Dec 02, 2022  
Undergraduate Record 2017-2018 
    
Undergraduate Record 2017-2018 [ARCHIVED RECORD]

Course Descriptions


 

Hindi

  
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    HIND 1060 - Accelerated Elementary Hindi


    This course is designed for heritage students who have some prior, informal proficiency in Hindi. Students work on their listening and speaking skills and achieve basic reading and writing skills so that they can handle simple written texts and converse appropriately on day-to-day situations with grammatical accuracy and suitable vocabulary.



    Credits: 4
  
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    HIND 2010 - Intermediate Hindi


    Introduction to various types of written and spoken Hindi; vocabulary building, idioms and problems of syntax; and conversation in Hindi. Prerequisite: HIND 1020 or equivalent.



    Credits: 4
  
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    HIND 2020 - Intermediate Hindi


    Prerequisite: HIND 2010 or equivalent.



    Credits: 4
  
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    HIND 2060 - Accelerated Intermediate Hindi


    This course is designed for heritage students who have some prior, informal proficiency in Hindi. Students work on their listening and speaking skills and achieve basic reading and writing skills so that they can handle simple written texts and converse appropriately on day-to-day situations with grammatical accuracy and suitable vocabulary.



    Credits: 4
  
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    HIND 3010 - Advanced Hindi Readings I


    Readings are drawn from areas of particular interest to the students involved, and include readings from various disciplines. Prerequisite: HIND 2020 or equivalent or instructor permission.



    Credits: 3
  
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    HIND 3019 - Language House Conversation


    For students residing in the Hindu group in Shea House. Prerequisite: instructor permission.



    Credits: 1
  
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    HIND 3020 - Advanced Hindi II


    Prerequisite: HIND 2020 or equivalent or instructor permission.



    Credits: 3
  
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    HIND 3029 - Language House Conversation


    For students residing in the Hindu group in Shea House. Prerequisite: instructor permission.



    Credits: 1
  
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    HIND 3230 - Readings in Hindi


    Advanced readings in modern standard Hindi and possibly in medieval Hindi, depending on the interests of the students. Prerequisite: HIND 3020/5020 or equivalent, or instructor permission.



    Credits: 3
  
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    HIND 3240 - Readings in Hindi


    Advanced readings in modern standard Hindi and possibly in medieval Hindi, depending on the interests of the students. Prerequisite: HIND 3020/5020 or equivalent, or instructor permission.



    Credits: 3
  
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    HIND 4993 - Independent Study in Hindi


    Independent Study in Hindi



    Credits: 1 to 3

History of Art

  
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    ARTH 1004 - A History of Architecture


    This course will introduce students to the study of architecture through an examination of selected examples from the history of architecture with a focus on Europe and the United States and buildings relevant to those regions (e.g. the Great Pyramids, the Parthenon, Versailles). Classes will be a combination of lectures and discussions as students are taught the fundamentals of architectural history as well as how to analyze buildings.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ARTH 1051 - History of Art I


    A survey of the great monuments of art and architecture from their beginnings in caves through the arts of Egypt, Mesopotamia, Greece and Rome, Byzantium, the Islamic world, and medieval western Europe. The course attempts to make art accessible to students with no background in the subject, and it explains the ways in which painting, sculpture, and architecture are related to mythology, religion, politics, literature, and daily life. The course serves as a visual introduction to the history of the West.



    Credits: 4
  
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    ARTH 1052 - History of Art II: Renaissance to Post-Modern Art and Architecture


    Studies the history and interpretation of architecture, sculpture and painting from 1400 to the present.



