Nov 26, 2022  
Undergraduate Record 2017-2018 
    
Undergraduate Record 2017-2018 [ARCHIVED RECORD]

Course Descriptions


 

Interdisciplinary Studies-Humanities

  
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    ISHU 3181 - Writing with Meaning: Using Creativity and Style to Write Powerful Essays


    Explores the methodology behind writing academic essays, professional exposition, and personal nonfiction with honesty, depth, and flair. Examines the work of essayists and looks at how they use diverse techniques to write engaging essays.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ISHU 3182 - Creative Writing Fiction Workshop and Analysis: A Dialogue Between Writers


    Analyzes the elements of fiction; structural elements such as character, plot, point of view, and conflict will be discussed in addition to stylistic elements, such as dialogue, setting, and sensory details. Includes readings of essays and short stories by published authors and class critiques of fiction written by the students.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ISHU 3183 - Writing the Story of Your Life: Creative Nonfiction


    Student learns how to bring together the imaginative strategies of fictional story telling with new ways of narrating true, real-life events. Explores how Creative Nonfiction writing allows you to share your stories in compelling ways, helps you write effectively in professional and personal situations, and provides new ways for you to document real-life experiences as they occurred.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ISHU 3184 - Writers in Conversation: A Workshop


    Approaches the study and practice of writing through seminar and workshop. Read examples of nonfiction, fiction, and poetry and join in the conversation with their own creative writing for workshop. Write, read, and peer-critique each other’s writing and produce a portfolio of work.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ISHU 3185 - Literature About the Body


    Explores the relationship between the physical body and human identity through such topics as body image, eating disorders, sexuality, aging, disease and its affects on the body by reading and discussion of short stories, poems, and novels. Engages students in frequent formal and informal writing, beginning with personal narratives and journal responses.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ISHU 3190 - Writing for Your Life


    This course gives students a general overview of prose writing and teaches them strategies of rhetoric and composition for their own work. The course has four components, given approximately equal portions of the semester: (1) the personal essay and fiction, (2) professional writing, (3) research and journalism, and (4) opinion/analysis. Each reading assignment has a companion writing assignment, which will be critiqued and edited by peer students and by the instructor.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ISHU 3191 - Magazine Writing


    Explores writing non-fiction articles for general magazines.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ISHU 3192 - From Short Story to Film: The Art of Adaptation


    Teaches students how to develop and write short stories that make good adaptations into film. Studies successful screenplay writing methods and the reading and viewing of certain films that have been adapted from short stories. Explores the process of adaptation. Emphasizes the beat-by-beat journey from idea to rewrite of an original story. Learn how to mold the story into step outline for a full length screenplay.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ISHU 3193 - Writing About the Environment


    Focuses on classic, contemporary, and non-traditional literature about the environment. The course is divided into three sections: nature writing, place-based writing, and environmental writing. Readings focus on issues beyond landscape as gender, race, politics, ethics, and culture all play a part in environmental writing.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ISHU 3201 - Happy Wars and Sad Love Songs: A History of Ireland


    Examines Ireland’s contributions to the wider history of the British Isles and Europe, as well as the consequences of the Irish diaspora in the modern era. Utilizes a broad range of primary sources, including imaginative literature and music. Addresses the major trends in the history of Ireland from earliest times to the present day.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ISHU 3210 - American Literary Naturalism


    American Literary Naturalism



    Credits: 3
  
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    ISHU 3220 - American Autobiography


    In this course, students explore through reading and writing the ethics and mores of autobiography, and consider how memoir-making plays a part in American reinvention of self. Students focus on critical writing and reading skills.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ISHU 3230 - Poetry and the African-American Experience


    Students will explore the diverse history of African-American poetry, focusing on intersections between religion, history, and literature, and exploring how interdisciplinary approaches can enhance our understanding of American culture.  Beginning with the work of eighteenth-century writers like Jupiter Hammon and Phillis Wheatley, students will consider the ‘vernacular traditions’ of spirituals and secular music, and later writers including Paul Laurence Dunbar, Countee Cullen, Langston Hughes, as well as contemporary poets. 



