Feb 27, 2024  
Undergraduate Record 2017-2018 
    
Undergraduate Record 2017-2018 [ARCHIVED RECORD]

Course Descriptions


 

Philosophy

  
  • PHIL 4999 - Senior Thesis


    For more details on this class, please visit the department website at http://www.virginia.edu/philosophy/.



    Credits: 3

Physics

  
  • PHYS 1010 - The Physical Universe


    In this class you will get a chance to explore the scientific wonders of the universe. Topics vary each semester but generally include: motion, energy, waves, electricity, magnetism, sound, light, relativity, atomic structure, molecules, quantum physics, the nucleus, chemistry, meteorology, geophysics, the solar system, stars, and cosmology. PHYS 1010 requires limited math, but has wide applications like electronics, wifi, rockets, satellites, nuclear reactors, lasers, climate change, earthquakes, the tides, eclipses, plate tectonics, fossil fuels, telescopes, solar energy, and the origin of universe. PHYS 1010 is for non-science majors. Premedical and pre-dental students should take PHYS 2010, 2020.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PHYS 1020 - The Physical Universe II


    For non-science majors. Covers physical science topics including chemistry, meteorology, geophysics, solar system, stars, and cosmology. Limited math, but with wide applications like periodic table, climate change, earthquakes, plate tectonics, fossil fuels, telescopes, solar energy, origin of universe. 1010 and 1020 may be taken in any order. Pre-medical and pre-dental students should take PHYS 2010, 2020



    Credits: 3
  
  • PHYS 1050 - How Things Work


    For non-science majors. Introduces physics and science in everyday life, considering objects from our daily environment and focusing on their principles of operation, histories, and relationships to one another. 1050 is concerned primarily with mechanical and thermal objects, while 1060 emphasizes objects involving electromagnetism, light, special materials, and nuclear energy. They may be taken in either order.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PHYS 1060 - How Things Work


    For non-science majors. Introduces physics and science in everyday life, considering objects from our daily environment and focusing on their principles of operation, histories, and relationships to one another. 1050 is concerned primarily with mechanical and thermal objects, while 1060 emphasizes objects involving electromagnetism, light, special materials, and nuclear energy. They may be taken in either order.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PHYS 1090 - Galileo and Einstein


    For non-science majors. Examines how new understandings of the natural world develop, starting with the ancient world and emphasizing two famous scientists as case studies. Galileo was the first to make subtle use of experiment, while Einstein was the first to realize time is not absolute and that mass can be converted to energy.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PHYS 1110 - Energy on this World and Elsewhere


    The subject of energy will be considered from the perspective of a physicist. Students will learn to use quantitative reasoning and the recognition of simple physics restraints to examine issues related to energy that are of relevance to society and the future evolution of our civilization. Prerequisite: Physics and math at high school level.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PHYS 1150 - Powerful Ideas in Physical Science


    Covers several main ideas in physical science including matter, sound, heat and energy, force and motion, electricity and magnetism, and light and optics, using a hands-on conceptual learning approach. Students work in cooperative learning groups throughout the course. The course includes experiments and examples suitable for teachers of elementary students.



    Credits: 4
  
  • PHYS 1210 - The Science of Sound and Music


    Studies the basic physical concepts needed to understand sound. Aspects of perception, the human voice, the measurement of sound, and the acoustics of musical instruments are developed and illustrated.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PHYS 1425 - General Physics I: Mechanics, Thermodynamics


    First semester of introductory physics for engineers and scientists. Classical mechanics, including vector algebra, particle kinematics and dynamics, energy and momentum, conservation laws, rotational dynamics, oscillatory motion, gravitation, thermodynamics, and kinetic theory of gases. Three lecture hours. Prerequisite: APMA 1090 or MATH 1310; corequisite: PHYS 1429.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PHYS 1427 - General Physics I


    Covers the same material as PHYS 1425, with certain topics treated in greater depth. Three lecture hours, one problem hour. Prerequisite: Rodman scholar status.



    Credits: 4
  
  • PHYS 1429 - General Physics I Workshop


    A required two-hour workshop accompanying PHYS 1425, including laboratory and tutorial activities. Corequisite: PHYS 1425.



    Credits: 1
  
  • PHYS 1610 - Introductory Physics I:Mechanics & Special Relativity


    First semester of a four-semester sequence for prospective physics and other science majors. Topics include kinematics and Newton’s laws with vector calculus; frames of reference; energy and momentum conservation; rotational motion; special relativity. Three lecture hours, one problem hour. Corequisite: MATH 1310.