    Credits: 3 to 4
  
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    ARTH 1500 - Introductory Seminars in Art History


    Introductory Seminars in Art History are small classes for first- and second-year students that emphasize reading, writing, and discussion. While subject varies with the instructor, topics will be selected that allow students to engage broad issues and themes historically and in relationship to contemporary concerns and debates. Subject is announced prior to each registration period. Enrollment is capped at 15.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ARTH 1505 - Topics in Art History


    Examines focused topics in Art History.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ARTH 2051 - Art of the Ancient Near East and Prehistoric Europe


    Studies the art of Mesopotamia, Egypt, the Aegean, and prehistoric Europe, from the sixth to the second millennium b.c. Examines the emergence of a special role for the arts in ancient religion.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ARTH 2052 - Ancient Egypt


    Survey of Egyptian art and architecture (Predynastic-New Kingdom, 4000-1100 BC). The course introduces students to the great monuments and works of art, and to the beliefs that engendered them. While the focus is on pharaonic ‘visual’ culture, neglected ‘others’ (women, cross-gendered persons, foreigners, commoners) and their material/visual cultures are brought to attention to provide a nuanced understanding of Egyptian society and culture.



    Credits: 3 to 4
  
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    ARTH 2053 - Greek Art and Archaeology


    The vase painting, sculpture, architecture, and other arts of the Greeks, from the Bronze Age through the Hellenistic periods. Works are studies in their social, political, and religious contexts with a special focus on archaeology and material culture.



    Credits: 3 to 4
  
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    ARTH 2054 - Roman Art and Archaeology


    Following an overview of Etruscan art, the course examines the development of Roman architecture, urbanism, sculpture and painting from the Republic to Constantine. A focus is Rome itself, but other archaeological sites, such as Pompeii, in Italy and throughout the empire are also considered. Themes, such as succession, the achievements of the emperor, the political and social role of art, and the dissolution of classical art, are traced.



    Credits: 3 to 4
  
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    ARTH 2055 - Introduction to Classical Archaeology


    Introduces the history, theory, and field techniques of classical archaeology. Major sites of the Bronze Age (Troy, Mycenae) as well as Greek and Roman cities and sanctuaries (e.g., Athens, Olympia, Pompeii) illustrate important themes in Greek and Roman culture and the nature of archaeological data.



    Credits: 3 to 4
  
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    ARTH 2056 - Aegean Art and Archaeology


    Introduction to the art and archaeology of the prehistoric Aegean, from the Early Bronze Age to the end of the Late Bronze Age (ca. 3000-1200 BCE). Notable sites examined include Troy, Knossos, Mycenae, Thebes, Pylos. The course also examines cultural and artistic connections with New Kingdom Egypt and the Late Bronze Age Levant.



    Credits: 3 to 4
  
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    ARTH 2151 - Early Christian and Byzantine Art


    Studies the art of the early Church in East and West and its subsequent development in the East under the aegis of Byzantium. Includes the influence of theological, liturgical and political factors on the artistic expression of Eastern Christian spirituality.



    Credits: 3 to 4
  
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    ARTH 2152 - Medieval Art in Western Europe


    Studies the arts in Western Europe from the Hiberno-Saxon period up to, and including, the age of the great Gothic cathedrals.



    Credits: 3 to 4
  
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    ARTH 2153 - Romanesque and Gothic Art


    From the Romanesque churches along the Pilgrimage Routes to the new Gothic architecture at St. Denis outside Paris and on to late medieval artistic production in Prague, this course examines profound and visually arresting expressions of medieval piety, devotion, and power made by artists from roughly 1000-1500. Throughout our investigations, particular attention will be paid to the contributions of important medieval women.



    Credits: 3 to 4
  
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    ARTH 2154 - Early Medieval Art


    This course examines art created in the era from 300 to 1100, when early medieval artists, motivated by devotion to their faiths and scientific beliefs, crafted beautiful and refined visual expressions of their values. These crafted confessions in stone, paint, parchment, and metal provide the living historical records of a vibrant period, during which medieval artists asserted their various cultural identities.



    Credits: 3 to 4
  
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    ARTH 2251 - Italian Renaissance Art


    Studies painting, architecture, and sculpture in Italy from the close of the Middle Ages through the sixteenth century. Focuses on the work of major artists such as Giotto, Donatello, Botticelli, Leonardo, and Michelangelo. Detailed discussion of the social, political, and cultural background of the arts.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ARTH 2252 - High Renaissance and Mannerist Art


    Studies the painting, architecture, and sculpture or the sixteenth century, emphasizing the works of major artists, such as Leonardo, Michelangelo, Raphael, Giorgione, and Titian. Detailed discussion of the social, political, and cultural background of the arts.



