Nov 29, 2022  
Undergraduate Record 2017-2018 
    
Undergraduate Record 2017-2018 [ARCHIVED RECORD]

Course Descriptions


 

German in Translation

  
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    GETR 3563 - Spiritual Journeys in Young Adult Fiction


    This writing-intensive, discussion-based seminar invites students to explore the topic of the spiritual journey both academically and personally. Different disciplinary perspectives and experiential approaches to reading and writing will deepen our exploration of such themes as: religiosity vs. spirituality, becoming a hero, confronting evil, being different, achieving autonomy, faith and doubt, and the magical and the miraculous.



    Credits: 3
  
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    GETR 3566 - Topics in film


    The course reflects on the often complicated ways in which representations of violence are related to gender codes. we will look especially at films that depict and document the topos of Lager/Camp: the Camp functions as metaphor, as fantasy, gendered space, laboratory, and heterotopia,. Critical look at films that imagine the camp both as a historical site or as a hiding place.



    Credits: 3
  
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    GETR 3580 - German Literature in Translation


    Outstanding works of German literature read and discussed in English.



    Credits: 3
  
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    GETR 3590 - Course(s) in English


    Reading and discussion of German texts compared to texts from other literatures (all in English translation), with the aim of illuminating a central theoretical, historical, or social issue that transcends national boundaries. For more details on this class, please visit the department website at: http://www.virginia.edu/german/Undergraduate/Courses.



    Credits: 3
  
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    GETR 3600 - Faust


    Taking Goethe’s Faust as its point of departure, this course traces the emergence and transformations of the Faust legend over the last 400 hundred years. We explore precursors of Goethe’s Faust in the form of the English Faust Book, Christopher Marlowe’s Doctor Faustus, and possibly other popular re-workings of the text. We will Goethe’s Faust in its entirety, and then proceed to Bulgakov’s response to Stalinism in The Master and Margharta and



    Credits: 3
  
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    GETR 3610 - Film under Fascism: Ideology and Entertainment


    Investigates the cinema of the fascist dictatorships of Germany, Italy, and Spain, with a concentration on the 1930s-1940s. Course focuses on the ideology and aesthetics of fascist films, including their promotion of militarism and treatment of race and gender issues. Offers comparative analysis with classical Hollywood films of the same era. Course also provides an introduction to the political and cultural history of fascist regimes. For more details on this class, please visit the department website at: http://www.virginia.edu/german/Undergraduate/Courses.



    Credits: 3
  
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    GETR 3620 - World Cinema


    This course offers a survey of the cinemas of Europe, Africa, Central and South America, the Middle East, India, and Asia, with an introduction to the film histories and stylistic tendencies of each region. Explores classical, avant-garde, and “third cinema” aesthetics, post-colonial theory, and transnational filmmaking. Students in GETR section focus on comparative topics related to German film.



    Credits: 3
  
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    GETR 3692 - The Holocaust


    This course aims to clarify basic facts and explore competing explanations for the origins and unfolding of the Holocaust–the encounter between the Third Reich and Europe’s Jews between 1933 and 1945 that resulted in the deaths of almost six million Jews. For more details on this class, please visit the department website at: http://www.virginia.edu/german/Undergraduate/Courses.



    Credits: 3
  
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    GETR 3695 - The Holocaust and the Law


    This course explores the pursuit of legal justice after the Holocaust. Study of legal responses to the Nazi genocide of Europe’s Jews in Europe, Israel, and the United States from the immediate aftermath of the Holocaust to the present. Focus on the Nuremberg, Eichmann Trial, Frankfurt Auschwitz Trials, among others. The course ask how the pursuit of legal justice after the Holocaust affects our understanding of the legal process.



    Credits: 3
  
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    GETR 3710 - Kafka and His Doubles


    Introduction to the work of Franz Kafka, with comparisons to the literary tradition he worked with and the literary tradition he formed.



    Credits: 3
  
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    GETR 3720 - Freud and Literature


    In formulating his model of the psyche and his theory of psychoanalysis, Freud availed himself of analogies drawn from different disciplines, including literature. Freud’s ideas were then taken up by many twentieth-century literary writers. After introducing Freud’s theories through a reading of his major works, the course will turn to literary works that engage with Freud.



