Feb 27, 2024  
Undergraduate Record 2017-2018 
    
Undergraduate Record 2017-2018 [ARCHIVED RECORD]

Course Descriptions


 

Religion-Judaism

  
  • RELJ 2230 - Jewish Spiritual Journeys


    Jewish Spiritual Journeys



    Credits: 3
  
  • RELJ 2240 - Jewish Ritual


    Jewish Ritual



    Credits: 3
  
  • RELJ 2300 - Introduction to Israeli Literature in Translation


    This course explores Israeli culture and society through the lens of its literature. Beginning with the revival of modern Hebrew and following the formative events of the Israeli experience, we will study a range of fictional works (and poetry) that represent the diverse voices of Israeli self-expression. Readings include S.Y. Agnon, Aharon Appelfeld, Yoel Hoffmann, Etgar Keret, A.B. Yehoshua, Yehudit Hendel, and others.



    Credits: 3
  
  • RELJ 2410 - Intermediate Classical Hebrew I


    Readings in the prose narratives of the Hebrew Bible. Emphasizes grammar, vocabulary, and syntax. Attention to issues of translation and interpretation. Prerequisite: HEBR/RELJ 1420 or the equivalent.



    Credits: 3
  
  • RELJ 2420 - Intermediate Classical Hebrew II


    Readings in the prose narratives and poetry of the Hebrew Bible. Emphasizes grammar, vocabulary, and syntax. Attention to issues of translation and interpretation. Prerequisite: HEBR/RELJ 2410 or the equivalent.



    Credits: 3
  
  • RELJ 2521 - Special Topics in Judaism


    Special Topics In Judaism.



    Credits: 3
  
  • RELJ 2590 - Topics in Jewish Studies


    This course provides the student with an opportunity to explore a new topic in Jewish Studies



    Credits: 3
  
  • RELJ 3052 - Responses to the Holocaust


    Responses to the Holocaust



    Credits: 3
  
  • RELJ 3070 - Beliefs and Ethics after the Holocaust


    Examines how theologians and ethicists have responded to the human catastrophe of the Nazi Holocaust, 1933-45. Readings include twentieth-century reflections on the Holocaust, and previous Jewish and Christian responses to catastrophe from Biblical times through the nineteenth- and twentieth-century pogroms in eastern Europe. Prerequisite: Any religious studies, history, or philosophy course, or instructor permission.



    Credits: 3
  
  • RELJ 3080 - Israeli Fiction in Translation


    Israeli Fiction in Translation



    Credits: 3
  
  • RELJ 3085 - The Passover Haggadah: A Service Learning Course


    The Passover Haggadah cultivates sensitivity for the plight of the stranger, and we will study how it came about and how it has been used as a template for rituals of social activism on behalf of oppressed peoples, and in particular, of refugees. In volunteer placements in the community, UVA students will work with individuals who have have found refuge in Cville. Together, they will collaborate on designing haggadahs and community seders.



    Credits: 3
  
  • RELJ 3090 - Israelite Prophecy


    This course examines the phenomenon of prophecy in ancient Israel. We will read in translation most of the stories from the Hebrew Bible/Old Testament about prophets (Moses, Deborah, Samuel, Elijah, Elisha), as well as the books attributed to prophets (Isaiah, Jeremiah, Ezekiel, and The Twelve). Each primary text will be considered in its historical, cultural, and political contexts.



    Credits: 3
  
  • RELJ 3100 - Medieval Jewish Thought


    This course introduces the medieval Jewish intellectual tradition (9th-13th centuries) in its cultural and historical context. We will explore key themes such as the nature of God, prophecy, exile, the status of Scripture, the history of religions, and the quest for spiritual perfection. Readings will be drawn from philosophical, theological, exegetical, pietistic and mystical texts, including works from Saadia Gaon, Judah Halevi, and Maimonides.



    Credits: 3
  
  • RELJ 3170 - Modern Jewish Thought


    This course offers an introduction into the major themes of Modern Jewish Thought.



    Credits: 3
  
  • RELJ 3220 - Judaism and Zionism


    Studies the complex relationship between Judaism the sacred tradition of the Jews and Zionism the modern ideology of Jewish national revival.



    Credits: 3
  
  • RELJ 3292 - The Book of Job & Its Interpretation


    A seminar on the biblical book of Job (with attention to its literary artistry and compositional history) and its subsequent interpretation.