    Credits: 3 to 4
  
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    ARTH 2271 - Northern Renaissance Art


    Surveys major developments in painting and graphics in the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries in the Netherlands and Germany. Includes the rise of Netherlandish naturalism and the origins of woodcut and engraving. Explores the effects of humanist taste on sixteenth-century painting and the iconographic consequences of the Reformation. Emphasizes the work of major artists, such as Van Eyck, Van der Weyden, Dürer, Bosch, and Bruegel.



    Credits: 3 to 4
  
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    ARTH 2273 - Disneyland


    This course examines the visual, aesthetic and cultural effects of Disneyland. It considers the history of the theme parks, its relationship to Disney films, and its visual construction of space, leisure, and American cultural identity. Presented both chronologically and thematically, this course is both reading and writing intensive.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ARTH 2275 - Heroes, Superheroes and American Visual Culture


    This course examines the aesthetic and cultural importance of ‘heroes’ and heroic representation in American visual culture from the mid-18th century to the present. It considers the construction and representation of heroic figures within debates about aesthetics, national identity, political representation, and popular culture. Presented both chronologically and thematically, this coure is both reading and writing intensive.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ARTH 2281 - The Age of Caravaggio, Velázquez, and Bernini


    Studies the painting, sculpture, and architecture of the seventeenth century in Italy, the Low Countries, France, and Spain. Focuses on Caravaggio, Bernini, Velazquez, Rubens, Rembrandt, and Poussin.



    Credits: 3 to 4
  
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    ARTH 2282 - The Age of Rubens and Rembrandt: Baroque Art in the Netherlands


    A survey of the art of the Dutch and Flemish Golden Age, including such artists as Rubens, Rembrandt, van Dyck, Hals and Vermeer. The course examines innovations in style and new subjects like landscape, still life and daily-life genre in relation to major historical developments, including the revolt of the Netherlands, the rise of the Dutch Republic, and the Counter-Reformation. The course includes a survey of Dutch architecture.



    Credits: 3 to 4
  
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    ARTH 2351 - Eighteenth-Century European Art


    Surveys European painting and sculpture from the late Baroque period to Neo-Classicism. Emphasizes the artistic careers of major figures and on the larger social, political, and cultural contexts of their work. Artists include Watteau, Boucher, Fragonard, Chardin, Falconet, Pigalle, Greuze, Batoni, Rusconi, Hogarth, Gainsborough, and Reynolds.



    Credits: 3 to 4
  
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    ARTH 2352 - Art of Revolutionary Europe


    Surveys European painting and sculpture from the last decades of the Ancien Regime to the liberal revolutions of 1848. Major artists, such as David, Canova, Ingres, Constable, Turner, Gericault, Delacroix, Friedrich, Goya, Corot, and Thorvaldsen are examined in their political, economic, social, spiritual, and aesthetic contexts.



    Credits: 3 to 4
  
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    ARTH 2353 - European Art and Empire


    Examines the relationship of visual art to empire from the colonization of North America to the scramble for Africa, focusing on the period between 1700 and 1900. The course examines the work of European artists working on five continents and it engages with readings in which art history intersects with that of other disciplines including anthropology and museum studies.



    Credits: 3 to 4
  
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    ARTH 2354 - British Art


    This survey of British Art in the modern period examines the work of some of Britain’s greatest painters, sculptors, and printmakers including Hogarth, Blake, Flaxman, Turner, the Pre-Raphaelites, Sickert, Bacon, and Freud. Major themes include the relationship of British art to religion, urbanization, empire, industrialization, and post-colonialism.



    Credits: 3 to 4
  
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    ARTH 2361 - Nineteenth-Century European Art


    A thematic survey of European art in the long nineteenth century, the course examines the work of German, French, Italian, British and Scandinavian artists, among them Boucher, Vien, David, Friedrich, Ingres, Gericault, Delacroix, Courbet, Manet, Whistler, Van Gogh, Gauguin, Munch, and others. Key course themes will include artistic training and practice, exhibition, and art-theoretical debates of the period.



