Feb 05, 2023  
Undergraduate Record 2017-2018 
    
Undergraduate Record 2017-2018 [ARCHIVED RECORD]

Course Descriptions


 

Engaging the Liberal Arts

  
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    ELA 3500 - Engaging the Liberal Arts: The Third Year


    Courses designed for mostly third-year students that will help them adjust and adapt to college and learn about the many resources and opportunities available to them as they pursue their liberal arts degree. Some topics may focus on career exploration.



    Credits: 1 to 3
  
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    ELA 4500 - Engaging the Liberal Arts: The Fourth Year


    Courses designed for fourth-year students that will help them adjust and adapt to college and learn about the many resources and opportunities available to them as they pursue their liberal arts degree.



    Credits: 1 to 3

Engineering

  
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    ENGR 1410 - Synthesis Design I


    Prerequisite: first-year Rodman scholar status.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ENGR 1420 - Synthesis Design II


    Prerequisite: first-year Rodman scholar status.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ENGR 1501 - Special Topics


    Student led special topic courses which vary by semester.



    Credits: 1
  
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    ENGR 1520 - Explorations in Engineering


    This course introduces students to engineering, including the role of engineers in modern society, engineering subdisciplines, & methods used by engineers to solve problems. A key component is a hands-on design-build project in which students work in small teams to develop a solution to a problem. This activity culminates in demonstration of a design solution prototype. Students should be able to make clearer choices when deciding a career path. Prerequisite: Instructor consent.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ENGR 1595 - Explorations–First-Year Engineering Seminar


    This is a seminar course for first-year students in the School of Engineering and Applied Science to acquire information about engineering careers, what different majors do, etc.



    Credits: 1
  
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    ENGR 1620 - Introduction to Engineering


    ENGR 1620 is a cornerstone course for first year engineering students. They are introduced to the philosophy and practice of engineering through hands-on experience in developing solutions for various open-ended, realistic challenges while considering the various contexts in which these challenges occur. Students will also learn about the majors SEAS offers and receive advisement about careers, plans of study, and major declaration. Prerequisite: First year enrollment in SEAS; exceptions are by instructor permission.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ENGR 1621 - Introduction to Engineering Lab


    Ensure that students master essential computer skills necessary for engineering studies and eventual careers, including use of the Internet (search engines), spreadsheets (MS Excel), and an equation solving/symbol manipulation software package (MathCAD). Ensure that students master fundamental problem solving techniques and mathematical skills common to engineering practice, including data plotting, basic statistics, curve fitting and matrices.



    Credits: 1
  
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    ENGR 2500 - Introduction to Nanoscience and Technology


    A hands-on introduction to nanoscience for students of all majors: Microfabrication, nanoscale chemical and biological self-assembly, applications, technological and ethical challenges; Labs ranging from use of scanning tunneling and atomic force microscopes to DNA fingerprinting. No prerequisites. Lecture/discussion meeting + one lab. For first two weeks of registration, enrollment will be limited to 1st and 2nd years (then opened to all).



    Credits: 3
  
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    ENGR 2555 - Special Projects in Engineering Education


    A project in the engineering education field that requires individual investigation. Each student works on an individual project in the engineering education research area of a supervisor. The student is required to conduct investigations that are summarized in a written report at the end of the experience.



    Credits: 1 to 6
  
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    ENGR 2595 - Special Topics in Engineering


    Special Topics in Engineering.



    Credits: 1 to 4
  
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    ENGR 2993 - Independent Study


    Special tutorial with a topic declared in advance. The topic, work plan, and conditions are arranged by contract between instructor and student and approved by the department Chair, with a copy to be filed in the department office.



    Credits: 1 to 3
  
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    ENGR 3020 - Introduction to Engineering in Context


    This course provides students with realistic and contemporary perspectives on the practice of engineering. A key objective is to improve understanding and appreciation for the role of contextual factors in engineering practice, with emphasis on the interactions between technological, organizational and cultural aspects. Invited speakers from industry, community organizations and academic research present and discuss their perspectives on these contextual interactions and professional challenges. The course helps students prepare for their senior thesis by structuring the search for topics, which are of strong interest to the student and likely to provide real benefits to the client and other stakeholders. Finally, students may generate proposals leading to funded, multidisciplinary team capstone projects in their 4th year. Prerequisite: 3rd year standing.



