Apr 12, 2024  
Undergraduate Record 2017-2018 
    
Undergraduate Record 2017-2018 [ARCHIVED RECORD]

Course Descriptions


 

Politics-International Relations

  
  • PLIR 2030 - International Relations of East Asia


    An introduction to leading theories in the field of international relations with reference to major events in the history of diplomacy, war, and economic relations in the East Asian region.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PLIR 2050 - Introduction to Political Economy


    Introduces core concepts in political economy, including the institutional bases for states and markets, and the way these interact through the exercise of exit, voice, and collective action. Empirical material drawn from the last five centuries.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PLIR 2500 - Special Topics in International Relations


    This course covers a variety of topics in the field of Politics and International Relations.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PLIR 3010 - Theories of International Relations


    A survey of the big ideas and arguments that explain foreign policy and international relations.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PLIR 3050 - Philosophy of International Relations


    Analyzes the philosophical foundations of the study of international relations as formulated by classical and contemporary thinkers. Prerequisite: PLIR 1010 or 2030, or instructor permission.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PLIR 3060 - Military Force in International Relations


    Examines the threat and use of military force in international relations. Includes deterrence theory and recent critiques, ethical and international legal considerations, domestic constraints, and the postwar U.S. and Soviet experiences with the use of force. Prerequisite: One course in PLIR or instructor permission.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PLIR 3080 - International Politics in the Nuclear Age


    Considers the impact of nuclear weapons on the relations among states. Prerequisite: One course in PLIR or instructor permission.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PLIR 3110 - International Law: Principles and Politics


    Investigates international legal rules, how they originate and evolve, their political consequences, and their relationship to morality. Emphasizes the international legal rules governing territoriality, nationality, human rights, and the recourse to armed force. Prerequisite: One course in PLIR or instructor permission.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PLIR 3210 - International Organizations


    Introduces the nature, functions, and significance of international organizations in international relations. Focuses on the United Nations. Prerequisite: One course in PLIR or instructor permission.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PLIR 3240 - Anti-Terrorism and the Role of Intelligence


    Course examines the intelligence failures prior to 9/11 and the Iraq war, and the critical reports composed after the events, to determine what improvements may be needed to avoid a recurrence and to pre-empt future terrorist attacks against the United States.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PLIR 3310 - Ethics and Human Rights in World Politics


    How do issues of human rights and ethical choice operate in the world of states? Do cosmopolitan ideals now hold greater sway among states than traditional ideas of national interests during the Cold War? Considers ideas of philosophers like Thucydides and Kant in addition to concrete cases and dilemmas taken from contemporary international relations. Specific issues include defining human rights, ‘humanitarian intervention,’ just war theory, and the moral responsibilities of leaders and citizens.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PLIR 3380 - Theories of International Political Economy


    Examines international conflict and cooperation over economic issues, using a variety of theoretical perspectives. Includes the domestic sources of foreign economic policy and the relationship between economic and military security in the 19th and 20th centuries. Prerequisite: PLIR 2050 or instructor permission.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PLIR 3400 - Foreign Policy of the United States


    Analyzes major themes in American foreign policy, emphasizing security issues, from World War I through the Nixon administration. Prerequisite: Some background in the field of international relations or in U.S. history.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PLIR 3500 - Special Topics in International Relations


    Special Topics in International Relations



    Credits: 3
  
  • PLIR 3600 - Political Economy of Asia


    Political Economy of Asia



    Credits: 3
  
  • PLIR 3610 - European Union in World Affairs


    Examines the content and formulation of foreign policies in Europe and the European Union from the twentieth century to the present. Prerequisite: Some background in international relations or European history. Students who have previously taken PLIR 3620 will not receive credit for PLIR 3610; students who take PLIR 3610 may not receive credit for PLIR 3620 if taken subsequently.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PLIR 3620 - Politics of the European Union


    This course will give an overview of the politics of the European Union. Attention will be paid to theoretical approaches to European integration (week 1), the structure of the EU and its constituent institutions (week 2), and finally policies and outcomes, and current topics and debates (week 3). No prior knowledge of the EU will be assumed, but familiarity with core concepts in political science and international relations will be. Students who have previously taken PLIR 3610 will not receive credit for PLIR 3620; students who take PLIR 3620 may not receive credit for PLIR 3610 if taken subsequently.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PLIR 3650 - International Relations of the Middle East