    Credits: 4
  
  • PHYS 1620 - Introductory Physics II:Gravitation, Oscillations, Waves & Thermodynamics


    Second semester of a four-semester sequence for prospective physics and other science majors. Topics include gravitation and Kepler’s laws; harmonic motion; thermodynamics; wave motion; sound; optics. Three lecture hours, one problem hour. Prerequisite: PHYS 1610; corequisite: MATH 1320.



    Credits: 4
  
  • PHYS 1660 - Practical Computing for the Physical Sciences


    This course teaches how to use the computer to solve quantitative problems. This involves learning the skills to write computer programs dedicated to certain tasks, to visualize data graphically, to use scientific software, and to learn other practical skills that are important for a future career in the sciences.



    Credits: 1
  
  • PHYS 1710 - Introductory Physics I: Classical mechanics, Waves, Thermodynamics


    First semester of the introductory physics sequence for prospective physics and other science majors. Topics include particle kinematics and dynamics, energy and momentum conservation; rotational motion; fluid dynamics; thermodynamics; oscillatory motion; waves and sound. Four lecture hours, one discussion section hour. Corequisite: MATH 1320 or instructor permission



    Credits: 5
  
  • PHYS 1720 - Introductory Physics II: Gravitation, Electricity & Magnetism, Optics


    Second semester of the introductory physics sequence for prospective physics and other science majors. Topics include gravitation; electricity & magnetism, and optics. Four lecture hours, one discussion section hour. Prerequisite: PHYS 1710 or PHYS 1425, MATH1320 Corequisite: MATH 2310



    Credits: 5
  
  • PHYS 1910 - Introduction to Physics Research


    This course highlights the diverse areas of research conducted within the physics department. These areas include both experimental and theoretical studies of high energy particle, nuclear, quantum, condensed matter, and atomic/molecular physics. Each week, a different professor will deliver a seminar-style presentation on his/her research. This course is recommended for all physics majors. No prerequisites.



    Credits: 1
  
  • PHYS 2010 - Principles of Physics I


    Physics 2010 and 2020 constitute a terminal course sequence covering the principles of mechanics, heat, electricity and magnetism, optics, atomic, solid state, nuclear, and particle physics. A working knowledge of arithmetic, elementary algebra, and trigonometry is essential. The PHYS 2010 - 2020 sequence does not normally serve as prerequisite for the courses numbered 3110 and above. Students who plan to take more physics should take PHYS 1610, 1620, 2610, 2620, or PHYS 2310, 2320, 2620. PHYS 2010, 2020, in conjunction with the laboratory PHYS 2030, 2040 satisfies the physics requirement of medical and dental schools. PHYS 2010 is prerequisite for 2020. Three lecture hours.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PHYS 2020 - Principles of Physics II


    PHYS 2010 and 2020 constitute terminal course sequence covering the principles of mechanics, heat, electricity and magnetism, optics, atomic, solid state, nuclear, and particle physics. A working knowledge of arithmetic, elementary algebra, and trigonometry is essential. The PHYS 2010 - 2020 sequence does not normally serve as prerequisite for the courses numbered 3110 and above. Students who plan to take more physics should take PHYS 1610, 1620, PHYS 2610, 2620 or PHYS 2310, 2320, 2620. PHYS 2010, 2020, in conjunction with the laboratory, PHYS 2030, 2040, satisfies the physics requirement of medical and dental schools. PHYS 2010 is prerequisite for 2020. Three lecture hours.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PHYS 2030 - Basic Physics Laboratory I


    Selected experiments in the different branches of physics are carried out and written up by the student. One two-hour exercise per week. Corequisite: PHYS 2010 or 2310. Premedical and pre-dental students should elect this course along with PHYS 2010; it is an option for others.



    Credits: 1
  
  • PHYS 2040 - Basic Physics Laboratory II


    Selected experiments in the different branches of physics are carried out and written up by the student. One two-hour exercise per week. Prerequisite: 2030; corequisite: PHYS 2010, 2020 or 2310, 2320. Premedical and pre-dental students should elect this course along with PHYS 2010, 2020; it is an option for others.



    Credits: 1
  
  • PHYS 2310 - Classical and Modern Physics I, II


    This was the first semester of a two-semester introduction to classical and modern physics for science majors, it has now been merged with PHYS 1425. It was a calculus-based treatment of the principles of mechanics, heat and thermodynamics.



    Credits: 4
  
  • PHYS 2320 - Classical and Modern Physics I, II


    This was the second semester of a two-semester introduction to classical and modern physics for science majors, it has now been merged with PHYS 2415. It was a calculus-based treatment of the principles of electricity and magnetism, physical optics, elementary quantum theory, and atomic and nuclear physics.



