Mar 29, 2020  
Undergraduate Record 2017-2018 
    
Undergraduate Record 2017-2018 [ARCHIVED RECORD]

Course Descriptions


 

Architecture

  
  •  

    ARCH 3020 - Foundation Studio IV


    This studio course emphasizes conceptualization and synthesis of complex programs in contemporary contexts at multiple scales. Prerequisite: ARCH 3010



    Credits: 6
  
  •  

    ARCH 3021 - Design Thinking Studio II


    This is a studio based course on Architectural design thinking with a focus on creative approaches to analyzing and solving diverse problems. Prerequisite: ARCH 3011



    Credits: 4
  
  •  

    ARCH 3070 - Foundations in Design Thinking


    This design thinking course will focus on complex design challenges with the goal of generating relevant proposals that benefit the common good. Design thinking approaches will be used to leverage innovative scenarios from novel perspectives to frame new interdisciplinary relationships and design strategies. Design principles and iterative applications will frame project-based exercises and involve students from across the University



    Credits: 4
  
  •  

    ARCH 3120 - 20th Century History of Ideas


    This class examines major themes & methodologies found in or taken up by twentieth century architectural theory. The course considers architecture through a wider set of cultural studies that include critical theory, phenomenology, semiotics, structuralism, post-structuralism & psychoanalysis.Questions involve the associations constructed between architecture &autonomy, technology, perception, art,theory&practice. Prereq: ARH 1010 &1020



    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ARCH 3122 - Contemporary Spatial Practices


    This seminar will present a critical account of contemporary spatial practices and develop a theoretical framework of spatial operations enabling students to situate their own work within this new territory.



    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ARCH 3140 - Architectural Analysis: Key Buildings of Modernism


    Investigates the link between ideas and forms of significant buildings in the canon of modern architecture.



    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ARCH 3230 - Systems, Sites and Building


    Examines the role of design in mediating between dynamic climatic forces such as wind, energy and light and the human response to the environment. Weaving discussions of fundamental principles with case studies and illustrative exercises, the course focuses on the design of the boundary between the internal and external environments.



    Credits: 4
  
  •  

    ARCH 3260 - Building Matters


    Explores and evaluates the properties of basic building materials and construction assemblies. Introduces building construction from a variety of viewpoints, with emphasis on ecological thinking in architectural decision-making. Students will analyze and critique materials and construction systems, and how they correspond to aesthetic, technical, financial and ethical issues.



    Credits: 4
  
  •  

    ARCH 3270 - Intro Parametric Structural Design


    This second course in structures for undergraduate students focuses on synthesis of structural issues and design. Prerequisite: ARCH 2240



    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ARCH 3271 - Breaking BIM


    This course offers an introduction to the principles of Building Information Modeling (BIM) and the interface and workflow of Autodesk’s Revit. Topics include the BIM workflow, associative modeling, conceptual massing, building components, site tools, customizing components, materials, detailing, schedules, and visualization. With successful completion students will be able to use Revit proficiently in a design process.



    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ARCH 3410 - CAAD 3D Modeling & Visualization


    A comprehensive course in three-dimensional computer aided design and visualization methods used in architecture and landscape architecture. The class explores design worlds that are made accessible through computer-based media. Lectures provide a theoretical framework for computer-aided design, describe current methods, and speculate on advanced methods.



    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ARCH 3422 - Computer Animation: Design in Motion


    Arch 3422 is a hands-on workshop in moviemaking by techniques in three-dimensional computer animation with composite video, sound editing and capture. We screen independent and feature film animation and ongoing student work concluding in a 1 to 5 min. final project. Short readings are in film and cognitive science. Students may enroll from diverse areas such as design, art, drama, computer science, the physical sciences, and education.



    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ARCH 3500 - Special Topics in Architecture


    Topical offerings in architecture.



    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ARCH 3640 - Town Design


    This course will investigate the generic principles and strategies that shape the form and character of towns and discuss influential towns that over the past several generations have, at least to their advocates, represented ‘good’ planning and design. While recognizing the importance of social and economic factors, the course will emphasize the physical, visual, and experiential qualities of towns.



