Jun 25, 2022  
Undergraduate Record 2017-2018 
    
Undergraduate Record 2017-2018 [ARCHIVED RECORD]

Course Descriptions


 

Education-Human Services

  
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    EDHS 2892 - Issues Facing Adolescent Girls II


    A continuation of EDHS 2891 Issues Facing Adolescent Girls I, this one-credit academic, service-learning class focuses on developing leadership skills through the Young Women Leaders Program (YWLP). Students attend a weekly one-hour class and two-hour mentoring group, and spend four hours a month one-on-one with their mentee. For those not able to mentor, they can meet the class requirements by being involved in the YWLP research team. Prerequisites: EDHS 2891 Issues Facing Adolescent Girls I.



    Credits: 1
  
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    EDHS 2895 - Minding the Mind: Engaging Youth in Learning


    Learning is how we create knowledge of our world. This course overviews prominent theories of learning and affords the opportunity to deepen this knowledge through tutoring youth in school. The course covers methods of analyzing learning tasks, understanding the role of memory in learning, cultural and individual variations among learners, and principles for reinforcing and engaging learners. Class content mirrorsactivities with tutees.



    Credits: 3
  
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    EDHS 2900 - Practice in Community and Youth Engagement


    This one-hour class is designed to monitor and provide support and supervision for students who work with youth in the community as part of their academic program.



    Credits: 1
  
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    EDHS 2950 - Advocating for Youth: Making Your Ideas Matter


    How can you communicate your knowledge and your ideas for youth advocacy with impact? In this course, you’ll focus on the power of quality writing and explore other ways to share ideas. The aim of this course is to strengthen the link between your passion and advocacy through effective communication and the written word.



    Credits: 3
  
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    EDHS 3002 - Anatomy & Physiology Lab II


    This course is designed to provide hands-on laboratory experience in anatomy and physiology. The course meets once per week for a guided laboratory experience using models, computer programs or other anatomic specimens. Specific emphasis is placed on the study of cells, tissues, organs and multiple systems of the human body.



    Credits: 1
  
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    EDHS 3055 - Development and Prevention of Youth Violence


    This course examines social and psychological factors contributing to the development of violent behavior in youth, accompanied by an analysis of current prevention approaches. Each topic will include a case study followed by relevant social science research. Students will participate in simulated legislative hearings where they will present oral and written position statements on policy issues such as bullying. media violence, and gun control.



    Credits: 3
  
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    EDHS 3100 - Media Socialization, Racial Stereotypes and Black Adolescent Identity


    This course will introduce students to developmental differences in media engagement for younger children, older children and adolescents. Students will learn about media socialization, black racial stereotypes in the media, racial identity, racial socialization and how these variables may influence the identity processes of black adolescents.



    Credits: 3
  
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    EDHS 3120 - Abnormal Psychology


    This course provides a broad overview of developmental psychopathology (abnormal psychology) - initially focusing on understanding basic concepts, historical context, developmental influences, theoretical perspectives, research methodology, and issues related to classification and assessment - followed by comprehensive information concerning major disorders (e.g., ADHD, major depression, anxiety, ASD, schizophrenia).



    Credits: 3
  
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    EDHS 3200 - Introduction to Counseling Student Athletes


    What does it mean to be a student athlete? What roles can race, gender, and class play in the student athlete experience? This course is for any undergraduate student interested in analyzing the complexities of the lived experiences of elite student athletes through a counseling lens.



    Credits: 3
  
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    EDHS 3220 - International Communication Disorders Research


    This study abroad program allows students to (1) engage in the development of research projects that are related to the speech pathology and audiology major, (2) understand universalities and differences as they apply to speech and language, (3) study cultural and linguistic differences in research (e.g., topics chosen by researchers), educational, and therapeutic practices, and (4) develop skills in international networking.



    Credits: 6
  
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    EDHS 3240 - Peer Health Education


    Academic content and training on various health topics for college students. Prerequisite: Instructor permission.



    Credits: 3
  
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    EDHS 3250 - Professional Development and Team Dynamics


    Interpersonal skills and relationships are more important than ever to employers. This course is designed for undergraduates who are preparing to enter the workforce to learn more about working in a team environment. We will focus on interpersonal and intrapersonal awareness, and application of course concepts including human development, psychology, and diversity through a team service learning project.