    Credits: 4
  
  • PHYS 2415 - General Physics II: Electricity & Magnetism, Optics


    Second semester of introductory physics for engineers and scientists. Electrostatics, including conductors and insulators; DC circuits; magnetic forces and fields; magnetic effects of moving charges and currents; electromagnetic induction; Maxwell’s equations; electromagnetic oscillations and waves. Introduces geometrical and physical optics. Three lecture hours. Prerequisite: PHYS 1425, APMA 1110 or MATH 1320.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PHYS 2419 - General Physics II Workshop


    A required two-hour workshop accompanying PHYS 2419, including laboratory and tutorial activities. Prerequisite: PHYS 2415.



    Credits: 1
  
  • PHYS 2610 - Introductory Physics III:Electromagnetism


    Third semester of a four-semester sequence for prospective physics and other science majors. Topics include electrostatics, circuits, electric and magnetic fields; electromagnetic waves. Three lecture hours, one problem hour. Prerequisite: PHYS 1620, 2310 or 1425; corequisite: MATH 2310.



    Credits: 4
  
  • PHYS 2620 - Modern Physics


    Introduction to quantum physics and relativity, with application to atomic structure, nuclear and elementary particle physics, condensed matter physics, and cosmology. Three lecture hours, one problem hour. Prerequisite: PHYS 2320, 2415, 1720, or 2610, and MATH 2310 or instructor permission.



    Credits: 4
  
  • PHYS 2630 - Elementary Laboratory I


    Elementary Lab for Physics Majors, 1st semester. Selected experiments in mechanics, heat, electricity and magnetism and optics. One lecture hour and four laboratory hours per week. Prerequisite: PHYS 1710, 1720; or instructor permission.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PHYS 2640 - Elementary Laboratory II


    Elementary Lab for Physics Majors, 1st semester. Selected experiments in mechanics, heat, electricity and magnetism and optics. One lecture hour and four laboratory hours per week. Prerequisite: PHYS 1710, 1720, 2630; co-requisite: PHYS 2620; or instructor permission.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PHYS 2660 - Fundamentals of Scientific Computing


    Applications of computers to solving basic problems in physical science. Introduction to programming, use of external libraries, and implementation of basic algorithms with focus on numerical methods, error analysis & data fitting. No previous computer experience is required. One Lecture & one lab session per week. Prerequisite: One semester of calculus and one semester of introductory physics (PHYS 1710, 1425, or 2010).



    Credits: 3
  
  • PHYS 2900 - Teaching Methods for Undergraduate Teaching Assistants


    This STEM teaching course will help Undergraduate TAs integrate learning theory and effective student engagement practices into their teaching. UTAs will participate in guided discussions to relate recommendations from the education literature to their classroom experiences. Assignments will include learning activities, such as teaching observations & reflections, and designing interventions to assist students with difficult topics/skills.



    Credits: 1
  
  • PHYS 3040 - Physics of the Human Body


    Application of basic physics principles to functions of the human body: biomechanics, metabolism, cardiovascular, cognitive & respiratory systems, and the senses. Medical diagnosis and therapy technologies (e.g., PET, MRI, CT) are discussed. Prerequisite: a semester of calculus and PHYS 2010 or PHYS 1425 or PHYS 1710. Corequisite: PHYS 2020 or PHYS 2415 or PHYS 1720 or instructor permission.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PHYS 3110 - Widely Applied Physics


    Applications of physical principles to a diverse set of phenomena: order of magnitude estimates, dimensional analysis, material science and engineering, astrophysics, aeronautics and space flight, communications technology, meteorology, sound & acoustics and fluid dynamics. Not all topics will be covered in every course. Three lecture hours. (Y) Prerequisite: PHYS 2620 or instructor permission.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PHYS 3120 - Applied Physics: Energy


    Basic physics principles involved in energy production, distribution and storage: engines, generators, photosynthesis, fossil fuels, solar energy, photovoltaics, thermoelectrics, geothermal, wind & hydro power, fuel cells, batteries, nuclear energy, and the power grid. Three lecture hours. (Y) Prerequisite: PHYS 2620 or instructor permission. PHYS 3110 is not a prerequsite.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PHYS 3150 - Electronics Laboratory


    Analog and digital electronics for scientific applications, including the use of transistors, FET’s, operational amplifiers, TTL, and CMOS integrated circuits. Six laboratory hours. Prerequisite: PHYS 2640 or 2040.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PHYS 3170 - Intermediate Laboratory I