    Credits: 3
  
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    ISHU 3240 - 20th Century American Literature


    Students explore fiction and poetry of U.S. writers ranging from early modernists to contemporary writers, including such prose writers as Fitzgerald, Hemingway, Faulkner, Ellison, and Morrison and poets such as Frost, Eliot, Stevens, Bishop, and Williams.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ISHU 3251 - Creative Writing: Poetry Workshop


    Explores the process, form, and voice of writing poetry. Offers the chance to read widely in contemporary American poetry and develop reflective prose essays on poetry, poetics, and the philosophy of poetry.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ISHU 3252 - Contemporary American Poetry


    Studies the work of poets in America from the 1920s to the 21st century, examining form, prosody, and movements within the art of poetry. Writes on these topics. Discusses poems from Gwendolyn Brooks to Billy Collins.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ISHU 3253 - Lyric Love: Poetic Devices and Emotional Effects


    Uses the theme of love to present poetic forms and techniques in English. Draws on poetry from a wide range of time periods to analyze how poetic devices such as rhyme, meter, and metaphor, convey the experience of loving. Compares different representations of love within the tradition.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ISHU 3254 - Great Modern Poetry and Poetics


    Surveys chronologically the major shapers of contemporary poetry from Walt Whitman and Emily Dickenson to Rita Dove and Billy Collins.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ISHU 3255 - The Short of It: Poetry’s Briefer Forms


    Approaches the study and practice of poetry’s short forms through seminar and workshop. Studies short forms such as sonnets, haiku, pantoums, limericks, epigrams, and couplet verse. Explores short forms in a topical sense: pastorals, elegies, love poems, dramatic monologues, etc. Engage in reading, writing, and peer-critiquing poems in a variety of traditions.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ISHU 3260 - Contemporary American Fiction


    Examines American novels and short stories since the 1960s in social, historical, and aesthetic contexts. Considers writers such as Anaya, Silko, and Morrison and attends to how previously marginalized identities have altered the canon. Asks the following questions: What is postmodernism? How do American narratives negotiate between “fact” and “fiction”? How is the production and reception of literature affected by social issues?



    Credits: 3
  
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    ISHU 3261 - Books Behind Bars: Life, Literature, and Community Leadership: 21st Ce


    Offers an integrated academic-community engagement curriculum, and provides an opportunity for service learning, leadership, and teaching by facilitating discussions about course readings with residents at a local juvenile treatment center. Provides a first-hand appreciation of cultural diversity and an appreciation of how the study of literature can contribute to positive social change.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ISHU 3280 - Great Historical Speeches


    Familiarizes students with some of the most notable speakers and speeches in world history. Increases appreciation of the impact of public address in world history and culture. Deepens the understanding of public address as a rhetorical art. Familiarizes students with standards and approaches to the criticism of speeches, enhancing the ability to analyze and evaluate discourse.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ISHU 3281 - The Art of Public Speaking


    Examines the five canons of the art of public speaking allowing students to learn and practice the skills needed to speak persuasively, confidently, forcefully, and intelligibly to an audience.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ISHU 3282 - Effective Business Writing and Speaking


    Develops communication possibilities through a number of writing and speaking activities. Emphasizes plain English style writing, essential for clear, concise messages. Examines how to create and deliver clear, persuasive, and professional short speeches and includes learning to write effective email, letters and memos. Explores online writing environments. Develops awareness of self and others.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ISHU 3290 - Analytical Writing Basics


    Develops critical thinking and analytical writing by asking questions, exploring ideas, seeking answers, and allowing intuition and insight to expand thoughts and views. Provides opportunities to learn methods for organizing material to prove the merit of inquiry.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ISHU 3300 - Socrates at the Cinema