    Credits: 3
  
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    EDHS 3440 - Teaching Games, Rhythms and Dance


    Participation in, and understanding of, performance and teaching techniques for elementary games, rhythms, outdoor education, games, tumbling, cooperative activities, and dance. The main focus of this course is on pedagogical issues.



    Credits: 2
  
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    EDHS 3500 - Special Topics In Human Services


    Topical offerings in the subject of human services.



    Credits: 1 to 6
  
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    EDHS 3850 - Introduction to Counseling


    What is counseling? How do counselors work with clients whose values differ from their own? What are some evidence-based practices used in various settings? How might race, gender, and class influence the counseling relationship? The answers to these and many other questions will be explored through small and large group discussions, conversations with community stakeholders, role-plays, and individual and team research.



    Credits: 3
  
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    EDHS 3891 - Fostering Leadership in Girls and Women


    The aim of this course is to help YWLP Facilitators acquire the skills and knowledge required for successful facilitation as well as to provide lots of support. Given the diverse members of each group, the mentoring group curriculum, and other factors that affect the group, how can YWLP be the most rewarding experience possible for each group member? How can students grow as facilitators and leaders through their experience as YWLP Facilitators? Prerequisite: EDHS 2891 and EDHS 2892



    Credits: 3
  
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    EDHS 3895 - Peer Counseling Theory and Skills


    This course explores the evolution of counseling theories of helping and considers how these theories can be used to better understand how and when one chooses to use peer helping interventions within a college setting. It is designed for all students interested in a career in helping, with emphasis on those who want to impact the student experience.



    Credits: 3
  
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    EDHS 4010 - Instructional & Assistive Technology Applications for Special Populations


    This course addresses the use and application of instructional and assistive technologies to promote client communication, learning, skill acquisition, and independence. Coursework includes an overview of the assistive technology assessment and delivery process, and options for alternative presentation within the therapeutic intervention plan or school curriculum.



    Credits: 3
  
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    EDHS 4020 - Clinical Phonetics


    Studies the structure and function of speech sound production. Teaches the basic skills of phonetic transcription for assessment and intervention purposes using the International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA). Provides students with fundamental knowledge to support their future studies of reading, speech and hearing science, communication disorders, and speech-language pathology.



    Credits: 3
  
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    EDHS 4030 - Speech and Hearing Science


    The course examines principal concepts and procedures for the study of physiologic, perceptual and acoustic aspects of voice, speech and hearing. The course leads the student into the fascinating world of new applications in daily life, in business, and especially in education and clinical work.



    Credits: 3
  
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    EDHS 4040 - Anatomy & Physiology of Speech & Hearing Mechanisms


    This course examines the anatomical and physiological features of hearing, speech perception, language comprehension, speech production, language production, voice production, and swallowing.



    Credits: 3
  
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    EDHS 4050 - Introduction to Audiology


    Introduction to the profession of audiology. Examine common pathologies of the auditory system, the impact of hearing loss, conventional procedures used to assess hearing, and interpretation of audiological test findings.



    Credits: 3
  
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    EDHS 4300 - Psycholinguistics & Communication


    This course focuses on the psychological processes that underlie the acquisition and the use of language. There is an emphasis on the interaction between linguistic skills and other cognitive skills. Topics include learnability, microgenesis of speech, bilingualism and variation, and a psycholinguistic approach to breakdowns (i.e., language pathology).



    Credits: 3
  
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    EDHS 4810 - Personal Adjustment and the Science of Happiness


    What does it mean to be normal, well-adjusted or happy? Examine the common conception of how people adjust to life. What are appropriate ways of being, and what behaviors are abnormal or deviant? Learn factors that influence psychological adjustment in normal human development and the relationship between adjustment and personal happiness. Includes study, self-examination, mindfulness, personal projects and the science of creating happiness.



    Credits: 3
  
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    EDHS 4993 - Independent Study


    Independent Study



    Credits: 1 to 6
  
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    EDHS 4995 - Directed Research


    Prerequisite: Instructor permission.



    Credits: 1 to 6

Education-Leadership, Foundations, and Policy

  
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    EDLF 1010 - Dialogs on Diversity (LINC)


    The first-year initiative Learning and Interacting in our Community (LINC) is designed to provide students with an opportunity to begin development of the skills needed to live and learn in a diverse community. Such learning depends on individual, personal reflection, and yet it cannot be accomplished alone. Through intense and extended interaction with each student in the class, students work to develop a better understanding of him or herself and a commitment to making the world a better place for all. Topics to be examined include race, gender, sexual oriention, class and religion particularly as they relate to pop culture, the media and the University community.