    Studies the emergence of the contemporary inter-state system in the Middle East; the important role played by outside powers, especially the United States; the effect of the Cold War on the region; the persistent conflict between Israel and its Arab neighbors and the efforts to reach peace; and the difficulty of constructing a stable order in the Persian Gulf. Prerequisite: Some background in international relations or the history of the Middle East.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PLIR 3720 - Terrorism and Political Violence


    This course introduces students to terrorism as a form of political violence. We will explore the origins of terrorism, the motivations of terrorists, and the tactics that terrorists employ. Finally, we will look closely at state responses in the form of counter-terrorism policy.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PLIR 3750 - South Asia in World Affairs


    Topics include the international relations of India; factors that condition its foreign policy; relation between internal need for unity, stability and development, and foreign policy; and India as a regional power and as a global leader of nonalignment. Prerequisite: Some background in the field of international relations or in the history of South Asia.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PLIR 3760 - Russia/USSR in World Affairs


    Surveys the international relations of the Russian state, looking at Imperial legacies, the Soviet era from 1917-85, the Gorbachev era, and post-Soviet problems of Russian foreign policy. Prerequisite: Some background in international relations or the history of Russia.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PLIR 3770 - Russian-American Relations


    Analyzes Soviet-U.S. and Russian-U.S. relations, with a focus on the post-1945 period; Cold War and contemporary issues. Prerequisite: Some background in international relations or the history of Russia; PLIR 3760 or 3400 recommended.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PLIR 4040 - Nationalism and World Politics


    Explores the effects of the ideology of nationalism on relations among states and the international system in general, particularly as regards war and conflict. Prerequisite: PLIR 1010, or instructor permission.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PLIR 4150 - Economics and National Security


    Explores the connections between economics and national security from three angles. First, does economic interdependence between nation-states foster a peaceful world, as liberals argue, or does it increase the likelihood of war, as realists contend? Second, what are the economic causes of the rise and decline of great powers? Third, what are the economic roots of great power imperialism against smaller states? Prerequisite: One course in international relations, history, or economics.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PLIR 4210 - World Order


    Seminar analyzing the problem of world order and examining various theoretical approaches to its solutions. Prerequisite: Two courses in PLIR or instructor permission.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PLIR 4220 - Alternative Nuclear Futures


    This course investigates six alternative futures relating to nuclear weapons:  abolition, anarchy, arms control, proliferation, U.S. dominance, and cooperative threat reduction.     



    Credits: 3
  
  • PLIR 4250 - Nuclear Proliferation and International Relations


    An examination of the impact of the spread of nuclear weapons on international relations with a particular emphasis on regional situations confronting varying proliferation challenges. Prerequisite: some background in international relations



    Credits: 3
  
  • PLIR 4260 - War and Peace in South Asia


    War and Peace in South Asia.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PLIR 4310 - Global Health and Human Rights


    Examines global health problems through the lens of human rights norms. Can the human rights movement motivate new approaches to disease prevention and the social determinants of health? The HIV/AIDS pandemic in Africa will be treated in depth. Prerequisites: PLIR 3310, a previous course in public health, or equivalent with instructor permission.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PLIR 4320 - Religion and War


    This seminar offers an overview of the rapidly-expanding literature on religion and international conflict



    Credits: 3
  
  • PLIR 4330 - Perceptions of America Abroad


    September 11, 2001, brought heightened interest in how America is perceived abroad. This class examines competing theories of why states should care about how they are percieved by governments and populations in other countries, and then examines evidence concerning both elite and popular perceptions of the U.S. during the Cold War, in the 1990s, including inside Saddam Hussein’s regime, and especially since 9/11 in several regions. Prerequisites: At least one course in PLIR.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PLIR 4340 - Feminist Theory in International Relations


    Examines leading feminist contributions to, and gendered critiques of, theories of international relations including (but not limited to) war, peace and security; international political economy; and international institutions and organizations.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PLIR 4350 - Humanitarian Intervention and International Relations