    Credits: 3
  
  • RELJ 3300 - The Jewish Mystical Tradition


    Historical study of the Jewish mystical tradition, emphasizing the persistent themes of the tradition as represented in selected mystical texts.



    Credits: 3
  
  • RELJ 3310 - Jewish Law


    Studies the structure and content of Jewish law in terms of its normative function, its historical background, its theological and philosophical principles, and its role in contemporary society both Jewish and general.



    Credits: 3
  
  • RELJ 3320 - Judaism: Medicine and Healing


    Judaism: Medicine and Healing



    Credits: 3
  
  • RELJ 3330 - Women and Judaism: Tradition and Change


    Women and Judaism: Tradition and Change



    Credits: 3
  
  • RELJ 3340 - Jewish Medical Ethics


    Jewish Medical Ethics



    Credits: 3
  
  • RELJ 3350 - Judaism and Ethics


    An exploration of ethical thinking using the resources of the Jewish tradition.



    Credits: 3
  
  • RELJ 3360 - Judaism and Christianity


    Studies the relationship between Judaism and Christianity from the origins of Christianity as a Jewish sect through the conflicts of the Middle Ages and modernity; and current views of the interrelationship.



    Credits: 3
  
  • RELJ 3370 - Modern Movements in Judaism


    Studies the modern religious movements in Judaism including Orthodox, Conservative, Reform, as well as Zionism, both secular and religious, with an emphasis on their theological and philosophical assertions and historical backgrounds.



    Credits: 3
  
  • RELJ 3372 - German Jewish Culture and History


    This course provides a wide-ranging exploration of the culture, history & thought of German Jewry from 1750 to 1939. It focuses on the Jewish response to modernity in Central Europe and the lasting transformations in Jewish life in Europe and later North America. Readings of such figures as: Moses Mendelssohn, Heinrich Heine, Rahel Varnhagen, Franz Kafka, Gershom Scholem, Martin Buber, Karl Marx, Rosa Luxembourg, Walter Benjamin, and Freud.



    Credits: 3
  
  • RELJ 3390 - Jewish Feminism


    Jewish Feminism



    Credits: 3
  
  • RELJ 3430 - Women in Judaism


    Women in Judaism



    Credits: 3
  
  • RELJ 3475 - Judaism and Science


    A study of the place of science in Judaism, focusing of the example of creation. Topics include: The Genesis story in plain sense, historical scholarship, rabbinic commentary and Jewish philosophy; The Big Bang through the history of Jewish reasoning; Newton and Modern Jewish Humanism; Quantum Physics and the Logic of Scripture; Science in modern and contemporary Jewish thought and belief; Judaism and the environment.



    Credits: 3
  
  • RELJ 3490 - Jewish Weddings


    As we study the ritual of the Jewish wedding ceremony from antiquity to the present day, we will see how notions about marriage, gender relations, and the normative family are displayed and challenged. In particular, we will be investigating the establishment of innovations in the contemporary Jewish weddings (traditional, liberal, same-sex and interfaith) in America and Israel.



    Credits: 3
  
  • RELJ 3590 - Topics in Jewish Studies


    This course provides the student with an opportunity to explore a new topic in Jewish Studies



    Credits: 3
  
  • RELJ 3615 - Joseph, Esther, Daniel: Biblical Novels


    The finest narratives in ancient Judaism - stories about Joseph, Esther, Daniel - describe an exiled hero, who delivers his or her people against all odds; related literature includes Ruth, Tobit, Judith, Joseph & Asenath. This course examines the literary, historical, theological significance of these works and common themes: exile, restoration, extraordinary women, coincidence, human agency, the remote deity, the vindication of the underdog.



    Credits: 3
  
  • RELJ 3830 - Talmud


    Talmud



    Credits: 3
  
  • RELJ 3910 - Women and the Bible


    Surveys passages in the Old Testament/Hebrew Bible and the New Testament that focus specifically on women or use feminine imagery. Considers various readings of these passages, including traditional Jewish and Christian, historical-critical, and feminist interpretations. Cross-listed as RELC 3910. Prerequisite: Any religious studies course or instructor permission.



