Feb 27, 2024  
Undergraduate Record 2017-2018 
    
Undergraduate Record 2017-2018 [ARCHIVED RECORD]

Course Descriptions


 

Psychology

  
  • PSYC 4125 - Psychology of Language


    Psychology of Language



    Credits: 3
  
  • PSYC 4130 - Risk and Resilience Among Marginalized Adolescents


    This course will cover risk factors facing urban, economically disadvantaged adolescents of color, as well as assets and resources these youth can employ to thrive in the face of risk. Students will use relevant theories, academic research studies, and various forms of media to discuss issues of risk and resilience within this population.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PSYC 4150 - Cognitive Processes


    Explores, in depth, the life of the mind. Topics may include pattern recognition; observational skills; remembering; language and thought; categorization; the nature of similarity; discovery and invention; problem and puzzle solution; animal cognition; and views of intelligence in humans and machines. Prerequisite: Twelve credits of psychology or instructor permission.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PSYC 4155 - Autism: From Neurons to Neighborhoods


    In this interdisciplinary seminar, we will discuss recent research on autism at multiple levels (biological, cognitive, social) and from multiple perspectives (autistic individuals, scientists, disability studies scholars, families, schools, community/government organizations).



    Credits: 3
  
  • PSYC 4160 - Thinking About Thinking


    Thinking About thinking.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PSYC 4180 - Invention and Design


    Collaborative learning environment that enables students to understand the way in which technology is created and improved and to become better designers. Includes readings from psychology, history, computing, ethics, and engineering. Cross-listed as STS 2180. Prerequisite: ENWR 1510 or STS 1010 or instructor permission.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PSYC 4200 - Neural Mechanisms of Behavior


    Introduces basic concepts in neuroanatomy, neurophysiology and neurochemistry needed for an understanding of brain and behavior. Prerequisite: Enrollment not allowed in more than one 4000-level or 5000-level PSYC course & student must be 4th year psychology, neuroscience, or cognitive science major status. Students should have also taken PSYC 2200 or PSYC 2210. PSYC 3210 is recommended.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PSYC 4250 - Brain Systems Involved in Memory


    The historical and current experimental findings that describe the contribution of neuroanatomical structures in regulating memory formation. Prerequisite: Enrollment not allowed in more than one 4000-level or 5000-level PSYC course & student must be 4th year psychology, neuroscience, or cognitive science major status. Students should have also taken PSYC 2200 or PSYC 2210.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PSYC 4255 - Behavioral Epigenetics


    We will discuss basic concepts in epigenetics and the role these molecular modifications play in development, behavior, and disorder. Emphasis will be placed on landmark papers and the emerging role for the interaction of nature and nurture.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PSYC 4270 - Neurobiology of Learning and Memory


    This seminar examines the neural basis of learning and memory. We will study brain systems that mediate different types of learning and memory as well as the cellular and molecular mechanisms that allow these systems to acquire and store information. The course begins with a historical overview of learning and memory research in psychology and transition into modern studies in behavioral neuroscience.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PSYC 4275 - Exploring Neural Codes for Perception and Cognition


    Our perception of the world is constructed from the raw data sent by sensory nerves using a common currency called “spikes”. When we see, we are not interpreting the pattern of light intensities that falls on our retina; we are interpreting spikes that million of cells send to the brain. In this course, I invite students to play the role of a hypothetical observer inside the brain, who use spikes to make inferences about the external world. Prerequisite: 3rd year PSYC major, PSYC 2220



    Credits: 3
  
  • PSYC 4290 - Memory Distortions


    Although memory is generally accurate, some illusions and distortions in remembering are unavoidable. We will review both neuroscience and cognitive research on a variety of different memory problems, ranging from relatively benign tip-of-the-tongue experiences to untrustworthy eye-witness testimony. Our ultimate goal will be to understand the neural basis and cognitive processes that contribute to these constructive memory phenomena.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PSYC 4300 - Theories of Perception


    Perception is the means by which we become aware of the world and of ourselves. This seminar presents an overview of theories about perception including the following perspectives: philosophy, physiology, Gestalt psychology, cognitive psychology, ecology, and artificial intelligence. Prerequisite: PSYC 2300 or instructor permission.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PSYC 4315 - Psychology of Art