    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ARCH 3710 - Photography and Digital Media


    This course seeks to give students the ability to conceive and create digital photographic imagery with control and sophistication. Topics include fundamentals of photography, color theory, digital control of visual qualities, and methods of image montage for both still images and short animations. Methods include production and presentation for both printed hard copy and for the World Wide Web.



    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ARCH 3993 - Independent Study


    Independent research on topics selected by individual students in consultation with a faculty advisor



    Credits: 1 to 3
  
  •  

    ARCH 4010 - Research Studio II


    This studio course emphasizes conceptualization and synthesis of complex programs in contemporary contexts at multiple scales. Prerequisite: ARCH 3020



    Credits: 6
  
  •  

    ARCH 4011 - Design Thinking Studio III


    This is a studio based course on Architectural design thinking with a focus on creative approaches to analyzing and solving diverse problems. Prerequisite: ARCH 3021



    Credits: 4
  
  •  

    ARCH 4020 - Independent Design Research Studio


    Students pursue a semester long independent design project. Prerequisite: ARCH 4010 or ARCH 4011.



    Credits: 6
  
  •  

    ARCH 4021 - Ind Design Thinking Research Studio


    This is a studio based course on Architectural design thinking with a focus on creative approaches to analyzing and solving diverse problems. Prerequisite: ARCH 3011/3021



    Credits: 6
  
  •  

    ARCH 4100 - Thesis Positioning


    Architectural research methods are introduced and applied to the development of an undergraduate thesis in Architecture. Students develop and investigate research questions, research methods, and data sources. Open to both Pre-Professional and Design Thinking concentrations.



    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ARCH 4201 - Forms and Materials of the Buildings of Venice


    The course aims at introducing the physical essence of Venice through direct contact with selected materials by means of manifold complementary approaches. Different specialists, from week to week, will go into depth on the techniques & their aesthetics through time, taking the students to sites of interest. Among others, the course provides an experience in a glass furnace as part of a practical design atelier, & focuses on marbles & stones.



    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ARCH 4401 - Drawing Venice


    This course will focus on the analysis of urban space and flows, with a focus on the development of representational techniques that investigate the relationship between urban form and urban life. The course will engage a range of media, from hand drawing through digital mapping, photography and film. The students will be expected to develop a capacity to diagram both static and dynamic conditions that structure the urban experience.



    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ARCH 4500 - Special Topics in Architecture


    Topical offerings in architecture.



    Credits: 1 to 3
  
  •  

    ARCH 4510 - J-Term Courses


    January Term courses provide students with unique opportunities: new courses that address topics of current interest, study abroad programs, undergraduate research seminars, and interdisciplinary courses. The intensive format of “J-term” classes encourages extensive student-faculty contact and allows students and faculty to immerse themselves in a particular subject.



    Credits: 1 to 3
  
  •  

    ARCH 4820 - Teaching Experience


    Selected students lead a seminar (of 8 to 10 younger students each) for ‘Lessons of the Lawn’ and ‘Lessons in Making.’ All student assistants attend class lectures (for a second time) and then meet with their seminar groups weekly, leading discussions of topics and questions raised by the instructor.



    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ARCH 4821 - Research Experience


    Student will engage with faculty on selected topics in Architecture Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor



    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ARCH 4993 - Independent Study


    Independent research on topics selected by individual students in consultation with a faculty advisor



    Credits: 1 to 4
  
  •  

    ARCH 4995 - Ind Design Res Thesis Studio


    Independent Design Research Studio for 4th year students in their final year. Prerequisite: ARCH 4010 and permission of the chair.



    Credits: 6

Architecture School

  
  •  

    SARC 1500 - SARC Advising Seminars


    SARC 1500 courses are 1-credit seminars capped at 20 first-year students, all of whom are assigned to the instructor as advisees. They are topically focused on an area identified by the faculty member; they also include a significant advising component centered on undergraduate issues (e.g., choosing a major, study abroad opportunities, undergraduate research, etc.).



    Credits: 1
  
  •  

    SARC 3100 - Principles and Practices of Arts Administration


    Introductory survey of principles and practices of arts administration, as the crossroads of art and audience.



