Feb 27, 2024  
Undergraduate Record 2017-2018 
    
Undergraduate Record 2017-2018 [ARCHIVED RECORD]

Course Descriptions


 

Religion-Christianity

  
  • RELC 4085 - Missions in Contemp Africa


    An examination of Christian missions in Africa in the 21st Century. Through a variety of disciplinary lenses and approaches, we examine faith-based initiatives in Africa–those launched from abroad, as well as from within the continent. What does it mean to be a missionary in Africa today? How are evangelizing efforts being transformed in response to democratization, globalization and a growing awareness of human rights?



    Credits: 3
  
  • RELC 4160 - Salem Essays


    An Opportunity for students to write a short essay based on the court records of the Salem Witch trials to be posted on the Salem Witch trials documentary archive. Prerequisite: RELC 4150 Salem Witch Trials



    Credits: 1
  
  • RELC 4530 - Advanced Topics in Christianity


    This topical course provides upper level undergraduate students in Religious Studies an opportunity for advanced coursework in Christianity



    Credits: 3
  
  • RELC 4610 - Sex and Morality


    A theological overview of Jewish and Christian reflection on proper sexual conduct in the United States, with specific emphasis on pre-marital sex, adoption, abortion, gay marriage, and the teaching of sex education in public schools.



    Credits: 3

Religion-General Religion

  
  • RELG 1005 - World Religions


    This course is a comparative study of the world’s enduring religious traditions and their cultural expressions in architecture, art, and music. Among others, the course will examine Buddhism, Confucianism, Daoism, Hinduism, Islam, Judaism, and Christianity, and their expression in world culture.



    Credits: 3
  
  • RELG 1010 - Introduction to Western Religious Traditions


    Studies the major religious traditions of the Western world; Judaism, Eastern Orthodox Christianity, Roman Catholicism, Protestantism, and Islam.



    Credits: 3
  
  • RELG 1040 - Introduction to Eastern Religious Traditions


    Introduces various aspects of the religious traditions of India, China, and Japan.



    Credits: 3
  
  • RELG 1500 - Introductory Seminar in Religious Studies


    These seminars introduce first- and second-year students to the academic study of religion through a close study of a particular theme or topic. Students will engage with material from a variety of methodological perspectives, and they will learn how to critically analyze sources and communicate their findings. The seminars allow for intensive reading and discussion of material. Not more than two Intro Seminars may count towards the Major.



    Credits: 3
  
  • RELG 2140 - Archaic Cult and Myth


    Surveys scientific and popular interpretations of prehistoric, ancient, and traditional religions.



    Credits: 3
  
  • RELG 2150 - Religion in American Life and Thought to 1865


    Topics include the influence of Puritanism, the character of American religious freedom, and the interaction between religion and social reform.



    Credits: 3
  
  • RELG 2155 - Whiteness & Religion: Religious Foundations of a Racial Category


    This class examines the role religion plays in defining a racial category known as whiteness. By reading cultural histories and ethnographies of the religious practices of various communities, we will examine how groups now classified as white (Irish, Italians, Poles, Jews, etc.) and religious images (depictions of Jesus and the Virgin Mary) “became white” and the role that religious practice played in this shift in racial classification.



    Credits: 3
  
  • RELG 2160 - Religion in American Life and Thought from 1865 to the Present


    Includes American religious pluralism, religious responses to social issues, and the character of contemporary American religious life.



    Credits: 3
  
  • RELG 2190 - Religion and Modern Fiction


    Studies religious meanings in modern literature, emphasizing faith and doubt, evil and absurdity, and wholeness and transcendence in both secular fiction and fiction written from traditional religious perspectives.



    Credits: 3
  
  • RELG 2210 - Religion, Ethics, & Global Environment


    This course interprets humanity’s changing ecological relationships through religious and philosophical traditions. It takes up ethical questions presented by environmental problems, introduces frameworks for making sense of them, and examines the symbols and narratives that shape imaginations of nature.