    The purpose of this course is to introduce the student to current research on the psychology of art. It is a broad course that does not only consider the research of psychologists. It draws on the writings of art historians, computer scientists, philosophers, and others. Enrollment Requirements: PSYC maj/min or COGS majors. Enrollment not allowed in more than one 4000-level or 5000-level PSYC course.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PSYC 4330 - Topics in Child Development


    Topics in Child Development



    Credits: 3
  
  • PSYC 4400 - Approaches to Quantitative Methods in Psychology


    Many psychological theories nowadays are formulated mathematically. In this course we will survey a variety of approaches to modeling in perception (such as signal detection theory), cognitive psychology (categorization learning) and social psychology. Prerequisites: 4th-yr in Psyc or Cog Sci maj/min. PSYC3005 & 3006 or equivalent. A calculus course and knowledge of a programming language. Enrollment not allowed in more than one 4000- or 5000-level PSYC course.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PSYC 4499 - Psychology and Law: Cognitive and Social Issues


    Examines issues for which cognitive and social psychology may be able to inform the legal system. Topics include eyewitness testimony, recovered memories, line-ups, expert testimony, jury selection, trial tactics, jury decision making, jury instructions, and the use of statistics in the courtroom. Prerequisite: PSYC 2150 or 2600; PSYC 3006.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PSYC 4500 - Special Topics in Psychology


    Topical Offerings in Psychology



    Credits: 3
  
  • PSYC 4580 - Directed Readings in Psychology


    Critical examination of an important current problem area in psychology.  May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: 14 credits in psychology and instructor permission.               



    Credits: 2 to 3
  
  • PSYC 4585 - Behavior Genetics


    This course will attempt to accomplish two basic goals. First, we will use the Plomin et al. text to establish a basic knowledge of genetics and its interaction with behavior. Second, we will use this knowledge to address some topics in behavioral genetics, using the Plomin et al. text and primary readings.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PSYC 4600 - Attachment and Social Development


    This course will address the role of child-parent attachment relationships in human development.  We will read theory and research about attachment and its relation to other social developmental issues during infancy, childhood and adolescence, including topics such as temperament, maltreatment, peer relationships, and psychopathology.  Prerequisite:  PSYC 2700 and PSYC 3006.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PSYC 4601 - Introduction to Clinical Psychology


    Overview of issues in clinical psychology including the scientific-practitioner model of training, reliability and validity of assessment techniques, validity of clinical judgment, and the effectiveness of psychological treatments. Prerequisite: PSYC 3410 and 3005.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PSYC 4602 - Women’s Issues in Clinical Psychology


    Studies current research and historical perspectives on clinical psychology issues as they pertain uniquely to women. Topics vary and may include eating disorders, battered women, pregnancy, and aging. Prerequisite: PSYC 3410 and 3006 or instructor permission.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PSYC 4603 - Psychology of Sexual Orientation


    Overview of research and theory related to sexual orientation across the lifespan from the standpoint of the social sciences. Topics include conceptualization of sexual identities, origins and development of sexual orientation, sexual identity formation and disclosure. Selected issues such as couple relationships, employment and careers, parenthood, and aging are also explored, since they may be affected by sexual orientation. Prerequisite: Third- or fourth-year psychology major



    Credits: 3
  
  • PSYC 4604 - Family Relations


    Furthers an understanding of family functioning and its impact on human development and the adjustment of family members. Emphasizes understanding family theories, research findings, and learning to apply frequently used strategies and methods in the study of family relations. Prerequisite: Upper level major or instructor permission.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PSYC 4605 - Research in Community Settings


    This course provides advanced undergraduate students with the opportunity to participate in a community-based research project with a local social service agency. We will investigate why low-income residents and agency personnel in communities are suspicious about researchers, how history and social science methods have contributed to the dynamics, and what this means for doing research in community settings. Prerequisite: PSYC 3006.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PSYC 4606 - Cognitive Biases in Anxiety and Related Disorders