    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    SARC 3102 - The Arts & Public Policy


    Arts & Culture policy is sequestered in the East Wing of the White House, far from the West Wing, where culture is considered a ‘soft’ backwater of interest (and of career building); but would 9/11 even have happened were it not for exports from ‘America’s cultural juggernaut’ (Ivey) inundating traditional societies around the globe? Arts Policy once played important roles in Foreign Policy



    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    SARC 3103 - Art Business


    A survey of contemporary phenomena in the art market, including an in-depth look at current dealings in major auction houses, museums and galleries. An extensive exploration of possible career routes through a series of guest lectures. Speakers possess backgrounds in fine art, arts administration, curation, art history, and economics. Course includes in-class debates and case studies based upon current events in the visual art market.



    Credits: 1 to 2
  
  •  

    SARC 3104 - Design Thinking


    This course is a pilot seminar designed to launch for the School of Architecture a curriculum in Design Thinking, to be broadened and deepened in subsequent semesters. The course introduces the use of abductive reasoning to solve complex problems, using Architecture and the Arts as exemplars of creative problem solving techniques.



    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    SARC 3301 - The Arts & the Environment


    The Arts and the Environment explores our complicated human relationship to our environment using water as a key focal point. The goal is to explore and challenge scientists and artists, architects, commerce students and engineers to re-think how we and thus our artists relate to the Environment.



    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    SARC 3500 - Special Topics in the School of Architecture


    Topical offerings in the School of Architecture



    Credits: 1 to 4
  
  •  

    SARC 3993 - Independent Study: School of Architecture


    Independent research on topics selected by individual students in consultation with a faculty advisor



    Credits: 1 to 4
  
  •  

    SARC 4801 - Italian Language and Culture


    Continuation of Italian language study begun in semester prior to arrival in Venice. In addition, introduction to a range of cultural aspects of living in Italy.



    Credits: 2

Arts Administration

  
  •  

    ARAD 1550 - Topics in Arts Administration


    Topics in Arts Administration, where the topic may change. At present (2012) The Art Business and Art Criticism are topic examples under the ARAD 1550 banner, both being taught in Fall, 2012.



    Credits: 1
  
  •  

    ARAD 2993 - Independent Study


    This course provides the opportunity for independent study in the subject of Arts Administration. Prerequisites: Instructor Permission.



    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ARAD 3100 - Principles and Practices of Arts Administration


    Introductory survey of principles and practices of arts administration, as the crossroads of art and audience.



    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ARAD 3550 - Topics of Arts in Context


    Topics course on The Arts in Context, where role of the arts in human society is examined in various contexts.



    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ARAD 3993 - Independent Study


    Independent study in Arts Adminstration



    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ARAD 4200 - Development and Board Management


    This course explores techniques and rationales behind the giving and the raising of funds; and the closely related skills of leading and managing trustees, boards and volunteers.  The course will examine these fields using both theory and practical applications.  Both in-class discussions and distinguished guest speakers will be utilized.



    Credits: 3

Astronomy

  
  •  

    ASTR 1210 - Introduction to the Sky and Solar System


    A study of the night sky primarily for non-science majors. Provides a brief history of astronomy through Newton. Topics include the properties of the sun, earth, moon, planets, asteroids, meteors and comets; origin and evolution of the solar system; life in the universe; and recent results from space missions and ground-based telescopes.



    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ASTR 1220 - Introduction to Stars, Galaxies, and the Universe


    A study of stars, star formation, and evolution primarily for non-science majors. Topics include light, atoms, and modern observing technologies; origin of the chemical elements; supernovae, pulsars, neutron stars, and black holes; structure and evolution of our galaxy; nature of other galaxies; active galaxies and quasars; expanding universe, cosmology, the big bang, and the early universe.



    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ASTR 1230 - Introduction to Astronomical Observation


    An independent laboratory class for non-science majors, meeting at night, in which students work individually or in small groups on observational projects that focus on the study of constellations, planets, stars, nebulae, and galaxies using binoculars, 8-inch telescopes, and imaging equipment at the department’s student observatory. Prerequisites: ASTR 1210, 1220, or 1270 or instructor permission.