    Credits: 3
  
  • RELJ 4570 - Advanced Topics in Judaism


    This topical course provides upper level undergraduate students in Religious Studies an opportunity for advanced coursework in Judaism



    Credits: 3
  
  • RELJ 4590 - Topics in Jewish Studies


    This course provides the student with an opportunity to explore a new topic in Jewish Studies



    Credits: 3
  
  • RELJ 4591 - Topics Modern Jewish History


    This topical course will explore topics in modern Jewish history, from 1948 to the present day.



    Credits: 3
  
  • RELJ 4950 - Senior Seminar in Jewish Studies


    This course introduces and examines the origins and development of Jewish Studies with emphasis on its interdisciplinary character. Requirements include active class participation and a significant research paper based on a topic of the student’s choice. This course is required of all fourth-year Jewish Studies majors. It is also open to all interested students with permission of the instructor.



    Credits: 3

Religion-Special Topic

  
  • RELS 4980 - Senior Essay


    Studies selected topic in religious studies under detailed supervision. The writing of an essay constitutes a major portion of the work. Prerequisite: Permission of departmental advisor and instructor.



    Credits: 3
  
  • RELS 4995 - Independent Research


    Systematic readings in a selected topic under detailed supervision. Prerequisite: Permission of departmental advisor and instructor.



    Credits: 1 to 6

Russian

  
  • RUSS 116 - Intensive Introductory Russian


    This is the non-credit option for RUSS 1016.



    Credits: 0
  
  • RUSS 126 - Intensive Introductory Russian


    This is the non-credit option for RUSS 2026.



    Credits: 0
  
  • RUSS 216 - Intensive Intermediate Russian


    This is the non-credit option for RUSS 2016.



    Credits: 0
  
  • RUSS 226 - Intensive Intermediate Russian


    This is the non-credit option for RUSS 2026.



    Credits: 0
  
  • RUSS 1010 - First-Year Russian


    Introduces Russian grammar with emphasis on reading and speaking. Class meets five days per week plus work in the language laboratory. To be followed by RUSS 2010, 2020.



    Credits: 4
  
  • RUSS 1016 - Intensive Introductory Russian


    This intensive course begins with instruction in basic oral expression, listening comprehension, elementary reading and writing, and continues with further development of these four skills at the intermediate level. Part of the Summer Language Institute.



    Credits: 3
  
  • RUSS 1020 - First-Year Russian


    Introduces Russian grammar with emphasis on reading and speaking. Class meets five days per week plus work in the language laboratory. To be followed by RUSS 2010, 2020. Prerequisite: A grade of C or above in RUSS 1010.



    Credits: 4
  
  • RUSS 1026 - Intensive Introductory Russian


    This intensive course begins with instruction in basic oral expression, listening comprehension, elementary reading and writing, and continues with further development of these four skills at the intermediate level. Part of the Summer Language Institute. Prerequisites: RUSS 1016 or equivalent.



    Credits: 3
  
  • RUSS 1030 - Russian Language Study in Russia


    In this course, students will begin or continue their study of the Russian language. Students will be placed at the appropriate level and will be taught by instructors at UVA’s partner institutions in Moscow and St. Petersburg. At either the beginning or intermediate level, the course includes reading, writing, listening, and speaking. Aimed to give students as high a level of proficiency in spoken and written Russian as possible.



    Credits: 2
  
  • RUSS 2010 - Second-Year Russian


    Continuation of Russian grammar. Includes practice in speaking and writing Russian and introduction to Russian prose and poetry. Class meets four days per week, plus work in the language laboratory. Prerequisite: RUSS 1020 (with grade of C- or better) or equivalent.



    Credits: 4
  
  • RUSS 2016 - Intensive Intermediate Russian


    This intensive course begins with instruction in intermediate level oral expression, listening comprehension, reading and writing, and continues with further development of these four skills. Part of the Summer Language Institute. Prerequisites: RUSS 1016 & 1026 or equivalent.



    Credits: 3
  
  • RUSS 2020 - Second-Year Russian


    Continuation of Russian grammar. Includes practice in speaking and writing Russian and introduction to Russian prose and poetry. Class meets four days per week, plus work in the language laboratory. Prerequisite: grade of C or better in RUSS 2010.



    Credits: 4
  
  • RUSS 2026 - Intensive Intermediate Russian


    This intensive course begins with instruction in intermediate level oral expression, listening comprehension, reading and writing, and continues with further development of these four skills. Part of the Summer Language Institute. Prerequisites: RUSS 1016 , 1026 & 2016 or equivalent.