    Credits: 1
  
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    ENGR 3501 - Special Topics in Engineering


    Special topics in engineering will vary based upon student and faculty interests.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ENGR 3502 - Special Topics in Engineering


    Special topics in engineering will vary based upon student and faculty interests.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ENGR 3580 - Rodman Scholars Seminar


    Special Topics Restricted to Rodman Scholars. Prerequisites: Rodman Scholar Status.



    Credits: 1
  
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    ENGR 3610 - Nanoscale Devices & Systems


    The ability to spatially localize, pattern and interconnect structures with nanoscale resolution is critical for emerging technologies. This course utilizes a hierarchical approach to survey nanotechnologies, beginning with the emerging phenomena at the nanoscale; their device application for electronics, photonics, biosensing and tissue regeneration; the fabrication of integrated nanosystems; and finally their impacts on environmental systems. Prerequisite: APMA 2130, and SEAS-required physics and chemistry courses.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ENGR 4010 - Multidisciplinary Design and Development I


    A two-semester, multidisciplinary, capstone engineering design sequence; the primary objective of ENGR 4010/4020 is to provide students with a realistic and rigorous, culminating engineering design experience, which is reflective of contemporary professional practice. Key course attributes include the multidisciplinary composition of the engineering design teams (students and faculty from any department within SEAS, Commerce, Darden, Nursing, etc.), emphasis on aspects of modern practice (e.g. concurrent engineering, total quality management, and balanced consideration of the technological, organizational and cultural context) and realistic problems and client-stakeholders. A disciplined design/development process is followed that incorporates the important activities of contextual analysis, problem definition, customer needs definition, concept generation and selection, product specification, modeling and engineering analysis, proof of concept prototyping, design verification, cost analysis and project management and scheduling. Prerequisite: 4th year standing.



    Credits: 1 to 3
  
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    ENGR 4020 - Multidisciplinary Design and Development II


    A two-semester, multidisciplinary, capstone engineering design sequence; the primary objective of ENGR 4010/4020 is to provide students with a realistic and rigorous, culminating engineering design experience, which is reflective of contemporary professional practice. Key course attributes include the multidisciplinary composition of the engineering design teams (students and faculty from any department within SEAS, Commerce, Darden, Nursing, etc.), emphasis on aspects of modern practice (e.g. concurrent engineering, total quality management, and balanced consideration of the technological, organizational and cultural context) and realistic problems and client-stakeholders. A disciplined design/development process is followed that incorporates the important activities of contextual analysis, problem definition, customer needs definition, concept generation and selection, product specification, modeling and engineering analysis, proof of concept prototyping, design verification, cost analysis and project management and scheduling. Prerequisite: ENGR 4010; 4th year standing.



    Credits: 1 to 3
  
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    ENGR 4595 - Special Topics in Engineering


    Advance projects course to be taken in parallel with STS 4010, 4020, or can be used for an advanced undergraduate course on a topic not covered in the course offerings. Prerequisite: instructor permission.



    Credits: 1 to 3
  
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    ENGR 4599 - Special Topics in Engineering


    Prerequisite: instructor permission.



    Credits: 1 to 3
  
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    ENGR 4880 - Business and Technical Leadership in Engineering


    This course on Business and Technological Leadership is normally taught by a senior level corporate executive with broad experience who serves as the Brenton S. Halsey Distinguished Visiting Professor of Chemical Engineering and Related Disciplines. The instructor provides experienced insight on business and professional issues likely to be faced by engineers early in their careers. The course normally covers major business skills and competencies in career management, leadership, working in teams, problem solving, and change management as well as international issues facing global companies. Guest speakers will provide additional insights on theses topics.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ENGR 4920 - Engineering License Review


    Overview of registration laws and procedures. Review of engineering fundamentals preparatory to public examination for the ‘Engineer in Training’ part of the professional engineers examination. Three hours of lecture up to the licensing examination. Corequisite: formal application for state registration.



    Credits: 0

English as a Second Language

  
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    ESL 886 - Listening and Speaking I


    This course focuses on vocabulary, grammar, pronunciation, and key communication functions to help students develop their listening and speaking skills. Open to intermediate students.



