Feb 05, 2023  
Undergraduate Record 2017-2018 
    
Undergraduate Record 2017-2018 [ARCHIVED RECORD]

Course Descriptions


 

Italian

  
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    ITAL 3350 - Fine Young Cannibals and Other Stories in Contemporary Italy


    This course analyzes stories and short novels by contemporary Italians, from 1990 to the present. The works exemplify new forms of narration, many of which integrate ideas and practices of pulp literature, and noir currents, in the specific aims of their authors. Works by writers self-dubbed the ‘cannibals’ (‘cannibali’) are foregrounded, in an investigation of current short fiction and the imaginary of Italian society today. Taught in Italian. Prerequisites: Completion of or current enrollment in ITAL 3010, and permission of UVa study abroad advisor in Italian.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ITAL 3460 - Growing Up Italian Style: Children’s Culture


    In this course, we will explore how major works of literature for children, from Collodi’s The Adventures of Pinocchio, to the poetry of Gianni Rodari, reflect changing views of childhood and parenting in Italy. Students will learn how children’s literature of the 19th-century helped to create an Italian national identity. We will also examine how new media inventions changed story time for children in Italy. Prerequisite: ITAL 3010



    Credits: 3
  
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    ITAL 3700 - Lirica (Italian Lyric Poetry)


    Lirica (Italian Lyric Poetry)



    Credits: 3
  
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    ITAL 3720 - Novella (Italian Short Narrative)


    Novella (Italian Short Narrative)



    Credits: 3
  
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    ITAL 3730 - Romanzo (Italian Novel)


    Surveys the major developments in Italian fiction during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Introduces textual analysis and critical interpretation of literary texts.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ITAL 3740 - Teatro (Italian Theater)


    Studies the major dramatic works from the Renaissance to the present, including productions by Niccolo Machiavelli, Carlo Goldoni, Luigi Pirandello, and Dario Fo.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ITAL 3750 - Critica (Italian Literary Criticism)


    Critica (Italian Literary Criticism)



    Credits: 3
  
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    ITAL 3760 - Italian Travel Literature


    Study of major Italian travel writers from medieval to modern times, within a discussion of the definition and history of the literary genre, and the critical perspectives relating to it. In Italian. Prerequisites: Italian language course 1010 through 2020, or demonstrated Italian language proficiency per consent of instructor.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ITAL 4000 - Methodologia (Stylistics and Methods)


    Methodologia (Stylistics and Methods)



    Credits: 3
  
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    ITAL 4100 - Medioevo (Italian Culture and Literature in the Middle Ages)


    Medioevo (Italian Culture and Literature in the Middle Ages)



    Credits: 3
  
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    ITAL 4200 - Umanesimo (Italian Culture and Literature in the Humanistic Period)


    Umanesimo (Italian Culture and Literature in the Humanistic Period)



    Credits: 3
  
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    ITAL 4300 - Rinascimento (Italian Culture and Literature during the Renaissance)


    Rinascimento (Italian Culture and Literature during the Renaissance)



    Credits: 3
  
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    ITAL 4350 - Representations of Women in Italian Literature


    Images of women as presented in major Italian literary works from the Medieval period to the 20th century. Areas in which gender issues will be examined include authorship, genre, feminist literary criticism, and representation theory. Prerequisite: ITAL 2020 or its equivalent or instructor approval



    Credits: 3
  
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    ITAL 4400 - Barocco (Italian Culture and Literature during the Baroque Age)


    Barocco (Italian Culture and Literature during the Baroque Age)



    Credits: 3
  
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    ITAL 4450 - Lights and Shadows: Italian 18th-Century Literature


    Study of the Italian Enlightenment, in terms of its spectrum of literary/cultural phenomena. Major and lesser-known writers, and the role their works played in transforming early modern traditions into today’s forms and institutions. Among the topics considered: notions of reason and progress, uses of science, criminal/justice systems, advances in theater, opera, the popular novel, autobiography and consumer journalism in Italian.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ITAL 4460 - Italian Mystery Novels