    Credits: 3
  
  • RELG 2255 - Religion and Film


    This course will introduce students to the relationship between religion and film. We will watch several films in class and, after learning the basics of film analysis, we will be able to perceive and interpret how films portray religions, religious peoples, and religious categories, and even to consider what religion and film have in common as experiences. Viewing of the films will be supplemented by short lectures and class discussion.



    Credits: 3
  
  • RELG 2260 - Religion, Race, and Relationship in Film


    This course explores themes of religion, race, gender, and relationship to the religious or racial ‘other’ in films from the silent era to the present. It will consider film as a medium and engage students in analysis and discussion of cinematic images, with the goal of developing hermeneutic lenses through which these images can be interpreted. The films selected all ask “How should we treat one another?”



    Credits: 3
  
  • RELG 2285 - Religion, Politics, Society


    Politics and religion are links to the exploration to culture, history, and current events. This course seeks to understand what is meant by religion and the multiple ways in which it is politically important by examining the world views of various religious traditions and their political implications.



    Credits: 3
  
  • RELG 2290 - Business Ethics


    Studies contemporary issues in business from a moral perspective, including philosophical and religious, as well as traditional and contemporary, views of business. Topics include international business, whistleblowing, discrimination, the environment, and marketing.



    Credits: 3
  
  • RELG 2300 - Religious Ethics and Moral Problems


    Examines several contemporary moral problems from the perspective of ethical thought in the Protestant, Catholic, and Jewish traditions.



    Credits: 3
  
  • RELG 2370 - Religion After Jefferson


    This course explores the history of the idea of “religion” as a distinct concept, and introduces students to a crucial topic of modern public life and helps them prepare to grapple with this problem from a global perspective. A Jefferson Public Citizens course.



    Credits: 3
  
  • RELG 2380 - Faith and Doubt in the Modern Age


    This course introduces undergraduates to seminal writings in modern Western thought that explore and question the meaning, truthfulness, and uses of religious belief. The goal is to develop a multi-storied narrative of the variety of interpretations given to the idea of God in modernity and to clarify the conditions of responsible religious belief in a pluralistic world. Requirements include two exams and a research paper.



    Credits: 3
  
  • RELG 2390 - Theism and Humanism


    Studies contemporary understandings of religious faith in response to the challenge of humanism.



    Credits: 3
  
  • RELG 2440 - Human Nature and Its Possibilities


    Examines psychological, literary, philosophical, and theological perspectives on human existence with a view to seeing what possibilities are contained in the linguistic, theoretical, practical, poetic, and ecstatic capacities of human beings.



    Credits: 3
  
  • RELG 2455 - Christian America?


    This course aims to describe the historical development of religious diversity in the United States, and to grapple with its social, political, legal, cultural, and spiritual implications. We will chart the trends that led this nation, once characterized as a triple melting pot of Protestant-Catholic-Jew, to become, by the late twentieth century, one of the most religiously diverse societies in the history of the world.



    Credits: 3
  
  • RELG 2475 - God


    An introduction to the personality of God as portrayed in the sacred literatures, histories, and practices of Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. (For the religious studies major, or minor, this counts as either RELC, RELI or RELJ)



    Credits: 3
  
  • RELG 2630 - Business, Ethics, and Society


    A study of the philosophical and religious frameworks for interpreting and evaluating human activity in the marketplace. This includes major theoretical perspectives, contemporary issues within the marketplace, and corporate ethics.



    Credits: 3
  
  • RELG 2650 - Theological Bioethics


    Analyzes various moral problems in medicine, health care, and global health from Christian (Catholic and Protestant), Jewish, and Islamic theological perspectives with reference to salient philosophical influences.



    Credits: 3
  
  • RELG 2660 - “Spiritual But Not Religious”: Spirituality in America


    This course asks: what does “spiritual but not religious” mean, and why has it become such a pervasive idea in modern America? We’ll study everything from AA to yoga to Zen meditation, with stops in Christian rock, Beat poetry, Abstract Expressionist painting and more. In the end, we’ll come to see spirituality in America as a complex intermingling of the great world religions, modern psychology, and a crassly commercialized culture industry.