    Credits: 3
  
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    GETR 3730 - Modern Poetry: Rilke, Valéry and Stevens


    Studies in the poetry and prose of these three modernist poets, with emphasis on their theories of artistic creation. The original as well as a translation will be made available for Rilke’s and Valery’s poetry; their prose works will be read in English translation.



    Credits: 3
  
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    GETR 3740 - Narratives of Childhood


    Childhood autobiography and childhood narrative from Romanticism to the present.



    Credits: 3
  
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    GETR 3750 - Women, Childhood, Autobiography


    Cross-cultural readings in women’s childhood narratives. Emphasis on formal as well as thematic aspects. For more details on this class, please visit the department website at: http://www.virginia.edu/german/Undergraduate/Courses.



    Credits: 3
  
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    GETR 3760 - Ways of Telling Stories: Eighteenth-Century Fiction


    Comparative studies in the European novel. Dominant novel types, including the fictional memoir, the novel in letters, and the comic “history.”



    Credits: 3
  
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    GETR 3770 - Women Writers: Women on Women


    This course focuses on women writers from any era who address the topic of femininity: what it means or implies to be a woman.



    Credits: 3
  
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    GETR 3780 - Memory Speaks


    Interdisciplinary course on memory. Readings from literature, philosophy, history, psychology, and neuroscience.



    Credits: 3
  
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    GETR 4493 - Independent Study


    Guided study



    Credits: 1 to 3

Global Development Studies

  
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    GDS 1100 - Useful Knowledge in the Local & Global Community


    This interdisciplinary course introduces students to the theory, practice, and ethics of socially engaged scholarship at UVA.



    Credits: 3
  
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    GDS 2020 - Global Culture, Commerce, and Travel


    This introductory social science course develops a cultural understanding of global commerce and travel. We begin with the anthropological notion of cultures and languages as keys to human diversity. We then look at some of the ways different cultures are connected today through international business, including the business of travel.



    Credits: 3
  
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    GDS 2100 - Developing Community-Based Projects


    This course is designed to provide students with the theory, methods, and competencies needed to develop meaningful community-based scholarly projects. One class each week will be devoted to topic areas and readings meant to prepare students to design and implement community-based projects. The second class each week will be workshop based and geared towards developing project teams and working on project proposals.



    Credits: 3
  
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    GDS 2291 - Global Culture and Public Health


    This course considers the forces that influence the distribution of health and illness in different societies, with attention to increasing global interconnectedness. We will examine the roles of individuals, institutions, communities, corporations and states in improving public health, asking how effective public health and development efforts to improve global health have been and how they might be re-imagined.



    Credits: 3
  
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    GDS 3010 - Global Development, Theories and Case Studies, Part One


    Theoretical approaches to global development from anthropology, economics, environmental sciences, history, politics, and sociology, and analysis of selected case studies. Instructor permission.



    Credits: 3
  
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    GDS 3020 - Global Development, Theories and Case Studies, Part Two


    Theoretical approaches to global development from anthropology, economics, environmental sciences, history, politics, and sociology, and analysis of selected case studies. This is the second course in a two-semester sequence. Prerequisite: GDS 3010.



    Credits: 3
  
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    GDS 3050 - Introduction to Social Entrepreneurship


    Social entrepreneurship is an approach to creating system-level change through the application of entrepreneurial thinking to social ventures, non-profit organizations, government institutions, and NGOs to create economic, environmental, and social value for multiple stakeholders. Students will survey a range of social-entrepreneurial approaches from the non-profit to the for-profit.



    Credits: 3
  
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    GDS 3100 - Development on the Ground


    Examines the protocols of planning for and conducting development projects and the research associated with them both locally and internationally. Special attention to the ethical obligations inherent in development work and the dynamics of collaborating with local communities.



    Credits: 3
  
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    GDS 3111 - Technology and Cross-Cultural Exchanges in Global History


    An interdisciplinary, historical exploration of the globalization of sociotechnical systems over the past 500 years. How have various cultures responded to imported technologies and the organizations and values that accompany them? What can this teach us about our own “technological ideology” today?