    Credits: 0
  
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    ESL 887 - Listening and Speaking II


    This course focuses on vocabulary, grammar, pronunciation, and key communication functions to help students develop their listening and speaking skills. Open to high intermediate/low advanced students.



    Credits: 0

  
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    ESL 896 - Reading and Writing II


    This course focuses on vocabulary, structures, reading strategies, and writing tasks to help students develop their reading and writing skills. Open to intermediate students.



    Credits: o

  
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    ESL 897 - Reading and Writing II


    This course focuses on vocabulary, structures, reading strategies, and writing tasks to help students develop their reading and writing skills. Open to high intermediate/low advanced students.



    Credits: 0

  
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    ESL 2915 - English for Academic Purposes (EAP)


    English for Academic Purposes (EAP) is an intensive language and culture course, for nonnative speakers of English who have been admitted to an undergraduate or graduate degree program at the University of Virginia or who are prospective UVA research associates or visiting scholars. Participants fine-tune the language skills required for success in US higher education through exercises in writing, reading, oral communication and pronunciation.



    Credits: 6
  
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    ESL 3010 - ESL - Classroom Communication - Undergraduate


    Students whose first language is one other than English develop advanced aural/oral communication skills required for success at a U.S. university. Topics include classroom discussion, oral presentation, and group participation sills. Academic vocabulary, reading strategies, and writing strategies that facilitate participation in academic discourse are also addressed.



    Credits: 2

English-Academic, Professional, & Creative Writing

  
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    ENWR 1505 - Writing & Critical Inquiry Stretch I


    Part I of the two-semester option for meeting the first writing requirement. For placement guidelines see http://professionalwriting.as.virginia.edu/requirements. Topics vary each semester and can be found using the SIS Class Search.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ENWR 1506 - Writing & Critical Inquiry Stretch II


    Part II of the two-semester option for meeting the first writing requirement. For placement guidelines see http://www.engl.virginia.edu/undergraduate/writing/placement. Topics vary each semester and can be found using the SIS Class Search. Prerequisite: ENWR 1505.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ENWR 1507 - Writing & Critical Inquiry Stretch I for Multilingual Writers


    Part I of the two-semester ESL option for meeting the first writing requirement. For placement guidelines see http://www.engl.virginia.edu/undergraduate/writing/placement. Topics vary each semester and can be found using the SIS Class Search.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ENWR 1508 - Writing & Critical Inquiry Stretch II for Multilingual Writers


    Part II of the two-semester ESL option for meeting the first writing requirement. For placement guidelines see http://www.engl.virginia.edu/undergraduate/writing/placement. Topics vary each semester and can be found using the SIS Class Search. Prerequisite: ENWR 1505



    Credits: 3
  
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    ENWR 1510 - Writing and Critical Inquiry


    The single-semester option for meeting the first writing requirement– intended to be taken during the first year of study– this course approaches writing as a way of generating, representing, and reflecting on critical inquiry. Graded A, B, C, or NC. Students whose last names end in A-K must take ENWR 1510 in the fall; those with last names ending in L-Z take it in the spring.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ENWR 2150 - Pavilion Writers I


    Part I of a two-semester workshop option for completing the first writing requirement. Focusing on framing and developing effective academic arguments. Both ENWR 2150 and ENWR 2160 must be completed to receive credit for either course and to complete the first writing requirement. For more details on this class, please visit the department website at http://www.engl.virginia.edu/courses.



    Credits: 1
  
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    ENWR 2160 - Pavilion Writers II


    Part II of a two-semester workshop option for completing the first writing requirement. Focusing on advanced argument patterns, syntax, and cohesion. Both ENWR 2150 and ENWR 2160 must be completed to receive credit for either course and to complete the first writing requirement. For more details on this class, please visit the department website at http://www.engl.virginia.edu/courses.