    Credits: 3
  
  • RELG 2713 - Sensing the Sacred: Sensory Perception and Religious Imagination


    Seeing is believing. Or is it? In this course, we will examine the role of sensory perception in religious imagination. We will consider how religious practitioners think about the senses, utilize the senses to experience the world, and assign meaning to the senses. We will also probe the ways in which religious traditions deploy sensory metaphors to describe human experience of the sacred.



    Credits: 3
  
  • RELG 2820 - Jerusalem


    This course traces the history of Jerusalem with a focus on its significance in Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. How has Jerusalem been experienced and interpreted as sacred within these religious communities? How have they expressed their attachments to this contested space from antiquity to modern times? Discussion will be rooted in primary texts from Jewish, Christian, and Muslim sources, with attention to their historical context.



    Credits: 3
  
  • RELG 3050 - Religions of Western Antiquity


    Studies Greco-Roman religions and religious philosophies of the Hellenistic period, including official cults, mystery religions, gnosticism, astrology, stoicism; emphasizes religious syncretism and interactions with Judaism and Christianity.



    Credits: 3
  
  • RELG 3051 - Religion and Society


    Critical appraisal of classical and contemporary approaches to the sociological study of religion and society.



    Credits: 3
  
  • RELG 3053 - Religion and Psychology


    Major religious concepts studied from the perspective of various theories of psychology, including the psychoanalytic tradition and social psychology.



    Credits: 3
  
  • RELG 3057 - Existentialism: Its Literary, Philosophical and Religious Expressions


    Studies Existentialist thought, its Hebraic-Christian sources, and 19th and 20th century representatives of the movement (Kierkegaard, Nietzsche, Sartre, Camus, Buber, and Tillich).



    Credits: 3
  
  • RELG 3200 - Martin, Malcolm, and America


    An analysis of African-American social criticism centered upon, but not limited to, the life and thought of Martin Luther King, Jr. and Malcolm X



    Credits: 3
  
  • RELG 3210 - Major Themes in American Religious History


    Examines a major religious movement or tradition in American history.



    Credits: 3
  
  • RELG 3255 - Ethics, Literature, and Religion


    Explores how ethical issues in religious traditions and cultural narratives are addressed in literature, scripture, essay, and memoir. How do stories inquire into “the good life”? How may moral principles and virtues be “tested” by fiction? How does narrative shape identity, mediate universality and particularity, reflect beliefs and values in conflict, and depict suffering?



    Credits: 3
  
  • RELG 3305 - Basic Philosophy Plato to Kant


    This course introduces students to the primary philosophic contributions of Plato/Socrates, Aristotle, the Stoics, Augustine, Locke, Descartes, Hume, and Kant, with briefer studies in Thomas, Maimonides, Ibn Sina, and Leibniz. Discussion will focus on these thinkers’ potential significance for contemporary studies in religion and theology.



    Credits: 3
  
  • RELG 3315 - Jefferson, Religion and the Secular University


    The undergraduate seminar will explore as inter-related topics the religious formation and outlook of Thomas Jefferson, his conception of the proper relation of religion and the civil power, his idea of the university as a secular institution, ad the role of religion in the founding and subsequent history of the University of Virginia.



    Credits: 3
  
  • RELG 3333 - Literature and Ethics


    Explores ethical questions raised by religious-traditional and cultural narratives as well as by fiction and memoir. How do stories inquire into the good life? How may moral principles and virtues be tested by fiction? How does narrative shape identity, mediate universality and particularity, reflect values that may conflict, and depict suffering. Format: literature and theory, guided discussion, critical essays, and a final presentation.



    Credits: 3
  
  • RELG 3360 - Conquests and Religions in the Americas, 1400s-1830s


    Beginning with Islamic-ruled Spain and the Aztec and Incan empires, the course examines historical changes in the religious practices of indigenous peoples, enslaved Africans and European settlers in Latin America and the Caribbean under European colonization and the transatlantic slave trade. Topics include: religious violence, human sacrifice, the Inquisition; missions; race, gender and sexuality; slavery, revolts, revolutions, nationalism.