    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ASTR 1260 - Threats from Outer Space


    This introductory astronomy course for non-science majors deals with harmful, or potentially harmful, astronomical phenomena such as asteroid/comet impacts, supernovae, gamma ray bursts, solar storms, cosmic rays, black holes, galaxy collisions, and the end of the universe. Physical principles will be used to evaluate the dangers involved.



    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ASTR 1270 - Unsolved Mysteries in the Universe


    An exploration of the unsolved mysteries in the universe and the limits of our knowledge for non-science majors. The class emphasizes the nature of scientific endeavor, and explores the boundaries between science, philosophy, and metaphysics. A number of thought provoking topics are discussed including the beginning and end of the universe, black holes, extraterrestrial life, the nature of time, dark matter and dark energy.



    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ASTR 1280 - The Origins of Almost Everything


    From ancient Babylon to modern cosmology, nearly every culture on Earth has stories and myths of creation. It is a universal human desire to understand where we came. In this introductory astronomy class for non-science majors, students will explore the origins of the Universe, structure and galaxies, stars, planets and life. The course will use the content to illustrate the nature of science and scientific inquiry.



    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ASTR 1290 - Black Holes


    Black holes are stellar remnants that are so dense that nothing, not even light, can escape their gravitational pull. Nevertheless, systems that contain these “dark stars” are among the brightest sources in the universe. In this introductory course, aimed primarily at non-science majors, students will explore the seemingly paradoxical nature of black holes and evaluate the astronomical evidence for their existence.



    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ASTR 1500 - Seminar


    Primarily for first and second year students, taught on a voluntary basis by a faculty member. Topics vary.



    Credits: 1
  
  •  

    ASTR 1510 - Seminar


    Primarily for first and second year students, taught on a voluntary basis by a faculty member. Topics vary.



    Credits: 1
  
  •  

    ASTR 1610 - Intro to Astronomical Research for Potential Astronomy/Astrophysics Majors


    For first and second year students considering Astronomy/Astronomy-Physics as a major, or current A/A-P majors. Faculty will present ongoing research to introduce students to both the subject matter and the required physical, mathematical, and computational background of contemporary astronomy research. Potential long term undergraduate research projects will be emphasized. Prerequisite: One semester of calculus and one semester of physics.



    Credits: 1
  
  •  

    ASTR 2110 - Introduction to Astrophysics I


    Primarily for science majors. A thorough discussion of the basic concepts and methods of solar system, stellar, galactic, and extragalactic astronomy and astrophysics with an emphasis on physical principles. Prerequisite/corequisite: MATH 1210 or 1310, PHYS 1610 or 2310, or instructor permission; ASTR 2110 and 2120 form a sequence and should be taken in that order.



    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ASTR 2120 - Introduction to Astrophysics II


    Primarily for science majors. A thorough discussion of the basic concepts and methods of solar system, stellar, galactic, and extragalactic astronomy and astrophysics with an emphasis on physical principles. Prerequisite/corequisite: ASTR 2110, MATH 1210 or 1310, PHYS 1610 or 2310, or instructor permission; ASTR 2110 and 2120 form a sequence and should be taken in that order.



    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ASTR 3130 - Observational Astronomy


    Primarily for science majors. A lecture and laboratory course that deals with basic observational techniques in astronomy. The laboratory section generally meets at night. Students use observational facilities at the McCormick and Fan Mountain Observatories. Additional work outside posted laboratory hours will be required to take advantage of clear skies. Prerequisite: ASTR 2110,2120 or ASTR 1210,1220, or instructor permission.



    Credits: 4
  
  •  

    ASTR 3140 - Introduction to Observational Radio Astronomy


    An introduction to the tools, techniques, and science of radio astronomy. Discussion includes fundamentals of measuring radio signals, radiometers, antennas, and interferometers, supplemented by illustrative labs; radio emission mechanisms and simple radiative transfer; radio emission from the Sun and planets, stars, galactic and extragalactic sources, and the cosmic microwave background. Prerequisite: ASTR 2110, 2120.



