Feb 27, 2024  
Undergraduate Record 2017-2018 
    
Undergraduate Record 2017-2018 [ARCHIVED RECORD]

Course Descriptions


 

Procurement and Contracts Management

  
  • PC 4070 - Seminar in Procurement and Contracts Management


    A capstone course for advanced students in acquisition management designed to meld the content of individual procurement courses into a fuller understanding of policies, practices, and procedures. Includes current research and advances and offers opportunities to develop skills in the critical evaluation of theories and their application in solving problems. Prerequisite: Completion of all required courses.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PC 4080 - Principles of Law for Contract Performance


    Principles of Law for Contract Performance



    Credits: 3
  
  • PC 4090 - Contracting for Information Resources


    Illustrates how to structure and negotiate hardware and software contracts and clearly underlines the responsibilities of both the buyer and seller. Key contracting problems emphasized are reliability standards, acceptance testing, performance and measurement, quality control, maintenance, progress reports, and payments. Prerequisite: PC 4020.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PC 4120 - International Purchasing and Business Transactions


    Analyzes the basic regulations and principles of international procurement, organizational structure, financing, cooperative programs, supply-support arrangements, co-production, agreements, consortiums, research and development agreements, distribution systems, and analysis of current problems and trends. Prerequisite: PC 4010.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PC 4130 - Purchasing and Materials Management


    Surveys the principles of industrial purchasing and management of inventories, including determinations of requirements, pricing, source selection, inventory policy, and professional ethics.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PC 4150 - Grants: Federal, State, and Local


    Provides a foundation for understanding the administration of grants. The course is primarily concerned with grants by the federal government; the means by which it provides financial assistance to state and local units of government and the private (nonprofit) community; and the purposes for which such assistance are covered, including revenue sharing, concerns over federal interests in non-federal functions, impact upon intergovernmental relations, and others.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PC 4160 - Application for and Management of Federal Grants


    Furthers an understanding of the mechanics of applying for federal grants, the review process, and the administrative problems facing recipients of grants. Covers the specific application procedures of selected federal agencies and several grant programs. Reviews the pre-application process, requirements for state plans, coordinating requirements among planning units of governments, and environmental impact statements.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PC 4170 - International Business Negotiations


    Covers the differences between international and domestic business negotiations, including language, customs, religion, and political and legal systems, and other cultural consideration. Discusses the various strategies and tactics used in negotiations, and uses extensive role-playing with these techniques to develop recognition and countering skills. Prerequisite: PC 4020.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PC 4200 - Advanced Major ADP Systems Acquisition


    Covers the basics of systems acquisition; general policy; the major systems process; DSARC information requirements; integrated DSARC and PPBS process; fundamental management principles; concerns with the acquisition process; controlled decentralization and participatory management principles; acquisition/life cycle management; and software systems acquisition process. Prerequisite: PC 4020, 4090.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PC 4220 - Federal Government Contracting: A Contractor’s Perspective


    Covers marketing and sales, pre-RFP work, RFP analysis, technical proposal preparation, management and cost proposal preparation, government site visits, audits, negotiations, contract start-up, performance, and contract shut-down.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PC 4230 - The Project Manager and Managing the Project Team


    Introduces the fundamentals of project-team management, emphasizing the management of large-scale, technically complex projects. Covers the entire project life cycle, from selection and initiation to termination and close-out.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PC 4240 - Subcontract Management


    Surveys government policies and regulations addressing subcontracting and subcontract management. Intended for employees of companies that subcontract with government prime contractors and for government officials who seek a better understanding of subcontracting procedures under the Federal Acquisition Regulation.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PC 4260 - Source Selection


    Provides a comprehensive overview of the government policies and regulations that address the major procurement technique used by the government for purchases above the simplified acquisition threshold. The intent of the course is to discuss all phases of the source selection process from the inception of the requirement to the award of the contract and notification and debriefing of unsuccessful offers.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PC 4270 - Commercial Item Acquisition


    Commercial Item Acquisition



    Credits: 1
  
  • PC 4280 - Terms and Conditions


    Terms and Conditions



    Credits: 3

Professional Studies-Criminal Justice

  
  • PSCJ 4310 - Organizational and Personal Development


    Enhances the leadership and organizational and personal development skills of state, local, and county law enforcement officials as well as sheriffs, executives from corrections, and private and corporate security entities. This is one course in a five-course series for the National Criminal Justice Command College.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PSCJ 4320 - Leadership, Management, and Communication