    In this course, we will explore the various subgenres that are most often associated with mysteries: the police procedural, the detective novel, the political thriller, and true crime. Together, we will study the defining features of each genre through close readings of Italian short stories, novels, films, comics, mini-series, and documentaries. Students will learn about how the mystery novel evolved in Italy during the 20th-century Prerequisite: 3010



    Credits: 3
  
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    ITAL 4475 - Romanticismo (Italian Culture and Literature in the Age of Romanticism)


    Romanticismo (Italian Culture and Literature in the Age of Romanticism)



    Credits: 3
  
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    ITAL 4600 - Novecentismo (Italian Culture and Literature in the Twentieth Century)


    Novecentismo (Italian Culture and Literature in the Twentieth Century)



    Credits: 3
  
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    ITAL 4810 - Italian Pop Culture: 1960’s - 1990’s


    An interdisciplinary approach to the last thirty years of Italian cultural history, from a theoretical and practical perspective. Prerequisite: Students who have completed ITAL 2020. Other students admitted with instructor permission.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ITAL 4980 - Distinguished Majors Colloquium - Italian Studies


    The Colloquium allows DMPs in Italian Studies to meet regularly with the DMP coordinator to discuss research strategies, documentation styles, and structure and style in extended expository writing as they are working independently on a thesis. It also provides a forum for presenting and discussing work-in-progress. Prerequisite: Acceptance in DMP.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ITAL 4989 - Distinguished Major in Italian Studies Thesis


    Distinguished majors in Italian Studies will meet individually with their thesis advisors to discuss progress and revise drafts of their theses. At the end of the semester, they will present the results of their research in a public forum.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ITAL 4993 - Independent Study


    Independent Study



    Credits: 1 to 3

Italian in Translation

  
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    ITTR 2150 - Italian Phonetics


    Italian Phonetics



    Credits: 3
  
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    ITTR 2160 - History of the Italian Language


    History of the Italian Language



    Credits: 3
  
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    ITTR 2260 - Dante in Translation


    Close reading of Dante’s masterpiece, The Inferno. Lectures focus on Dante’s social, political, and cultural world. Incorporates The World of Dante: A Hypermedia Archive for the Study of the Inferno, and a pedagogical and research website (www.iath.virginia/dante), that offers a wide range of visual material related to The Inferno.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ITTR 2270 - Petrarch in Translation


    Petrarch in Translation



    Credits: 3
  
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    ITTR 2280 - Boccaccio in Translation


    Boccaccio in Translation



    Credits: 3
  
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    ITTR 2300 - Machiavelli in Translation


    Machiavelli in Translation



    Credits: 3
  
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    ITTR 2310 - Ariosto in Translation


    Ariosto in Translation



    Credits: 3
  
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    ITTR 2360 - Tasso in Translation


    Tasso in Translation



    Credits: 3
  
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    ITTR 2420 - Goldoni and Alfieri in Translation


    Goldoni and Alfieri in Translation



    Credits: 3
  
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    ITTR 2430 - Foscolo and Leopardi in Translation


    Foscolo and Leopardi in Translation



    Credits: 3
  
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    ITTR 2440 - Manzoni in Translation


    Manzoni in Translation



    Credits: 3
  
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    ITTR 2450 - Verga in Translation


    Verga in Translation



    Credits: 3
  
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    ITTR 2620 - The Modern Italian Novel in Translation


    The Modern Italian Novel in Translation



    Credits: 3
  
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    ITTR 2630 - Italian History and Culture Through Film: 1860s - 1960s


    This course uses the medium of film to discuss the developments in Italian culture and history over a period of one hundred years, from 1860 to 1960.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ITTR 2710 - Italian Cultural History


    This course traces the general history and culture of Italy from the Middle Ages to the present. It covers the Renaissance, the Baroque, the ‘Risorgimento,’ the new problems of post-unification, Fascism and the post-World War II Italian Republic. The aim is to provide historical background to comprehend both the complexity of Italian political and social evolution and the multifaceted nature of its cultural identity Taught in English.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ITTR 3107 - Evolution of Media in Italy: From Unification to the Present