    This course examines cognitive processing biases in anxiety and related disorders. To understand, for example, why a person with social anxiety sees only the one scowling face in a room full of smiles, we consider automatic processing of emotional information. The course critiques cutting-edge research on how these processes contribute to anxiety and related problems, and if it is important to change the processes to reduce psychopathology. Prerequisite: Psyc 3410. 4th year Psyc majors/minors or COGS majors . Enrollment not allowed in more than one 4000-level or 5000-level class.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PSYC 4650 - Oppression and Social Change


    Oppression and Social Change focuses on an analysis of oppression, empowerment and liberation as defined within an ecological system perspective. Topics to be covered include discussion of racial, economic, sexual discrimination, individual and social alienation, and loss of self esteem. Moreover, the course considers the role of privilege in the maintenance of an oppressive schema. Prerequisite: PSYC (who have never taken another Psyc 4000-level course), AAS or WGS major and 4th Year or Instructor Permission. Enrollment not allowed in more than one 4000-level or 5000-level PSYC course.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PSYC 4670 - Psychology of the African-American Athlete


    Psychology of the African-American Athlete



    Credits: 3
  
  • PSYC 4682 - Mobile Technology in Mental Health Research


    This course provides an introduction to research design and computational methods for non-invasive mental health monitoring using mobile devices such as phones and wearable computing. Students will gain a practical understanding of mobile monitoring approaches as they relate to mental health. Topics include estimating health status (e.g. mood) through mobility data, application design, mobile data mining, and emerging issues in mental health.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PSYC 4690 - Self-Knowledge


    Self-knowledge is the focus of countless self-help books, magazine articles, and faddish therapies. In this course we will examine self-knowledge from a scientific perspective, based on research in social, personality, cognitive, and developmental psychology.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PSYC 4695 - Social Cognition and Social Change


    This class will examine how research on social cognition –how people think in a social context– can be used to address a wide variety of personal and social problems. It will cover both basic research in social psychology and applied research designed to solve personal and social problems.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PSYC 4700 - Flourishing


    People are like plants:  if you get the conditions just right, they will usually flourish.  So what are those conditions?  We will examine the latest research in social and positive psychology on love, work happiness and virtue.  The course will involve several outside-of-class research projects and activities, including making yourself a better person.  Prerequisite:  PSYC 2600



    Credits: 3
  
  • PSYC 4720 - Psychology of Morality and Politics


    Moral motives are all around us, but they are often hard to see because of our own moralism: we dismiss actions and people we disagree with as evil or misguided. The first part of this course will be a primer on moral psychology, including the evolutionary basis of human morality and its cultural diversity. Then we’ll move on to politics, partisanship, and the culture war; then finally, to terrorism.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PSYC 4750 - Social Stigma


    Examines the subjective experience of individuals whose social identity or social group memberships make them a target of prejudice.  We will examine research and theory pertaining to how individuals interpret prejudice, how they cope with prejudice, and how prejudice affects their self-evaluations and behavior.  A social psychological approach to understanding this problem will be emphasized.  Prerequisite:  PSYC 2600



    Credits: 3
  
  • PSYC 4755 - Social Neuroscience


    A broad perspective on the expanding field of social neuroscience. A. Topics include but are not limited to social perception, social cognition, person perception, theory of mind, attitudes, and interpersonal processes. Emphasis on understanding the reciprocal interaction between brain function and everyday social behaviors. Prerequisite: PSYC 2200 or BIOL 3050.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PSYC 4870 - The Minority Family: A Psychological Inquiry


    Examines the current state of research on minority families, focusing on the black family. Emphasizes comparing ‘deficit’ and ‘strength’ research paradigms. Prerequisite: PSYC 3006 and at least one course from each of the following groups: PSYC 2100, 2150 or 2300, and PSYC 2400, 2700 or 2600, and students in the Afro-American and African studies or studies in women and gender programs.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PSYC 4910 - Undergraduate Internship Programs Seminar


    An internship placement arranged by the supervising faculty. Students work 10 to 20 hours per week in various community agencies, such as health care delivery, social services, or juvenile justice. Requires written reports, as well as regular class meetings with supervising faculty in order to analyze the internship experience, engage in specific skill training, and discuss assigned readings. Apply in February of third year. Prerequisite: Fourth-year psychology major with at least 14 credits in psychology, and instructor permission. S/U grading.