    Credits: 3
  
  • RUSS 3000 - Russian House Conversation


    Russian House Conversation



    Credits: 1
  
  • RUSS 3010 - Third-Year Russian


    Continuation of Russian grammar. Includes intensive oral practice through reports, dialogues, guided discussions; composition of written reports and essays; readings in literary and non-literary texts. Class meets three hours per week, plus work in the language laboratory. Prerequisite: RUSS 2010, 2020 or equivalent with a grade of C or better.



    Credits: 3
  
  • RUSS 3020 - Third-Year Russian


    Continuation of Russian grammar. Includes intensive oral practice through reports, dialogues, guided discussions; composition of written reports and essays; readings in literary and non-literary texts. Class meets three hours per week, plus work in the language laboratory. Prerequisite: RUSS 2020 with a grade of C or better.



    Credits: 3
  
  • RUSS 3030 - Intermediate Conversation


    Two hours of conversation practice per week. Prerequisite: RUSS 1020, or equivalent. RUSS 2020 is strongly recommended.



    Credits: 1
  
  • RUSS 3040 - Applied Russian Phonetics


    Examines the sound system of the Russian language with special attention to palatalization, vowel reduction, sounds in combination, and the relationship of sound to spelling. Prerequisite: RUSS 1020.



    Credits: 3
  
  • RUSS 3050 - Russian Word Formation


    Examines the sound system, lexicon, and word formative processes of the Russian literary language. Prerequisite: RUSS 1020



    Credits: 3
  
  • RUSS 3060 - Russian for Business


    Russian for oral and written communication in business situations. Prerequisite: RUSS 2020.



    Credits: 3
  
  • RUSS 3500 - Topics in Russian Language & Literature


    Selected Topics in Russian Language and Literature



    Credits: 1 to 3
  
  • RUSS 4010 - Fourth-Year Russian


    Continuation of Russian grammar. Includes oral practice, extensive reading, and work in Russian stylistics. Prerequisite: RUSS 3010, 3020 with a grade of C or better.



    Credits: 3
  
  • RUSS 4020 - Fourth-Year Russian


    Continuation of Russian grammar. Includes oral practice, extensive reading, and work in Russian stylistics. Prerequisite: RUSS 4010 with a grade of C or better.



    Credits: 3
  
  • RUSS 4500 - Topics in Russian Language & Literature


    Selected Topics in Russian Language and Literature



    Credits: 1 to 3
  
  • RUSS 4520 - Introduction to Russian Literature


    Introduction to Russian literary studies. Reading and analysis of literary works in the original. Texts are selected from classical and contemporary literature. Topic varies. All readings and discussion in Russian. Course is open to advanced students of Russian and heritage speakers.



    Credits: 3
  
  • RUSS 4990 - Senior Honors Thesis


    Required of honors majors in Russian language and literature and Russian and East European studies.



    Credits: 3
  
  • RUSS 4993 - Independent Study


    May be repeated for credit.



    Credits: 3
  
  • RUSS 4998 - Senior Thesis in Russian Studies


    For majors in Russian and East European studies, normally taken in the fourth year.



    Credits: 3
  
  • RUSS 4999 - Senior Thesis in Russian Studies


    For majors in Russian and East European studies, normally taken in the fourth year.



    Credits: 3

Russian in Translation

  
  • RUTR 2310 - UVA in Russia: Literary Places in Russia


    This course will take students to visit the places associated with literature – writers’ museums and the locations where they site their works – in Moscow and St. Petersburg. Visiting and studying these places can teach us much about Russian literary works, their creators and their readers. We will read and explore the works of Tolstoy, Dostoevsky, Chekhov, Mayakovsky, Bulgakov and other Russian writers.



    Credits: 4
  
  • RUTR 2320 - America Through Russian Eyes


    Changing Russian representations of America and American visions of Russia from revolution to post-communism (in literature, film, music and other forms of popular culture.



    Credits: 3
  
  • RUTR 2330 - Russia and the Caucasus


    This interdisciplinary course introduces students to the respective cultural histories of Armenia, Georgia, and Russia, relying heavily on literary and cinematic sources. We will also explore the more contemporary relationship between the Caucasus and Russia from the 19th century to the present.