    The course will explore the specific features of Italian mass media from the Unification to the present, considering how the press, cinema, radio, television and the Internet have affected and shaped Italian society. It will trace the evolution of Italian media in relation to key events such as the Risorgimento, Fascism, both World Wars, reconstruction and industrialization, and the political rise of media tycoon Silvio Berlusconi.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ITTR 3215 - Dante’s Italy


    This course investigates Italian history and culture through the prism of Dante Alighieri’s Comedy, one of the most important works in European literature. The three canticles of the Comedy offer a meditation on the social and political life of the Italian city-states, a critique of contemporary Christianity, and a commentary on art and literature at the end of the Middle Ages.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ITTR 3250 - Italian Love Poetry in the Middle Ages and Renaissance


    This course treats the production of major poets and writers of Italian Medieval and Renaissance times (Dante, Petrarca, Ariosto, and Tasso) and focuses on the theme of love. It illustrates how central the topic of love was to Italian poetry in the early modern age, its development from classical love verse, and the immense influence of Italian love poetry in the diffusion of Italian culture abroad. Taught in English.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ITTR 3580 - Sister Arts Literary Artistic Relations in the Italian Renaissance


    This course focuses on the literary and cultural traditions that inform treatments of art and artists in the Italian Middle Ages and Renaissance.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ITTR 3610 - Italian Political Thinkers


    Students of this course will study the political theories of Dante, Machiavelli, Beccaria, and Gramsci through a close-reading of each author’s major works. We will also examine how their ideas influenced contemporary politics, literature, and the visual arts both in Italy and in the United States. These goals will be accomplished through regular reading assignments, short essays, and presentations.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ITTR 3680 - Eve’s Sinful Bite: Foodscapes in Women’s Writing Culture and Society


    This course explores how Italian women writers have represented food in their short stories, novels and autobiographies in dialogue with the culture and society from late nineteenth century to the present. These lectures will offer a close reading of the symbolic meaning of food in narrative and the way it intersects with Italian women’s socio-cultural history, addressing issues of gender, identity and politics of the body.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ITTR 3710 - From Fiction to Film


    Combining narratological and socio-historical interpretative approaches, this course studies a series of novels and short stories that have been adapted to the big screen. We will concentrate on the study of film technique, comparative analyses of textual and filmic sequences, and cross-cultural examinations of the different socio-historical contexts that produced both narratives and films.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ITTR 3758 - Love Affair with Tuscany: Utopias and Beyond


    This course aims to examine the Anglo-American love affair with Tuscany/Florence, and deepen students’ understanding of it by providing richer, more complex knowledge of the region and its culture. The class will simultaneously explore notions of utopia and dystopia, against the background and actual lived experience of this sought-after destination.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ITTR 3770 - The Culture of Italian Comedy


    Treats Italian comedy from historic, generic, and theoretical viewpoints; divided into 4 units: 1) medieval comic-realist verse (poetry and song), 2) Renaissance comic theater, including plays by Machiavelli, Ariosto and the Sienese Intronati Academy, 3) the commedia all’italiana film, focusing on cinema by Germi and Monicelli, and 4) modern comic performances by Italians. Special units on Tuscan- and Neapolitan-style humor. Taught in English.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ITTR 3775 - Acting Italian: Benigni, Goldoni, Fo


    Watch, read, and laugh at performances by Italy’s most famous comic stars! Plays, films, and one-man shows form the texts, which include not only modern productions by contemporary masters Roberto Benigni and Dario Fo, but also the comedies of the originator of middle-class Italian humor, Carlo Goldoni. Works of these writers/actors/producers introduce important aspects of Italian literary, performative, and cultural traditions. In ENGLISH.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ITTR 4655 - Early Modern Theater: The Drama of Marriage