    Enhances the leadership, management, and communication skills of state, local, and county law enforcement officials, sheriffs, and executives from corrections and private and corporate security. This is one course in a five-course series for the National Criminal Justice Command College.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PSCJ 4330 - Leadership and Criminal Justice


    Enhances the leadership and forensic skills of state, local, and county law enforcement officials as well as sheriffs, and executives from corrections and private and corporate security entities. This is one course in a five-course series for the National Criminal Justice Command College.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PSCJ 4340 - Negotiation and Collaboration


    Enhances the negotiation and collaboration skills of state, local, and county law enforcement officials as well as sheriffs, and executives from corrections and private and corporate security entities. This is one course in a five-course series for the National Criminal Justice Command College.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PSCJ 4350 - Individual and Organizational Effectiveness


    Enhances the individual and organizational skills of state, local, and county law enforcement officials as well as sheriffs, and executives from corrections and private and corporate security entities. This is one course in a five-course series for the National Criminal Justice Command College.



    Credits: 3

Professional Studies-Health Policy

  
  • PSHP 2040 - Introduction to the American Healthcare System


    Introduces the structure and financing of the U.S. healthcare system. Includes an overview of private and public health insurance, as well as growing American health problems and how they affect the quality of healthcare delivery in the United States.



    Credits: 1.5 to 3
  
  • PSHP 2041 - Introduction to the American Healthcare System


    Continues with the structure and financing of the U.S. healthcare system. Includes an overview of private and public health insurance, as well as growing American health problems and how they affect the quality of healthcare delivery in the United States. Prerequisite: PSHP 2040



    Credits: 1.5

Professional Studies-Health Sciences Management

  
  • PSHM 1010 - Explorations in Health Care: Issues and Opportunities


    Introduces the healthcare literature, structure, delivery systems and challenges facing US healthcare, healthcare economics and research, insurance, policy and the Affordable Care Act; explores the educational requirements and job responsibilities of various healthcare providers and career opportunities; fosters critical thinking and library research skills. Prerequisite: Approved as a SCPS High School Community Scholar.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PSHM 3010 - Introduction to Health Care Management: Applying Concepts to Practice


    Provides an introduction to health care management for allied health practitioners. Integrates theory and practice through course presentations, readings, online discussions, experiential exercises, and written assignments. Emphasizes the application of critical thinking and problem solving skills, within multidisciplinary environments, to both health care practice and professional development.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PSHM 3050 - Current Issues in Health Care


    Provides an introduction to the healthcare and healthcare management literature for allied healthcare professionals, building on the foundational knowledge provided in the concurrent PSHM 3010 Introduction to Healthcare Management. The course emphasizes the application of critical thinking and library research skills.



    Credits: 1
  
  • PSHM 3080 - Legal and Ethical Decision-Making in Health Care


    Provides an overview of the laws governing health care institutions and the ethical dilemmas facing health care managers and providers; reviews ethical principles utilized to examine health care issues. Evaluates the procedures followed by health care organizations in making legal and ethical decisions; addresses such contemporary issues as cloning, euthanasia, and organ donation. Prerequisite: Admission to BPHM or BIS program.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PSHM 3805 - Health Information Systems and Applications


    Introduces foundational knowledge and emerging trends in health informatics, and examines how information systems can be utilized to improve patient care, health outcomes, efficiency, and quality. Provides knowledge on how health informatics can enhance evidence-based decision making, cost-management, and performance; analyzes key issues in data management, and confidentiality in health informatics. Prerequisite: Admission to BPHM or BIS Program.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PSHM 4050 - Understanding Diversity in Health Care


    Prepares students to understand the importance of providing culturally appropriate care to diverse populations, and introduces students to the systematic as well as disciplined approaches used to incorporate diversity management and cultural competence in the delivery of healthcare. Explores relevant organizational dynamics and organizational policies that are necessary to effectively manage a healthcare organization.