    Credits: 1
  
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    ENWR 2510 - Advanced Writing Seminar


    A single-semester option for meeting the first writing requirement– intended to be taken during the first year of study– this course approaches writing as a way of generating, representing, and reflecting on critical inquiry. Enrollment limited to students meeting benchmarks determined by the Writing Program.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ENWR 2520 - Special Topics in Writing


    Includes courses on writing studies, corporate communications, and digital writing. For more details on this class, please visit the department website at http://www.engl.virginia.edu/courses. Prerequisite: Completion of first writing requirement.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ENWR 2610 - Writing with Style


    Develops an understanding of the wide range of stylistic moves in prose writing, their uses, and implications. Students build a rich vocabulary for describing stylistic decisions, imitate and analyze exemplary writing, and discuss each others writing in a workshop setting.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ENWR 2620 - Reviewing Popular Culture


    A writing workshop that focuses on critical approaches to popular culture. Students will read, analyze, and write a variety of critical essays on pop culture artifacts.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ENWR 2630 - Writing About Work


    We will use inquiry-based writing to explore the role that work plays in the good life. We’ll critically analyze how and why we write about work to refresh our thinking about real-world experiences both familiar and unfamiliar to us. We will develop as writers by generating and exploring complicated questions. Why do we do the things that we do? What work do we value, and how do we communicate that?



    Credits: 3
  
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    ENWR 2640 - Composing Digital Stories and Essays


    A workshop in which students produce stories and essays as both conventional print texts and multimodal electronic texts. Through a mix of theory and example students explore how emerging technologies changed the genres and modes of writing inside and outside the academy.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ENWR 2700 - News Writing


    Introductory course in news writing, emphasizing editorials, features, and reporting. For more details on this class, please visit the department website at http://www.engl.virginia.edu/courses.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ENWR 3500 - Topics in Advanced Academic Writing


    A course for students who are already proficient academic writers and wish to develop their writing skills further in a workshop setting.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ENWR 3640 - Writing with Sound


    This course trains students to become attuned, thoughtful listeners and sonic composers. In addition to discussing key works on sound from fields such as rhetoric and composition, sound studies, and journalism, we will experiment with the possibilities of sound as a valuable form of writing and storytelling. Students will learn how to use digital audio editing tools, platforms, and techniques for designing and producing sonic projects.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ENWR 3650 - Digital Writing: Remix Culture


    This course explores the remix as a transformative compositional practice. Remix culture raises poignant questions about originality, creativity, and the ethical and legal implications of twenty-first century forms of composition. Students will examine remixing through theoretical, historical, aesthetic, and political lenses in order to cultivate a deep understanding of the rhetorical and affective power of this genre.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ENWR 3660 - Travel Writing


    This course will explore travel writing using a variety of texts, including essays, memoirs, blogs, photo essays, and narratives. We will examine cultural representations of travel as well as the ethical implications of tourism. Students will have the opportunity to write about their own travel experiences, and we will also embark on “local travel” of our own.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ENWR 3665 - Writing about the Environment


    This course focuses on creating meaningful, responsible, and engaged writing in the context of significant environmental issues. Analysis of representative environmental texts, familiarity with environmental concepts, examination of ethical positions in private and public spheres of writing, and sustained practice with form, style, medium, and genre will drive a variety of writing projects.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ENWR 3700 - Intermediate News Writing


    Writing news and feature stories for magazines and newspapers. For more details on this class, please visit the department website at http://www.engl.virginia.edu/courses. Prerequisite: ENWR 270 or instructor permission.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ENWR 3710 - News Magazine Writing


    A course in weekly news magazine writing. Prerequisite: Instructor permission.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ENWR 3720 - Magazine Writing


    A course in writing non-fiction articles for general magazines. Prerequisite: Instructor permission.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ENWR 3800 - Academic and Professional Writing


    Prepares students for professional or advanced academic writing; also prepares students to manage (assign, edit, supervise, and coach) the writing of others. Lectures present principles based on research in writing studies; seminars allow students to master those principles in the context of projects keyed to their specific interests and career plans. Meets second writing requirement. For more details on this class, please visit the department website at http://www.engl.virginia.edu/courses.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ENWR 3900 - Career-Based Writing and Rhetoric


    Develops proficiency in a range of stylistic and persuasive effects. The course is designed for students who want to hone their writing skills, as well as for students preparing for careers in which they will write documents for public circulation. Students explore recent research in writing studies. In the workshop-based studio sessions, students propose, write, and edit projects of their own design.



