

    AAS 4570 - Advanced Research Seminar in African-American & African Studies


    Reading, class discussion, and research on a special topic in African-American and African Studies culminating in the composition of a research paper. Topics change from term to term, and vary with the instructor. Primarily for fourth-year students but open to others.



    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    AAS 4845 - Black Speculative Fiction


    This course seeks to explore the world of African American ‘speculative’ fiction. This genre of writing largely includes science fiction, fantasy fiction, and horror. In this class, we will read, watch, and discuss narratives by black writers of speculative fiction to better understand the motivation, tone, and agenda in the work of black writers. We will also consider the role of black culture and representation in the larger field.



    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    AAS 4993 - Independent Study


    Allows students to work on an individual research project. Students must propose a topic to an appropriate faculty member, submit a written proposal for approval, prepare an extensive annotated bibliography on relevant readings comparable to the reading list of a regular upper-level course, and complete a research paper of at least 20 pages.



    Credits: 1 to 12

Air Science

  
  •  

    AIRS 100 - Leadership Laboratory


    A mandatory laboratory in leadership and followership development for AFROTC cadets. As a complement to the air science classes, this laboratory focuses on applying leadership principles and understanding leaders’ responsibilities while emphasizing the benefits of practical experience. (2 hrs.)  Prerequisite: Enrollment in Air Force ROTC.



    Credits: 0
  
  •  

    AIRS 101 - AFROTC Physical Training


    Fulfills weekly physical training requirement for AFROTC cadets. Emphasis is placed on increasing cardio-vascular endurance through various forms of exercise, including, but not limited to, calisthenics, circuit training and running.



    Credits: 0
  
  •  

    AIRS 1100 - The Foundations of the U.S. Air Force


    Introduces the United States Air Force and Air Force Reserve Officers’ Training Corps. Topics include mission and organization of the Air Force, officership and professionalism, military customs and courtesies, Air Force officer career opportunities. Corequisite: AIRS 100. (2 hrs)



    Credits: 1
  
  •  

    AIRS 1200 - The Foundations of the U.S. Air Force


    Introduces the United States Air Force and Air Force Reserve Officers’ Training Corps. Topics include Air Force core values, leadership team building and communication skills. Corequisite: AIRS 100. (2 hrs.)



    Credits: 1
  
  •  

    AIRS 2100 - The Evolution of Air and Space Power


    Examines general aspects of air and space power through a historical perspective, from the first balloons and dirigibles through the Korean War. Presents historical examples of the development of Air Force capabilities and missions to demonstrate the evolution of what has become today’s USAF air and space power. Investigates several fundamental truths associated with war in the third dimension (e.g., Principles of War and Tenets of Air and Space Power). Considers the general element and employment of air and space power from institutional, doctrinal, and historical perspectives. Discusses the importance of Air Force core values using operational examples and historical Air Force leaders. Continues to develop communication skills. Corequisite: AIRS 100. (2 hrs.)



    Credits: 1
  
  •  

    AIRS 2200 - The Evolution of Air and Space Power


    Examines general aspects of air and space power through a historical perspective, from the Vietnam Conflict to the space-age global positioning systems used in today’s conflicts. Presents historical examples of the development of Air Force capabilities and missions to demonstrate the evolution of what has become today’s USAF air and space power. Investigates several fundamental truths associated with war in the third dimension (e.g., Principles of War and Tenets of Air and Space Power). Considers the general element and employment of air and space power from institutional, doctrinal, and historical perspectives. Discusses the importance of Air Force core values using operational examples and historical Air Force leaders. Continues to develop communication skills. Corequisite: AIRS 100. (2 hrs.)   



    Credits: 1
  
  •  

    AIRS 3100 - Concepts of Air Force Leadership and Management


    Focuses on the study of leadership, management fundamentals, professional knowledge, and communication skills required of an Air Force junior officer. Case studies are used to examine Air Force leadership and management situations as a means of demonstrating and exercising practical application of the concepts being studied. Prerequisite: Officer Field Training attendance; corequisite: AIRS 100. (2 hrs.)