    Credits: 2
  
  • PSHM 4200 - Women’s Health Issues: Access, Treatment and Policy


    Approaches issues related to women, gender, and health from various interdisciplinary and theoretical perspectives. Examines the role of the medical profession, public health professionals, activists and social institutions in constructing discourses and knowledge about women and health; emphasizes the biological, social, economic, behavioral, and political factors associated with women’s health. Prerequisite: Admission to BPHM or BIS Program.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PSHM 4300 - Introduction to Population Health: Programs, Policy & Epidemiology


    Examines health issues from a population health perspective of policy and programs; introduces students to principles of population health practice with emphasis on history, philosophy and scope. Examines how health care delivery systems, public health agencies and community organizations work together to develop interventions to improve the health outcomes in the various communities they serve. Prerequisite: Admission to BPHM or BIS Program.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PSHM 4400 - Introduction to Research in the Health Sciences


    Provides an intro to the research process for the allied healthcare professional. The purpose, conduct and eval. of research will be discussed using examples from the health sciences literature. At the conclusion of the course, students will possess the skills to propose and present a basic health sciences research proposal and critically eval. the sources and substance of health related sources and literature. Prereq: PSHM 3010 & PSHM 3050



    Credits: 3
  
  • PSHM 4600 - Service Excellence in Health Care: Quality Improvement & Customer Service


    Explores the concepts and organizational factors that impact service delivery and quality in health care. It emphasizes service excellence and resources to improve customer service and quality of services. It will also focus on the concepts, theories, practices, tools, and strategies for quality improvement and quality management in health care organizations and in service delivery. Prerequisite: Completion of PSHM 3010



    Credits: 3
  
  • PSHM 4650 - American Health Care: Challenges and Opportunities


    Provides foundational overview of the structure and function of the US health care system. Promotes critical discussion of history and current status of organizations and delivery systems. Examines challenges facing providers, patients, and policy makers, as health care becomes more complex. Utilizes current events and media to explore controversies related to labor, finance, access, and health disparities. Req: Admission to BPHM or BIS Program.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PSHM 4700 - Economics and Finance of Health Care


    Provides basic overview of economic and financial management concepts in health care. Introduces important economic concepts and issues in health care including market factors, production, costs, labor issues, and economic evaluation. Provides an overview of basic financial management principles, capital planning, financial statements, and budgeting in health care organizations. Prerequisite: Admission to BPHM or BIS Program.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PSHM 4900 - Capstone I: Development of the Health Sciences Management Project


    Introduces the development of the health sciences management capstone project; students select a relevant project or research question and a focused topic of investigation, conduct a comprehensive literature reivew of the topic, engage with a project mentor, plan out the research project and complete a capstone project proposal. Prerequisites: Completion of PSHM 4400.



    Credits: 2
  
  • PSHM 4950 - Capstone II: Health Sciences Management Project Implementation


    Focuses on the successful completion of the student¿s capstone project proposed in PSHM 4900 Capstone Course I. Integrates the knowledge, skills, and competencies acquired in the BPHM degree program and applies them to a problem or opportunity for improvement in the healthcare management field. Students conduct a project in a real world healthcare management setting. Prerequisite: PSHM 4900.



    Credits: 2

Professional Studies-Leadership Skills

  
  • PSLS 1010 - Leadership in Environmental Studies: Florida and Costa Rica


    Provides students with a coherrent perspective of the interrelationships between environmental systems and societies. Enables students to adopt an informed personal response to the wide range of pressing environmental issues that they will inevitably come to face. Explores several environmental issues in some depth.



    Credits: 1 to 3
  
  • PSLS 4000 - Leadership Skills for Managers


    Leadership Skills for Managers



    Credits: 2

Professional Studies-Political Leadership

  
  • PSPL 1000 - State & Local Political Ldrshp


    State & Local Political Ldrshp



    Credits: 3
  
  • PSPL 1010 - Democracy in Action


    Democracy in Action



    Credits: 1
  
  • PSPL 1020 - Seminar in National Government


    Provides a stimulating academic environment where secondary school students exchange information and develop informed opinions about prominent issues confronting contemporary society.



    Credits: 1
  
  • PSPL 1030 - Leadership and Character: Reaching for Potential


    Examines the difference between good performance and great performance: the degree to which one puts the interest of others ahead of one’s own, willingness to do things for others without regard for what is in it for them, the ability to coach and mentor, to be able to make decisions and recommendations that benefit the good of everyone, and who demonstrate courage and earn the trust of others.