    Credits: 4
  
  • PSYC 4920 - Undergraduate Internship Programs Seminar


    An internship placement arranged by the supervising faculty. Students work 10 to 20 hours per week in various community agencies, such as health care delivery, social services, or juvenile justice. Requires written reports, as well as regular class meetings with supervising faculty in order to analyze the internship experience, engage in specific skill training, and discuss assigned readings. Apply in February of third year. Required Labs. Requisites: Fourth-year psychology major with at least 14 credits in psychology and instructor permission.



    Credits: 4
  
  • PSYC 4930 - Undergraduate Internship Program Supplement


    Provides students in certain placements with the opportunity for a more in-depth and extensive internship program year. Background: some placements (e.g., with courts) demand 20 hours per week of field experience rather than the 10 in PSYC 4910, 4920. Simultaneous enrollment in this course provides appropriate credits for the additional 10 hours of field work. Corequisite: PSYC 4910, 4920; and instructor permission. S/U grading.



    Credits: 2
  
  • PSYC 4940 - Undergraduate Internship Program Supplement


    Provides students in certain placements with the opportunity for a more in-depth and extensive internship program year. Background: some placements (e.g., with courts) demand 20 hours per week of field experience rather than the 10 in PSYC 4910, 4920. Simultaneous enrollment in this course provides appropriate credits for the additional 10 hours of field work. Corequisite: PSYC 4910, 4920; and instructor permission. S/U grading.



    Credits: 2
  
  • PSYC 4970 - Distinguished Major Thesis


    A two-semester course in which the student prepares a thesis under the supervision of a departmental faculty member. The thesis may be based on empirical research conducted by the student or a critical review or theoretical analysis of existing findings. Prerequisite: Participants in the Distinguished Majors Program in Psychology. Enrollment Requirement: You are required to register for PSYC 3870.



    Credits: 0
  
  • PSYC 4980 - Distinguished Major Thesis


    A two-semester course in which the student prepares a thesis under the supervision of a departmental faculty member. The thesis may be based on empirical research conducted by the student or a critical review or theoretical analysis of existing findings. Prerequisite: Participants in the Distinguished Majors Program in Psychology.



    Credits: 6

Public Health Sciences

  
  • PHS 2291 - Global Culture and Public Health


    This course considers the forces that influence the distribution of health and illness in different societies, with attention to increasing global interconnectedness. We will examine the roles of individuals, institutions, communities, corporations and states in improving public health, asking how effective public health and development efforts to improve global health have been and how they might be re-imagined.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PHS 2810 - West Indies Health Care: Disaster Preparedness, St Kitts & Nevis


    The participants in this course held in the West Indies, will study the fundamentals of emergency care and disaster preparedness through exploration of existing preparedness infrastructures in St. Kitts and Nevis.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PHS 3050 - Fundamentals of Public Health


    This survey course explores the core disciplines of public health (epidemiology, biostatistics, biomedical sciences, social & behavioral sciences, environmental health science, & health policy & mngt) through a combination of lectures & case discussions. Students also work in small groups for in-depth analyses of course materials & to develop research skills by writing a brief paper on an important public health topic.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PHS 3090 - Health Care Economics


    Reviews principles of economics most relevant to analyzing changes in health care provision and applies those principles to current health care institutions and their performance, trends in health care service delivery, and methods of forecasting future trends. Prerequisite: Instructor Permission



    Credits: 3
  
  • PHS 3095 - Health Policy in the United States - An Economic Perspective


    This course uses an economic perspective to analyze the health policies and institutions that shape the health care system in the US. The consequences of current health care policies on health outcomes are discussed. The processes through which health policies are developed, implemented, and evaluated are analyzed.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PHS 3102 - Introduction to Public Health Research: Population Data Analysis


    This course is designed to provide students with the knowledge & skills needed to use population data to answer research questions. Students will utilize SPSS to access, evaluate, & interpret public health data. The course will give students an opportunity to generate hypotheses & variables to measure health problems. The course will also describe how the public health infrastructure is used to collect, process, maintain & disseminate data. Prerequisite: Instructor Permission



    Credits: 3
  
  • PHS 3103 - Intro to Epidemiology:Case Studies on Hlthy Lifestyles & Disease Prevention