    Students will examine major topics in Philosophy through the discussion of the issues raised in contemporary cinema.  Students will view films, whether in whole or in part, both individually and in class, with a focus on the critical issues raised by those films.  Films will include:  The Matrix, Being John Malkovich, Citizen Ruth, Bruce Almighty, and Lord of the Flies.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ISHU 3301 - Introduction to Film


    Examines the cultural and commercial contexts of film production, including the directors, the intended audience, and the audience’s response. Investigates film structure, how meaning is created, and how this structure can be read and understood. Examines genres, stories, and the ways in which films and their audiences are a part of the larger structure of the culture in which they exist.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ISHU 3302 - Hollywood’s America: How Movies Portray and Influence American Life


    Examines Hollywood films and encourages students to learn about the people and organizations that produced these influential productions.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ISHU 3303 - Shakespeare on Film


    Examines Shakespeare’s plays as well film adaptations, with particular interest in how each film’s cultural context influenced how it interpreted the original text.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ISHU 3304 - The Films of Orson Welles and Alfred Hitchcock


    Studies the films of Orson Welles and Alfred Hitchcock, two very different but equally creative filmmakers who explored their medium with an intensive imagination. Analyzes such films as Citizen Kane, Touch of Evil, Vertigo, and Psycho, examining what makes them work and looking at the cultural and historical context of the films.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ISHU 3305 - The Impact of Media on the Development of Popular Culture


    Examines the media;s role in conveying cultural meaning through popular culture. Analyzes the histories and theories underlying media and popular culture. Focuses on print, film, radio, television, the Internet and social media. Critiques contemporary popular culture through music, movies, tv programming, advertising, sports, fashion, celebrity culture, language and, collective public expression.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ISHU 3306 - American Film and Culture in the 1950s


    Explores the way film echoes and influences the culture that contains it. Examines a number of film genres that were particularly sensitive to cultural and political currents including melodrama, the gangster film, the Western, science fiction, and others. Determines how Post-World War II America saw itself in films.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ISHU 3310 - Film, History, Politics, and Controversy


    Examines movie case studies that aroused controversy. Analyzes the messages these movies communicated on the screen. Considers what the filmmakers intended to communicate, and how audiences and media critics responded to the portrayals.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ISHU 3322 - Literature of the Fantastic: Myth, Fantasy, and Science Fiction


    Studies critical thinking using literature of the fantastic written in Europe and the U.S. since the late 1800’s. Discusses the idea of the fantastic and the development of rational thought in western culture as compared to medieval notions of an animate world and storytelling that depicts heroes as gods rather than as common individuals or antiheroes.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ISHU 3330 - Write Where You Are


    Develops the skills to inspire and cultivate writing and creativity.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ISHU 3331 - Advanced Expository Writing: On-the-job and for college


    Studies writing as a process and the conventions shared by writing communities in various academic disciplines, business, and the professions. Course topics vary depending on students’ major fields. Focuses on revision techniques, with students writing and revising several papers.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ISHU 3350 - Close Encounters with American Culture: Alien Imagery in Contemporary Popular Discourse


    ‘The truth is out there’ - and the truth is that in many ways UFOs and concepts of the alien (and the extraterrestrial) have come to constitute a quintessential part of contemporary grassroots American mythos. This course explores the dynamics of UFO-based cultural discourse in contemporary American life. Students will ask profound and probing questions about the construction of cultural discourse in both twenty-first century American society and throughout the evolution of American history.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ISHU 3383 - The Dark Side of the Twentieth Century


    Enables students to reflect on what was perhaps the greatest downfall into barbarity, genocide and mass oppression. Examines first-hand accounts of both the Holocaust and crimes of the Communist regimes in the Soviet Union, Eastern Europe, China, and Cambodia. Explores historical, intellectual, cultural, and psychological roots of Nazism and Communism.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ISHU 3421 - The Psychology of Music


    Examines research, illusions, popular texts, and case studies (e.g., musical savants) to learn about the fundamentals of sound, music perception, and the influence of developmental and cultural experiences.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ISHU 3422 - Appalachian Musical Traditions via the Appalachian Dulcimer.