    Credits: 1 to 3
  
  • PSPL 3010 - State & Local Political Ldrshp


    State & Local Political Ldrshp



    Credits: 3
  
  • PSPL 3020 - State & Local Political Ldrshp


    State & Local Political Ldrshp



    Credits: 3

Professional Studies-Project Management

  
  • PSPM 4010 - Project Management: The Basics


    Highlights the five basic processes of project management and the key practices for project success. Increases awareness for novice practitioners of the fundamental skills of delivering a project on time and on budget with the desired quality. Explores the key practices they need to use to improve the performance of their projects.



    Credits: 1
  
  • PSPM 4020 - Project Management - Initiation and Planning


    Focuses on the key elements to make a project start-up succeed, including project charter, project management plan, project execution plan, project monitoring plan, project control plan, change control plan, and the plans for project phase transitions.



    Credits: 1
  
  • PSPM 4030 - Project Management - Execution, Control, and Closure


    Covers the key management elements for project execution, including scope, time, cost, quality, people, and vendors. Reviews the critical area of project control, including project matrix, project monitoring, risk management, change control, and project communications.



    Credits: 1

Professional Studies-Social Sciences

  
  • PSSS 1010 - Focus on China: Introduction to Chinese History, Culture, Govt, and Economy


    Explores China’s culture, society, government, and economy, beginning with its historical underpinnings. Provides students with the foundation for understanding and appreciating China. Utilizes lectures, readings, site visits, and films to.explore the development and challenges of commerce between the East and the West.



    Credits: 1 to 3
  
  • PSSS 1020 - Issues in a Global Context: Focus on Introduction to English History


    Motivates students to view the world from multiple perspectives as past and cultural global issues are explored. Engage in various activities in order to develop the ablity to recognize one’s own heritage in global context, fosters an in-depth understanding of the importance of a global economy and the importance of being a responsible global citizen.



    Credits: 1 to 3

Professional Studies-Technology and Society

  
  • PSTS 1010 - Digital Technology and Communication


    Provides an increased awareness and understanding of digital technology while developing the foundational skills necessary to use various digital technology applications for educational purposes.



    Credits: 3

Psychology

  
  • PSYC 1010 - Introductory Psychology


    Overview of psychology from both the natural science and social science perspectives. Topics include biological bases of behavior, sensory and perceptual processes, learning, motivation, thought, maturational and developmental changes, individual differences, personality, social behavior, and abnormal psychology. In some terms an optional one credit discussion section (graded S/U) is offered. An optional weekly review session is offered for those who wish to attend.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PSYC 2100 - Introduction to Learning


    Analyzes the concepts, problems, and research methodology in the study of processes basic to learning and motivation.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PSYC 2150 - Introduction to Cognition


    Cognition is the activity of knowing: the acquisition, organization, and use of knowledge. Emphasizing fundamental issues, this course introduces such basic content areas in cognitive psychology as perception, memory, language, cognitive development, and philosophy of science. An optional weekly review session is offered for those who wish to attend.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PSYC 2200 - A Survey of the Neural Basis of Behavior


    After an overview of brain organization and function, the course examines what we know about the physiological bases of several behaviors including sensation and perception, learning, memory, sleep development, hunger, thirst, and emotions. An optional weekly review session is offered for those who wish to attend.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PSYC 2210 - Animal Minds


    Studies animal behavior considered from an evolutionary and ecological perspective. Topics include the basic mechanisms of evolution of social behavior in animals with particular emphasis upon mating systems; ecological constraints on modes of animal communication; and quantitative analysis of social communication.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PSYC 2220 - Principles of Psychobiology


    An enriched section of PSYC 2200 that includes laboratory demonstrations, group discussions and individual projects. Enrollment is limited to 20 first- and second-year students who demonstrate outstanding aptitude and interest in this area. When offered, applications are available from the instructor at times publicized in the list of course offerings distributed by the psychology department. Three lecture hours plus discussion section. Credit is not given for both PSYC 2200 and PSYC 2220.



    Credits: 4
  
  • PSYC 2300 - Introduction to Perception


    Study of selected topics in perception, particularly visual perception; the role of stimulus variables, learning and motivation of perception. Optional 1 credit laboratories are offered. Prerequisite: Mathematics at least up to trigonometry recommended.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PSYC 2301 - Introduction to Perception Laboratory


    Optional 1 credit laboratory.