    Course will investigate marriage as represented on the early modern European stage. Italian, Spanish, French and English plays comprise our subject matter. We’ll consider the legal, social, and cultural history of matrimony to background our study of the stageworks; we will analyze scripts and performances to learn how dramatic and theatrical convention intersected w/ marital institution and negotiations, onstage and off. Taught in English.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ITTR 4820 - Italian Pop Culture From the 1960s to the Present


    This course examines the cultural and socio-political transformations that took place in Italy during its recent history. By discussing different cultural artifacts (films, essays, literature), we shall ultimately try to answer the following questions : does Italy still have space for works that resist populist and consumer culture? What are the ethical and political consequences of Italy’s present culutral condition? Is there an Italian identity?



    Credits: 3

Japanese

  
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    JAPN 1010 - First-Year Japanese


    Introduces the basic speech patterns and grammatical units, including casual, daily spoken style, and the polite speech used in formal occasions. Emphasizes speaking, listening, and reading. Writing hiragana, katakana, and 200 kanji are also introduced.



    Credits: 4
  
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    JAPN 1020 - First-Year Japanese


    Introduces the basic speech patterns and grammatical units, including casual, daily spoken style, and the polite speech used in formal occasions. Emphasizes speaking, listening, and reading. Writing hiragana, katakana, and 200 kanji are also introduced. Prerequisite: JAPN 1010 or equivalent.



    Credits: 4
  
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    JAPN 2010 - Second-Year Japanese


    Continuation of Elementary Japanese introducing more complex sentence patterns, idioms, and vocabulary to prepare students for an intermediate-level communication. Reinforces spoken Japanese skills with writing and reading exercises, and 250 kanji are introduced. Prerequisite: JAPN 1020 or equivalent.



    Credits: 4
  
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    JAPN 2020 - Second-Year Japanese


    Prerequisite: JAPN 1020 or equivalent.



    Credits: 4
  
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    JAPN 3010 - Third-Year Japanese I


    Emphasizes comprehension and active reproduction of modern Japanese beyond the basic patterns of speech and writing. Various topics on current Japanese culture and society are introduced. Prerequisite: JAPN 2020 or equivalent, or instructor permission.



    Credits: 3
  
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    JAPN 3015 - Language House Conversation


    For students residing in the Japanese group in Shea House. Prerequisite: instructor permission.



    Credits: 1
  
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    JAPN 3020 - Third-Year Japanese II


    Continuation of Third-Year Japanese, emphasizing comprehension and active reproduction of modern Japanese beyond the basic patterns of speech and writing. Continued introduction of topics on current Japanese culture and society. Prerequisite: JAPN 3010 or instructor permission.



    Credits: 3
  
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    JAPN 3025 - Language House Conversation


    For students residing in the Japanese group in Shea House. Prerequisite: instructor permission.



    Credits: 1
  
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    JAPN 3100 - Supplemental Reading in Japanese I


    The first in a two-part sequence, to be taken in conjunction with JAPN 3010. Students will acquire college-level reading and writing skills through engagement with articles and essays written by Japanese for the Japanese public.



    Credits: 1
  
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    JAPN 3110 - Supplemental Reading in Japanese II


    The second of a two-part reading course, to be taken in conjunction with JAPN 3020. In-depth study of authentic materials such as newspapers, short essays, and brief articles. Prerequisite: JAPN 3010 or equivalent background.



    Credits: 1
  
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    JAPN 4500 - Topics in Japanese Literature


    An advanced language seminar devoted to literary texts and criticism with topics determined by instructor.



    Credits: 3
  
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    JAPN 4710 - Introduction to Literary Japanese (Bungo)


    An introduction to the Japanese language as it was written from earliest times up until the mid-twentieth century. In addition to familiarizing students with grammatical fundamentals of literary Japanese and their differences from the modern language, the course will introduce students to representative writing styles from a wide variety of genres and historical periods. Prerequisite: JAPN 3010 or equivalent background.