    Examines Appalachian music, history, and folklore. Assembles dulcimers from kits and learns to play traditional Applachian tunes in group and solo settings. Conducts guided research on aspects of Applalachian music.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ISHU 3423 - Country Music as Literature


    Examines Country music as it was first recorded nearly a century ago and how the genre has evolved from merely a southern form listened to by southern people into a vibrant form of American popular culture. Through the exploration of language within and of the genre, we’ll probe social, historical, psychological, racial, sexual, and economic concerns.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ISHU 3450 - Cultural History of the Depression: Art & Society in 1930s America


    Examines some of the most powerful, interesting, and influential music, painting, film, and literature produced during the period of the Great Depression. Exploring these various artistic developments in the context of the Great Depression will facilitate a deeper understanding of American Culture and art not only in the 1930s, but also today.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ISHU 3453 - Food for Thought: An Exploration of the Way We Eat


    Looks at ways food has influenced western culture, and its significance in our lives from the invention of agriculture to the contemporary debate about health foods; examines films and texts to find woman’s role in food production, how religious beliefs, economic factors, and ideas about health influence why and what we eat. Should we live to eat or eat to live? Where do we eat? What forces shape our choice of foods? That’s plenty to chew on!



    Credits: 3
  
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    ISHU 3455 - Sources and Development of Modern Architecture and Design


    Examines some of the major themes and movements of modern architecture and design from the late 19th century to the 20th century in Europe and the United States. Explores major artistic ideas and movements of the period, including French rationalism, Art Nouveau, Art Deco and Streamline Modern, Bauhaus, Scandinavian National Romanticism, and American Modernism.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ISHU 3456 - History of Western Architecture from Antiquity to the Present


    Examines the tradition of Western architure from its inception in Greece and Rome to the present. Focuses on aesthetic, cultural, and political ideas framing the design, uses, and meanings of these celebrated buildings. Provides tools for visual analysis using a variety of methods from text anaylsis to visits of buildings.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ISHU 3470 - Late Bloomers in the Arts


    Focuses upon the phenomenon of creative bursts within the final years of long artistic lives by examining artists such as: Sophocles, Leonardo de Vinci, Monet, Matisse, and Georgia O’Keefe. Emphasizes this phenomenon using literary texts with parallel examples from the artistic worlds of painting and music.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ISHU 3485 - Childhood, Memory, and Society


    Explores changing concepts of the child from medieval times to the present by examining personal memoirs, competing social theories, and literary visions of the child. Focuses on medieval childhood, the romantic child, the Victorian child, slave children, pioneer childhood, immigrant childhood, childhood and the Great Depression, and childhood in today’s family.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ISHU 3500 - Photography as Art


    Examines the tense but fruitful relationship between photography and art. Draws upon aesthetics, history, and criticism to explore controversies about photography as art, examine the impact of photography on artistic ideas and practices, and evaluate the importance of photography and art in modern culture.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ISHU 3615 - Leonardo and Michelangelo


    Examines the notion of artistic genius in relation to these artists through a study of the context from which they emerged, looking closely at the Florentine workshops in which they trained and questioning long-held beliefs regarding the myth of the artist. Develops a deeper understanding of the relationship between Leonardo and Michelangelo through a comparison of their other extant works.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ISHU 3616 - What is Art?


    Introduces the study of the visual arts by way of ideas from current artistic practices and institutional culture, history, aesthetics, and anthropology. Examines art objects from a wide range of epochs and cultures, prehistoric to contemporary, that respond to and help illuminate questions of original purpose, commodity status, beauty, and historical significance.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ISHU 3620 - Visual Shock: Art Controversies in the U.S.