    Since the fall of the Berlin wall, humanitarian intervention has been an important talking point and policy decision for governments and intergovernmental institutions globally. In recent months, the United Nations, NATO, the EU and powerful states with the capacity to act unilaterally have debated the merits of intervening in numerous locations including but not limited to Libya, Somalia, and Sudan.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PLIR 4360 - National Interests and Foreign Policy


    A seminar examining the consistent ways in which U.S. foreign policy has been shaped by its national interests. Students are asked to analyze how these interests have shaped U.S. policy in different regions of the world. Prerequisite: one class in PLIR



    Credits: 3
  
  • PLIR 4370 - Space and International Security


    This course focuses on why and how space matters for national and international security. Prerequisites: A prior course in PLIR or diplomatic history.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PLIR 4380 - America in a World Economy


    Seminar focusing on politics of the international trade and monetary systems, emphasizing third world industrialization, trade conflicts between the U.S. and Japan, and the global debt crisis. Prerequisite: PLIR 2050 or instructor permission.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PLIR 4381 - Globalization and Development


    International economic integration creates constraints and opportunities for less developed countries. This course systematically examines these tradeoffs across various dimensions of economic integration and aspects of development. Analysis of these tradeoffs reveals how politics influences choices about economic integration and the ultimate course of economic development and human welfare. Prerequisites: Economics 2010 and Economics 2020.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PLIR 4410 - Political Economy of Foreign Direct Investment


    Examines the political economy of foreign direct investment (FDI) including the determinants of FDI and its economic and political consequences. Prerequisite: ECON 2010 and ECON 2020.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PLIR 4420 - Political Economy of Immigration


    An examination of various explanations of the causes and consequences of global immigration, with an emphasis on political economy theories and models. Prerequisites: A prior course in PLIR.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PLIR 4430 - Empire, Hegemony, Leadership


    Conceives of the international system as hierarchical, and considers how states gain, maintain, and lose predominance; whether hierarchy is necessary to international order; and how hierarchy affects the options of smaller states and other actors. Prerequisites: At least one course in PLIR.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PLIR 4431 - Democracy and Foreign Policy


    This course examines both academic and policy debates about democracy and foreign policy. We begin by reviewing the theory and practice of democracy and the literature on democracy in international politics.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PLIR 4440 - Domestic Politics and American Foreign Policy


    Domestic Politics and American Foreign Policy.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PLIR 4450 - The Clash of Ideas in World Politics


    Course considers whether differences over the best societal, regional, or global order affect patterns of conflict and cooperation in international affairs; and if so, how. We emphasize both theory and history. Requisite: One PLIR course



    Credits: 3
  
  • PLIR 4500 - Special Topics in International Relations


    Intensive analysis of selected issues and concepts in international relations. Prerequisite: One course in PLIR or instructor permission.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PLIR 4610 - Media, Public Opinion, and Foreign Policy


    This course explores the relationships among media, public opinion, and foreign policy. While it is widely assumed that leaders, and particularly the president, act with a relatively free hand when conducting foreign affairs, the reality is much more complex. Congress can take an active role in foreign policy, but typically only at certain times and issue areas.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PLIR 4630 - Strategy, Conflict, and Causes of War


    Reviews and evaluates explanations for military conflict, with emphasis on the First World War. Topics include military technology, the international power structure, bargaining, economics, psychology, organization behavior, and domestic politics. Prerequisite: two courses in PLIR



    Credits: 3
  
  • PLIR 4650 - American Foreign Policy Making


    Focuses on how American foreign policy is made by examining several theoretical approaches and a series of cases: The Cuban Missile Crisis, The Camp David Negotiations of 1978, The End of the Cold War, The Intervention in Iraq, and others as suitable. Prerequisite: limited to Graduate Students and Fourth-Year Undergraduates who have taken PLIR 3650 or PLIR 3400.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PLIR 4720 - Japan in World Affairs


    Studies the international relations of Japan; domestic and foreign factors and forces that condition its foreign policies; and the political, economic, military, and social problems resulting from contacts with China, the Soviet Union, and the Western powers. Prerequisite: Some background in international relations and/or the history of Japan.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PLIR 4760 - International Financial Institutions


    What are the IFIs and how have they influenced development policy and country outcomes? What factors do internal and external politics play in their operation and the panopoly of international aid efforts? Are groups like “50/60 years in enough” and the Meltzer report right? Come explore IFIs (the IMF, the World Bank, and the Multilateral Development Banks) in a seminar setting examining policy in practice.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PLIR 4800 - International Political Economy of Africa