    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ASTR 3340 - Teaching Astronomy


    A seminar-style class offered primarily for non-majors planning to teach science or looking to improve their ablility to communicate science effectively. In addition to astronomy content, students will learn effective teaching strategies and gain practical experience by developing and implementing their own concept-based astronomy lessons. Prerequisite: ASTR 1210, 1240; instructor permission



    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ASTR 3410 - Archaeo-Astronomy


    Open to non-science students. Discussion of prescientific astronomy, including Mayan, Babylonian, and ancient Chinese astronomy, and the significance of relics such as Stonehenge. Discusses the usefulness of ancient records in the study of current astrophysical problems such as supernova outbursts. Uses current literature from several disciplines, including astronomy, archaeology, and anthropology. Prerequisite/corequisite: A 1000- or 2000-level ASTR course, or instructor permission.



    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ASTR 3420 - Life Beyond the Earth


    Open to non-science students. Studies the possibility of intelligent extraterrestrial life; methods and desirability of interstellar communication; prospects for humanity’s colonization of space; interaction of space colonies; and the search for other civilizations. Prerequisite/corequisite: A 1000- or 2000-level ASTR course or instructor permission.



    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ASTR 3460 - Development of Modern Astronomy


    The 20th Century saw a revolution in our study of the origin and evolution of the universe. It was a dynamic period with the opening of the electromagnetic spectrum and the transition to “Big Science.” This course is a survey of the development of modern astrophysics, with an emphasis on the second half of the 20th Century. Prerequisite: A 1000- or 2000-level ASTR course or instructor permission.



    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ASTR 3470 - Science and Controversy in Astronomy


    Open to non-science students. Investigates controversial topics in science and pseudo-science from the astronomer’s perspective. Analyzes methods of science and the nature of scientific evidence, and their implications for unresolved astrophysical problems. Topics include extraterrestrial life, UFO’s, Velikovsky, von Daniken, and astrology. Prerequisite/corequisite: ASTR 1210 or 1240, or instructor permission.



    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ASTR 3480 - Introduction to Cosmology


    Open to first-year students; primarily for non-science students. A descriptive introduction to the study of the ultimate structure and evolution of the universe. Covers the history of the universe, cosmological speculation, and the nature of the galaxies. Provides a qualitative introduction to relativity theory and the nature of space-time, black holes, models of the universe (big bang, steady-state, etc.) and methods of testing them.



    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ASTR 3880 - Planetary Astronomy


    Studies the origin and evolution of the bodies in the solar system, emphasizing the geology of the planets and satellites of the inner solar system and the satellites of the gaseous planets. Topics will include the interpretation of remote sensing data, the chemistry and dynamics of planetary atmospheres and their interactions with the planetary surfaces, and the role of impacts. Prerequisite: Introductory course in geosciences or astronomy.



    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ASTR 3881 - Planetary Astronomy Laboratory


    Optional one hour laboratory for students in ASTR 3880 that provides practical experience in accessing and analyzing data related to the origin and geology of solar system planetary bodies, including the Moon, Mars, and outer planet satellites.



    Credits: 1
  
  •  

    ASTR 4140 - Research Methods in Astrophysics


    Primarily for astronomy/astrophysics majors. Students will be exposed to a research methods-intensive set of mini projects,with emphasis on current active areas of astrophysics research. The goal is to prepare students for research in astrophysics. Topics will include databases and database manipulation, astronomical surveys, statistics, space observatories and observation planning, intro to numerical simulations, and proposal writing. Prerequisites: ASTR 2110/2120 and PHYS 2660, or instructor permission.



    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ASTR 4810 - Astrophysics


    Basic concepts in mechanics, statistical physics, atomic and nuclear structure, and radiative transfer are developed and applied to selected fundamental problems in the areas of stellar structure, stellar atmospheres, the interstellar medium, and extragalactic astrophysics. Prerequisite: ASTR 2110, 2120 (recommended); MATH 5210, 5220; PHYS 3210, 3310 (concurrent), 3430 (concurrent), 3650; or instructor permission.



    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ASTR 4993 - Tutorial


    Independent study of a topic of special interest to the student under individual supervision by a faculty member. May be repeated once for credit. Prerequisite: Instructor permission.



    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ASTR 4998 - Senior Thesis


    May be repeated once for credit. Prerequisite: Instructor permission.