    Credits: 3
  
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    JAPN 4800 - Lost and Found in Translation


    This course is an advanced language seminar in which students will read, analyze, and translate works by leading contemporary Japanese fiction writers. By comparing translations with those of others (including professionals), students will also learn to appreciate not only the inevitability of losing something in translation, but also the pleasure of unearthing something unintended even by the author. Prerequisite: JAPN 3020 or equivalent background.



    Credits: 3
  
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    JAPN 4801 - Japanese for Professionals


    This advanced Japanese language course aims to cultivate future professionals who will acquire awareness of cross-cultural differences that enable them to operate effectively in the global world. Critical thinking and communication skills will be emphasized.



    Credits: 3
  
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    JAPN 4810 - Modern Literary Texts


    Reading and discussion in Japanese. Develops comprehension and verbal expression skills at the fourth-year level. Reading selections include works by modern and contemporary novelists, short story writers and poets. Prerequisite: JAPN 3020 or equivalent.



    Credits: 3
  
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    JAPN 4820 - Mysteries, Detective Fiction and Business Novels


    Reading and discussion in Japanese. Develops comprehension and verbal expression skills at the Fourth-Year level. Reading selections include some on Japan’s bestselling and award-winning writers, Seicho Matsumoto, Miyuki Miyabe, and Ikke Shimizu. Prerequisite: JAPN 3020 or equivalent.



    Credits: 3
  
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    JAPN 4830 - Media Japanese


    In this course, students will interpret, analyze, and discuss various media for education, business and entertainment–such as newspaper articles, blogs, and statistics–in order to gain a deeper linguistic and cultural understanding of contemporary Japan by comparing and contrasting different perspectives on current issues. Prerequisite: JAPN 3020 or equivalent background.



    Credits: 3
  
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    JAPN 4840 - Japan’s Two Nobel Laureates: Kawabate and Oe


    An advanced Japanese language course focused on Japan’s two Nobel Laureates through bi-lingual texts. This course is partly reading, partly comprehension, partly discussion in Japanese. JAPN 3020 or permission of instructor.



    Credits: 3
  
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    JAPN 4850 - Readings in Politics and Economics


    This is an advanced Japanese language course, designed to help students read, interpret and discuss on Japanese politics and economics written by Japanese authors for the Japanese audience. Some selections of the teaching materials will be made by the instructor, some by student interests. Prerequisites: JAPN 3020



    Credits: 3
  
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    JAPN 4860 - Modern and Contemporary Japanese Poetry


    An advanced Japanese Language course focused on poetic language and each poet’s metaphoric world. The course consists of reading, writing, oral presentations, and free discussion in Japanese. JAPN 3020 or permission of instructor.



    Credits: 3
  
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    JAPN 4870 - Reading Investigative Journalism


    Advanced Japanese language seminar, designed to help students read, interpret, analyze, and discuss current issues in Japanese society, culture, economy and/or politics through an in-depth examination of selected magazine articles from one of Japan’s top investigative magazines, Aera. Prerequisite: JAPN 3020 or placement test



    Credits: 3
  
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    JAPN 4880 - Reading Banana Yoshimoto & Haruki Murakami


    This language seminar introduces two of Japan’s most popular contemporary fiction writers by reading and interpreting selections from Kitchen and Dance, Dance, Dance, Selections give students an insight to how today’s Japanese youth, in search of meaning in life and intimate connections, copes with Japan’s rapidly changing society and culture. Prerequisite: JAPN 3020 or placement test



    Credits: 3
  
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    JAPN 4993 - Independent Study in Japanese


    Independent Study in Japanese.



    Credits: 1 to 3

Japanese in Translation

  
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    JPTR 2600 - Early Modern Japanese Literature


    This course will focus on early modern Japanese literature, spanning the period from 1600 to 1900, known variously as the Edo or the Tokugawa period, in which urbanization, mass education, and the development of printing technology helped produce one of the most creative epochs in Japanese literary and cultural history.



    Credits: 3
  
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    JPTR 3010 - Survey of Traditional Japanese Literature


    This course provides an introduction to Japanese literature from earliest times through to the nineteenth century. We will read selections from representative texts and genres, including myth, poetry, prose fiction, memoir literature, drama, and works of criticism. No knowledge of Japanese culture or language is required.