    Credits: 3 to 4
  
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    ARTH 2371 - Impressionism and Post Impressionism


    Surveys modernist movements in European art during the second half of the nineteenth century. Major themes include the establishment of modernity as a cultural ideal, the development of the avant-garde, and the genesis of the concept of abstraction.



    Credits: 3 to 4
  
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    ARTH 2372 - Paris, “Capital of the Nineteenth Century”


    Examines the places, spaces, practices and representations of Paris in the nineteenth century. Tracing the changing faces of the city, we will study the modern city through architecture and urban planning, painting, drawing, photography, popular imagery and literature. Topics include Paris ‘types’; fashion and birth of the department store; Haussmannization; and the ‘spectacular’ Paris of the panorama, morgue, Opera, and World’s Fairs.



    Credits: 3 to 4
  
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    ARTH 2451 - Modern Art, 1900-1945


    A survey of major artistic movements in Europe and the United States during the first half of the twentieth century: Fauvism and Expressionism, Cubism, Futurism, the School of Paris, Dada and Surrealism, the Russian avant-garde, modernist trends in America. Painting, sculpture, photography, and the functional arts are discussed.



    Credits: 3 to 4
  
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    ARTH 2471 - Art Since 1945


    Surveys art production and theory in the U.S. and Europe since World War II. Relationships between artistic practice and critical theory are stressed in an examination of movements ranging from abstract expressionism to neo-geo.



    Credits: 3 to 4
  
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    ARTH 2472 - Modern Art in Italy


    ARTH 2472 will use the resources of Italy’s modern and contemporary art museums supplemented by classroom and on-site lectures to offer an overview of the major movements of modern art in Italy. It will examine the historical and political contexts for developments from Futurism and Valori Plastici to Informel and Arte Povera, with a particular focus on the postwar years..



    Credits: 3 to 4
  
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    ARTH 2491 - The History of Photography


    General survey of the photographic medium from 1839 to the present. Emphasizes the technical, aesthetic, and critical issues particular to the medium.



    Credits: 3 to 4
  
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    ARTH 2525 - Topics in Renaissance Art History


    Examines focused topics in Renaissance Art History.



    Credits: 3 to 4
  
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    ARTH 2659 - Sacred Sites


    Examines the art and architecture of ten religious sites around the world focusing on ritual, culture, and history as well as the artistic characteristics of each site.



    Credits: 3 to 4
  
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    ARTH 2745 - African American Art


    This course surveys the visual arts (painting, sculpture, photography, prints, mixed media and textiles) produced by those of African descent in the United States from the Colonial period to the present. Presented both chronologically and thematically, the class interrogates issues of artistic identity, gender, patronage and the aesthetic influences of the African Diaspora and European and Euro-American aesthetics on African American artists.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ARTH 2751 - American Art to the Armory Show


    This lecture course will examine American visual arts from the time of European settlement to around 1900 with special emphasis on its political, social and cultural contexts. The course is both chronological and thematic. It focuses on major artistic figures, but it also focuses on issues such as the construction of an American identity, the role of fine arts in American society, and the tensions of class, gender, race & ethnicity in Amer Art.



    Credits: 3 to 4
  
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    ARTH 2752 - American Art Since Reconstruction


    This lecture course examines the visual arts (painting, sculpture, photography, prints) of the United States from the late 19th-century to World War II. Particular emphasis is placed on cultural, political, and social issues that provide a contextual framework for the analysis of these images. The course interrogates topics such as artistic identity, American modernism, patronage, and the influence of popular culture on fine art.



    Credits: 3 to 4
  
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    ARTH 2753 - Arts & Cultures of the Slave South


    This interdisciplinary course covers the American South to the Civil War. While the course centers on the visual arts ‘architecture, material culture, decorative arts, painting, and sculpture’ it is not designed as a regional history of art, but an exploration of the interrelations between history, material and visual cultures, foodways, music and literature in the formation of Southern identities.