    Credits: 3
  
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    GDS 3112 - Ecology and Globalization in the Age of European Expansion


    Grounded in the field of environmental history, this course examines the ways in which enviornmental changes and perceptions of nature have interacted with socio-economic structures and processes associated with the expansion of Europe since the 15th century.



    Credits: 3
  
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    GDS 3113 - A Buddhist Approach to Development


    The proposed course has the same description as above but will include an additional hour for group meditation, film presentations, anonymous journal discussion, and final project planning.



    Credits: 4
  
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    GDS 3114 - Science, Technology and Development


    This course will survey the history of scientific and technical interventions in development, as well as examine the factors that shape the outcomes of contemporary practices. We will look at science and technology in two broad areas in which UVA has considerable expertise: the built environment and public health.



    Credits: 3
  
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    GDS 3250 - MotherLands: Landscapes of Hunger, Futures of Plenty


    This course explores the legacy of the “hidden wounds” left upon the landscape by plantation slavery along with the visionary work of ecofeminist scholars and activists daring to imagine an alternative future. Readings, guest lectures, and field trips illumine the ways in which gender, race, and power are encoded in historical, cultural, and physical landscapes associated with planting/extraction regimes such as tobacco, mining, sugar, and corn.



    Credits: 3
  
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    GDS 3820 - Global Ethics & Climate Change


    This seminar takes up questions of responsibility and fairness posed by climate change as ways into a search for shared ground across moral traditions. It investigates the ethical dimensions of climate change as a way to consider broad frameworks for developing responsibilities across national, cultural, and religious borders.



    Credits: 3
  
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    GDS 4825 - Development Practice: Social Enterprises in Bangladesh


    Examines the critical role that Non-Governmental Organizations can play in economic development. Our classroom will be Bangladesh in South Asia, a poor country, but one with inspiring success stories in lifting people out of poverty. We will visit and analyze microfinance institutions, large social enterprises, village health clinics, schools,fish hatcheries, crafts production facilities, and small enterprises in the countryside.



    Credits: 3
  
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    GDS 4951 - University Museums Internship


    This is the first semester internship at either UVA Art Museum or Kluge Ruhe. Students will work approximately 100 hours per semester in the museum, and will participate in three training sessions and three academic seminars. Instructor Permission, by application; deadline May 1. Please see information at www.virginia.edu/art/arthistory/courses and www.artsandsciences.virginia.edu/globaldevelopment



    Credits: 3
  
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    GDS 4952 - University Museums Internship


    This is the second semester internship at either UVA Art Museum or Kluge Ruhe. Students will work approximately 100 hours per semester in the museum, and will participate in three training sessions and three academic seminars. ARTH/GDS 4951 and instructor permission, by application; deadline May 1. Please see information at www.virginia.edu/art/arthistory/courses and www.artsandsciences.virginia.edu/globaldevelopment



    Credits: 3
  
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    GDS 4991 - Fourth-Year Seminar


    In this seminar, GDS majors complete their GDS research paper. Prerequisite: Instructor permission AND the student must be a GDS major in order to enroll.



    Credits: 3
  
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    GDS 4993 - Independent Study


    Independent Study. Prerequisites: Instructor permission.



    Credits: 1 to 6

Global Studies-Global Studies

  
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    GSGS 2010 - Global Commerce in Culture


    A liberal arts perspective on commerce, or business, as a part of modern American (and global) culture.



    Credits: 3
  
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    GSGS 2210 - Epidemics, Pandemics, and History


    Covers epidemic diseases such as plague, cholera, smallpox, tuberculosis, malaria, and AIDS in world history since 1500.



    Credits: 3
  
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    GSGS 2211 - Environment, Health, and Development in Africa


    This course explores the changing relationships between people in Africa, their environments, and global neighbors since 1900. Issues covered include imperialism, conservation, the Green Revolution, HIV/AIDS, petroleum, Chinese investments, and recent viral epidemics. Course focus is on Africa, but issues are global and comparative, and learning therefore applicable to other places.