    This undergraduate course provides an introduction to basic epidemiology concepts, including measures of frequency & association, study design, & methodological issues such as confounding. Students will use case studies & team projects, as well as literature reviews, to examine strategies for promoting healthy behavior & lifestyles & addressing such public health challenges as obesity & tobacco abuse. Prerequisite: Instructor Permission



    Credits: 3
  
  • PHS 3104 - Introduction to Epidemiology: Methodological and Ethical Considerations


    This course is an introduction to epidemiology at the undergraduate level. Using epidemiology as a framework, class participants are challenged to engage more thoughtfully with many of the big issues facing the world today. The course emphasizes the importance of critical thinking and the scientific method, collaboration in teams, and ethical principles and reasoning in this process.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PHS 3130 - Introduction to Health Research Methods


    Much of what we know about human health & health-related behavior is based on quant & qual research. This course involves students in the research process from start to finish, including formulating a research question; conducting a background literature review; choosing a study design; developing data collection tools; recruiting a study population; collecting data; assuring data quality; analyzing data; & interpreting & presenting results.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PHS 3186 - Comparative Health Care Systems


    Provides a background for students who may be interested in learning about challenges & opportunities for improvement in health status for citizens in all countries. Although at the operational level, each national system is unique, there are common characteristics that permeate the design & structure of most health care delivery sectors. The major health reform activities occurring in developed & developing countries will be highlighted.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PHS 3620 - Built Environment & Public Health: Local to Global


    How do sidewalks, block parties, food deserts, and transit systems impact our health? This course maps the intersections between architecture, urban planning, and public health that shape the built environment, health and well being of our local and global communities. Lectures and learning applications will present the evidence and its limits on topics such as food security, age-friendly cities, obesity, social equity and vulnerable population.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PHS 3818 - UVA in the Dominican Republic: Dominican Public Health


    Students will explore some of the basic tenets of global public health while experiencing the realities of life and public health during two weeks in the Dominican Republic. The course is comprised of 9 instructional modules. Course material will be enhanced through hands-on learning field trips and community service projects. Prerequisite: Instructor Permission



    Credits: 3
  
  • PHS 3825 - Global Public Health: Challenges and Innovations


    Covers principles, measurements, cross-cutting themes, the burden of diseases, & innovative efforts to improve global health. Explores links between health & development, culture, the environment, poverty, education, & demographic characteristics. A combination of lectures, case studies & other small group activities are used. Students also perform a literature review on an important global health topic. Prerequisite: PHS 3050 strongly recommended. Instructor Permission



    Credits: 3
  
  • PHS 4016 - Human Factors Design for Community Health


    We will draw on approaches from public health, medical informatics, and human factors engineering to answer these questions. We will explore how to create interventions that are grounded in theoretical perspectives and field-based assessments of patients needs and preferences. Our ultimate goal will be to create interventions that are useful and usable by patients and that ultimately support self-management and improve health outcomes.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PHS 4050 - Public Health Policy


    Explores the legitimacy, design, & implementation of a variety of policies aiming to promote public health & reduce the social burden of disease & injury. Highlights the challenge posed by public health’s pop-based perspective to traditional ind-centered, autonomy-driven approaches to bioethics & const. law. Other themes center on conflicts between PH & pub morality & the relationship between PH and social justice.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PHS 4991 - Global Public Health Capstone


    Explores topics in global public health and the myriad of governmental and non-governmental entities whose goal is to address and resolve problems encountered in global public health and synthesizes the student’s interdisciplinary studies in global public health, culminating in a Capstone Paper.



    Credits: 3

Public Health Sciences Ethics

  
  • PHSE 4500 - Special Topics in Public Health Science Ethics


    The Topics in Public Health Ethics are designed for fourth-year undergraduate students who have declared a minor, or an interdisciplinary major, in bioethics. These topics will focus on ethical issues in Healthcare Policy and Administration.



    Credits: 1 to 3

Public Policy

  
  • PPOL 3000 - Writing Lab


    Effective written communication is critical to leadership for public policy. The Writing Lab provides students an opportunity to improve their composition and revision skills. Students will use the assignments from a required core class as the material for the lab.



    Credits: 1
  
  • PPOL 3001 - Public Policy Writing Lab


    Develops professional writing skills.