    Credits: 3 to 4
  
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    ARTH 2771 - American Modernism


    American Modernism is a survey of American art in the first half of the 20th century. The course will address the arrival of modern art in America, the situation of the American artist in relation to European art, and an American public, and the question of the American art.



    Credits: 3 to 4
  
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    ARTH 2772 - American Film Noir and the City


    Studies the classic period of film noir and its engagement with the city as a problematic subject and a frequent resource within American Art and culture immediately before and after WW II. Using the classic period of film noir as a framework, this lecture and discussion course examines the ways in which ‘the city’ is represented as a problematic subject and a frequent resource within American Art and culture immediately before and after WWII.



    Credits: 3 to 4
  
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    ARTH 2773 - Hollywood Cinema’s Golden Age: The 1930s


    The course examines American cinema produced in Hollywood during the 1930s. While the Great Depression serves as an important historical backdrop, we will interrogate how issues such as ethnic/racial representation, shifting gender roles, sexuality, and urbanity are mediated in popular cinema in this decade.



    Credits: 3 to 4
  
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    ARTH 2774 - Stardom and American Film


    This course examines the role of stardom and star performance in American cinema from the silent era to the 1960s. Using art history, cultural studies and film criticism, we will explore topics such as visions of stardom, constructions and subversions of star identity, and the ways in which the media of film actively constructs how we look at and respond to stars as cultural and pictorial icons.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ARTH 2851 - World Art


    Big art history, on the role of art in human cultures. The construction of spaces in relation to human presence. Materials, skills, and the making of social hierarchies. Places, group origins, and identity. Kingship and empire across the continents; art and world religions. Contact, interaction and the beginnings of the present world.



    Credits: 3 to 4
  
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    ARTH 2861 - East Asian Art


    Introduces the artistic traditions of China, Korea, and Japan, from prehistoric times to the modern era. Surveys major monuments and the fundamental concepts behind their creation, and examines artistic form in relation to society, individuals, technology, and ideas.



    Credits: 3 to 4
  
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    ARTH 2862 - Arts of the Buddhist World- India to Japan


    Surveys the Buddhist sculpture, architecture and painting of India, China and Japan. Considers aspects of history and religious doctrine.



    Credits: 3 to 4
  
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    ARTH 2863 - Chinese Decorative Arts


    Chinese Decorative Arts



    Credits: 3 to 4
  
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    ARTH 2871 - The Arts of India


    The class is an overview of Indian sculpture, architecture, and painting from the Third Millennium BC to the 18th century AD and includes works from Hindu, Buddhist, Jain and Islamic traditions.



    Credits: 3 to 4
  
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    ARTH 2961 - Arts of the Islamic World


    The class is an overview of art made in the service of Islam in the Central Islamic Lands, Egypt, North Africa, Spain, Turkey, Iran, Central Asia, and South and Southeast Asia.



    Credits: 3 to 4
  
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    ARTH 2993 - Independent Study


    Independent study in the history of art.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ARTH 3051 - Greek Vase Painting


    Survey of the major styles, techniques, and painters of Greek vases produced in the Archaic and Classical periods (c. 700-350 b.c.). Emphasizes themes of myth and daily life, the relationship of vases to other ancient arts, the legacy of form and decoration in the arts of later periods, such as 18th century England, and comparisons with other cultures, such as the Native American southwest. Prerequisite: any course in Art History, Anthropology, Classics or History.