    Credits: 3
  
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    EDLF 1020 - LINC Facilitators


    This course consists of students who have taken EDLF 1010 and wish to continue their study of multiculturalism and diversity. The course delves deeper into theoretical studies of systemic oppression in addition to training students to become facilitators of discussions around these issues. As facilitators, students take on a leadership role in awareness exercises in EDLF 1010, read and comment on students’ weekly reflections and papers, and facilitate small group discussions.



    Credits: 6
  
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    EDLF 1200 - Examining the Effectiveness of Social Innovation


    Educational and social innovations such as Head Start, Teach for America, and Promise Neighborhoods aim to dramatically improve outcomes for children by altering the status quo. This course explores innovations intended to improve outcomes for children and youth and how we can determine whether innovations actually ‘work’? What is meant by ‘works’ and what are the outcomes by which we judge whether an innovation works?



    Credits: 3
  
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    EDLF 2050 - What the Innovators Do: Strategies to Transform the Lives of Youth


    Inequalities persist at every level of education. Throughout this course we will study innovations designed to address these disparities. We will investigate the process by innovations are designed and will critically assess the efficacy of a wide range of innovations. The course will feature numerous guest speakers involved in innovation design and implementation, including leaders in the private, educational, and government sectors.



    Credits: 3
  
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    EDLF 3000 - Research Design for Social Innovation with Youth


    What are the makings of good research in youth development? How do our methods help us more clearly measure what matters in settings for youth? This course will provide an introduction to applied social-science research methods and design. Students will engage a hands-on semester research project while learning the foundations of ethics, method, and design for research in the field of youth development. Prerequisite: EDHS 1100



    Credits: 3
  
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    EDLF 3050 - Introduction to Social Entrepreneurship


    Social entrepreneurship is an approach to creating system-level change through the application of entrepreneurial thinking to social ventures, non-profit organizations, government institutions, and NGOs to create economic, environmental, and social value for multiple stakeholders. In this course you will be introduced to a range of entrepreneurial approaches aimed at solving social problems from the non-profit to the for-profit.



    Credits: 3
  
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    EDLF 3150 - Introduction to Child Growth and Development


    This survey course introduces several prominent theories of child development and explores the related empirical research. Emphasis is placed on applying developmental principles to parenting and professional practice. Major topics include: The historical basis of child study, the life cycle, maturational milestones, cognitive, emotional, and moral development, and biological foundations.



    Credits: 3
  
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    EDLF 3160 - Introduction to Educational Psychology


    Organized around two major concepts of learning: motivation and instruction. Teaches students to alter conditions of motivation and instruction in order to maximize the effectiveness of educational programs. Topics include motivation theory, learning theory, evaluation, self-management, and instructional strategies.



    Credits: 3
  
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    EDLF 3170 - Introduction to Adolescence


    Psychological and social development during adolescence are affected by multiple factors, such as biological, social and cultural changes, and larger macrosystem influences. We will examine how these influences shape development generally during the 2nd and 3rd decades of life. We will explore questions of identity, relationships, health and culture by considering key questions that adolescents explore such as “Who am I,” and “Where am I going?”



    Credits: 3
  
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    EDLF 3180 - Lifespan Development


    In this course, we will explore the journey we all share, asking “How do individuals grow and change throughout life?” We will take a topical approach, with particular focus on biological, psychological, and social development from birth through older adulthood. We will seek to understand our own developmental processes, as well as the role of race, class, gender and culture on others,’ and question our beliefs about what it means to “grow up.”



    Credits: 3
  
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    EDLF 3240 - Multicultural Education


    Through readings, film, music, and guided discussion students seek to answer questions such as: What is multiculturalism and how might education inform our understanding of it? What challenges are we facing regarding multiculturalism and diversity? How can we promote social justice and a greater understanding of others? This course engages the nexus of multiculturalism, multicultural education, and social justice to respond to these questions.



    Credits: 3
  
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    EDLF 3250 - Intro to Citizenship & Activism: Critical Exam of Jefferson’s University


    This course examines ideas about citizenship, engagement, student activism, and social justice within the context of the University. It will examine, through lecture, discussion, readings, and an applied action research project, the various definitions of political engagement, activism, and social change as they are relate to current issues at the University.