    Credits: 3
  
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    GSGS 2310 - Intercultural Communication: Italy in Sienese and Sicilian Contexts


    Students will learn the theory and acquire skills necessary to conscientiously negotiate a variety of cross-cultural situations. Based on the student’s direct experience in two Italian cities, Siena (Tuscany) and Catania (Sicily), the course engages students in a) developing a critical awareness of Italian regional and urban identities, b) reappraising their own culture in light of others, and c) analyzing the nature of cross-cultural encounter.



    Credits: 3
  
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    GSGS 3030 - Global Cultural Studies


    The course analyzes our global cultural condition from a dual historical perspective and follows a development stretching over the last 60 years, beginning with the period just after WW II and continuing to the present day. Of central concern will be the varieties of cultural expression across regions of the world and their relation to a rapidly changing social history, drawing upon events that occur during the semester.



    Credits: 3
  
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    GSGS 3110 - US Military Experience and International Development


    This course examines the US military tradition of humanitarian aid, civil reconstruction, and economic/rural development, through case studies from the last two decades. We study the history, policies, and doctrines that made this work possible, but our primary focus will be to ask and, collaborating with practitioners, learn methods, ethics, precedents, and insights for international development from this largely neglected tradition.



    Credits: 3
  
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    GSGS 3115 - Work, Women’s Work and Women Workers in South Asia


    What is ‘work’? Are women seen as ‘workers’? Are there women who do not ‘work’? What is the history of paid, less paid, and unpaid work? This course focuses on new trends in the relationship between gender, class and work; and will reveal emerging possibilities in knowledge and practice through changes or reversal in the gender order and its impact on work and its relationship with capital.



    Credits: 3
  
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    GSGS 3116 - Social Movements and Development


    This course examines debates about social movements and development, from workers responding to changes in their sphere of work, to communities responding to the seizure of land, water or other resources. Issues will include displacement, migration, trafficking, labor rights, environmental damage; gender, class and caste aspects of movements; human rights of marginalized groups; the role of the state and non-state organizations.



    Credits: 3
  
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    GSGS 3210 - Making Culture Visible While Studying Abroad (Pre-departure)


    Course offers a flexible structure for students studying abroad to learn to be intentional, self-reflective, and curious in how they transact and engage across cultures. It consists of independent assignments organized around methods used by social scientists to understand different cultures and worldviews. It is intended as a supplement to education abroad and can be adapted to different timeframes and locations. First of three-course sequence.



    Credits: 0.5
  
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    GSGS 3220 - Making Culture Visible While Studying Abroad (During Abroad)


    Course offers a flexible structure for students studying abroad to learn to be intentional, self-reflective, and curious in how they transact and engage across cultures. It consists of independent assignments organized around methods used by social scientists to understand different cultures and worldviews. It is intended as a supplement to education abroad and can be adapted to different timeframes and locations. Second of 3-course sequence.



    Credits: 1
  
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    GSGS 3230 - Making Culture Visible While Studying Abroad (After Return)


    Course offers a flexible structure for students studying abroad to learn to be intentional, self-reflective, and curious in how they transact and engage across cultures. It consists of independent assignments organized around methods used by social scientists to understand different cultures and worldviews. It is intended as a supplement to education abroad and can be adapted to different timeframes and locations. Third of three-course sequence.



    Credits: 0.5
  
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    GSGS 3365 - Conscious Social Change: Contemplation and Innovation for Social Change


    This course offers an experiential social venture incubator integrating mindfulness-based leadership and contemplative practices and social entrepreneurship tools. Students will work in teams to develop a business plan for a real or hypothetical social-purpose venture. Daily contemplative practice, interactive personal leadership work and dialogue will allow students to explore both the inner and external dimensions of becoming change leaders.



    Credits: 3
  
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    GSGS 3675 - Museums and Cultural Representation in Quebec


    In this J-term course, we visit museums in Montreal and Quebec City to examine the politics of cultural representation, asking how various kinds of group identity are exhibited in art, history, and anthropology museums. Daily museum visits are accompanied by readings and lectures.



    Credits: 3
  
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    GSGS 3690 - City and Modernity


    The course explores the theories, concepts and contradictions of urban modernity through an investigation of concrete cities. It examines the development of the modern city, including such varieties as the socialist, colonial and post colonial city. It also considers the ways in which globalization affects urban space and urban cultures around the world.