    Credits: 3
  
  • RELG 3365 - Conscious Social Change: Contemplation and Innovation for Social Change


    This course offers an experiential social venture incubator integrating mindfulness-based leadership and contemplative practices and social entrepreneurship tools. Students will work in teams to develop a business plan for a real or hypothetical social-purpose venture. Daily contemplative practice, interactive personal leadership work and dialogue will allow students to explore both the inner and external dimensions of becoming change leaders.



    Credits: 3
  
  • RELG 3370 - God Since Cinema


    A survey of films about God and the effect these films (as opposed to books or paintings) have had on the Western understanding of God.



    Credits: 3
  
  • RELG 3375 - Spiritual Writing


    This course in spiritual writing chronicles quests for meaning, purpose and direction. The reading and writing assignments explore encounters with the sacred, and consider such written wrestlings within faith communities, and other sources of wisdom. Over the semester, students will study examples of contemporary spiritual writing in diaries, memoir, and fiction. They will also write about “matters of the spirit” in various genres.



    Credits: 3
  
  • RELG 3380 - Feasting, Fasting and Faith: Food in Judaism and Christianity


    Students study and research religion as it has been practiced in everyday life in two different traditions and write up and communicate their findings in articulate and thoughtful ways. As they focus on the themes of feasting and fasting in Jewish and Christian communities, they engage in various forms of interdisciplinary inquiry, including the study of sacred texts, history, ethics, and ethnography.



    Credits: 3
  
  • RELG 3400 - Women and Religion


    Introduces the images of women in the major religious traditions, the past and present roles of women in these traditions, and women’s accounts of their own religious experiences.



    Credits: 3
  
  • RELG 3420 - First Amendment Limits


    The promise of religious liberty contained in the First Amendment has always been subject to a variety of restraints by federal and local governments. This course will focus on the cultural experience of these restraints; not only how they were devised by courts and implemented by regulatory agencies, but also how they are understood in the popular imagination and, finally, what influence they have on the shape of religion in America.



    Credits: 3
  
  • RELG 3444 - Religious Conflict and Resolution Among the Abrahamic Religions


    What are the religions of Abraham? Are they bound for peace or conflict? This course introduces students to the scriptural sources and medieval to modern practices of Islam, Christianity, and Judaism including key historical narratives from the Qur’an, and the Hebrew and Christian Bibles. An examination of the role these scriptures play in people’s lives is followed by focusing on the ‘hot spots’ of inter-Abrahamic conflict today.



    Credits: 3
  
  • RELG 3450 - The Emotions


    Exploration of how what we feel colors what we believe, what we claim to know. What are human emotions and why do we have them? Philosophers, psychiatrists, neurologists and religious thinkers disagree. We will analyze these disagreements, along with the question of how the emotions can be controlled or educated. We will focus on William James, who influentially argued that for most believers, religious experience is first and foremost emotional.



    Credits: 3
  
  • RELG 3470 - Christianity and Science


    Christian Europe gave rise to modern science, yet Christianity and science have long appeared mutual enemies. Does science undermine religious belief? Can human life and striving really be explained in terms of physics and chemistry? In this course we explore the encounter between two powerful cultural forces and study the intellectual struggle to anchor God in the modern world.



    Credits: 3
  
  • RELG 3485 - Moral Leadership


    This course introduces students to the moral frameworks of Aristotle, Maimonides, Machiavelli, and Jeff McMahon and then examines pressing moral issues in contemporary America.



    Credits: 3
  
  • RELG 3560 - Issues in Theological Ethics


    Studies a moral problem or set of related problems (e.g., human experimentation, special moral relations, or warfare) in the context of recent work in theological ethics.



    Credits: 3
  
  • RELG 3600 - Religion and Modern Theatre


    Examines the works of several playwrights, some of whom dramatize explicitly religious themes or subjects, and others who are predominantly concerned with secular situations and contexts that imply religious questions and issues.



    Credits: 3
  
  • RELG 3605 - Religion, Violence and Strategy: How to Stop Killing in the Name of God


    This course will teach students to evaluate critically the leadership and strategies of social impact campaigns, and the ways in which governments, religious actors and civil society have tried to reduce violent conflict. Students will be organized into small integrated teams to research the root causes and triggers for religion-related violence across the Middle East and North Africa.