    Credits: 3
  
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    EDLF 3333 - Lessons from a Toy Store: Behavioral Economics and Education


    Policy makers have made substantial investments over the past several decades to improve educational outcomes for economically-disadvantaged students, yet disparities remain. The purpose of this class is to 1) apply insights from behavioral economics to diagnose why education policies do not always achieve their desired goals, and 2) identify strategies for improving students’ educational outcomes



    Credits: 3
  
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    EDLF 3420 - Athletics in the University


    This course addresses the history, organization, finance, governance, leadership and symbolism of athletics as a key part of the political economy of the contemporary university. With student athletes as a primary unit of analysis we will review the history of intercollegiate athletic competition, the symbolic role of athletics in society and the future of athletics on post-secondary campuses.



    Credits: 3
  
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    EDLF 3440 - Psychology of Sport and Physical Activity


    This course will focus on the social and psychological factors related to participation in sport and physical activity over the life span. Personal factors that influence sport & exercise behavior (e.g., personality, self-perceptions, age, gender, race), situational factors (e.g., observational learning, motivational climate, socioeconomic level), and psychological methods for enhancing sport and exercise behavior will be reviewed.



    Credits: 3
  
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    EDLF 3460 - Race and Identity in Youth Development


    This course is designed to examine how race/ethnicity, diversity, & identity matter in the lives of youth with a focus on educational settings. We will use theory and research to question stereotypes about youth achievement and will explore how individual, interpersonal, and structural factors help to explain associations between group membership & educational outcomes. Students should have previously taken an intro level social science course.



    Credits: 3
  
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    EDLF 3470 - Hip-Hop History and Global Movements


    Examines the history of hip-hop as an educational and social movement in the United States and around the globe. Explores hip-hop as a form of global literacy that transcends race, gender, culture, and ethnicity. Includes lectures, group discussions, poetry readings, emcee and spoken word sessions, and critical reviews of hip-hop music.



    Credits: 3
  
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    EDLF 3500 - Special Topics in Educ Leadership


    Topical offerings in educational leadership.



    Credits: 1 to 6
  
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    EDLF 3610 - Immigrant Youth and Families


    Questions of immigration have been at the fore of the national political conversation in the United States over the last decade. This course provides a developmental perspective on immigrant youth and families, with particular attention to educational contexts from early childhood through early adulthood.



    Credits: 3
  
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    EDLF 4000 - Dream it, Design it, Do it: Youth and Social Innovation Capstone


    With a team, you will design and implement an innovation to address a community issue facing youth. You will become an expert in the issue, and develop the skills needed to 1) assess a social issue, 2) evaluate and integrate multiple perspectives on social issues, 3) collaborate with a diverse team of stakeholders to design and implement an innovation to address a social issue, and 4) assess and revise an innovation to improve its effectiveness. Prerequisite: YSI major



    Credits: 3
  
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    EDLF 4080 - U.S. Education Policy


    Education policy has taken center stage in a variety of national, state and local debates such as teacher evaluation, universal pre-K, school accountability, and charter schools. These are issues around which there is often contentious debate, much of which is polarized and simplistic. This class will explore a few current education policy debates through the lenses of conceptual models and empirical evidence.



    Credits: 3
  
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    EDLF 4605 - Anthropology of Education


    This course will examine the relationship between culture and education and the ways in which the study and understanding of education can be enhanced by attention to culture. Using cases drawn from studies of learning and schooling in cultures around the world as well as among minority cultures and societies in the United States , students will be challenged to begin to see education through cultural comparative frames of reference.



    Credits: 3
  
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    EDLF 4606 - Comparative Education


    We will focus on the sociocultural context of education, addressing values, iedology, practices & policies as they are found across a diverse selection of nations & societies. What can we learn from comparisons? What theories currently shape international educational developments? With knowledge of how other countries approach educational issues, it is hoped that students can broaden their understanding of their own educational practices.



    Credits: 3
  
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    EDLF 4610 - Civil Rights Movement and Education


    This course is a “bottom-up” history of education seminar on African Americans’ struggle for equal education during the civil rights movement. As “bottom up” history, the course explores and seeks out overlooked and untold stories of youth and teacher activism. The course will include learning how to do oral history and engagement with the local community.