    Credits: 3

English-American Literature to 1900

  
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    ENAM 3110 - American Literature to 1865


    Surveys American literature from the Colonial Era to the Age of Emerson and Melville. For more details on this class, please visit the department website at http://www.engl.virginia.edu/courses.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ENAM 3120 - American Literature Since 1865


    Surveys American literature, both prose and poetry, from the Civil War to the present. For more details on this class, please visit the department website at http://www.engl.virginia.edu/courses.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ENAM 3130 - African-American Literature I


    Analyzes the earliest examples of African-American literature, emphasizing African cultural themes and techniques that were transformed by the experience of slavery as that experience met European cultural and religious practices. Studies essays, speeches, pamphlets, poetry, and songs. For more details on this class, please visit the department website at http://www.engl.virginia.edu/courses.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ENAM 3140 - African-American Literature II


    Continuation of ENAM 3130, this course begins with the career of Richard Wright and brings the Afro-American literary and performing tradition up to the present day. For more details on this class, please visit the department website at http://www.engl.virginia.edu/courses.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ENAM 3150 - The American Renaissance


    Analyzes the major writings of Poe, Emerson, Hawthorne, Melville, Whitman, Thoreau, and Dickinson. For more details on this class, please visit the department website at http://www.engl.virginia.edu/courses.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ENAM 3160 - Realism and Naturalism in America


    Analyzes American literary realism and naturalism, its sociological, philosophical, and literary origins as well as its relation to other contemporaneous literary movements. For more details on this class, please visit the department website at http://www.engl.virginia.edu/courses.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ENAM 3180 - Introduction to Asian American Studies


    An interdisciplinary introduction to the culture and history of Asians and Pacific Islanders in America. Examines ethnic communities such as Chinese, Japanese, Filipino, Korean, Asian Indian, and Native Hawaiian, through themes such as immigration, labor, cultural production, war, assimilation, and politics. Texts are drawn from genres such as legal cases, short fiction, musicals, documentaries, visual art, and drama. For more details on this class, please visit the department website at http://www.engl.virginia.edu/courses.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ENAM 3240 - Faulkner


    An intensive study of the works of William Faulkner in the contexts of American literature, southern literature, and international modernism.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ENAM 3280 - Reading the Black College Campus


    Historically Black Colleges and University campuses are records of the process of democratizing (extending to excluded social groups such as African-Americans) opportunities for higher education in America. Through landscapes, we trace this record, unearthing the politics of landscapes via direct experience as well as via interpretations of representations of landscapes in literature, visual arts, maps, plans, and photographs. For more details on this class, please visit the department website at http://www.engl.virginia.edu/courses.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ENAM 3300 - American Poetry


    Studies theme and technique in major American poets. For more details on this class, please visit the department website at http://www.engl.virginia.edu/courses.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ENAM 3400 - American Fictions


    Classic American fiction 1800-1900. Readings vary but may include Cooper, Sedgewick, Stowe, Hawthorn, James, Twain, Chestnutt, Chopin, Dreiser, Crane, Melville



    Credits: 3
  
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    ENAM 3450 - American Short Novel


    Examines American short novels since 1840 by such authors as Poe, Melville, James, Jewett, Crane, Larsen, Faulkner, Reed, MacLean, Auster, and Chang. For more details on this class, please visit the department website at http://www.engl.virginia.edu/courses.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ENAM 3500 - Studies in American Literature


    For more details on this class, please visit the department website at http://www.engl.virginia.edu/courses.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ENAM 3510 - Studies in African-American Literature and Culture


    Intensive study of African-American writers and cultural figures in a diversity of genres. Includes artists from across the African diaspora in comparative American perspective. For more details on this class, please visit the department website at http://www.engl.virginia.edu/courses.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ENAM 3520 - Major American Authors


    Studies the work of one or two major authors. For more details on this class, please visit the department website at http://www.engl.virginia.edu/courses.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ENAM 3570 - Contemporary Ethnic American Fiction


    This course introduces students to the growing body of fiction by recent American writers of ethnic and racial minorities. For more details on this class, please visit the department website at http://www.engl.virginia.edu/courses.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ENAM 3750 - Sex and Sentiment


    Focuses on the rise of sentimental novels and sensational novels between the American Revolution and the Civil War. For more details on this class, please visit the department website at http://www.engl.virginia.edu/courses.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ENAM 3770 - Women in American Art