    Credits: 1
  
  • PPOL 3050 - Introduction to Social Entrepreneurship


    Social entrepreneurship is an approach to creating system-level change through the application of entrepreneurial thinking to social ventures, non-profit organizations, government institutions, and NGOs to create economic, environmental, and social value for multiple stakeholders. In this course you will be introduced to a range of entrepreneurial approaches aimed at solving social problems - from the non-profit to the for-profit.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PPOL 3100 - Foundations of Behavioral Science


    An overview of the fields of social psychology and behavioral science. We will explore behavioral research in basic social psychology, leadership and organizational behavior, and the ways in which social science methods and research are currently being used in public policy and to solve major societal problems. The ultimate goal is to teach students how to think like behavioral scientists.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PPOL 3200 - Introduction to Public Policy


    This course will introduce students to both the process of public policy and the tools of policy analysis. The first part examines the actors, institutions, and procedures involved in the adoption, implementation, and evaluation of public policy. The second part introduces students to the basic concepts and tools of policy analysis including problem definition, specification of alternatives, and solution analysis.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PPOL 3210 - Introduction to Civic Leadership


    Drawing on social science research, this course explores how public leaders contribute to problem identification, issue framing, policy adoption, crisis management, and organizational and societal change. The course will clarify the relationships among key concepts including leadership and followership, authority and influence, reciprocity and persuasion, and examine the role of contextual factors in shaping the strategies of 21st century leaders



    Credits: 3
  
  • PPOL 3225 - Conscious Social Change


    An experiential learning course and social venture incubator integrating and applying contemplative practice, mindful leadership skills, conscious social change methodologies and social entrepreneurship frameworks in the development of new ideas to solve local and global social issues. The course provides future change leaders with the skills to invest in their own self-understanding and initiate social change with impact at home and abroad.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PPOL 3230 - Public Policy Challenges of the 21st Century


    This survey course that introduces students to the history, politics, and economic and social significance of the major challenges facing 21st century U.S. policymakers. Examples of topics that may be explored include: the federal deficit and debt, the rise of China and India, health care costs, climate policy, energy security, economic opportunity in an era of globalization, the future of public higher education, and U.S. foreign policy.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PPOL 3235 - International Public Policy


    This course examines how public problems are defined, how different policy solutions are crafted, and the ways in which we judge their effec¬tiveness in the U.S. and around the world. We will use the countries we visit to illustrate the different ways that countries craft public policies, why they do so, and what the tradeoffs and consequences are.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PPOL 3240 - Anti-Terrorism and the Role of Intelligence


    Explores the various ways our federal government, primarily the DoJ & the FBI, have responded to the threat of terrorism, in the US & abroad. The modern terrorist threat, electronic surveillance authorities, US detention authority, terrorist debriefing, cooperating witnesses in terrorism cases, enhanced interrogation techniques, the differences between the intelligence & law enforcement approaches and other topics will be covered.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PPOL 3241 - Science and Technology Policy for Interns


    This course is designed to prepare undergraduates for internships in science and technology policy. In the longer term, it aims to develop future leaders in science and technology, inside and outside of government, by equipping students with knowledge and skills in public policy. Enrollment is limited to Instructor permission. Students are strongly encouraged to find an internship in the Summer, but this is not required.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PPOL 3250 - International Development Policy


    The course introduces students to the theories, policies and policy debates relevant to developing and transition economies. It introduces standard theories of development economics and discusses of how current trends in the global economy challenge those theories and existing policies. We will focus on the macro and micro-economic challenges facing governments in developing countries and the international institutions that attempt to assist them



    Credits: 3
  
  • PPOL 3255 - Comparative Policy History


    Course will survey the historical development of key public policy issues in cross-national perspective. What explains the similarities and differences in the content of the policy agendas across nations? Why do different nations often respond to similar problems in very different ways? Examples of issues that will be explored include health care, education, immigration, environment, and social policy.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PPOL 3260 - Value and Bias in Public Policy


    This course moves beyond the traditional economic approach to public policy and explores the role of psychological analysis. Decision-making is not always rational, but involves various cognitive biases that can result in mistrust and prejudice, preference for avoidance of loss rather than maximization of gain, and overweighting of short-term outcomes.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PPOL 3270 - Comparative Social Policy