    Credits: 3
  
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    EDLF 4620 - International Human Rights Activism and Education


    How do educators and activists spread messages about human rights? What might make them more likely to succeed? What are the ethical and political implications of using education as a tool for moral persuasion? Students will engage with these questions, as well as engage critically with debates over whether the human rights system offers an appropriate way to achieve justice in diverse contexts.



    Credits: 3
  
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    EDLF 4890 - Workshop in Instructional Technology


    Topical workshops designed for K-12 teachers to gain experience in instructional technology applications for use in classrooms and schools.



    Credits: 1 to 4
  
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    EDLF 4993 - Independent Study


    Independent Study



    Credits: 1 to 6
  
  •  

    EDLF 4995 - Directed Research


    Directed Research under supervision of faculty member.



    Credits: 1 to 6
  
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    EDLF 5300 - Academic Writing


    Students will be introduced to the principles of academic writing through practice using specific strategies for writing clear and audience-appropriate academic documents. Students will learn to identify elements of clarity and style that constitute successful academic writing and will practice writing clear and audience-appropriate texts for academic audiences. In addition, students will analyze writing and research discourse practices.



    Credits: 1

Electrical and Computer Engineering

  
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    ECE 1501 - Special Topics in Electrical & Computer Engineering


    Student-led special topic courses which vary by semester.



    Credits: 1
  
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    ECE 2066 - Science of Information: How the iPhone Works


    An introduction to the fundamental scientific principles governing information science and engineering. Topics include: definition of information; entropy; information representation in analog and digital forms; information transmission; spectrum and bandwidth; information transformation including data compression, filtering, encryption, and error correction; information storage and display; and large-scale information systems. Technologies for implementing information functions.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ECE 2330 - Digital Logic Design


    Includes number systems and conversion; Boolean algebra and logic gates; minimization of switching functions; combinational network design; flip-flops; sequential network design; arithmetic networks. Introduces computer organization and assembly language. Six laboratory assignments. Cross-listed as CS 2330.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ECE 2501 - Special Topics in Electrical and Computer Engineering


    A second-level undergraduate course covering a topic not normally covered in the course offerings. The topic usually reflects new developments in the electrical and computer engineering field. Offering is based on student and faculty interests.



    Credits: 0.5 to 4.5
  
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    ECE 2502 - Special Topics in Electrical and Computer Engineering


    A second-level undergraduate course covering a topic not normally covered in the course offerings. The topic usually reflects new developments in the electrical and computer engineering field. Offering is based on student and faculty interests.



    Credits: 0.5 to 4.5
  
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    ECE 2630 - ECE Fundamentals I


    Electrical circuits with linear applications of passive and active elements; Kirchhoff’s voltage and current laws to derive circuit equations; solutions for first- and second-order transient and DC steady-state responses; AC steady-state analysis; frequency and time domain signal representations; Fourier series; phasor methods; complex impedance; transfer functions; Thevenin/Norton equivalent models; controlled sources. Prerequisite: APMA 1110.



    Credits: 4
  
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    ECE 2660 - ECE Fundamentals II


    Studies the modeling, analysis, design, computer simulation, and measurement of electrical circuits which contain non-linear devices such as junction diodes, bipolar junction transistors, and field effect transistors. Includes the gain and frequency response of linear amplifiers, power supplies, and other practical electronic circuits. This course is taught in the studio mode with mixed lecture and lab. Prerequisite: ECE 2630, APMA 2130 co-requisite



    Credits: 4
  
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    ECE 3103 - Solid State Devices


    Analyzes the basics of band theory and atomic structure; charge-transport in solids; current voltage characteristics of semiconductor devices, including p-n junction diodes, bipolar transistors, Schottky diodes, and insulated-gate field-effect transistors; electron emission; and superconductive devices. Prerequisite: ECE 2630.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ECE 3209 - Electromagnetic Fields


    Analyzes the basic laws of electromagnetic theory, beginning with static electric and magnetic fields, and concluding with dynamic E&M fields; plane wave propagation in various media; Maxwell’s Laws in differential and integral form; electrical properties of matter; transmission lines, waveguides, and elementary antennas. Prerequisite: APMA 2130, ECE 2630



    Credits: 4
  
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    ECE 3250 - Electromagnetic Energy Conversion