    Credits: 3

Bengali

  
  •  

    BENG 1010 - Elementary Bengali I


    This course is designed for the students whose mother tongue is not Bengali and whose language skill is in novice level however want an effective progress in all four language skills: speaking, listening, reading and writing. At the end of the semester students are expected to recognize Bengali alphabets (including combined letters), to speak with simple and everyday words, and to read and write simple sentences.



    Credits: 4
  
  •  

    BENG 1020 - Elementary Bengali II


    This course is designed for students who already have some elementary knowledge of the Bengali language (typically those who have taken BENG 1010) and want an effective, comprehensive approach to learn Bengali that will enable them to make fast, solid progress in all four language skills: speaking, listening, reading, and writing. At the completion of this course, students will be able to carry on real conversations in social situations. Prerequisite: BENG 1010 or equivalent, or instructor permission.



    Credits: 4
  
  •  

    BENG 2010 - Intermediate Bengali I


    Further develops the listening, speaking, reading and writing skills in Bengali. BENG 2010 enables students to successfully perform linguistic tasks that allow them to communicate in everyday situations (e.g., narrating present, past and future activities, and expressing hopes, desires, and requests). Students also read journalistic and literary selections designed for Bengali speakers. Four class hours. Followed by BENG 2020. Prerequisites: BENG 1020 or equivalent, or instructor permission.



    Credits: 4
  
  •  

    BENG 2020 - Intermediate Bengali II


    Further develops listening, speaking, reading and writing skills in Bengali. BENG 2020 enables students to successfully perform linguistic tasks that allow them to communicate in everyday situations (e.g., narrating present, past and future activities, and expressing hopes, desires, and requests). Students also read journalistic and literary selections designed for Bengali speakers. Four class hours. Prereq: C or better in BENG 2010, or instr. permission.



    Credits: 4
  
  •  

    BENG 4993 - Independent Study in Bengali


    For independent study of the Bengali language guided by an instructor.



    Credits: 1 to 3

Biology

  
  •  

    BIOL 1040 - The DNA Revolution in Science and Society


    Imagine a world where your DNA is sequenced for free and any human gene can be altered at will. The goal of this course is to address the question: can our society be better prepared for this transformation in science? Is genetic privacy achievable or genetic discrimination avoidable? Who owns your genes? Do your genes drive your medical future? Classes involve student perspectives and discussions with experts in science, policy, ethics and law.



    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    BIOL 1050 - Genetics for an Informed Citizen


    Genetics and Genomics form the basis for much of modern biology and the future of medical practice. A basic understanding of them is important for people to be able to evaluate the science behind many issues both public and private. Genetics and Genomics and some of the ways they confront and inform modern life will be covered in a way that is accessible to non-scientists.



    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    BIOL 1060 - Principles of Nutrition


    Paleo or South Beach? Are supplements wise? Together we will investigate advertising claims, discover & evaluate nutritional resources, discuss public policies & food industry regulations, search through data from epidemiological studies and read clinical cases. To do this, we will delve deep into the physiological workings of the gastrointestinal tract, as well as the molecular metabolic pathways that cells and tissues need to survive & thrive.



    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    BIOL 1080 - Nerve Cells, Networks and Animal Behavior


    Ecolocation in bats, development of learning in songbirds, paralytic goats and toxic fish. In this course, we’ll examine these and other examples from nature to model the fundamental properties of neurons and the neural circuits that underlie various aspects of animal behavior. Building an understanding of the structure & function of the nervous system will include consideration of the evolutionary and developmental emergence of its properties.



    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    BIOL 1210 - Human Biology and Disease


    Introduces how the human body works using basic biological principles. Uses disease as a lens to develop healthcare literacy and to understand fundamental healthcare decisions. This course provides tools to help make informed choices as voters and consumers.