    Credits: 4
  
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    GSGS 4821 - The Culture of London Past and Present


    “The Culture of London: Past and Present” offers an interdisciplinary approach to metropolitan culture, as an historically embedded object of inquiry. Located in London, it runs for a month each year from early June to early July. Faculty members from the University direct, teach and lead the class; they are complemented by London-based specialists in architecture, art history, religious studies and contemporary politics.



    Credits: 1
  
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    GSGS 4961 - Education Abroad Advising and Administration I


    Students learn about the history, demographics, current trends in student mobility, and the principles and practices in effective education abroad advising and administration. Students gain first-hand exposure to the operations of an education abroad office and acquire knowledge and develop skills needed to enter the field of education abroad advising and administration. Prerequisite: Completed a study abroad program, Instructor Permission.



    Credits: 3
  
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    GSGS 4962 - Education Abroad Advising and Administration II


    Students continue their examination of student mobility and principles and practices in effective education abroad advising and administration. Students gain first-hand exposure to the operations of an education abroad office and acquire knowledge and develop skills needed to enter the field of education abroad advising and administration. Prerequisite: Completion of GSGS 4961; Instructor permission.



    Credits: 3
  
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    GSGS 4993 - Independent Study


    Independent study to be arranged by student in consultation with professor.



    Credits: 1 to 6

Global Studies-Security and Justice

  
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    GSSJ 3010 - Global Issues of Security and Justice


    This is the foundation course for students admitted to the Global Studies-Security and Justice track of Global Studies.



    Credits: 3
  
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    GSSJ 3579 - New Practicum in Global Security and Justice


    This practicum course provides the opportunity to offer new topics in Global Security and Justice.



    Credits: 3
  
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    GSSJ 4991 - Capstone Seminar


    This is the capstone seminar for students in the Security and Justice track of Global Studies.



    Credits: 3
  
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    GSSJ 4993 - Independent Study


    This course is designed to allow Global Studies-Security and Justice majors to pursue independent study of relevant topics that go beyond the program’s core, track and/or elective curricula.



    Credits: 1 to 6

Greek

  
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    GREE 1010 - Elementary Greek


    Attic Greek: beginning grammar, composition, and selected readings. For more details on this class, please visit the department website at http://www.virginia.edu/classics/.



    Credits: 4
  
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    GREE 1020 - Elementary Greek


    Attic Greek: beginning grammar, composition, and selected readings. For more details on this class, please visit the department website at http://www.virginia.edu/classics/.



    Credits: 4
  
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    GREE 2010 - Intermediate Greek I


    Xenophon and Plato. For more details on this class, please visit the department website at http://www.virginia.edu/classics/. Prerequisite: GREE 1010-1020.



    Credits: 3
  
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    GREE 2020 - Intermediate Greek II


    Herodotus and Euripides. For more details on this class, please visit the department website at http://www.virginia.edu/classics/. Prerequisite: GREE 2010.



    Credits: 3
  
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    GREE 2230 - The New Testament I


    Introduces New Testament Greek; selections from the Gospels. For more details on this class, please visit the department website at http://www.virginia.edu/classics/. Prerequisite: GREE 1010, 1020.



    Credits: 3
  
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    GREE 2240 - The New Testament II


    Selections from the Epistles. For more details on this class, please visit the department website at http://www.vvirginia.edu/classics/. Prerequisite: GREE 1010-1020 or equivalent.



    Credits: 3
  
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    GREE 3010 - Advanced Reading in Greek


    Reading of a tragedy and a related prose work. Weekly exercises in writing Greek. For more details on this class, please visit the department website at http://www.virginia.edu/classics/. Prerequisite: GREE 2020.



    Credits: 3
  
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    GREE 3020 - Advanced Reading in Greek


    Readings in Greek from Homer’s Iliad. For more details on this class, please visit the department website at http://www.virginia.edu/classics/. Prerequisite: GREE 3010 or 3030.