    Analyzes the roles played by women as artists and as the subjects of representation in American art from the colonial period to the present. Some background in either art history or gender studies is desirable. For more details on this class, please visit the department website at http://www.engl.virginia.edu/courses.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ENAM 3780 - Science and Identity in American Literature


    Studies literary representations of science, pseudo-science and technology in nineteenth century America, particularly works that explore the possible effects of science on personal, civic, and social identity. For more details on this class, please visit the department website at http://www.engl.virginia.edu/courses.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ENAM 3850 - Folklore in America


    Surveys the traditional expressive culture of various ethnic and religious groups in America, including songs, folk narratives, folk religion, proverbs, riddles. Emphasizes southeastern Anglo-Americans. For more details on this class, please visit the department website at http://www.engl.virginia.edu/courses.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ENAM 3870 - Literature of the West


    Analyzes selected works by writers of the Western United States from the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Emphasizes the Anglo-American exploration, settlement, and development of the West, as well as readings from other ethnic groups, including Native and Hispanic Americans. For more details on this class, please visit the department website at http://www.engl.virginia.edu/courses.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ENAM 3880 - Literature of the South


    Analyzes selected works of poetry and prose by major Southern writers. For more details on this class, please visit the department website at http://www.engl.virginia.edu/courses.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ENAM 3890 - Mass Media and American Culture


    Studies the development and impact of mass forms of communication in America including newspapers, magazines, film, the wireless and the radio, television, and the Internet. For more details on this class, please visit the department website at http://www.engl.virginia.edu/courses.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ENAM 4500 - Advanced Studies in American Literature


    Limited enrollment. Topics vary from year to year. For more details on this class, please visit the department website at http://www.engl.virginia.edu/courses.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ENAM 4814 - African-American Women Authors


    For more details on this class, please visit the department website at http://www.engl.virginia.edu/courses.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ENAM 4840 - Fictions of Black Identity


    This class will examine novels, essays, critical works that address the meanings of blackness in an American context. We will explore the notion that Black identity is a fiction, not necessarily in the sense of falsity, but in its highly mediated, flexible, and variable condition. Among the questions to consider: how does one make and measure Black identity? What is the value of racial masquerade? For more details on this class, please visit the department website at http://www.engl.virginia.edu/courses. Prerequisite: third year, fourth year, AAS or English major or minor.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ENAM 4845 - Black Speculative Fiction


    This course seeks to explore the world of African American ‘speculative’ fiction. This genre of writing largely includes science fiction, fantasy fiction, and horror. In this class, we will read, watch, and discuss narratives by black writers of speculative fiction to better understand the motivation, tone, and agenda in the work of black writers. We will also consider the role of black culture and representation in the larger field. For more details on this class, please visit the department website at http://www.engl.virginia.edu/courses. Prerequisite: third year, fourth year, English major or minor, AAS major or minor.



    Credits: 3

English-Creative Writing

  
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    ENCW 2200 - Introduction to Creative Nonfiction


    Creative non-fiction encompasses a variety of genres - personal essays, travelogues, memoir, nature writing, literary journalism - that present factual information from a personal perspectives. We will read works by writers either hailing from or intimately familiar with each of countries we are visiting. attending to how these authors use elements of fiction, such as scene, dialogue, character, story, and metaphor, to tell their “true” stories.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ENCW 2300 - Poetry Writing


    An introduction to the craft of writing poetry, with relevant readings in the genre. For more details on this class, please visit the department website at http://www.engl.virginia.edu/courses.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ENCW 2530 - Introduction to Poetry Writing - Themed


    An introduction to the craft of writing poetry, with relevant readings in the genre. Both readings and writing assignments will be on topics that vary. For more details on this class, please visit the department website at http://www.engl.virginia.edu/courses.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ENCW 2560 - Introduction to Fiction Writing - Themed


    An introduction to the craft of writing fiction, with relevant readings in the genre. Both readings and writing assignments will be on topics that vary. For more details on this class, please visit the department website at http://www.engl.virginia.edu/courses.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ENCW 2600 - Fiction Writing


    An introduction to the craft of writing fiction, with relevant readings in the genre. For more details on this class, please visit the department website at http://www.engl.virginia.edu/courses.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ENCW 3310 - Intermediate Poetry Writing I