    Addresses such topics as colonial legacies and postcolonial dynamics, the nature of the African state, regime change and democratization, regional wars and complex humanitarian crises, the politics of debt and structural adjustment, and the AIDS crisis. Prerequisite: At least one course in economics, African history, political economy/development, African literature.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PLIR 4820 - Africa and the World


    Overview of the international politics of sub-Saharan Africa, including inter-African relations as well as Africa’s relations with the major powers, and the international dimensions of the Southern African situation. Explores alternative policy options open to African states. Considers a number of case studies which illustrate the policy alternatives. Prerequisite: Some background in international relations and/or the history of Africa.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PLIR 4990 - Honors Core Seminar in International Relations


    A critical analysis of important issues and works in political theory from diverse perspectives. Students are required to write weekly analytical essays and actively participate in small seminar discussions on issues including: theories of common good, economic justice, toleration and free society, and radical criticism. Prerequisite: Admission to Politics Honors Program.



    Credits: 9
  
  • PLIR 4999 - Senior Thesis


    Allows especially motivated students to receive credit for supervised work on a thesis in the area of international relations. Prerequisite: Three courses in PLIR and instructor permission.



    Credits: 3

Politics-Political Theory

  
  • PLPT 1010 - Introduction to Political Theory


    Introduces political philosophy as a mode of inquiry, and consideration of selected problems and writers in Western political theory.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PLPT 2500 - Special Topics in Political Theory


    Special Topics in Political Theory



    Credits: 3
  
  • PLPT 3010 - Ancient and Medieval Political Theory


    Studies the development of political theory from Greek antiquity through the medieval period.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PLPT 3020 - Modern Political Thought


    Studies the development of political theory from the Renaissance through the nineteenth century.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PLPT 3030 - Contemporary Political Thought


    Studies the course of political theory from the late 19th century through the present. Includes the major critical perspectives on modern politics and culture (existentialism, feminism, post-modernism, ‘critical theory’) and explores the problems that have preoccupied political theory in this period (alienation, language, individualism and discrimination). Prerequisite: One course in political theory or instructor permission.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PLPT 3050 - Survey of American Political Theory


    Surveys the development of the American tradition of free government emphasizing the major contributors and their critics.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PLPT 3200 - African-American Political Thought


    This course examines key figures and central concepts in African American political thought from the 19th through the 21st centuries. Issues addressed include the relationship between slavery and American democracy, separation vs. integration, and the promise and limitations of formal equality. Prerequisite: one course in PLPT or instructor permission.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PLPT 3500 - Special Topics in Political Theory


    Special topics in political theory.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PLPT 3610 - Italian Political Thinkers


    Students of this course will study the political theories of Dante, Machiavelli, Beccaria, and Gramsci through a close-reading of each author’s major works. We will also examine how their ideas influenced contemporary politics, literature, and the visual arts both in Italy and in the United States. These goals will be accomplished through regular reading assignments, short essays, and presentations.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PLPT 3999 - Philosophical Perspectives on Liberty


    Examination of the nature and function of liberty in social theorists such as Adam Smith, JJ Rousseau, Ayn Rand, John Rawls, Robert Nozick.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PLPT 4020 - Plato and Aristotle


    Studies the political and philosophical ideas of the founders of the tradition of political philosophy. Prerequisite: PLPT 1010 or 3010 or instructor permission.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PLPT 4030 - Democratic Theory


    Surveys the major contributors to democratic theory, the central problems that any democratic theory has to answer, and the criticisms leveled at the various philosophical attempts to give a firm ground for democratic practices. Prerequisite: One course in PLPT or instructor permission.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PLPT 4031 - Marxist Theories


    Studies the basic political, sociological and philosophical ideas advanced by Marx and Engels, and their historical backgrounds; the later developments and varieties of Marxist thought in the twentieth century; and the principal critic, and chief debates. Prerequisite: PLPT 1010 or PLPT 3020, or instructor permission.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PLPT 4040 - Hermeneutics of Political Theory


    An introduction to leading theories in the field of textual interpretation with reference to major texts of the Western canon. Prerequisite: a course in PLPT or permission of the instructor.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PLPT 4050 - Concepts of Law