    Credits: 3
  
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    GREE 3030 - Advanced Reading in Greek


    Reading of a comedy and a related prose work. Weekly exercises in writing Greek. For more details on this class, please visit the department website at http://www.virginia.edu/classics/. Prerequisite: GREE 2020.



    Credits: 3
  
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    GREE 3040 - Advanced Reading in Greek


    Readings in Greek from Homer’s Odyssey. Offered in alternate years. For more details on this class, please visit the department website at http://www.virginia.edu/classics/. Prerequisite: GREE 3010 or 3030.



    Credits: 3
  
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    GREE 4993 - Independent Study


    Independent Study in Greek. For more details on this class, please visit the department website at http://www.virginia.edu/classics/.



    Credits: 1 to 3
  
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    GREE 4998 - Greek Distinguished Majors Thesis Research


    Independent research under direction of a faculty member leading to writing of a Distinguished Majors thesis or comparable project



    Credits: 3
  
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    GREE 4999 - Greek Distinguished Majors Thesis Writing


    Writing of Distinguished Majors thesis or comparable project. Prerequisite: GREE 4998



    Credits: 3

GS-Environments & Sustainability

  
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    GSVS 2050 - Sustainable Energy Systems


    Sustainable energy is not just about the component technologies, it’s about how they fit together to create a complete energy system. Put another way, the individual technologies are only pieces of a much larger puzzle. In this class we will study the science and technology behind those energy “pieces” in an attempt to better define at least their present day shapes. We will then explore ways of assembling them into total energy systems. Prerequisite: High school level physics and chemistry.



    Credits: 3
  
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    GSVS 2150 - Global Sustainability


    This integrated and interdisciplinary course provides foundational knowledge on the multifaceted aspects of both problems and solutions related to sustainability, and challenges participants to deepen their understanding of global sustainability issues through a real-world, collaborative Think Global/ Act Local project.



    Credits: 3
  
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    GSVS 2210 - Religion, Ethics, & Global Environments


    This course interprets humanity’s changing ecological relationships through religious and philosophical traditions. It takes up ethical questions presented by environmental problems, introduces frameworks for making sense of them, and examines the symbols and narratives that shape imaginations of nature.



    Credits: 3
  
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    GSVS 3160 - The Politics of Food


    How and what we eat is basic to who we are as individuals, as a culture, and as a polity. This course looks at the production and consumption of food in a political context, focusing on controversies over agricultural subsidies, labeling requirements, taxation, farming practices, food safety, advertising and education.



    Credits: 3
  
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    GSVS 4991 - Capstone Seminar in Global Studies Environments and Sustainability


    This course is the required Capstone Seminar in the Global Environments and Sustainability track of Global Studies



    Credits: 3
  
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    GSVS 4993 - Independent Study in Environments and Sustainability


    This course is an independent study to be arranged by student in consultation with faculty.



    Credits: 1 to 6

Hebrew

  
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    HEBR 116 - Intensive Introductory Hebrew


    This is the non-credit option for HEBR 1016.



    Credits: 0
  
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    HEBR 126 - Intensive Introductory Hebrew


    This is the non-credit option for HEBR 1026.



    Credits: 0
  
  •  

    HEBR 216 - intensive intermediate Hebrew


    This is the non-credit option for HEBR 2016.



    Credits: 0
  
  •  

    HEBR 226 - Intensive Intermediate Hebrew


    This is the non-credit option for HEBR2026.



    Credits: 0
  
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    HEBR 1010 - Introduction to Modern Hebrew I


    An introduction to the pronunciation, vocabulary, grammar, and writing system of modern Israeli Hebrew. By the end of this sequence students have mastered the core grammatical principles of Hebrew, along with a basic vocabulary of 1000 words, and they are able to read and understand simple texts and carry out simple conversation. Includes material on Israeli culture, history, and politics.



    Credits: 4
  
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    HEBR 1016 - Intensive Introductory Hebrew


    This intensive course begins with instruction in basic oral expression, listening comprehension, elementary reading and writing, and continues with further development of these four skills at the intermediate level. Part of the Summer Language Institute.



    Credits: 3
  
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    HEBR 1020 - Introduction to Modern Hebrew II


    Prerequisite: HEBR 1010.