    Analyzes the principles of electromechanical energy conversion; three-phase circuit analysis; magnetic circuits and nonlinearity; transformers; electromagnetic sensing devices; DC, synchronous, stepper, and induction machines; equivalent circuit models; power electronic control of machines, switching regulators, Class D amplification. Laboratory, computer, and design exercises complement coverage of fundamental principles. Prerequisite: ECE 2660, ECE 3209 or PHYS 2415



    Credits: 3
  
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    ECE 3251 - Electromagnetic Energy Conversion Lab


    This lab provides practical exposure and continuation of the topics covered in the lecture sections of ECE 3250. Topics include principles of measurement and analysis using computerized instrumentation. Co-requisite ECE 3250



    Credits: 1.5
  
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    ECE 3430 - Introduction to Embedded Computer Systems


    An embedded computer is designed to efficiently and (semi-) autonomously perform a small number of tasks, interacting directly with its physical environment. This lab-based course explores architecture and interface issues relating to the design, evaluation and implementation of embedded systems . Topics include hardware and software organization, power management, digital and analog I/O devices, memory systems, timing and interrupts. Prerequisite: ECE 2660, CS 2110



    Credits: 4
  
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    ECE 3501 - Special Topics in Electrical and Computer Engineering


    A third-level undergraduate course covering a topic not normally covered in the course offerings. The topic usually reflects new developments in the electrical and computer engineering field. Offering is based on student and faculty interests.



    Credits: 0.5 to 4.5
  
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    ECE 3502 - Special Topics in Electrical and Computer Engineering


    A third-level undergraduate course covering a topic not normally covered in the course offerings. The topic usually reflects new developments in the electrical and computer engineering field. Offering is based on student and faculty interests.



    Credits: 0.5 to 4.5
  
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    ECE 3660 - Microelectronic Circuits


    Construction of electronic circuit design to specifications. Focuses on computer simulation, construction, and testing of designed circuits in the laboratory to verify predicted performance. Includes differential amplifiers, feedback amplifiers, multivibrators, and digital circuits. Three lecture and three laboratory hours. Prerequisite: ECE 2660



    Credits: 4
  
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    ECE 3750 - ECE Fundamentals III


    Develops tools for analyzing signals and systems operating in continuous-time, with applications to control, communications, and signal processing. Primary concepts are representation of signals, linear time-invariant systems, Fourier analysis of signals, frequency response, and frequency-domain input/output analysis, the Laplace transform, and linear feedback principles. Practical examples are employed throughout, and regular usage of computer tools (Matlab, CC) is incorporated. Students cannot receive credit for both this course and BIOM 3310. Prerequisite: ECE 2660, APMA 2130



    Credits: 4
  
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    ECE 4140 - Fundamentals of Nanoelectronics


    Today’s electronic devices are reaching nanometer dimensions where fundamental quantum and atomistic processes dominate. Instead of the traditional ‘top-down’ classical viewpoint in “Solid State Device” courses, quantum transport principles are needed to understand `bottom-up’ how current flows through individual atoms, molecules, nanotubes or spintronic devices. This course provides a convenient starting point. Prerequisite: APMA 2130



    Credits: 3
  
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    ECE 4155 - Microelectronic Integrated Circuit Fabrication Laboratory


    Fabrication and testing of MOS capacitors. Determination of material properties, including carrier concentration, mobility, lifetime, orientation, and layer thickness. Device fabrication using oxidation, diffusion, evaporation, and device testing of MOS and power bipolar transistors. Corequisite: ECE 5150.



    Credits: 1.5
  
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    ECE 4209 - RF Circuit Design and Wireless Systems


    Design and analysis of wireless communication circuits. Topics covered include transmission lines, antennas, filters, amplifiers, mixers, noise, and modulation techniques. The course is built around a semester long design project. Prerequisite: ECE 3209,ECE 2660, ECE 3750



    Credits: 3
  
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    ECE 4265 - Microwave Engineering Laboratory


    Analyzes the measurement and behavior of high-frequency circuits and components; equivalent circuit models for lumped elements; measurement of standing waves, power, and frequency; use of vector network analyzers and spectrum analyzers; and computer-aided design, fabrication, and characterization of microstrip circuits. Corequisite: ECE 5260 or instructor permission.