    This course examines social policy in the high-income countries of Western Europe, North America, and Australasia. Using a number of frames to define social citizenship, we will consider the scope of the welfare state in advanced economies. In particular, this will include considering the policies that affect the decisions of young adults: from employment, to forming a family, to acquiring housing.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PPOL 3280 - Urban Environmental Policy


    In this course we will examine environmental challenges to cities, including climate change, pollution, recreation, resource consumption, public health, and disasters. We will analyze how policies have contributed to, mitigated, and adapted to these challenges and how policy goals and outcomes can be evaluated using concepts such as sustainability, resilience and environmental justice.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PPOL 3290 - Social Innovation in Emerging Markets: India and South East Asia


    This is an introductory course, aimed at exposing students to modern Indian and South Asian society, culture, business and policy through a variety of materials. The course may be particularly important due to the rising stature and importance of India and more generally, South Asia, in the global economy.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PPOL 3295 - Global Humanitarian Crises: Dilemmas, Leadership, and Action


    Course will look at critical questions defining global humanitarian action and policy. The inability to deliver aid inside Syria, record refugee flows, drought in Ethiopia, brutal conflict in Yemen, are only some of today’s crises. Using historical and critical analysis, case studies, and insights from guest speakers, the foundations, dilemmas, and operations of humanitarian aid will be explored.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PPOL 3410 - Innovation and Social Impact


    This course introduces students to the strategies and processes required in the contemporary economy to leverage innovation in order to maintain overall competitiveness and make a difference. Students will examine several firms, and individuals who have catalyzed positive social change through different organizational platforms in the market, in government, within the nonprofit sector, and increasingly in the space between these three sectors.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PPOL 3415 - Sci, Eng, Tech for National Security & Leadership


    Science, engineering and technology (SET) are seminal assets for economic growth, social progress, innovation and national security. Global challenges impact national security and leaders must be conversant about SET to develop related domestic and international policies. The seminar examines these challenges, probes strategic foresight for global “megatrends” and assesses emerging and disruptive SET for leaders in a national security context.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PPOL 3420 - Law and Public Policy: Great Britain, Europe and the US


    This course examines the legal underpinnings of key public policy challenges facing Great Britain, Europe, and the U.S. From the policy and regulatory perspective, problem-solving in such areas as the environment, immigration, trade, labor, social welfare, national security, and education depend on nations having functional and effective laws in place.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PPOL 4200 - Institutional and Political Context of Public Policy


    What are the strengths and weaknesses of the major policy-making institutions, and how does the current system of American governance compare with that of other advanced societies? This class will examine the key institutional and political actors in policymaking; focusing on the increasing fole of non-governmental institutions in problem solving.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PPOL 4210 - Integrating Ethics in Public Policy


    This course explores how ethical considerations are integrated in public policy choices. How do legal, regulatory and political mechanisms facilitate or impede their integration? Can ethical concerns keep pace with disruptive technological change? We consider obstacles to informed ethical decision-making, including technical competence, and the challenge of addressing ethical concerns when society is divided by divergent viewpoints and values.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PPOL 4215 - Designing Institutions


    This class aims to introduce students to the choices we make (and have made) by crafting our institutions and the rules of the game of policymaking and our best understanding of the consequences of institutional design.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PPOL 4220 - Poverty: In the US and Rest of the World


    Although the US has experienced significant growth in its history, poverty has remained high at around 15 percent of the population. This seminar course will focus on poverty in the US and in the rest of the world (RoW). How the poverty line in the US is set and what data are used to estimate poverty in the US will be presented, and contrasted with relative poverty methodology in Europe and $1 per person per day poverty in the developing world.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PPOL 4225 - Leadership and Practice


    In this seminar, the Meriwether Lewis Institute 3rd year cohort focuses its effort both on measurable impact on the University and personal growth as a leader. Using their project proposals as the vehicles for collective impact and personal growth, students will develop & advance their proposals, analyze course readings, engage one another on project challenges, and begin translating the leadership skills they are learning to the broader world.