    An in-depth exploration of recent and contemporary analytical jurisprudence, covering the work of such writers as Hart, Dworkin, Finnis, Raz, and others. Prerequisite: Two courses in PLPT or philosophy, or permission of the instructor.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PLPT 4060 - Politics & Literature


    This course explores the relationship of literary expression to political life and theory. What kinds of political insight are made possible by different kinds of writing? How do authors’ generic choices address and reimagine relations of power and powerlessness? Authors may include Sophocles, Shakespeare, Woolf, Baldwin, and Soyinka. Prerequisites: One PLPT course or Instructor Permission.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PLPT 4070 - Liberalism and Its Critics


    An exploration of the sources and origins of liberal political ideas, of the recent development of Rawlsian liberal theory, and of the most prominent contemporary critical responses to this body of thought. Prerequisite: At least one course in PLPT (preferably PLPT 3020).



    Credits: 3
  
  • PLPT 4080 - Political Representation


    Examines practices of political representation within and outside of formal institutions. Does your US Congressperson represent you well? Does Bono represent poor Africans well? Is representation less democratic than direct participation? Should representatives ever be selected by lot rather than voting? Why are Congressional districts organized geographically? Course also examines the politics of visual representations (i.e. portrayals). Prerequisites: One political theory class.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PLPT 4090 - Pragmatism, Religion, and Democracy


    This course examines classical and contemporary articulations of American pragmatism through the lens of religion, ethics, and democracy. Prerequisite: PHIL 1000, PLPT 1010, or PLPT 3020 or permission of instructor.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PLPT 4120 - Theories of Justice


    Examines several contemporary theories of justice, including utilitarianism, liberal equality, libertarianism, and communitarianism. Considers how well these theories serve us in thinking through more “applied” topics, e.g. global poverty and animal welfare. Prerequisites: At least one course in political theory or philosophy and instructor permission.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PLPT 4130 - Global Ethics


    This class is intended to help you improve your capacity to understand, evaluate, and make reasoned arguments about ethical problems faced by different kinds of actors operating across state borders. Topics vary, but might include the responsibilities of international anti-poverty NGOs, torture, and the ethics of the global patent regime. Emphasis is more on learning concepts and improving analytic skills than on the details of public policy. Prerequisite: prior course in PLPT.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PLPT 4200 - Feminist Political Theory


    Studies modern and contemporary feminist theories of political life. Prerequisite:  One previous course in political theory or instructor permission.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PLPT 4210 - Evolutionary Theory and Human Nature


    Contrasts contemporary Darwinism’s understanding of human nature with critics of Darwinism and with classic treatments of human nature. Attention is given to theory about differences in male and female nature. Prerequisite: some prior coursework in the Politics Department.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PLPT 4220 - Luck, Responsibility, and Justice


    This course reviews the recent history of, and analyzes the ideas of luck, desert, and responsibility in moral and political theory, with a particular concern to assess their role in theories of justice. Prerequisites: PLPT 3030 or PLPT 4070 or Instructor Permission.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PLPT 4305 - American Political Thought to 1865


    This course examines the development of American political thought from the Puritans through the Civil War. The questions they posed and attempted to answer are the eternal questions of all political thought, such as, what is the best form of government; what are the rights and obligations of citizens; what is the proper relationship between the state and religion.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PLPT 4320 - The Idea Of Power


    This course surveys philosophical, political theoretical, and social theoretical accounts of the idea of power , with special reference to political concerns such as domination, legitimacy, and justice. Requisite: PLPT 3030 or PLPT 4070



    Credits: 3
  
  • PLPT 4500 - Special Topics in Political Theory


    Investigates a special problem of political theory such as political corruption, religion and politics, science and politics, or the nature of justice. Prerequisite: One course in PLPT or instructor permission.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PLPT 4800 - Political Economy


    Focuses on historical and contemporary theorists who relate politics and economics. Prerequisite: Previous course work in PLA, economics, or philosophy.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PLPT 4990 - Honors Core Seminar in Political Theory


    A critical analysis of important issues and works in political theory from diverse perspectives. Students are required to write weekly analytical essays and actively participate in small seminar discussions on issues including: theories of common good, economic justice, toleration and free society, and radical criticism. Prerequisite: Admission to Politics Honors Program.