    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    AIRS 3200 - Concepts of Air Force Leadership and Management


    Focuses on the study of leadership, management fundamentals, professional knowledge, Air Force personnel and evaluation systems, leadership ethics, and communication skills required of an Air Force junior officer. Case studies are used to examine Air Force leadership, core values, and military ethics as a means of demonstrating and exercising practical application of the concepts being studied. Prerequisite: Officer Field Training attendance; corequisite: AIRS 100. (2 hrs.)



    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    AIRS 4100 - National Security Affairs/Preparation for Active Duty


    Examines the national security process, constitutional provisions, advanced leadership ethics, joint operations, and Air Force doctrine. Topics include the military as a profession, officership, civilian control of the military, and current issues affecting the military. Emphasizes refining communication skills through cadet briefings. Prerequisite: AIRS 3100 and/or 3200; corequisite: AIRS 100. (2 hrs.)



    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    AIRS 4200 - National Security Affairs/Preparation for Active Duty


    Examines military law, regional studies, advanced leadership ethics, and Air Force doctrine. Topics include the military as a profession, officership, preparation for active duty, and current issues affecting the military. Emphasizes refining communication skills through cadet presentations. Prerequisite: AIRS 3100 and/or 3200; corequisite: AIRS 100. (2 hrs.)



    Credits: 3

American Sign Language

  
  •  

    ASL 1010 - Elementary American Sign Language I


    Introduces receptive and expressive American Sign Language skills, including basic vocabulary, sentence structure, classifiers, use of space, non-manual type indicators, and fingerspelling. Examines signing deaf people as a linguistic/cultural minority.



    Credits: 4
  
  •  

    ASL 1020 - Elementary American Sign Language II


    Introduces receptive and expressive American Sign Language skills, including basic vocabulary, sentence structure, classifiers, use of space, non-manual type indicators, and fingerspelling. Examines signing deaf people as a linguistic/cultural minority. Prerequisite: ASL 1010 or successful completion of placement exam.



    Credits: 4
  
  •  

    ASL 2010 - Intermediate American Sign Language I


    Continues training in American Sign Language, with focus on more complex sentence types, signs, and idioms. Considers ASL literary forms such as poetry, theater, and storytelling, as well as deaf history and other related topics. Prerequisite: ASL 1020 or successful completion of placement exam.



    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ASL 2020 - Intermediate American Sign Language II


    Continues training in American Sign Language, with focus on more complex sentence types, signs, and idioms. Considers ASL literary forms such as poetry, theater, and storytelling, as well as deaf history and other related topics. Prerequisite: ASL 2010 or successful completion of placement exam.



    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ASL 2300 - Women and Gender In The Deaf World


    Examines the roles of deaf women inside and outside of the signing Deaf community. Using an interdisciplinary approach, considers such topics as language and cultural barriers, violence against women, sexuality, race, class, education, and work. Investigates disparities between deaf and hearing women and the choices available to d/Deaf women, individually and collectively, in contemporary culture. No prior knowledge of ASL is required.



    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ASL 2450 - Deaf People, Society, and the Law


    This course will explore the Deaf community, discrimination, and laws affecting Deaf people in the United States. We will consider the experiences of Deaf people before and after such measures as the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the Americans With Disabilities Act of 1990 to gain insight into how the law affects social perceptions and people’s everyday lives. No prior knowledge of ASL or Deaf culture is required for this course.



    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ASL 3010 - Conversational ASL


    Continues language and cultural instruction with emphasis on everyday conversation. Topics include common idioms and slang, explaining rules, discussing finances and major decisions, and storytelling techniques such as role-shifting and narrative structure. Students will be required to interact with deaf signers. Prerequisite: ASL 2020 or successful completion of placement interview.