    Focuses on the controversies that have been generated by art in America from its founding through the present day. Examines a variety of sources and perspectives to act as guides in the understanding of the art controversies that have surrounded a wide range of art in American culture, from monuments to photography, from murals to performance art.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ISHU 3621 - The Biological Basis for Art


    Investigates the idea of approaching art as a form of human evolution. Examines the art of several past and present cultures. Blends art and science to connect aesthetics to an understanding of human nature from the cognitive and biological sciences. Examines existing personal and cultural theories of art and art criticism.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ISHU 3622 - Art as Protest: The Situationist International and the Contemporary World


    Examines art as protest in the contemporary world. Traces the history and influence of the Situationist International on contemporary art and culture as a culmination of other Avant-garde movements of the 20th century. Requires students to create artworks, or write proposals for artworks, in dialogue with Avant-garde movements such as DaDa, the Surrealists, CoBrA, Art Informal, and Abstract Expressionism to determine their impact on the present.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ISHU 3623 - Studio Art Seminar: Painting


    Introduces painting techniques and concepts, with emphasis on the understanding of its formal language and the fundamentals of artistic expression. Explores color theory, linear perspective, pictorial composition , figure/ground relationships, visual perception, spatial concepts, and critical thinking skills.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ISHU 3624 - Visual Culture and Aesthetics: The Practice of Seeing


    Examines the cultural elements involved in the interactive process of defining and interpreting the meaning of visual images with regard to how art images are produced, consumed, and made meaningful. Explores images in art history and digital media to investigate the philosophical, social, and cultural influences which affect how we interpret and define the art experience.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ISHU 3625 - Bruno Schulz: The Age of Genius


    Explores Bruno Schulz’s two collections of short stories, as well as his letters and essays. Examines reproductions of his drawings and paintings. Engages student opinions and critical discourse with regard to his writings and paintings.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ISHU 3626 - Studio Art Seminar: Sculpture


    Immerses students immediately into the medium of sculptue through discussion and creation. Examines the history of sculpture from antiquity to the present through emphasis on contemporary sculpture. Observes the sculptural works of several artists including Duchamp, Brancusi, Judd, Smithson, Beuys, Hess, Nuaman, Goldsworthy, and many others the exploration of a wide variety of materials and techniques.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ISHU 3630 - The American Presidency in Film and Television


    Examines representations of government, specifically the presidency by analyzing fictional depictions of the presidency in film and tv. Allows students to grasp the language of political film and television, by its necessary manipulations, guided and misguided intentions, and its tangible results on society.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ISHU 3700 - The Romans


    Incorporates important Roman works, including art and architecture. Reviews the major interpretations of modern scholarship.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ISHU 3800 - Important Issues in Art Since 1945


    This course covers the development of high modernism, beginning with Abstract Expressionism, and continue through postmodern practices of conceptual art, feminism, performance art, and site-specific installation art.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ISHU 3810 - Ethical Issues


    Introduces the philosophical concept of the ethical discrimination of actions. Examines primary sources in some detail by presenting prevailing philosophical systems. Studies decision-making in the context of the contemporary world using examples such as business environment, faith and religion, and the political arena.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ISHU 3820 - American National Identity


    Examines how to reconcile national unity and cultural diversity; the responsibilities of democratic citizenship with the cultural values of a consumer society; and being a patriotic American citizen with the contemporary imperative to become citizens of the world. Explores important writings by comparing American figures and ideas of 1968 to some of the key figures and ideas of 2008.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ISHU 3840 - The Ethical & Philosophical Primate: Evolution, Ethics and Human Altruism


    Examines evolutionary explanations for the origins of morality, philosophy and religion, and their ramifications for ethics and culture. Recognizes the views of Darwinism, Social Darwinism, and Natural Selection and identifies the cultural and ethical implications of living with each view in today’s world.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ISHU 3850 - Virtues and Vices


    Evaluates the conceptions of the virtues and the vices that are articulated by the Epicureans, the Stoics, Plato, Aristotle, St. Thomas Aquinas, Friedrich Nietzsche and others. Explores ethical theories concerned with the relation between morality and human happiness/human flourishing.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ISHU 3851 - Screening Terrorism