    Credits: 3
  
  • RUTR 2340 - Russian Women’s Literature


    Russia’s literary tradition includes a rich vein of poetry, prose, and memoir written by women. This course examines works composed from the eighteenth to the twenty-first centuries; emphasis is on literature of the twentieth century and the contemporary period. This is primarily a literature class, but works are grounded in their historical and sociopolitical contexts. All readings are in English translation. For more details on this class, please visit the department website at: http://artsandsciences.virginia.edu/slavic/courses.html.



    Credits: 3
  
  • RUTR 2350 - Russian and East European Film


    This course is an introduction to and overview of the history of film in Eastern Europe, with a particular focus on Russia, though we will be discussing other countries that were once part of the Soviet Bloc. We will be covering a variety of films, long and short, as well as animation, and how these works of art reflect the time periods in which they were created.



    Credits: 3
  
  • RUTR 2360 - Tales of Transgression


    This course examines how Russian writers engage with ethical questions ranging from lofty pursuits of freedom and the meaning of life to more prosaic issues of personal responsibility and happiness. In the context of literary analysis, we explore such conceptual terms describing human activity as love and justice, right and wrong, good and evil. Texts by Dostoevsky, Leskov, Tolstoy, Ostrovsky, Chekhov, Olesha, and Petrushevskaya.



    Credits: 3
  
  • RUTR 2370 - Fairy Tales


    Credits: 3
  
  • RUTR 2400 - Russian Masterpieces


    Open to students with no knowledge of Russian. Studies selected great works of nineteenth- and twentieth-century prose fiction.



    Credits: 3
  
  • RUTR 2450 - Art of Scandal: Literature and Culture in Society


    Studies works of art that caused major controversy and debate in Russia. Why did certain texts resonate more loudly than others in society? How did this dynamic change between the imperial and post-Soviet periods? Includes works of art in a variety of media: literature and criticism, modern painting, architecture, film and music.



    Credits: 3
  
  • RUTR 2460 - Introduction to Russian Culture and Civilization


    No knowledge of Russian needed. Investigates ‘being Russian’ through the works of Russia’s great writers, artists, architects, and composers. Focuses on the heroes, heroines, and villains, symbols, legends, and rituals central to Russian creativity.



    Credits: 3
  
  • RUTR 2470 - Understanding Russia: Symbols, Myths, and Archetypes of Identity


    This course explores different sources of Russian national identity from pre-Christian `Rus’ to the present. We will investigate how the occidental and oriental elements blend into a unique Euro-Asian culture, nation, and world power. Our main aim is to provide an orientation to the symbolic world of Russian self-identification. We will employ the tools of the historian, geographer, psychologist, and student of literature and culture.



    Credits: 3
  
  • RUTR 2500 - Topics in Russian Literature


    Studies in English translation of selected authors, works, or themes in Russian literature. Topics in recent years were Solzhenitsyn, Nabokov. May be repeated for credit under different topics.



    Credits: 1 to 3
  
  • RUTR 2730 - Dostoevsky


    Open to students with no knowledge of Russian. Studies the major works of Dostoevsky.



    Credits: 3
  
  • RUTR 2740 - Tolstoy in Translation


    Open to students with no knowledge of Russian. Studies the major works of Tolstoy.



    Credits: 3
  
  • RUTR 3340 - Books Behind Bars: Life, Lit, & Community Leadership


    Students will grapple in a profound and personal way with timeless human questions: Who am I? Why am I here? How should I live? They will do this, in part, by facilitating discussions about short masterpieces of Russian literature with residents at a juvenile correctional center. This course offers an integrated academic-community engagement curriculum, and provides a unique opportunity for service learning, leadership, and youth mentoring.



    Credits: 4
  
  • RUTR 3350 - Nineteenth-Century Russian Literature


    Open to students with no knowledge of Russian. Studies the major works of Pushkin, Lermontov, Gogol, Turgenev, Goncharov, Dostoevsky, Tolstoy, and others. Emphasizes prose fiction. This course is a prerequisite for 5000-level literature courses. For more details on this class, please visit the department website at: http://artsandsciences.virginia.edu/slavic/courses.html.



    Credits: 3
  
  • RUTR 3360 - Twentieth Century Russian Literature


    This course surveys Russian literature (prose and poetry) of the twentieth century. Readings include works by Soviet and émigré writers. All works are read in English translation.