    Credits: 3 to 4
  
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    ARTH 3052 - Art and Poetry in Classical Greece


    Study of the major themes in Greek sculpture and painting of the fifth century, including mythological narrative, cult practices, banqueting, and athletics. In order to view these themes in the context of classical Greek culture, the course seeks out shared structures of response and feeling in contemporary poetry; including readings in translation in Anakreon, Pindar, Aischylos, Sophokles, and Euripides.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ARTH 3053 - The Greek City


    Study of the Greek city from the Archaic to the Hellenistic period. The course focuses on such themes as city planning, public buildings and houses, gender distinctions, the relationship between city and territory, and the nature of the polis.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ARTH 3061 - Roman Architecture


    Study of the history of Roman architecture from the Republic to the late empire with special emphasis on the evolution of urban architecture in Rome. Also considered are Roman villas, Roman landscape architecture, the cities of Pompeii and Ostia, major sites of the Roman provinces, and the architectural and archaeological field methods used in dealing with ancient architecture.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ARTH 3062 - Pompeii


    Explores the life, art, architecture, urban development, religion, economy, and daily life of the famous Roman city destroyed in the cataclysmic eruption of Mt. Vesuvius in a.d. 79.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ARTH 3151 - Art and Science in the Middle Ages


    During the medieval period, power and knowledge required the endorsement of clerics. Alongside secular courtiers they also cultivated creative expressions of their erudition, revealing the medieval interpenetration of art, science and religion. The artworks surveyed in this course provide lasting records of critically creative confrontations between the scientific and spiritual traditions linked to medieval Christianity, Islam, and Judaism.



    Credits: 3 to 4
  
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    ARTH 3251 - Gender and Art in Renaissance Italy


    Examines how notions of gender shaped the production, patronage, and fruition of the visual arts in Italy between 1350 and 1600. Prerequisite: A previous course in art history or gender studies.



    Credits: 3 to 4
  
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    ARTH 3253 - Renaissance Art and Literature


    Examines the interrelations between literature and the visual arts in Italy from 1300 to 1600. The writings of Dante, Petrarch, and Boccaccio and their followers are analyzed in relation to the painting, sculpture, and architecture of Giotto, Brunelleschi, Botticelli, Raphael, and Michelangelo, among others.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ARTH 3254 - Leonardo da Vinci


    An analysis of Leonardo da Vinci’s paintings, drawings, and notes, giving special attention to his writings and drawings on human anatomy, the theory of light and shade, color theory, and pictorial composition. His work is considered in relation to the works of fellow artists such as Bramante, Raphael, and Michelangelo as well as within the context of Renaissance investigation of the natural world. Prerequisite: One course in the humanities.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ARTH 3255 - Renaissance Art on Site


    Firsthand, direct knowledge of Renaissance art and architecture through an intensive program of on-site visits in Florence and Rome. The course aims to provide a deeper understanding of the specificity of images and sites; that is, their materials, texture, scale, size, proportions, colors, and volumes. It also aims to instill a full sense of the importance of the original location for the understanding and interpretation of Renaissance art. Prerequisite: Instructor permission.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ARTH 3257 - Michelangelo and His Time


    Analyzes the work of Michelangelo in sculpture, painting and architecture in relation to his contemporaries in Italy and the North. The class focuses on the close investigation of his preparatory drawings, letters, poems and documents. Prerequisite: One course in the history of art beyond the level of ARTH 1051 and 1052



    Credits: 3
  
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    ARTH 3281 - Rembrandt


    Study of the life and work of the great Dutch seventeenth-century master. Topics include Rembrandt’s interpretation of the Bible and the nature of his religious convictions, his relationship to classical and Renaissance culture, his rivalry with Rubens, and the expressive purposes of his distinctive techniques in painting, drawing, and etching.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ARTH 3351 - British Art: Tudors through Victoria


    Surveys English (British) painting, sculpture, and printmaking from the reign of Henry VII Tudor (1485) to the death of Queen Victoria (1901). Major artists such as Holbein, Mor, Mytens, Rubens, van Dyck, Lely, Kneller, Hogarth, Rysbrack, Roubilliac, Gainsborough, Reynolds, Rowlandson, Flaxman, Lawrence, Constable, Turner, Landseer, the Pre-Raphaelites and Alma-Taddema are examined in their political, social, economic, spiritual, and aesthetic contexts. Prerequisite: At least one post-medieval art history course is recommended.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ARTH 3491 - Women Photographers and Feminist Aesthetics


    This course explores the question of whether there might be something called a ‘feminist aesthetics.’ We look at the work of a handful of women photographers, and read criticism about photography, to leverage our exploration into feminist aesthetics. The course works within the frame of feminist discourse. It presents the work of a small number of photographers whose work we will interpret in conjunction with readings in criticism and theory.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ARTH 3525 - Topics in Renaissance Art History


    Examines focused topics in Renaissance Art History.