    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    BIOL 2030 - Introductory Biology Laboratory I


    An investigative experience illustrating modern methods of studying genes and proteins including techniques of DNA isolation, separation, cloning, sequencing, creating recombinant DNA, and using bioinformatics tools. Prerequisite: Limited to 2nd, 3rd, 4th year students who have completed BIOL2010



    Credits: 1
  
  •  

    BIOL 2040 - Introductory Biology Laboratory II


    Studies life forms, from simple to complex organization, demonstrating the unique properties of living organisms. Exercises focus on evolution, physiology and development. Prerequisite: Limited to 2nd, 3rd, 4th year students who have completed BIOL2020



    Credits: 1
  
  •  

    BIOL 2100 - Introduction to Biology with Laboratory: Cell Biology & Genetics


    BIOL 2100 is one of two semester courses that together provide an intensive introduction to biology for prospective Biology majors and pre-health (med, vet, dental) students. This course focuses on the fundamentals of cell biology and genetics with an emphasis on classical and modern experimental approaches. Lecture topics and concepts are reinforced and extended during once-weekly laboratory/small group discussions.



    Credits: 4
  
  •  

    BIOL 2200 - Introduction to Biology w/Laboratory: Organismal & Evolutionary Biology


    BIOL 2200 is one of two semester courses that together provide an intensive introduction to biology for prospective Biology majors and pre-health (med, vet, dental) students. This course focuses on evolution, physiology and development. Lecture topics and concepts are reinforced and extended during once-weekly laboratory/small group discussions. The Introductory courses are not sequenced and may be taken in either order.



    Credits: 4
  
  •  

    BIOL 2757 - Science Writing: Creative Approaches to Biology & Ecology


    Writing is fundamental to the practice of science. We write about individual organisms, ecosystems, and patterns, to record our findings and to reach broader audiences. This course explores diverse writing styles to improve student communication both inside scientific communities and to the public. Students will be inspired by their experiences at MLBS and by prominent nature and science writers to create a variety of written works.



    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    BIOL 2900 - Teaching Methods for Undergraduate Teaching Assistants


    This STEM teaching course will help Undergraduate TAs integrate learning theory and effective student engagement practices into their teaching. UTAs will participate in guided discussions to relate recommendations from the education literature to their classroom experiences. Assignments will include learning activities, such as teaching observations & reflections, and designing interventions to assist students with difficult topics/skills.



    Credits: 1
  
  •  

    BIOL 3000 - Cell Biology


    Examines the fundamental principles of eukaryotic cell biology at the molecular level. Topics will include: structure and function of the plasma membrane, transport of small molecules, ions and macromolecular complexes across membranes, protein trafficking, the cytoskeleton, signal transduction pathways , and the control of cell division and cellular proliferation. Prerequisites: Must have completed BIOL 2010 or BIOL 2100 or BME 2104 and any two of the following classes CHEM 1410, 1420, 1810 & 1820. BIOL 3000 is not repeatable.



    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    BIOL 3010 - Genetics and Molecular Biology


    What makes humans different from fruit flies? Why does your brain have neurons and not liver cells? This course is all about the answer to these questions: It’s the genes! This course covers the chemical make-up of genes, how they’re passed on through generations, how they’re expressed and how that expression is regulated, how disruption in the structure and expression of genes arise and how those disruptions lead to cellular defects and disease. Prerequisite: Must have completed BIOL 2010 or BIOL 2100 or BME 2104 and either CHEM 1410 or CHEM 1810 or CHEM 1610. BIOL 3010 is not repeatable.



    Credits: 4
  
  •  

    BIOL 3020 - Evolution and Ecology


    Examines the mechanisms of evolutionary change, with an emphasis on the genetic and evolutionary principles needed to understand the diversification of life on earth.  Covers the ecology of individuals and population dynamics.  Major topics include the genetics and ecology of natural populations, adaptation, molecular evolution and macroevolution, and the application of evolutionary and ecological concepts to conservation biology.  Required for all Biology majors. Prerequisite: Must have completed BIOL 2200 or BIOL 2020. BIOL 3020 is not repeatable.



    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    BIOL 3030 - Biochemistry


    Biochemistry underlies nearly every biological process, from environmental science to medicine. When living systems are in chemical and energetic balance, organisms thrive. When they’re out of balance, as in disease or unpredictable environments, life is compromised. This course will explain how simple chemical and physical principles apply to the major classes of biological macromolecules that maintain life. Prerequisite: BIOL 2010 or BIOL 2100 or BME 2104 and BIOL 2020 or BIOL 2040 and either CHEM 2410 or CHEM 1820



    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    BIOL 3040 - Developmental and Regenerative Biology


    Are developmental biology and regenerative biology one and the same? Throughout this course, we will emphasize both classical and modern experimental approaches that have been used to unravel the genetic, molecular and celluar mechanisms of development. Additionally, the practical value of understanding development is enormous, and the relationship between embryology and clinical applications will be a theme that runs throughout the course.