    Credits: 3
  
  • RUTR 3370 - Russian Prose From 1881-1917


    Open to students with no knowledge of Russian. Studies late nineteenth-century and early twentieth-century Russian prose. Concentrates on evolution of Russian realism and rise of symbolist and ornamentalist fiction.



    Credits: 3
  
  • RUTR 3390 - Edens, Idylls, and Utopias in Russian Literature


    This course explores Russian literature’s many renderings of heaven on earth and their roots in folklore, religion, art, and political thought.



    Credits: 3
  
  • RUTR 3400 - Nabokov


    Open to students with no knowledge of Russian. Studies the evolution of Nabokov’s art, from his early Russian language tales to the major novels written in English.



    Credits: 3
  
  • RUTR 3500 - Topics in Russian Literature


    Studies in English translation of selected authors, works, or themes in Russian literature. Topics in recent years were Solzhenitsyn, Nabokov. May be repeated for credit under different topics.



    Credits: 3 to 6
  
  • RUTR 3510 - Topics in Russian Literature


    Studies in English translation of selected authors, works, or themes in Russian literature. Topics in recent years were Solzhenitsyn, Nabokov. May be repeated for credit under different topics.



    Credits: 3 to 6
  
  • RUTR 3520 - Case Studies in Russian Literature


    Open to students with no knowledge of Russian. One great novel such as War and Peace or The Brothers Karamazov is studied in detail along with related works and a considerable sampling of critical studies.



    Credits: 3
  
  • RUTR 3680 - The Russian Novel in European Perspective


    Open to students with no knowledge of Russian. Studies the evolution of the Russian novel, its thematic and structural features, from the early nineteenth century to the present.



    Credits: 3

Sanskrit

  
  • SANS 1010 - Elementary Sanskrit I


    Studies Sanskrit sounds, the Devanagari script, and basic grammar.



    Credits: 3
  
  • SANS 2020 - Elementary Sanskrit II


    A continuation of SANS 1010. Prerequisite: SANS 1010. Note: The following six courses are all intermediate level Sanskrit courses. They are offered two-by-two in a three-year rotation.



    Credits: 3
  
  • SANS 3012 - Selections from the Mahabharata


    A second-year course focusing on developing reading fluency in Sanskrit. Selections are chosen to reinforce students’ knowledge of grammar from SANS 1020, to expand vocabulary and to introduce the Mahabharata, one of ancient India’s major epics. Prerequisite: SANS 1020.



    Credits: 3
  
  • SANS 3014 - Selections from the Ramayana of Valmiki


    A second-year course focusing on developing reading fluency in Sanskrit. Selections are chosen to reinforce student’s knowledge of grammar from SANS 1020, to expand vocabulary, and to introduce the Ramayana of Valmiki, one of two major epics of ancient India, and the ‘first poem’ in Sanskrit. Prerequisite: SANS 1020.



    Credits: 3
  
  • SANS 3016 - Selections from the Kathasaritsagara of Somadeva


    A second-year course focusing on developing reading fluency in Sanskrit. Selections are chosen to reinforce student’s knowledge of grammar from SANS 5020, to expand vocabulary, and to introduce the Kathasaritsagara of Somadeva, the most important collection of story literature in Sanskrit. Prerequisite: SANS 1020.



    Credits: 3
  
  • SANS 3022 - The Bhagavadgita


    A second-year course focusing on developing reading fluency in Sanskrit. Selections are chosen to reinforce students’ knowledge of grammar from SANS 1020, to expand vocabulary and to introduce the Bhagavadgita, a major religious text of ancient India. Prerequisite: SANS 1020.



    Credits: 3
  
  • SANS 3024 - Selections from the Upanisads


    A second-year course focusing on developing reading fluency in Sanskrit. Selections are chosen to reinforce student’s knowledge of grammar from SANS 1020/5020, to expand vocabulary, and to introduce the Upanisads, a major spiritual text of ancient India. Prerequisite: SANS 1020.



    Credits: 3
  
  • SANS 3026 - Selections from the Puranas


    A second-year course focusing on developing reading fluency in Sanskrit. Selections are chosen to reinforce student’s knowledge of grammar from SANS 5020, to expand vocabulary, and to introduce the huge corpus of Puranic texts. Prerequisite: SANS 1020.



    Credits: 3
 

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