    Credits: 3 to 4
  
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    ARTH 3545 - Topics In 20th/21st Century Art


    Examines focused topics in 20th/21st Art History.



    Credits: 3 to 4
  
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    ARTH 3591 - Art History Colloquium


    The Art History Colloquium combines lecture and discussion. Subject varies with the instructor, who may decide to focus attention either on a particular period, artist, or theme, or on the broader question of the aims and methods of art history. Subject is announced prior to each registration period. This course fulfills the second writing requirement, involving at least two writing assignments totaling at a minimum 4,000 words (20 pages).



    Credits: 3
  
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    ARTH 3595 - Art History Practicum


    The Art History Practicum course places added emphasis on immersive experience and the active construction of knowledge, involving hands-on projects, experiments, lab work, and field trips of varying lengths, including on-site studies at archaeological sites, laboratories, or museums.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ARTH 3651 - Anthropology of Australian Aboriginal Art


    This class studies the intersection of anthropology, art and material culture focusing on Australian Aboriginal art. We examine how Aboriginal art has moved from relative obscurity to global recognition over the past 30 yrs. Topics include the historical and cultural contexts of invention, production, marketing and appropriation of Aboriginal art. Students will conduct research using the Kluge-Ruhe Aboriginal Art Collection and Study Center.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ARTH 3751 - Material Life in Early America


    Studies American domestic environments (architecture, landscapes, rural and urban settings) and decorative arts (furniture, silver, ceramics, and glass) in relation to their social, cultural, and historical contexts from European settlement to 1825. Prerequisite: At least one course in either American art or early American history or literature is recommended.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ARTH 3761 - Women in American Art


    Analyzes the roles played by women both as visual artists and as the subjects of representation in American art from the colonial period to the present. Explores the changing cultural context and institutions that support or inhibit women’s artistic activity and help to shape their public presentation. Some background in either art history or women’s studies is desirable.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ARTH 3781 - New York School


    The New York School focuses on the background, development, and dissemination of abstract expressionism, beginning with an examination of the place and politics of the artist in America in the depression era. The slide lectures and required readings examine the social and intellectual groundings of the subjects of abstract painting in the 1940s and the development of an international art scene in New York in the 1950s.



    Credits: 4
  
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    ARTH 3861 - Chinese Art


    The course is a survey of the major epochs of Chinese art from pre-historic to the modern period. The course intends to familiarize students with the important artistic traditions developed in China: ceramics, bronzes, funerary art and ritual, Buddhist art, painting, and garden architecture. It seeks to understand artistic form in relation to technology, political and religious beliefs, and social and historical contexts, with focus on the role of the state or individuals as patrons of the arts. It also introduces the major philosophic and religious traditions (Confucianism, Daoism, and Buddhism) that have shaped cultural and aesthetic ideals, Chinese art theories, and the writings of leading scholars.



    Credits: 3 to 4
  
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    ARTH 3862 - Japanese Art


    Introduces the arts and culture of Japan. Focuses on key monuments and artistic traditions that have played central roles in Japanese art and society. Analyzes how artists, architects, and patrons expressed their ideals in visual terms. Examines sculptures, paintings, and decorative objects and their underlying artistic and cultural values.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ARTH 3951 - African Art


    Studies Africa’s chief forms of visual art from prehistoric times to the present.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ARTH 3993 - Independent Study


    Independent study in the history of art



    Credits: 1 to 3
  
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    ARTH 4051 - Art History: Theory and Practice


    This course introduces art history majors to the basic tools and methods of art historical research, and to the theoretical and historical questions of art historical interpretation. The course will survey a number of current approaches to the explanation and interpretation of works of art, and briefly address the history of art history. Prerequisite: Major or minor in art history.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ARTH 4591 - Undergraduate Seminar in the History of Art