    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ASL 3081 - History of the American Deaf Community


    This new course will examine the history of deaf people in the United States over the last three centuries, with particular attention to the emergence and evolution of a community of Deaf people who share a distinct sign language and culture. We will read both primary texts from specific periods and secondary sources. We will also view a few historical films. Prerequisite: none (thought a previous class in History or ASL is recommended)



    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ASL 3450 - Comparative Linguistics: ASL and English


    English Language and Literature



    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ASL 4112 - Psychology and Deaf People


    This course will consider the psychological development and psychosocial issues of deaf people. Topics covered will include cognition, education, hearing and speech perception, impact of family interaction and communication approaches, influence of etiology/genetics, language development, literacy, mental health, social and personality development, interpersonal behavior, and current trends.



    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ASL 4115 - Multiculturalism in the Deaf Community


    Explores cultural influences on identity development, family systems, linguistics, engagement with educational and community agencies, and resilience within the Deaf community. The interaction of culture, identity and language will be highlighted and applied to future trends for groups within the Deaf community, such as children of Deaf adults, GLTB community members, ethnic minority groups, women, and persons with disabilities.



    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ASL 4750 - Topics in Deaf Studies


    Examines such topics as American deaf history; ASL linguistics; deaf education; cultural versus pathological views of deaf people; controversies over efforts to eliminate sign language and cure deafness; ASL poetry and storytelling; deafness in mainstream literature, film, and drama; deafness and other minority identities; and the international deaf community.



    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ASL 4810 - Deafness in Literature and Film


    Studies representations of deaf people in literature and film over the last three centuries. Takes a contrapuntal approach, juxtaposing canonical literature and mainstream films with works (in either English or American Sign Language) by relatively unknown deaf artists.



    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ASL 4993 - Independent Study in American Sign Language


    Independent Study in American Sign Language. Prerequisite: Instructor Permission



    Credits: 1 to 3

American Studies

  
  •  

    AMST 1050 - Slavery and Its Legacies


    This course examines the history of slavery and its legacy at UVA and in the central Virginia region. The course aims to recover the experiences of enslaved individuals and their roles in building and maintaining the university, and to contextualize those experiences within Southern history.



    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    AMST 2001 - Introduction to American Studies


    This course introduces students to American Studies, the interdisciplinary study of US culture. Students will be exposed to the three main categories of American Studies methods, historical analysis, close analysis, and fieldwork and to a broad variety of cultural forms, including films, photographs, music, sermons, journalism, fiction, speeches, court decisions, government documents, and web-based materials including social media sites.



    Credits: 3
  
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    AMST 2100 - Introduction to Asian American Studies


    An interdisciplinary introduction to the culture and history of Asians and Pacific Islanders in America. Examines ethnic communities such as Chinese, Japanese, Filipino, Korean, Asian Indian, and Native Hawaiian, through themes such as immigration, labor, cultural production, war, assimilation, and politics. Texts are drawn from genres such as legal cases, short fiction, musicals, documentaries, visual art, and drama.



    Credits: 3
  
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    AMST 2155 - Whiteness & Religion: Religious Foundations of a Racial Category


    This class examines the role religion plays in defining a racial category known as whiteness. By reading cultural histories and ethnographies of the religious practices of various communities, we will examine how groups now classified as white (Irish, Italians, Poles, Jews, etc.) and religious images (depictions of Jesus and the Virgin Mary) “became white” and the role that religious practice played in this shift in racial classification.



    Credits: 3
  
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    AMST 2210 - Arts of the Harlem Renaissance


    Studies the literature, painting, photography and prints produced by New York artists based in Harlem in the 1920s and 1930s, and examines their relation to concurrent social, cultural, and aesthetic issues.



    Credits: 3
  
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    AMST 2220 - Race, Identity and American Visual Culture


    Surveys popular visual material (advertisements, cartoons, films, paintings and photographs) and its representation of race in the united States from 1850 to 1950.



    Credits: 3
  
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    AMST 2231 - Native Americans in Popular Culture


    This course interrogates American Indian people in pop culture. Students historicize and analyze the representation of American Indians across such media as print, photography, cinema, music, and more recently in the twenty-first century, social media. This course asks students to think about the ways American Indian people have not only contributed to pop culture, but the desire for American Indians as cultural objects.