    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    BIOL 3050 - Introduction to Neurobiology


    Analyzes the concepts of general neurobiology, including basic electrophysiology and electrochemistry, origin of bioelectric potentials, sensory, motor, integrative and developmental neurobiology, and conceptual models of simple learning. Prerequisite: Must have completed BIOL 2010 or BIOL 2100 or BME 2104 and BIOL 2020 or BIOL 2040. May not take if previously completed BIOL 3170.



    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    BIOL 3080 - Virology


    Presents an in-depth look at the molecular biology, pathogenesis and control of animal viruses. Small pox, influenza and HIV are used as model viruses for the analysis of viral replication mechanisms, viral genetics and the evolutionary relationship between the virus and its host. Epidemiology, transmission mechanisms, patterns of disease, and the societal impact of viruses are all discussed in terms of host/virus evolution. Prerequisite: BIOL 2010, 2020, CHEM 1410, 1420. First semester organic chemistry suggested, but not required.



    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    BIOL 3090 - Our World of Infectious Disease


    Infectious disease impacts every human, plant and animal on earth. What is the most deadly disease in human history? What is killing our ocean’s turtles? Why is Zika so scary? We will explore questions related to the biology, transmission, and pathogenicity of infectious agents across the world. We will also place special emphasis on what it takes to successfully control an infectious disease.



    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    BIOL 3120 - General Microbiology


    Microbes rule. In this course, we will explore how microbes rule the world and how genomics has revolutionized the way we study them. Fundamental principles of microbiology, together with the basics of genomics will be introduced. Topics include microbial cell structure, metabolism, genetics, microbial diversity and ecology, epidemiology, genome sequencing technologies and bioinformatics. Prerequisites: Must have completed BIOL 2010 or BIOL 2100 or BME 2104 and BIOL 2020 or BIOL 2200



    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    BIOL 3140 - Biology of Aging


    This interdisciplinary course will explore our current knowledge of the biology of aging in populations of plants and animals, including humans. Topics include demographic trends across species; analysis of why organisms age in the context of evolutionary theories; analysis of how organisms age in the context of cellular and physiological theories; and the genetic basis of longevity. Prerequisites: BIOL 2010 and 2020.



    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    BIOL 3150 - General Microbiology Laboratory


    An introduction to microorganisms and to basic microbiological principles through laboratory experimentation. Emphasis is on the structure, physiology and genetics of bacteria and bacterial viruses. Prerequisite: BIOL 3120



    Credits: 2
  
  •  

    BIOL 3180 - Introduction to Plant Biology


    Examines basic principles of plant structure, development, classification, and physiology. Prerequisite: BIOL 2010, 2020.



    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    BIOL 3200 - Basic Laboratory Investigations


    Students complete three of six 4-week laboratory modules offered; cell biology, molecular biology, genetics, development, behavior and evolution. Two of the six modules are offered concurrently in the first four weeks of the semester, two in the second four weeks, and two in the third; students complete one module in each four-week session. The learning objectives of each module are (1) to teach students the basic principles of problem solving through scientific investigation, and the written and oral skills needed to communicate results, and (2) to provide students with basic training in laboratory methodologies, techniques and protocols, and the use of laboratory instrumentation. Prerequisite: BIOL 2030, CHEM 1410, 1420.



    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    BIOL 3210 - Cell, Molecular and Developmental Biology Lab


    Students will acquire basic training in cell culture, cell fractionation, microscopy, electrophoresis, spectrophotometry, chromatography, and immunological methods through a serries of lab investigatons. Contemporary molecular methods utilizing recombinant DNA and PCR will be included. Prerequisite: CHEM 1410-1420 or equivalent, BIOL 2010 (prerequisite) or BIOL 3000 (co-requisite), AP credit for BIOL 2010 is not sufficient.



    Credits: 3
 

Page: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11Forward 10 -> 55