    Subject varies with the instructor, who may decide to focus attention either on a particular period, artist, or theme, or on the broader question of the aims and methods of art history. Subject is announced prior to each registration period. Representative subjects include the life and art of Pompeii, Roman painting and mosaics, history and connoisseurship of baroque prints, art and politics in revolutionary Europe, Picasso and painting, and problems in American art and culture. Prerequisite: Instructor permission.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ARTH 4951 - University Museums Internship


    This is the second semester of the internship at either the Fralin Museum of Art or Kluge Ruhe. Students will work approximately 100 hours per semester in the museum, and will participate in three training sessions and three academic seminars. Prequisite: ARTH/GDS 4951 and instructor permission, by application. Please see information at www.virginia.edu/art/arthistory/courses and www.artsandsciences.virginia.edu/globaldevelopment



    Credits: 3
  
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    ARTH 4952 - University Museums Internship


    This is the second semester internship at either UVA Art Museum or Kluge Ruhe. Students will work approximately 100 hours per semester in the museum, and will participate in three training sessions and three academic seminars. ARTH/GDS 4951 and instructor permission, by application; deadline May 1. Please see information at www.virginia.edu/art/arthistory/courses and www.artsandsciences.virginia.edu/globaldevelopment



    Credits: 3
  
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    ARTH 4998 - Undergraduate Thesis Research


    Research for a thesis of approximately 50 written pages undertaken in the fall semester of the fourth year by art history majors who have been accepted into the department’s Distinguished Majors Program.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ARTH 4999 - Undergraduate Thesis Writing


    Writing of a thesis of approximately 50 written pages undertaken in the spring semester of the fourth year by art history majors who have been accepted into the department’s Distinguished Majors Program.



    Credits: 3

History-African History

  
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    HIAF 1501 - Introductory Seminar in African History


    Introduces the study of history intended for first- or second-year students. Seminars involve reading, discussing, and writing about different historical topics and periods, and emphasize the enhancement of critical and communication skills. Several seminars are offered each term. Not more than two Introductory Seminars may be counted toward the major in history.



    Credits: 3
  
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    HIAF 2001 - Early African History


    Studies the history of African civilizations from the iron age through the era of the slave trade, ca. 1800. Emphasizes the search for the themes of social, political, economic, and intellectual history which present African civilizations on their own terms.



    Credits: 4
  
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    HIAF 2002 - Modern African History


    Studies the history of Africa and its interaction with the western world from the mid-19th century to the present. Emphasizes continuities in African civilization from imperialism to independence that transcend the colonial interlude of the 20th century.



    Credits: 3
  
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    HIAF 2031 - The African Diaspora


    A history of African peoples and their interaction with the wider world; emphasis on historical and cultural ties between African diasporic communities and the homeland to the mid-nineteenth century.



    Credits: 4
  
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    HIAF 3011 - North African History from Carthage to the Algerian Revolution


    Surveys the main outlines of North African political, economic, and cultural history from the rise of Carthage as a Mediterranean power until the conclusion of the Algerian war for independence in 1962, and the creation of a system of nation-states in the region. It places the North African historical experience within the framework of both Mediterranean/European history and African history. Focuses mainly upon the area stretching from Morocco’s Atlantic coast to the Nile Delta; also considered are Andalusia and Sicily, and the ties between Northwest Africa and sub-Saharan regions, particularly West Africa.



    Credits: 3
  
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    HIAF 3021 - History of Southern Africa


    Studies the history of Africa generally south of the Zambezi River. Emphasizes African institutions, creation of ethnic and racial identities, industrialization, and rural poverty, from the early formation of historical communities to recent times.



    Credits: 3
  
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    HIAF 3051 - West African History


    History of West Africans in the wider context of the global past, from West Africans’ first attempts to make a living in ancient environments through the slave trades (domestic, trans-Saharan, and Atlantic), colonial overrule by outsiders, political independence, and ever-increasing globalization.



    Credits: 3
 

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