    Credits: 3
  
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    AMST 2233 - Contemporary Native American Literature


    In this course we use contemporary Native American literature, authored by individuals from diverse tribal backgrounds, as an accessible avenue to better understand the history of federal Indian policy, its complexity, legal construct, and the ways federal Indian policy influences the lives of American Indian people.



    Credits: 3
  
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    AMST 2300 - Introduction to U.S. Latino Studies


    A small lecture course (35) AMST 2300 offers students close study and analysis of significant texts or cultural artifacts that are printed, visual, oral or musical representing the perspective and contributions of the main Latino populations in the United States. These works include, but are not limited to, cultural manifestations from Puerto Rican, Chicano, Dominican, Central American and Cuban American origin.



    Credits: 3
  
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    AMST 2321 - Latinx Fiction and Film


    This course explores the diverse and also converging experiences of Latinos in the US. We will read contemporary novels and poetry by Latinx authors from different Latinx groups (Chicano, Puerto Rican, Cuban, Dominican, Central American and South American). We will discuss reasons for migration, concepts of the “border” and the impact of bilingualism on group identity. We will view films that depict the Latinx experience in the US.



    Credits: 3
  
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    AMST 2420 - Cultural Landscapes of the United States


    This course introduces the study of everyday landscapes as cultural spaces that illuminate the history of social and political developments in the U.S. It encourages a broad understanding of landscape across genres-painting, photography, fiction, journalism. Particular focus will be paid to the political economy of landscapes to explore the connections between landscape and public policy from multiple vantage points.



    Credits: 3
  
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    AMST 2422 - Point of View Journalism


    This course analyzes ‘point-of-view’ journalism as a controversial but credible alternative to the dominant model of ”objectivity’ in the U.S. news media. It will survey point-of-view journalists from Benjamin Franklin to the modern blog.



    Credits: 3
  
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    AMST 2460 - Language in the U.S.


    Through diverse academic/theoretical readings and spoken, written, and visual material, students will learn to analyze, evaluate, and construct arguments as related to critical linguistic and cultural analysis of primary and secondary source material. This course examines complex relationships among American language and cultural practices, American history, race, gender, and class ideologies, and social identities.



    Credits: 3
  
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    AMST 2462 - Language & New Media


    This course investigates the interactional relationship between language and American society with a focus on New Media contexts. More specifically, it considers how language both shapes and is shaped by society in email, texting, Facebook, blogging, online gaming, YouTube, and more. Through an interdisciplinary approach, students examine how social constructions are created by, and are realized in New Media genres.



    Credits: 3
  
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    AMST 2470 - Disney


    This discussion course examines the cultural role of Disney and its effects on the visual arts in the 20th and 21st centuries. It considers a range of material to interrogate how Disney as both a corporation and a cultural icon promotes and reinforces national ideals. Presented both chronologically and thematically, students engage with aesthetic, ideological and theoretical concerns regarding history, identity, space/place, and popular culture.



    Credits: 3
  
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    AMST 2500 - Major Works for American Studies


    Topics vary according to instructor. The goal of the course is to introduce students to interdisciplinary work in American Studies by juxtaposing works across disciplinary boundaries and from different methodological perspectives.



    Credits: 3
  
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    AMST 2660 - Spiritual But Not Religious: Spirituality in America


    What does “spiritual but not religious” mean, and why has it become such a pervasive self-description in contemporary America? This interdisciplinary course surveys spirituality in America, with a particular eye for the relationship between spirituality and formal religion, on the one hand, and secular modes of understanding the self, such as psychology, on the other.



    Credits: 3
  
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    AMST 2711 - American Environmental History


    Explores the historical relationship between people and the environment in North America from colonial times to the present. Topics include the role of culture, economics, politics, and technology in that relationship. Prerequisite: first-year writing course (e.g. TCC 101, ENWR 101)



    Credits: 3
 

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