    Credits: 3
  
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    JPTR 3020 - Survey of Modern Japanese Literature


    A gateway to the rich, diverse modern Japanese literary tradition, from the early 1900s to the present, this course adopts socio-cultural and gender perspectives in the context of world literature.



    Credits: 3
  
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    JPTR 3100 - Myths and Legends of Japan


    A seminar exploring Japan’s earliest myths describing the origins of its islands, their gods, and rulers through close readings in English of eighth-century chronicles and poems. Fulfills the Non-Western and Second Writing requirements.



    Credits: 3
  
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    JPTR 3210 - The Tale of Genji


    A seminar devoted to an in-depth examination in English translation of Japan’s most renowned work of literature, often called the world’s first novel. Satisfies the Non-Western and Second Writing requirements.



    Credits: 3
  
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    JPTR 3290 - Feminine Fictions in Japanese Court Literature


    This seminar will take up the world’s earliest instance of literature written extensively by, for, and about women, including such famous works as the Pillow Book of Sei Shonagon and Sarashina Diary, among others. The focus will be on reading gender as a fictional enactment of desire and identity that is performed through acts of writing and reading. No prior knowledge of Japanese language or literature is required.



    Credits: 3
  
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    JPTR 3300 - Love in Modern Japanese Fiction


    This seminar examines through Japanese prose fiction the still elusive idea and expression of romantic love, first introduced to Japan in the late 1800s (Meiji, 1868-1912) and the pull of traditional values that shy away from the fulfillment of an emotional life and integrating love and sexual desire.



    Credits: 3
  
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    JPTR 3320 - Cinematic Images of Japanese Culture and Society


    This seminar examines how films from Japan visually raise different cultural and social issues, and how they relate to the universal human condition. With an understanding that films involve so many different disciplines, this seminar examines contemporary Japan via comparativist and cross-cultural perspectives by paying careful attention to the effects of the imagistic and visual power that only films can offer.



    Credits: 3
  
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    JPTR 3390 - Japanese Writers Speak Their Minds


    A literary and socio-histocial examination of Japanese men’s and women’s fiction and essays as a primer to Japan’s conflicted socio-cultural-gender history in light of the country’s complex psychological relationship to the West.



    Credits: 3
  
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    JPTR 3400 - Tales of the Samurai


    A seminar focusing on influential medieval and early-modern narratives such as the Tale of Heike in which the notion of the samurai first developed. No prerequisites. Satisfies the non-Western and Second-Writing requirements.



    Credits: 3
  
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    JPTR 3600 - Urban Fantasies in Edo Literature


    This seminar takes up Japanese literature made between 1600 and 1900, including such iconic forms as haiku poetry and kabuki, that came out of one of the most sophisticated and advanced forms of urban culture in global history centered around the million-plus inhabitants of Edo (now Tokyo). Satisfies the Non-Western and Second Writing requirements.



    Credits: 3
  
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    JPTR 3620 - Religion in Japanese Popular Culture


    The course explores different topics and media relevant to the understanding of the relationship between religion and popular culture in Japan. Through readings, film screenings, discussions, and written assignments, students will become familiar with those ideas and world-views that have informed Japanese culture in order to assess the roles played by different media forms in the popularization of religious practices and beliefs.



    Credits: 3
  
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    JPTR 3900 - Sleuthing Japan’s Culture and Society: Japanese Mysteries


    This seminar will examine the surprisingly diverse cultural landscapes of Japan through the prism of its finest and most popular mysteries and detective fiction. Prior exposure to Japanese literature encouraged but not required.



    Credits: 3
  
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    JPTR 3910 - Kawabata and Oe: Japan’s Nobel Laureates


    This seminar focuses on the achievements of Japan’s Two Nobel Laureates within the diverse modern Japanese literary tradition and their respective places in world literature.