    Examines cimematic and televisual representations of terrorism. Promotes critical awareness of the ways in which terrorism is depicted on screen and explores the complex ways in which real acts of terror involve performance and theatrics.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ISHU 3860 - Faith and Doubt


    Explores the relationship between religious faith, forms of reasoning, and scientific explanation. Examines such questions as: What is the nature of religious faith? Is religious faith a rational, irrational, or non-rational belief? Does reasoning undermine faith or strengthen it? Are scientific and religious perspectives compatible?



    Credits: 3
  
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    ISHU 3900 - Identity and Culture in Contemporary Dance


    This course examines the ways in which dance creates and expresses ideas of personal and cultural significance in ritual, theatrical, and social contexts. By observing dance on film and reading ethnographic, historical and theoretical texts, students explore the emergent meaning of dance from the perspective of both performers and spectators.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ISHU 3901 - Dance: Anthropological Origins of Dance and Music in World Cultures


    Examines the anthropological origins of dance history in world cultures. Discusses the importance of dance to define and preserve the historic traditions within a culture. Explores the inherent relationship between dance and music within both the socio-cultural and folk aspects, as well as the ceremonial, religious, and ritual aspects of a culture.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ISHU 3902 - Dance: Origins, Ethnology, and Evolution


    Examines how dance is the human expression of communication through movement. Explores how dance is used as a universal language to express such things as emotion, entertainment, storytelling, or representation of religious or ritualistic ceremony. Follows the history of dance, its origins, ethnology, and the evolution of dance to present day.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ISHU 3950 - Acting


    This course will introduce students to the craft of acting. Students will learn fundamental techniques for the actor, including defining the character through text analysis, creation of subtext, analysis of the structure of the text (beats) and of the character motivations (objectives and obstacles).



    Credits: 3
  
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    ISHU 3951 - Discovering the Art of Acting


    Studies the fundamentals of acting. Focuses on textual analysis, personalization, objectives, and characterization. Uses some of the basic techniques of pivotal acting teachers, Constantine Stanislavski, Lee Strasberg, Stella Adler, and Sanford Meisner, in scene work and in performing short plays.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ISHU 3952 - Exploration of Theatre as an Art Form


    Studies the people of the theatre: actors, directors, designers, and backstage personnel and topics that include the core and characteristics of a script; theatrical forms and styles; acting and theatre history. Gain a deeper appreciation for the various tools, techniques and collaborative styles required when producing theatre in a team setting.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ISHU 3953 - African-American Theater, Music and Dance from the 19th - 20th Century


    Explores the historic perspective of the influence of African-American culture on theater, music and dance of 19th-20th Century U.S. Examines the socio-cultural aspects of the integration of West African slaves into America. Probes the evolution of early American theater beginning with minstrels, for example, and continues with the development of both music and dance of the Jazz Age.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ISHU 3960 - The Elements of Action


    This course explores the concept of Action, the basic fundamental tool of all theatrical art, and how it informs the creation of performance for the stage. Through games, improvisations and scene work, ranging from Shakespeare to Sam Shepard, students experience and develop the idea of what it takes to be fully Alive in the Present Moment, and connect that with the imaginative craft of acting.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ISHU 4000 - Writing the Unwritten


    Since the Romantic era, writing has often been motivated by the desire to say what has not been said, whether through neglect or through social censorship. Reading works by American and British novelists from the 19th century to the present, students will explore changing definitions of the unwritten during this period as well as write their own personal narratives, analytic essays and prose fiction as a means to discover and bring forth the unwritten in their own experience.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ISHU 4010 - Art in Society: Myth, Music, and Merriment


    Proposes to examine the history of western culture through the history of the performing arts beginning with plays of ancient Greece and ending with musicals of twentieth-century Broadwood and Hollywood. Examines different works of art in order to discover what they can tell about the aspirations, fears, and basic conflicts of the societies from which they emerged.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ISHU 4011 - That Devil Music: A Cultural History of Blues Music in the U.S.