    Credits: 4
  
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    HEBR 1026 - Intensive Introductory Hebrew


    This intensive course begins with instruction in basic oral expression, listening comprehension, elementary reading and writing, and continues with further development of these four skills at the intermediate level. Part of the Summer Language Institute. Prerequisite: HEBR 1016 or equivalent



    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    HEBR 1410 - Elementary Classical Hebrew I


    Studies the essentials of grammar, syntax, and vocabulary. Includes readings of narrative portions of the Hebrew Bible.



    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    HEBR 1420 - Elementary Classical Hebrew II


    Studies the essentials of grammar, syntax, and vocabulary. Includes readings of narrative portions of the Hebrew Bible.



    Credits: 3
  
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    HEBR 2010 - Intermediate Modern Hebrew


    Continuation of the study of the fundamentals of grammar, with special attention to verb conjugation, noun declension, and syntactic structure, and their occurrence in texts which deal with modern Israeli culture and values. These texts, which include excerpts from newspapers and fiction, introduce 600 new words and expose the learner to political and other issues of modern Israel. Prerequisite: HEBR 1020 with grade of C or above, or instructor permission.



    Credits: 4
  
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    HEBR 2016 - Intensive Intermediate Hebrew


    This intensive course begins with instruction in intermediate level oral expression, listening comprehension, reading and writing, and continues with further development of these four skills. Part of the Summer Language Institute. Prerequisite: HEBR 1016 & 1026 or equivalent



    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    HEBR 2020 - Intermediate Modern Hebrew


    Prerequisite: HEBR 1020 with grade of C or above, or instructor permission.



    Credits: 4
  
  •  

    HEBR 2026 - Intensive Intermediate Hebrew


    This intensive course begins with instruction in intermediate level oral expression, listening comprehension, reading and writing, and continues with further development of these four skills. Part of the Summer Language Institute. Prerequisite: HEBR 1016, 1026 & 2016 or equivalent



    Credits: 3
  
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    HEBR 2410 - Intermediate Classical Hebrew I


    Readings in the prose narratives of the Hebrew Bible. Emphasizes grammar, vocabulary, and syntax. Attention to issues of translation and interpretation. Prerequisite: HEBR 1420 or equivalent, or instructor permission.



    Credits: 3
  
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    HEBR 2420 - Intermediate Classical Hebrew II


    Readings in the prose narratives of the Hebrew Bible. Emphasizes grammar, vocabulary, and syntax. Attention to issues of translation and interpretation. Prerequisite: HEBR 2410 or equivalent, or instructor permission.



    Credits: 3
  
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    HEBR 3010 - Advanced Modern Hebrew I


    This course focuses on the conjugation of weak, or hollow verbs, and the passive of all conjugations. It also continues the study of subordinate clauses with special attention to adverbial clauses and their use. Texts for the course, which form the basis for class discussion in Hebrew and exercises in Hebrew composition, are drawn from various genres. Prerequisite: HEBR 2020 or equivalent, or instructor permission.



    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    HEBR 3020 - Advanced Modern Hebrew II


    Prerequisite: HEBR 2020 or equivalent, or instructor permission.



    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    HEBR 4993 - Independent Study in Hebrew


    Independent study for advanced students of Hebrew. Prerequisite: Instructor permission.



    Credits: 1 to 3

Hebrew in Translation

  
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    HETR 2300 - Introduction to Israeli Literature in Translation


    This course explores Israeli culture and society through the lens of its literature. Beginning with the revival of modern Hebrew and following the formative events of the Israeli experience, we will study a range of fictional works (and poetry) that represent the diverse voices of Israeli self-expression. Readings include S.Y. Agnon, Aharon Appelfeld, Yoel Hoffmann, Etgar Keret, A.B. Yehoshua, Yehudit Hendel, and others.



    Credits: 3

Hindi

  
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    HIND 1010 - Elementary Hindi-Urdu


    Introductory training in speaking, understanding, reading, and writing Hindi and Urdu.



    Credits: 4
  
  •  

    HIND 1020 - Elementary Hindi-Urdu


    Prerequisite: HIND 1010.



    Credits: 4
 

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