    Credits: 1.5
  
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    ECE 4332 - Introduction to VLSI Design


    Digital CMOS circuit design and analysis: combinational circuits, sequential circuits, and memory. Second order circuit issues. Global design issues: clocking and interconnect. Use of Cadence CAD tools. Team design of a significant VLSI chip including layout and implementation. This course satisfies the requirements for the Major Design Experience for undergraduates. Prerequisites: ECE 2330,ECE 2660



    Credits: 4.5
  
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    ECE 4434 - Dependable Computing Systems


    Focuses on the techniques for designing and analyzing dependable computer-based systems. Topics include fault models and effects, fault avoidance techniques, hardware redundancy, error detecting and correcting codes, time redundancy, software redundancy, combinatorial reliability modeling, Markov reliability modeling, availability modeling, maintainability, safety modeling, trade-off analysis, design for testability, and the testing of redundant digital systems. Cross-listed as CS 4434. Prerequisite: ECE 3430 or CS 3330 and APMA 3100 or APMA 3110.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ECE 4435 - Computer Architecture & Design


    Introduces computer architecture and provides a foundation for the design of complex synchronous digital devices, focusing on: 1) Established approaches of computer architecture, 2) Techniques for managing complexity at the register transfer level, and 3) Tools for digital hardware description, simulation, and synthesis. Includes laboratory exercises and significant design activities using a hardware description language and simulation. Prerequisite: ECE 3430



    Credits: 4.5
  
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    ECE 4440 - Embedded System Design


    Modeling, analysis and design of embedded computer systems. Tradeoff analysis and constraint satisfaction facilitated by the use of appropriate analysis models. Includes a semester-long design of an embedded system to meet a specific need. Counts as MDE (major design experience) for both electrical and computer engineering students.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ECE 4457 - Computer Networks


    A first course in communication networks for upper-level undergraduate students. Topics include the design of modern communication networks; point-to-point and broadcast network solutions; advanced issues such as Gigabit networks; ATM networks; and real-time communications. Cross-listed as CS 4457. Prerequisite:  CS 3330 or ECE 3430



    Credits: 3
  
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    ECE 4501 - Special Topics in Electrical and Computer Engineering


    A fourth-level undergraduate course covering a topic not normally covered in the course offerings. The topic usually reflects new developments in the electrical and computer engineering field. Offering is based on student and faculty interests.



    Credits: 1 to 4
  
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    ECE 4502 - Special Topics in Electrical and Computer Engineering


    A fourth-level undergraduate course covering a topic not normally covered in the course offerings. The topic usually reflects new developments in the electrical and computer engineering field. Offering is based on student and faculty interests.



    Credits: 1 to 4
  
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    ECE 4550 - Applied Research and Design Lab


    A lab-based course that provides a hands-on way to learn about new developments in electrical and computer engineering fields. Topics include technologies or application areas that relate to ongoing design and research activities of faculty and students.



    Credits: 1.5
  
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    ECE 4641 - Bioelectricity


    Studies the biophysical mechanisms governing production and transmission of bioelectric signals, measurement of these signals and their analysis in basic and clinical electrophysiology. Introduces the principles of design and operation of therapeutic medical devises used in the cardiovascular and nervous systems. Includes membrane potential, action potentials, channels and synaptic transmission, electrodes, electrocardiography, pacemakers, defibrillators, and neural assist devices. Cross-listed as BIOM 4641. Prerequisite: ECE 2630, BIOM 2101, or instructor permission.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ECE 4660 - Analog Integrated Circuits


    Topics include the design and analysis of analog integrated circuits; feedback amplifier analysis and design, including stability, compensation, and offset-correction; layout and floor-planning issues associated with mixed-signal IC design; selected applications of analog circuits such as A/D and D/A converters, references, and comparators; extensive use of CAD tools for design entry, simulation, and layout; and the creation of an analog integrated circuit design project. Prerequisite: ECE 3660, ECE 3750



    Credits: 3
  
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    ECE 4710 - Communications


    Explores the statistical methods of analyzing communications systems: random signals and noise, statistical communication theory, and digital communications. Analysis of baseband and carrier transmission techniques; and design examples in satellite communications. Prerequisite: APMA 3100, ECE 3750



    Credits: 3
  
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    ECE 4715 - Communication Systems Laboratory


    Provides first-hand exposure to communications practice, including response of systems, signal theory, modulation and detection, sampling and quantization, digital signal processing, and receiver design. Prerequisite: ECE 3760; corequisite: ECE 4710.