    Examines why many scholars claim that Blues formed the basis for Rock n’ Roll, Classic Rock, and even some of today’s music. Analyzes the sophisticated art form known simply as the Blues. Formulate your own questions, or investigate topics within the scope of the course that are of particular interest to you.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ISHU 4012 - Popular Music and Media


    Examines how media technologies have impacted the production, dissemination, and consumption of popular music. Considers the economic and legal issues that intersect this ongoing history.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ISHU 4013 - The Documentary Impulse: A Multi-Media Exploration of Journalism


    Develops effective communication with fluency in several media including writing, audio, video & photography. Instruction is project-based & technologically immersive. Trained in the basics of a medium, students undertake rigorous assignment. Builds ability to organize information and craft arguments while exploring narrative, rhetorical, and aesthetic tools.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ISHU 4030 - Religion and the Quest for Meaning


    This course examines the religions of the world as ways of finding patterns of meaning and value for our personal and social existence. Students will survey the major religions of the world, using both primary and secondary sources.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ISHU 4031 - Critical Matter: Questions of Materiality in Our Age


    Uses a selection of critical literature to ask relevant questions with regards to the presence of materiality in human life, its contingency and obstinacy as things surround and affect us until it becomes unclear to what extent who ‘we’ are is separated from ‘what’ we have, and ‘where’ we are.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ISHU 4032 - Writing the Self: The Art of Personal Discovery


    Focuses on the ‘voice’ of the Self in literature and visual representations. Explores the meaning of using ‘first person’ in a narrative, life account, or other forms of representation and who is the ‘self’ that is being represented? Includes readings from both creative fiction and creative non-fiction.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ISHU 4040 - Authenticity: American Literature and Culture


    This course scrutinizes several theoretical, dramatic and fictional responses to this crisis. We’ll read from Walter Benjamin who examines what happens to art in an age of mechanical reproduction. We’ll see how Oscar Wilde not only accepts but embraces in authenticity as a way to mock repressive late Victorian sexual and social norms. We’ll examine Jean Hegland’s scathing novelistic attack on modernity while pondering her radical solution: a return to primitivism. This class will take place in seminar form and will have a substantial writing workshop component.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ISHU 4041 - Crime, Misery and Vice: The Victorian Underworld


    Explores in their original contexts the social, cultural, economic and political themes of works such as The Return of Sherlock Holmes, Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde, The Time Machine, and Dracula, through a combination of class discussion and written assignments. Examines the attitudes, ideals and values associated with the Victorian era.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ISHU 4050 - Knowledge, Truth, and Objectivity


    This course examines some of our most basic beliefs about the world we think we know and the nature of our knowledge about that world. The goals of the course are to understand what these philosophers took to be the important questions concerning the nature of knowledge and then see to what degree these insights are relevant in our own everyday dealings with the world.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ISHU 4060 - Knowing and Being: The Work of Michael Polanyi


    Explores the interdisciplinary philosophical contributions of Michael Polanyi, The Father of tacit knowledge. Performs a close reading of the philosophical system of Michael Polanyi through focusing on the primary source “Personal Knowledge”.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ISHU 4061 - Kipling’s Raj: The Cutting Criticism of British Ex-Patriot Society


    Explores the marvelous world depicted in Kipling’s Indian Tales from the perspective of the commentary they provide on British Ex-Patriot society. Discusses how Kipling has often been viewed as a critic of Indian society, when in fact he is as critical of the British. Examines the work of Clifford Geerts and other anthropologists to provide a rounded picture of Kipling as an analyst of cultural systems.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ISHU 4063 - Hell’s Angel: How Hunter Thompson Kept America Honest