    Credits: 1
  
  • PSYC 2400 - Introduction to Personality Psychology


    Introduces the major approaches, methods, and findings in the field of personality psychology. Topics include sex-typing, identification and observational learning, frustration and aggression, stress, anxiety, defense, self-control, altruism, self-concepts, authoritarianism, achievement motivation, and sensation-seeking. An optional weekly review session is offered for those who wish to attend.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PSYC 2500 - Topics in Psychology


    This course covers a variety of special topics in the field of psychology.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PSYC 2600 - Introduction to Social Psychology


    Surveys major topics in social psychology, including personal perception and social cognition, attitudes and persuasion, interpersonal influence, interpersonal attraction, and helping relationships. Considers research theory and applications of social psychology. Three lecture hours plus optional discussion sections.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PSYC 2601 - Introduction to Social Psychology Discussion


    Optional one-credit discussion section.



    Credits: 1
  
  • PSYC 2700 - Introduction to Child Psychology


    Introduces the biological, cognitive and social development of the child. Topics include the child’s emotional, perceptual, and intellectual development; and the development of personality and socialization. Students can participate in an optional discussion section. An optional weekly review session is offered for those who wish to attend. Prerequisite: PSYC 1010 strongly recommended, top students will be fine without it.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PSYC 2701 - Introduction to Child Psychology Discussion Section


    Optional discussion section for Psych 2700.



    Credits: 1
  
  • PSYC 2900 - Teaching Methods for Undergrad Teaching Assistants


    This teaching methods course will help undergraduate teaching assistants integrate learning theory and effective student engagement practices to their teaching. They will learn about how to teach statistics, learn about experimental design and methods, and various pedagogical issues related to lab computer use and using R software in the learning process.



    Credits: 1
  
  • PSYC 3005 - Research Methods and Data Analysis I


    Introduces research methods in psychology, including computer-controlled experimentation, integrated with computer-based exploratory data analysis, and elementary statistical analysis. This course is required for majors and minors and is the first part of a two-part series (3005-3006). Prerequisites: One of the following MATH 1190, 1210, 1212, 1220, 1310, 1320, APMA 1090 or 1110 are required with a grade of C- or higher.



    Credits: 4
  
  • PSYC 3006 - Research Methods and Data Analysis II


    A continuation of discussion of research methods in psychology, including computer-controlled experimentation, integrated with computer-based exploratory data analysis, and elementary statistical analysis. Three lecture hours, two laboratory hours. Prerequisite: PSYC 3005 with a grade of C or higher; may not be taken concurrently with PSYC 3005.



    Credits: 4
  
  • PSYC 3110 - Psychology of Language


    Introduces the cognitive psychology of language focusing on language as a cognitive process. Prerequisite: PSYC 1010 or 2150 or instructor permission.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PSYC 3115 - Psychology of Art


    The purpose of this course is to introduce students to the application to visual art, sculpture and film of research and theories developed in the fields of perceptual, cognition, emotion, personality theory and social psychology.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PSYC 3210 - Psychobiology Laboratory


    Develops skills necessary for the study of neural bases of behavior, such as brain dissection, electrophysiology, histology, behavioral analysis, and genetic/epigenetic analyses. Emphasis is on mastering contemporary techniques used in neuroscience research and effective, professional written presentation of research findings. Prerequisite: PSYC 2200 or 4200 or BIOL 3050; PSYC 3005 recommended.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PSYC 3215 - Biological Models of Cognition


    Examines animal models that have been developed to study neurobiological mechanisms of cognition. Topics to be covered include goal-directed learning, decision-making, navigation, action selection, motivation, working memory and addiction. Each section will cover a specific cognitive process, the development and validation of animal models to study this process and a discussion of identified neurobiological mechanisms.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PSYC 3220 - Neurobiology of Learning and Memory


    This course will examine the neural basis of learning and memory. We will study brain systems that mediate different types of learning and memory as well as the cellular and molecular mechanisms that allow these systems to acquire and store information. The course will begin with a historical overview of learning and memory research in psychology and transition into modern studies in behavioral neuroscience.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PSYC 3235 - Introduction to Epigenetics


    This course is a didactic, mechanistic exploration of epigenetics; we will discuss all epigenetic modifications known to date, the processes through which they are established and modified and their impact on the cell and organism.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PSYC 3410 - Abnormal Psychology