    Credits: 3
  
  • RELG 3630 - Idolatry


    Beginning with Biblical sources and concluding with contemporary texts, this course will examine the philosophical framework of casting idolatry as an unspeakable sin: What is an idol, and why is idolatry so objectionable? With an emphasis on Judaism, though not exclusively, we will discuss idolatry in the context of representation, election, otherness, emancipation, nationalism, secularism, religious innovation, and messianism.



    Credits: 3
  
  • RELG 3640 - Religion, God, and Evil


    Studies the ‘problem of evil,’ using philosophical, literary, and various religious sources.



    Credits: 3
  
  • RELG 3650 - Systems of Theological Ethics


    Examines one or more contemporary systems of Christian ethics, alternating among such figures as Reinhold Niebuhr, C. S. Lewis, Jacques Ellul, and Jacques Maritain.



    Credits: 3
  
  • RELG 3750 - Taoism and Confucianism


    Taoism and Confucianism



    Credits: 3
  
  • RELG 3780 - Faulkner and the Bible


    This class is study of the influence of the Bible (both Hebrew and Christian canons) on the fiction of William Faulkner. We will also see how this ancient text and its heritage informed Faulkner’s views on race, community, and personal identity as well.



    Credits: 3
  
  • RELG 3795 - Theology, Spirituality and Ethics of Sustainability


    Primarily through the readings of theologians from the Protestant, Roman Catholic and Eastern Orthodox traditions, this course explores theological, spiritual and ethical perspectives on the environmental issues that are becoming increasingly important across the globe.



    Credits: 3
  
  • RELG 3800 - African American Religious History


    This course will explore African American religious traditions in their modern and historical contexts, combining an examination of current scholarship, worship and praxis. It will examine the religious life and religious institutions of African Americans from their African antecedents to contemporary figures and movements in the US.



    Credits: 3
  
  • RELG 3820 - Global Ethics & Climate Change


    This seminar takes up questions of responsibility and fairness posed by climate change as ways into a search for shared ground across moral traditions. It investigates the ethical dimensions of climate change as a way to consider broad frameworks for developing responsibilities across national, cultural, and religious borders.



    Credits: 3
  
  • RELG 3860 - Human Bodies and Parts as Properties


    An analysis and assessment of theological, philosophical, and legal interpretations of rights holders and rights held in living and dead human bodies and their parts, in the context of organ and tissue transplantation, assisted reproduction, and research. Prerequisite: RELG 2650



    Credits: 3
  
  • RELG 3950 - Evil in Modernity: Banal or Demonic


    Investigates how modern thinkers have understood the character of evil and the challenge it poses to human existence. Evaluates the proposals made in response to that challenge. Prerequisite: Any course in religious studies.



    Credits: 3
  
  • RELG 4023 - Bioethics Internship Seminar


    The course enables students to spend time in medical settings as ‘participant-observers,’ in order to gain first-hand experience of the subject matter that is the focus of the theory, teaching, and practice of bioethics. Prerequisites: Bioethics Major/Minor



    Credits: 3
  
  • RELG 4220 - American Religious Autobiography


    Multidisciplinary examination of religious self-perception in relation to the dominant values of American life. Readings represent a variety of spiritual traditions and autobiographical forms.



    Credits: 3
  
  • RELG 4450 - Visions of the Apocalypse


    The course will introduce apocalypticism in Western religious traditions, but will soon focus on the United States in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Explorations will take us from slave revolts to UFO cults to Dr. Strangelove, from Edward Bellamy to genetic engineering, from the space program to Left Behind, and from the Great Disappointment of the 1840s and the Ghost Dance of 1890 to the New Age of the present.



    Credits: 3
  
  • RELG 4500 - Majors Seminar


    Introduces the study of religion as an interdisciplinary subject, utilizing methods in history of religions, theology, sociology, depth psychology, and literary criticism. The seminars are thematic and topics will vary according to the design of the instructor. Limited to twenty religious studies majors.