    Examines the work of Hunter Thompson in a study of how ‘Gonzo’ changed greater American journalism as a whole. Demonstrates how Thompson’s role as a public intellectual spread into wider journalism, such as Doonesbury. Portrays Thompson as a premier political critic of each administration who exerted near unparalleled social influence.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ISHU 4070 - Principles of Criminal Law


    Examines basic principles of Anglo-American criminal law. Evaluates ethical and philosophical questions that emerge from legal issues such as the justification of punishment, the nature and extent of criminal liability, strict liability statutes, victimless crimes, the insanity defense, legally mandated hospitalization for mental illness, and capital punishment.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ISHU 4075 - Literature of Business: Insights on Management from Great Literature


    Examines values, biases, and preconceptions about the world through the study of business literature. Studies models on how to come to an understanding of basic needs such as the need for self-esteem, identity, power, acceptance, security, and recognition. The student will see that it is only through self-definition that we can begin to understand human motives.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ISHU 4080 - Religion and Politics


    Explores the relationship between religion and politics. Examines how the relationship has changed over time and place, what the relationship should be, and how prior religious and/or political commitments affect how answers to these questions are structured.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ISHU 4090 - Writing: Comfortable as a Hearth Rug


    Writing begins with intuition, moves towards consciousness and strives for clarity. Such movement calls for a steady eye and an enduring approach. Accordingly, this course focuses upon resurrecting the fading art of patience, a faculty required for writing. Students will read widely, respond to assigned readings through weekly essays and share work in a workshop setting with an emphasis on revision. Writing intensive.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ISHU 4100 - Writing Narrative


    This course focuses on developing the techniques of prose narrative. Students work on a short story, novel, memoir, or any combination of these. The course is structured as a workshop: each week, four or five works by students are discussed in full-class workshop led by the instructor. Issues to be addressed include characterization, voice, creating and sustaining tension, plotting in long and in short narratives, and the skills of critical response.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ISHU 4105 - Creative Writing and the Literature of Nature


    Explores the process, form, and voice of creative writing in three genres: fiction, poetry, and essay. Includes site visits to several natural areas in and around Charlottesville. Focuses on student work with in-class group critiques, but also offers students the chance to read widely in contemporary literature. Culminates with a portfolio of student work and a reading.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ISHU 4110 - Fiction Writing


    Provides total immersion in the fiction writer’s experience. Explores the ability to connect to creative sources, to overcome the inner critic, to read as a writer, to respond constructively to others’ work (and to one’s own), to discover the possibilities of different fictional genres, and to master the basics of writing a story.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ISHU 4120 - The American Short Story: The Writer and Tradition


    This course examines the American short story from the perspective of the both reader and writer. Defining recurrent themes and conventions of the genre by reading major stories spanning the last 200 years of American literature, students explore the importance of tradition to the writer analytically in critical essays and experientially in their own short stories.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ISHU 4121 - How to Write a Screenplay: From Short Story to the Big Screen


    Teaches students how to develop and write screenplays from idea through story and script, to notes for rewrite. Studies screenplay writing methods. Produce an original feature length script adaptation of his or her short story.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ISHU 4130 - Film Noir


    Focuses on the genre of film noir, styles noir has brought into mainsteam cinema, themes, and characters throughout the genre. Includes class, gender, and the historical context of noir.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ISHU 4140 - Novel Movements: Modernism, Post-Modernism, and the New Media


    Examines two great movements in 20th century Western literary thought and practice: Modernism and Postmodernism. Explores texts that began to rewrite literary and philosophical beliefs and progress through the decades. Examines how both movements pave the way for ongoing literary revolution; a new media enabled by the explosion of digital technologies.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ISHU 4141 - Multi-Genre Writing


    Explores, analyzes and practices the genres of fiction, non-fiction, poetry, and screenwriting. Strengthens reading and writing skills and explores the relationship between content and form. Examines and analyzes writer’s skills at all levels. Applies literary theory and critical analysis for a more in depth understanding of the connection between form and content.



    Credits: 3
 

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