    Credits: 2
  
  • PPOL 4240 - Research Methods and Data Analysis in Public Policy


    This course will provide an overview of research methods and data analysis in public policy, integrating basic statistical modeling. The class will promote a critical understanding of what good research is, how people sometimes lie with statistics, and how flawed research can be identified, and an appreciation of the relationship between researchers and the rest of society, and how researchers can most suitably deal with the existence of skeptics



    Credits: 3
  
  • PPOL 4250 - Choice and Consequences: The Economics of Public Policy


    This course uses basic models from microeconomics to understand how these decision makers will respond to policies and when voluntary actions in private markets may be expected to lead to suboptimal outcomes and hence the circumstances under which a collective decision to control or influence behavior might produce better outcomes than private choices.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PPOL 4500 - Topics in Public Policy and Leadership


    Topical courses in public policy and leadership



    Credits: 1
  
  • PPOL 4550 - Social Entrepreneurship: Global Field Experience


    Social Entrepreneurship Global Field Experience Topics Course



    Credits: 3
  
  • PPOL 4569 - Sustainable Practices Denmark


    This course is an intensive examination of how one progressive country in Europe is working toward sustainability through a variety of interconnected programs. This course in Denmark examines several programs being undertaken by local leaders to address problems in their communities. We will see what is being done to promote sustainability in four areas: green energy, sustainable transportation, food security, and what are called “livable cities”



    Credits: 3
  
  • PPOL 4599 - Special Topics in Public Policy


    This is an upper level topics course offered in the Frank Batten School of Leadership & Public Policy



    Credits: 3
  
  • PPOL 4720 - Open Source for the Common Good


    Open source technology plays a major role in society and embodies a different culture with different tradeoffs and societal impacts. Open source is highly innovative and holds considerable promise for addressing most of the critical problems facing society such as sustainability, inequality, the cost of technology, and open access to knowledge. We will study the role of open source through numerous case studies and discussions.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PPOL 4725 - NGOs in the Policy Arena


    Since the 1960s, nonprofit, nongovernmental organizations have played an increasingly central role in the domestic public policy arena. This class explores their involvement in the interpretation and implementation of federal policy, the coordination of policy solutions, and advocacy for the policies and populations they serve. Policy areas we may consider include poverty and social welfare; the environment; and civil and political rights.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PPOL 4730 - Impact Investing


    ‘Impact Investing’ is the proactive deployment of financial resources to organizations for a positive return on investment and an additional, intentional social impact beyond financial returns. Impact Investing explores how funders (grant funders, investors, and policymakers) deploy capital to support social entrepreneurs. This course provides an introductory understanding of utilizing finance as a tool for solving social problems worldwide.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PPOL 4735 - Experiential Social Entrepreneurship


    This experiential learning course applies basic principles of social entrepreneurship to real-world problems that social entrepreneurs are facing. Students will work in teams on challenges proposed by a set of local and international social entrepreneurs. This is a design-thinking-centric course for students interested in investigating how our world is adapting to solve the greatest social and environmental challenges of this century.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PPOL 4740 - Philanthropy


    This is a course on the philanthropic sector, comprising a set of private actors - foundations, nonprofit organizations, and private citizens - engaged in work to promote the public good. What distinguishes this sector is that while interacting with government and the business community, it operates differently than either, with its own ethics, goals, standards, and practices. Requisite: Instructor permission.



    Credits: 4
  
  • PPOL 4745 - Leadership in Context


    This course provides exposure to prevailing theories and principles of leadership with the goal of familiarizing students with leadership concepts in multiple contexts. Students will identify and evaluate the knowledge, skills, & values that different organizations and communities expect their leaders to possess. Through course readings, case studies, guest speakers and discussion, students reflect on what leadership roles will demand of them.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PPOL 4750 - Political Leadership in American History


    This course will consider political leadership in American history as illustrated in decisions taken by U.S. Presidents, such as Lincoln, Wilson, Truman, Kennedy and Nixon. We shall analyze the pressures and constitutive factors leading to these decisions.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PPOL 4755 - White Collar Criminal Justice Policy


    This course examines the nature, scope, and impact of white collar crime in today’s society. It will address the definition of white collar crime and how it is distinguished from other crimes; the perpetrators and victims of white collar crime; the broader costs of white collar crime and the theories of how these costs are measured; and the methods by which white collar crime is investigated, prosecuted, punished, and deterred.



    Credits: 3
 

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