    Credits: 1.5
  
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    ECE 4750 - Digital Signal Processing


    An introduction to digital signal processing. Topics include discrete-time signals and systems, application of z-transforms, the discrete-time Fourier transform, sampling, digital filter design, the discrete Fourier transform, the fast Fourier transform, quantization effects and nonlinear filters. Prerequisite: ECE 3750



    Credits: 3
  
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    ECE 4784 - Wireless Communications


    This is a survey course in the theory and technology of modern wireless communication systems, exemplified in cellular telephony, paging, microwave distribution systems, wireless networks, and even garage door openers. Wireless technology is inherently interdisciplinary, and the course seeks to serve the interests of a variety of students. Prerequisite: ECE 3750 and 4710.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ECE 4850 - Linear Control Systems


    Explores the modeling of linear dynamic systems via differential equations and transfer functions utilizing state space representations and classical input-output representations; the analysis of systems in the time and frequency domains; study of closed-loop systems; state-space methods and the classical stability tests, such as the Routh-Hurwitz criterion, Nyquist criterion, root-locus plots and Bode plots. Studies compensation design through lead and lag networks, rate feedback, and linear state-variable feedback. Prerequisite: ECE 3750 or instructor permission.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ECE 4855 - Control Laboratory


    A laboratory consisting of design, analysis, construction, and testing of electrical and electromechanical circuits and devices. Corequisite: ECE 4850.



    Credits: 1.5
  
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    ECE 4860 - Digital Control Systems


    Analyzes the design of dynamic systems that contain digital computers; the Z transform; block diagrams and transfer functions in the z-domain; block diagrams, frequency response and stability in the z-domain; state space methods; and design using the z-transform and state methods. Prerequisite: ECE 4850 or instructor permission.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ECE 4907 - Electrical Engineering Projects


    Under faculty supervision, students plan a project of at least one semester’s duration, conduct the analysis or design and test, and report on the results. If this work is to be the basis for an undergraduate thesis, the course should be taken no later than the seventh semester. Prerequisite: Instructor permission.



    Credits: 1 to 3
  
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    ECE 4908 - Electrical Engineering Projects


    Under faculty supervision, students plan a project of at least one semester’s duration, conduct the analysis or design and test, and report on the results. If this work is to be the basis for an undergraduate thesis, the course should be taken no later than the seventh semester. Prerequisite: Instructor permission.



    Credits: 1 to 3
  
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    ECE 4991 - MDE-Capstone Design


    MDE - Capstone Design - this is a one semester course to satisfy the MDE requirement. Students perform a self directed design in teams of 3-5 individuals. The project includes design, fabrication, and test components, along with a final presentation. Prerequisite: Fourth-Year Standing



    Credits: 3

Engaging the Liberal Arts

  
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    ELA 1500 - Engaging the Liberal Arts: The First Year


    Courses designed for first-year students that will help them adjust and adapt to college and learn about the many resources and opportunities available to them as they pursue their liberal arts degree.



    Credits: 1 to 3
  
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    ELA 2500 - Engaging the Liberal Arts: The Second Year


    Courses designed for second-year students that will help them adjust and adapt to college and learn about the many resources and opportunities available to them as they pursue their liberal arts degree.



    Credits: 1 to 3
  
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    ELA 2600 - Collect, Select, Reflect


    Transcripts and resumes in the 21st century have to be more than documentation on paper. This is not only because computers have become ubiquitous, but also because digital technology allows us to represent who we are to others and to ourselves in more multi-dimensional ways than print can. In this class you will assemble three e-portfolios. Together students will view, critique, and give feedback to each other’s work.



    Credits: 1
  
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    ELA 2610 - Liberal Arts and the Health Professions


    Students explore how insights from various disciplines inform their understanding of healthcare. Guest lectures and informational interviews connect students with healthcare professionals to gain a better understanding of the various health professions and to assess their own career goals. Students develop skills in interdisciplinary research and problem solving, in oral and written communication, and the integration of diverse perspectives.



    Credits: 1
  
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    ELA 2890 - Strategies for Academic Achievement


    This course introduces strategies that will enable students to be effective learners. These tools include methods for learning, planning, and critical thinking. Specific topics include: methods for time management, prioritization, note-taking, test preparation, habit formation, assessment of arguments and data, productive approaches to challenges, and utilization of University resources.



    Credits: 3
 

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