    Credits: 3
  
  • RELG 4540 - Advanced Topics in General Religious Studies


    This topical course provides upper level undergraduate students in Religious Studies an opportunity for advanced coursework in General Religious Studies



    Credits: 3
  
  • RELG 4800 - Crafting a Research Project in Religious Studies


    This course offers third- and fourth-year Religious Studies majors resources for conceiving and executing a major research project.  As a follow-up, students usually take RELG 4900 (“Distinguished Major Thesis”), which affords them an opportunity to write the research project they have conceived in this course.  Whether you plan to write a thesis or not, RELG 4800 offers an accessible introduction to the craft of research in Religious Studies.



    Credits: 3
  
  • RELG 4810 - Poetry and Theology


    This seminar seeks to develop a close reading of major religious poetry by two major religious poets



    Credits: 3
  
  • RELG 4900 - Distinguished Major Thesis


    Students write a thesis, directed by a member of the department, focusing on a specific problem in the theoretical, historical or philosophical study of religion or a specific religious tradition. The thesis grows out of the project proposal and annotated bibliography developed in the Research Methods seminar. Prerequisite: Selection by faculty for Distinguished Major Program and completion of RELG 4800.



    Credits: 3
  
  • RELG 4910 - Secularism and Religion


    Does religion belong in the public square? Does it have a legitimate role in secular life, despite a lack of unanimity in the religious beliefs of the public? Can religion be separated from public and political life? This course explores theoretical works that examine these and related questions and queries the ways in which religion shapes, challenges, and clashes with the modern nation-state.



    Credits: 3

Religion-Hinduism

  
  • RELH 2090 - Hinduism


    Surveys the Hindu religious heritage from pre-history to the 17th century; includes the Jain and Sikh protestant movements.



    Credits: 3
  
  • RELH 2110 - Popular Hinduism


    Introduces Hinduism through the examination of the religious lives, practices, and experiences of ordinary Hindus in the modern world.



    Credits: 3
  
  • RELH 3140 - The Jain Tradition


    Examines Jain history, belief, and practice. Prerequisite: RELG 1040, RELH 2090, 2110, or instructor permission.



    Credits: 3
  
  • RELH 3440 - Religion and Violence in Modern India


    The purpose of this course is to study the phenomenon of religious violence in one geographic and cultural context. We will examine the roles of religion and violence in Indian political life from the British period until contemporary times, and through the Indian example, we will explore current questions and problems regarding the relationship between religion and politics.



    Credits: 3
  
  • RELH 3710 - Hindu Traditions of Devotion


    Examines the history of Hindu devotionalism in three distinct geographical and cultural regions of India, focusing on the rise of vernacular literature and local traditions of worship. Prerequisite: Any course in Asian religions or instructor permission.



    Credits: 3
  
  • RELH 3725 - Travel Writing and India


    This course examines western encounters with India by reading the fiction and travel writing of Europeans, expatriate Indians, and Americans in India. In reading such works, the course will explore the place of India in the European and American literary and cultural imagination.



    Credits: 3
  
  • RELH 3740 - Hinduism Through its Narrative Literatures


    Examines a major genre of Hindu religious narrative. Genre varies but may include the epics; the mythology of the Puranas; the ‘didactic’ Kathasaritsagara and Pancatantra; the hagiographies of the great Hindu saints; and the modern novel. Prerequisite: RELG 1040, RELH 2090, RELH 2110, or instructor permission.



    Credits: 3
  
  • RELH 4550 - Advanced Topics in Hinduism


    This topical course provides upper level undergraduate students in Religious Studies an opportunity for advanced coursework in Hinduism



    Credits: 3

Religion-Islam

  
  • RELI 2024 - Jewish-Muslim Relations


    Jewish and Muslim communities share a complex history of interaction, spanning from seventh-century Arabia to the present day, and including instances of collaboration as well as moments of violence. Our course examines this dynamic relationship through documentary and literary sources. We focus on points of contact between Muslims and Jews in contexts ranging from battlefields to universities, from religious discourse to international politics.



    Credits: 3
  
  • RELI 2070 - Classical Islam


    Studies the Irano-Semitic background, Arabia, Muhammad and the Qur’an, the Hadith, law and theology, duties and devotional practices, sectarian developments, and Sufism.