    For students advanced beyond the level of ENWR 2300. Involves workshop of student work, craft discussion, and relevant reading. May be repeated with different instructor. For instructions on how to apply to this class, see www.engl.virginia.edu/courses. Prerequisite: Instructor permission.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ENCW 3320 - Intermediate Poetry Writing II


    For students advanced beyond the level of ENWR 2300. Involves workshop of student work, craft discussion, and relevant reading. May be repeated with different instructor. For instructions on how to apply to this class, see www.engl.virginia.edu/courses. Prerequisite: Instructor permission.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ENCW 3350 - Intermediate Nonfiction Writing


    For students advanced beyond the level of ENWR 2600. Involves workshop of student work, craft discussion, and relevant reading. May be repeated with different instructor. For instructions on how to apply to this class, see www.engl.virginia.edu/courses. Prerequisite: Instructor permission.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ENCW 3610 - Intermediate Fiction Writing


    For students advanced beyond the level of ENWR 2600. Involves workshop of student work, craft discussion, and relevant reading. May be repeated with different instructor. For instructions on how to apply to this class, see www.engl.virginia.edu/courses. Prerequisite: Instructor permission.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ENCW 4350 - Advanced Nonfiction Writing


    For advanced students with experience in writing literary nonfiction. Involves workshop of student work, craft discussion, and relevant reading. May be repeated with different instructor. For instructions on how to apply to this class, see www.engl.virginia.edu/courses. Prerequisite: Instructor permission.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ENCW 4810 - Advanced Fiction Writing I


    Devoted to the writing of prose fiction, especially the short story. Student work is discussed in class and individual conferences. Parallel reading in the work of modern novelists and short story writers is required. For advanced students with prior experience in writing fiction. May be repeated with different instructor. For instructions on how to apply to this class, see www.engl.virginia.edu/courses. Prerequisite: Instructor permission.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ENCW 4830 - Advanced Poetry Writing I


    For advanced students with prior experience in writing poetry. Student work is discussed in class and in individual conferences. Reading in contemporary poetry is also assigned. May be repeated with different instructor. For instructions on how to apply to this class, see www.engl.virginia.edu/courses. Prerequisite: Instructor permission.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ENCW 4993 - Independent Project in Creative Writing


    For the student who wants to work on a creative writing project under the direction of a faculty member. For more details on this class, please visit the department website at http://www.engl.virginia.edu/courses. Prerequisite: Instructor permission.



    Credits: 3

English-Criticism

  
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    ENCR 3000 - Contemporary Literary Theory


    Introduces some of the most influential schools of contemporary literary theory and criticism. For more details on this class, please visit the department website at http://www.engl.virginia.edu/courses.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ENCR 3400 - Theories of Reading


    This course has two parts. The first half offers a survey of influential styles of critical reading, including psychoanalysis, structuralism, deconstruction, and several styles of political interpretation. The second half invites students to think theoretically yet sympathetically about affective dimensions of reader response such as identification, empathy, enchantment, and shock.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ENCR 3620 - Introduction to Criticism and Cultural Studies


    Introduces the various and contested theories and practices of what has come to be called ‘cultural studies.’ Examines various theoretical traditions and histories of mass culture and advertising. For more details on this class, please visit the department website at http://www.engl.virginia.edu/courses.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ENCR 3630 - Psychoanalytic Criticism


    Studies Freudian and post-Freudian psychology and its literary applications. For more details on this class, please visit the department website at http://www.engl.virginia.edu/courses.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ENCR 3710 - Intellectual Prose


    Studies non-fictional discursive prose. Readings drawn from such fields as criticism, aesthetic theory, philosophy, social and political thought, history, economics, and science; from the Renaissance to the present day. For more details on this class, please visit the department website at http://www.engl.virginia.edu/courses.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ENCR 3810 - Feminist Theories and Methods


    Introduces current feminist scholarship in a variety of areas literature, history, film, anthropology, and psychoanalysis, among others pairing feminist texts with more traditional ones. Features guest speakers and culminates in an interdisciplinary project. Cross listed as SWAG 3810. For more details on this class, please visit the department website at http://www.engl.virginia.edu/courses.



    Credits: 3
 

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