    Introduces psychopathology with a focus on specific forms of abnormal behavior: depression, schizophrenia, anxiety disorders, substance use disorders, and personality disorders. (In some terms, an optional 1-credit discussion section is available.) Prerequisite: Six credits of psychology or instructor permission.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PSYC 3425 - History of Psychology


    Survey of the origins of psychology from the early philosophers to the current time.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PSYC 3430 - Psychology of Aging


    Seminar on current topics in gerontology, using multiple levels of analysis to understand developmental changes across late adulthood. Covers issues regarding biological, psychological and sociological aspects of the aging process, emphasizing cognitive changes and their underlying neurobiology. Prerequisite: 9 credit hours of psychology or instructor permission; recommended courses include PSYC 2200, 3005, and 3210 or 4200.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PSYC 3435 - Educational Psychology


    Psychologists have studied the processes of learning and thinking for over 100 years, and theoreticians have attempted to apply that knowledge to K-12 education for almost that long. This course will use information from cognitive psychology to examine: major steams of thought in pedagogy; data patterns in student achievement and in teacher effectiveness; subject-specific teaching strategies, and proposed reforms for American education. Prerequisites: PSYC 2150 and 2700 required.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PSYC 3440 - Child Psychopathology


    Overview of the description, cause and treatment of various psychological disorders of childhood. Prerequisite: PSYC 2700 recommended.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PSYC 3445 - Introduction to Clinical Psychology


    This course is designed to provide an overview of the academic and clinical activities within the field of clinical psychology. Theories, research, psycho therapeutic approaches, and critical professional issues will be explored.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PSYC 3460 - Psychological Study of Children, Families, and the Law


    Can psychology research and theory inform the law as it relates to children and families? This course provides an overview of the issues emphasizing psychological knowledge and its present and possible future contributions. Three lecture hours, two laboratory hours. Prerequisite:Six credits in psychology.



    Credits: 4
  
  • PSYC 3480 - Adolescence: Theory and Development


    Course focus: 1) Background and theories of adolescence, 2) contributions to adolescence from: puberty, intellectual growth, and identify formation, 3) contexts of adolescence: the family situation, peer groups, school, and culture, 4) special topics of adolescence; religious, moral, and sexual development, sex roles, career planning (and achievement), disorders (drugs, delinquency, depression, suicide, etc.). Prerequisite: PSYC 2700 or 6 hours in Psychology.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PSYC 3485 - The Science & Lived Experience of Autism I


    This year-long, interdisciplinary seminar will explore how well the science of autism captures the experience of those living with autism and their families. Students will critically evaluate research in psychology, psychiatry, neuroscience, and education, and they will work together with members of the autism community to identify new research questions that reflect the interests and concerns of the people who are most affected by autism science.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PSYC 3490 - Infant Development


    Infancy is the time of life during which enormous changes take place- newborns are very different from the inquisitive, walking and talking 2-year-old. The following lines of development during the first two years are traced in detail: motor, perceptual, cognitive, social, and emotional development. Environmental influences, including parental behavior are considered, as well as the effect the infant has on caregivers. Prerequisite: PSYC 1010.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PSYC 3495 - The Science & Lived Experience of Autism II


    This year-long, interdisciplinary seminar will explore how well the science of autism captures the experience of those living with autism and their families. Students will critically evaluate research in psychology, psychiatry, neuroscience, and education, and they will work together with members of the autism community to identify new research questions that reflect the interests and concerns of the people who are most affected by autism science.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PSYC 3500 - Special Topics in Psychology


    Seminars on special and current topics in psychology.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PSYC 3590 - Research in Psychology


    An original experimental project is undertaken in which each student is responsible for the design and operation of the experiment. S/U grading. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: 14 credits of psychology and instructor permission.



    Credits: 2 to 3
  
  • PSYC 3870 - Seminar for Distinguished Majors


    Topics include the design of independent research projects, ethical considerations in research, computer applications, and preparation for a career in psychology. S/U grading. Prerequisite: Acceptance in Psychology or CogSci Distinguished Majors Program. Enrollment Requirement: You are required to register for PSYC 4970 or COGS 4970.