    Credits: 9
  
  • PLPT 4999 - Senior Thesis


    Supervised work on a thesis in political theory for especially motivated students. Prerequisite: Three courses in PLPT and instructor permission.



    Credits: 3

Portuguese

  
  • PORT 1110 - Beginning Intensive Portuguese


    Introduces speaking, understanding, reading and writing Portuguese, especially as used in Brazil. Five class hours and one laboratory hour. Followed by PORT 2120. Prerequisite: Completion of FREN 2020 or SPAN 2020, or instructor permission.



    Credits: 4
  
  • PORT 2120 - Intermediate Intensive Portuguese


    Continued study of Portuguese through readings, vocabulary exercises, oral and written compositions, and grammar review. Prerequisite: PORT 1110 or equivalent.



    Credits: 4
  
  • PORT 3010 - Advanced Grammar, Conversation and Composition


    Studies advanced grammar through analysis of texts; includes extensive practice in composition and topical conversation. Prerequisite: PORT 2120 or by permission.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PORT 4020 - Readings in Literature in Portuguese


    Studies readings from the chief periods of Brazilian and Portuguese literature. Prerequisite: PORT 2120 or by permission.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PORT 4410 - Brazilian Cultural Production I (1500 to 1900)


    Studies canonical and popular Brazilian Cultural Production from the arrival of the Portuguese in 1500 to the end of the nineteenth-century.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PORT 4420 - Brazilian Cultural Production II (1900 to Present)


    Studies canonical and popular Brazilian Cultural Production from the beginning of the twentieth-century to the present day.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PORT 4610 - Studies in Luso-Brazilian Language and Culture


    Studies topics in Portuguese or Brazilian linguistics or culture. Prerequisite: One course at the 3000 level or higher, or Instructor Permission



    Credits: 3
  
  • PORT 4620 - Studies in Luso-Brazilian Language and Literature


    Studies topics in Portuguese or Brazilian literature or in Portuguese linguistics according to the interests and preparation of the students. Prerequisite: One course at the 3000 level or higher, or instructor permission.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PORT 4920 - Independent Study


    Luso-Brazilian Culture Independent Study - Instructor Permission Required



    Credits: 1 to 3

Portuguese in Translation

  
  • POTR 4260 - Brazilian Media


    The objective of this proposal is to provide students with a topics course in English, which will examine Brazilian media by focusing on specific iterations ranging from television and film to the Internet and social media.



    Credits: 3
  
  • POTR 4270 - The Civilization of Brazil


    Introduces the development of Brazilian culture from 1500 to the present. This course is taught in English and does not fulfill the language requirement.



    Credits: 3

Procurement and Contracts Management

  
  • PC 4010 - Introduction to Federal Procurement


    Introduces the procurement and contracting processes, and explores fundamental principles and techniques in detail. Emphasis is on government procurement, but the course also provides an understanding of procurement methods and subcontracting in the private sector. Uses the FAR (Federal Acquisition Regulations) as a text.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PC 4020 - Contract Administration


    Covers the technical and fundamental procedures basic to contract administration. Examines both theory and practice, emphasizing enforcement of contract terms and conditions, cost overruns, change orders, disputes and appeals, financial analysis, contract authority and interpretation, production surveillance, quality assurances, and audit. Prerequisite: PC 4010.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PC 4030 - Cost and Price Analysis


    Covers the basic concepts in the analysis of contract-price by cost-price analysis techniques, learning curve, weighted guidelines, profit objectives, and analysis of the ADP systems environment. Prerequisite: PC 4010.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PC 4040 - Government Contract Law


    Introduces government contract law, contract clauses and provisions, legal aspects associated with contracting, and administering contracts. Prerequisite: PC 4010.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PC 4050 - Negotiation of Contracts and Modifications


    Covers the techniques of negotiation. Focuses on the organization and operation of the procurement team, preparation and conduct of negotiations of contracts, and contract modifications by the team concept. Mock negotiations are conducted in class using case studies. Prerequisite: PC 4030.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PC 4060 - Management Principles for Procurement and Contracting


    A review of management theory and recent developments in management practices, focusing on the four modern schools of management theory: management process, quantitative, behavioral, and unified.



    Credits: 3
 

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