    Credits: 3
  
  • RELI 2080 - Global Islam


    Global Islam traces the development of political Islamic thought from Napoleons invasion of Egypt in 1798 to the Arab Spring in 2010 and its aftermath in the Middle East.



    Credits: 3
  
  • RELI 2085 - Modern Islam: From the Age of Empires to the Present


    Surveys Islamic history from the “age of the great empires” (Ottoman, Safavid, Mughal) to the colonial period and up to the present day, including Islam in America. Islamic life and thought will be examined from multiple angles – including popular piety and spirituality, philosophy and theology, law, gender, art, architecture, and literature – with particular attention paid to the rise of modern Islamic “fundamentalist” movements.



    Credits: 3
  
  • RELI 3110 - Muhammad and the Qur’an


    Systematic reading of the Qur’an in English, with an examination of the prophet’s life and work. Prerequisite: Instructor permission.



    Credits: 3
  
  • RELI 3120 - Sufism: Islamic Mysticism


    This course will be a historical and topical survey of the development of Sufism from the classical Islamic period through the modern age, paying special attention to the interaction of ideas and the social and political contexts surrounding them.



    Credits: 3
  
  • RELI 3415 - Medieval Books and Scholars


    Colloquium on medieval books and scholars



    Credits: 3
  
  • RELI 3670 - Religion and Politics in Islam


    Historical and topical survey of the roots and genesis of the religion, and political conceptions operating in the Islamic world today.



    Credits: 3
  
  • RELI 3900 - Islam in Africa


    Historical and topical introduction to Islam in Africa. Cross-listed as RELA 3900. Prerequisite: RELA 2750, RELI 2070, RELI 2080, or instructor permission.



    Credits: 3
  
  • RELI 4560 - Advanced Topics in Islam


    This topical course provides upper level undergraduate students in Religious Studies an opportunity for advanced coursework in Islam



    Credits: 3

Religion-Judaism

  
  • RELJ 1210 - Hebrew Bible/Old Testament


    Studies the history, literature, and religion of ancient Israel in the light of the Hebrew Bible/Old Testament. Emphasizes methods of contemporary biblical criticism. Cross listed as RELC 1210.



    Credits: 3
  
  • RELJ 1410 - Elementary Classical Hebrew I


    Studies the essentials of grammar, syntax, and vocabulary. Includes readings of narrative portions of the Hebrew Bible.



    Credits: 3
  
  • RELJ 1420 - Elementary Classical Hebrew II


    Studies the essentials of grammar, syntax, and vocabulary. Includes readings of narrative portions of the Hebrew Bible. Prerequisite: HEBR/RELJ 1410 or the equivalent.



    Credits: 3
  
  • RELJ 1590 - Topics in Jewish Studies


    This course provides the student with an opportunity to explore a new topic in Jewish Studies



    Credits: 3
  
  • RELJ 2024 - Jewish-Muslim Relations


    Jewish and Muslim communities share a complex history of interaction, spanning from seventh-century Arabia to the present day, and including instances of collaboration as well as moments of violence. Our course examines this dynamic relationship through documentary and literary sources. We focus on points of contact between Muslims and Jews in contexts ranging from battlefields to universities, from religious discourse to international politics.



    Credits: 3
  
  • RELJ 2030 - Introduction to Judaism


    Introduces the world view and way of life of classical Rabbinic Judaism.



    Credits: 3
  
  • RELJ 2040 - American Judaism


    Description and explanation of the diverse forms of Jewish religious life in America.



    Credits: 3
  
  • RELJ 2056 - Classical Sources in the Jewish Tradition


    Classical Sources in the Jewish Tradition/Judaism in Antiquity



    Credits: 3
  
  • RELJ 2061 - Judaism, Modernity, and Secularization


    This course attempts to develop the history and intellectual underpinnings of the Jewish experience of modernity and secularization. It will explore the variety of Jewish responses and adjustments to the modern world and their implications for present day Judaism in its many forms.



    Credits: 3
 

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