    Credits: 1
  
  • PSYC 3970 - Research on Affective Forecasting


    This is a hands-on course in which students participate in ongoing research on affective forecasting, or the way in which people make predictions about their emotional reactions to future events. Students will serve as research assistants to the faculty member & graduate students to help with all phases of the research–design experiments, research its theoretical underpinnings, collect data, analyze the data, attend lab meetings.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PSYC 3980 - Research in Psychology


    An original experimental project is undertaken in which each student is responsible for the design and operation of the experiment. Prerequisite: 14 credits of psychology and instructor permission.



    Credits: 2
  
  • PSYC 4001 - Controversies in Human Sexuality


    Various controversial topics in human sexuality will be explored. Students will read articles from the popular press, the web, and academic journal articles to critically evaluate an issues involving human sexuality.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PSYC 4002 - How Animals Perceive the World: Evolution of Sensory Systems


    This course will be divided into topics based on animal’s behaviors and how the sensory systems support these behaviors, ranging from perceiving prey to communication within and between species. This class will rely heavily on the theory of evolution and will concentrate mainly on the visual system.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PSYC 4005 - Adv Res Mthds & Data Analysis I: Mathematical Foundations of Quant Psyc


    This class will cover foundations of linear algebra, randomness, probability theory, principal component analysis, complexity theory, hypothesis testing and power, structural equation models, maximum likelihood. This course is the first of a two-semester sequence (PSYC 4005 and PSYC 4006) of advanced data analysis and research methods classes.



    Credits: 4
  
  • PSYC 4006 - Adv Res Mthds & Data Analysis II: Statistical Analysis and Advanced Design


    This class covers advanced statistical procedures, including t-tests, ANOVA, regression and multiple regression, general linear models, item response theory models, distribution-free tests, and simulation. Research methods and designs for experimental and correlational studies will be covered. This course is the second of a two-semester sequence (PSYC 4005 and PSYC 4006) of advanced data analysis and research methods classes.



    Credits: 4
  
  • PSYC 4105 - Cognitive Psychology and American Education


    Psychologists have studied the processes of learning and thinking for over 100 years, and theoreticians have attempted to apply that knowledge to K-12 education for almost that long. This course will use information from cognitive psychology to examine: major steams of thought in pedagogy; data patterns in student achievement and in teacher effectiveness; subject-specific teaching strategies, and proposed reforms for American education. Prerequisite: PSYC 2150.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PSYC 4109 - Acquisition of Syntax in Language Development


    This course investigates the acquisition of syntax in language development from empirical and theoretical perspectives. Questions about what it means to know language and how language is acquired will be explored in depth, along with discussions involving acquisition/development of language, which will include sign language and development of homesigned “language”.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PSYC 4110 - Psycholinguistics


    Topics include psychological and linguistic theory; experimental and empirical studies of linguistic usage; development of language in infants and children; cross-cultural studies of linguistic usage; and the biology of language.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PSYC 4111 - Language Development and Disorders


    Course will focus on language and cognitive development in persons with disabilities. Among the populations examined will be children with autistic disorder, children with Williams syndrome, deaf children, developmentally dysphasic children, adults with aphasia, and children with severe mental retardation. In addition to spoken language development, the course will examine the acquisition of sign communication skills. Prerequisite: 4th year psychology or cognitive science major status. Must have completed PSYC 3005 and PSYC 3006.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PSYC 4112 - Psychology and Deaf People


    This course will consider the psychological development and psychosocial issues of deaf people. Topics covered will include cognition, education, hearing and speech perception, impact of family interaction and communication approaches, influence of etiology/genetics, language development, literacy, mental health, social and personality development, interpersonal behavior, and current trends.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PSYC 4115 - Multiculturalism in the Deaf Community


    Explores cultural influences on identity development, family systems, linguistics, engagement with educational and community agencies, and resilience within the Deaf community. The interaction of culture, identity and language will be highlighted and applied to future trends for groups within the Deaf community, such as children of Deaf adults, GLTB community members, ethnic minority groups, women, and persons with disabilities. Prerequisites: Psychology major/minor, 4th year. Enrollment not allowed in more than one 4000-level or 5000-level PSYC course.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PSYC 4120 - Psychology of Reading


    Analyzes the critical psychological experiments which have influenced the way that psychologists consider topics in reading, such as text comprehension, parsing, and sentence processing. Prerequisite: PSYC 3005



    Credits: 3
 

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