    Credits: 3
  
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    JPTR 3931 - A Cultural Understanding of U.S.-Japan Relations


    This seminar examines how culture and communication have often contributed to the perpetuation of myths and misperceptions of Japan and the U.S. about each other. Prior exposure to Japanese culture encouraged.



    Credits: 3
  
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    JPTR 4991 - Japanese Capstone


    Restricted to Japanese majors, this course is designed as a capstone seminar that will require a class presentation and an extended final paper that demonstrate the significant knowledge of Japanese language.



    Credits: 1

Jewish Studies

  
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    JWST 2130 - Introduction to Jewish Musical Traditions


    This course is an introduction to sacred and secular Jewish musical traditions. Texts include books and articles that draw on ethnomusicology, musicology, folklore, anthropology, sociology, Jewish studies, history and other fields. The course uses case studies to concentrate on developments in these traditions since the middle of the 19th century, focusing the three main groupings of Ashkenazic, Sephardic and Mizrakhi Jewry.



    Credits: 3
  
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    JWST 4950 - Senior Majors Seminar in Jewish Studies


    This course introduces and examines the origins and development of Jewish Studies with emphasis on its interdisciplinary character. Requirements include active class participation and a significant research paper based on a topic of the student’s choice. This course is required of all fourth-year Jewish Studies majors. It is also open to all interested students with permission of the instructor.



    Credits: 3
  
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    JWST 4970 - Supervised Research


    Supervised Research



    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    JWST 4980 - Supervised Research


    Supervised Research



    Credits: 3
  
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    JWST 4998 - Distinguished Majors Seminar Thesis I


    Thesis, directed by a member of the department, focusing on a specific problem in Jewish Studies. The thesis is based in part on at least three hours of directed reading in the field of the thesis. Prerequisite: Selection by faculty for Distinguished Major Program.



    Credits: 0
  
  •  

    JWST 4999 - Distinguished Majors Seminar Thesis II


    Thesis, directed by a member of the department, focusing on a specific problem in Jewish Studies. The thesis is based in part on at least three hours of directed reading in the field of the thesis. Prerequisite: Selection by faculty for Distinguished Major Program and JWST 4998.



    Credits: 6

Kinesiology

  
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    KINE 1000 - Introduction to Mindfulness


    Mindfulness practice is bringing full, non-judgmental attention to what is happening in the present moment. Classes include instruction in four core practices: body scan, mindful yoga, sitting, and walking meditation. The practical application of mindfulness in mind-body awareness, health maintenance, mindful eating, stress reduction, and communication will be explored through exercises & group discussion.



    Credits: 1
  
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    KINE 1040 - Women’s Self-Defense


    This course strives to develop the mind and body through martial arts. There will be an introduction to basic moves followed by more challenging techniques over the course of the semester. There is an equal emphasis on striking and grappling. This course is only offered when there is a qualified instructor available.



    Credits: 1
  
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    KINE 1050 - Meditation Peer Leadership


    This course will introduce students to mindfulness practices, and prepare you to instruct your peers in mindfulness meditation in settings like school, work, clubs, and sport. Current research and adaptations of mindfulness in settings such as health care, education, and athletics will be explored. Training includes exercises in embodied presence, deep listening, and facilitating dialogue. No previous meditation experience necessary.



    Credits: 1
  
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    KINE 1100 - Tennis


    All tennis classes include participants from beginners through intermediate/advanced players. Instruction is tailored to the level of class participants. Classes stress proper use of the basic fundamentals including proper strokes, court positions and strategy for singles and doubles. Rules, terminology, and etiquette are equally stressed.



    Credits: 1
  
  •  

    KINE 1110 - Racquetball


    The basic fundamentals of skills and shots, including serves, forehand, and backhand are stressed, along with rules and game strategy



    Credits: 1
  
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    KINE 1115 - Squash


    The basic fundamentals of skills and shots, including serves, forehand, and backhand are stressed, along with rules and game strategy. All levels are welcome. A racquet can be provided, but all participants will need their own protective eyewear and non-marking shoes.



    Credits: 1
 

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