    Approximately five experiments drawn from the major fields of physics. Introduces precision apparatus, experimental techniques, and methods of evaluating experimental results. Outside report preparation is required. Six laboratory hours. Prerequisite: PHYS 2640



    Credits: 3
  
  • PHYS 3180 - Intermediate Laboratory II


    Approximately three to five experiments, selected in consultation with the instructor, emphasizing modern aspects. Outside library research and report preparation are required. Six laboratory hours.
    Prerequisite: PHYS 2640 or PHYS 2419. PHYS 3170 is an independent course, and not a prerequisite.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PHYS 3190 - Advanced Laboratory


    Normally a single, semester-long experiment chosen in consultation with the instructor. Prerequisite: Instructor permission.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PHYS 3210 - Classical Mechanics


    Statics and dynamics of particles and rigid bodies treated with extensive use of vector calculus; includes the Lagrangian formulation of mechanics. Prerequisite: MATH 3255 (preferred) or MATH 3250, and PHYS 1720, or instructor permission.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PHYS 3250 - Applied Nuclear Physics


    Applications of nuclear physics and nuclear energy: Introduction to nuclear physics, radioactivity, radiation standards and units, interaction of radiation with matter, accelerators, x-ray generators, detectors, biological effects, nuclear medicine, nuclear fission and reactors, nuclear fusion. Three lecture hours. (Y) Prerequisite: PHYS 2620 or instructor permission.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PHYS 3310 - Statistical Physics


    Includes temperature and the laws of thermodynamics; introductory treatments of kinetic theory and statistical mechanics; and applications of Boltzmann, Bose-Einstein, and Fermi-Dirac distributions. Prerequisite: MATH 3255 (preferred) or MATH 3250, and PHYS 2620, or instructor permission.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PHYS 3420 - Electricity and Magnetism I


    Systematic treatment of electromagnetic phenomena with extensive use of vector calculus, including Maxwell’s equations. Prerequisite: MATH 4210, and PHYS 1720 or PHYS 2415, or instructor permission.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PHYS 3430 - Electricity and Magnetism II


    Includes Maxwell’s equations; electromagnetic waves and their interaction with matter; interference, diffraction, polarization; waveguides; and antennas. Prerequisite: PHYS 3420.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PHYS 3620 - Introduction to Condensed Matter Physics


    The course will examine basic principles of simple theories for metals, the basics of crystallography and crystal structures, the reciprocal space, lattice vibrations, elastic properties of solids, electronic band structure, impurities and defects, dielectric properties, magnetism and superconductivity. Prerequisite: PHYS 2620.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PHYS 3650 - Quantum Physics I


    Includes quantum phenomena and an introduction to wave mechanics; the hydrogen atom and atomic spectra. Prerequisite: MATH 3255 (preferred) or MATH 3250, PHYS 2620; corequisite: PHYS 3210 or instructor permission.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PHYS 3660 - Quantum Physics II


    Continuation of PHYS 3650. Intermediate quantum mechanics including perturbation theory; application to systems of current interest. Prerequisite: PHYS 3650.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PHYS 3820 - Topics in Physics-Related Research Areas


    Applies the principles and techniques of physics to related areas of physical or life sciences or technology with an emphasis on current research problems. (PHYS 3810 is not prerequisite to PHYS 3820.)



    Credits: 3
  
  • PHYS 3993 - Independent Study


    Individual study of topics in physics not normally covered in formal classes. Study is carried out under the tutelage of a faculty member with whom the requirements are agreed upon prior to enrollment. (S-SS) Prerequisite: Instructor permission



    Credits: 3
  
  • PHYS 3995 - Research


    A research project on a topic in physics carried out under the supervision of a faculty member culminating in a written report. May be taken more than once. (S-SS) Prerequisite: Instructor permission.



    Credits: 3

Polish

  
  • POL 1210 - Introduction to Polish Language


    Introduces students to the essentials of Polish grammar with emphasis on speaking and reading. For more details on this class, please visit the department website at: http://artsandsciences.virginia.edu/slavic/courses.html.



    Credits: 3
  
  • POL 1220 - Introduction to Polish Language


    Introduces students to the essentials of Polish grammar with emphasis on speaking and reading. Prerequisite: POL 1210 or instructor permission.



    Credits: 3
  
  • POL 2210 - Intermediate Polish Language


    Second-year continuation of POL 1210, 1220. Prerequisite: POL 1210, 1220 and instructor permission.



    Credits: 3
  
  • POL 2220 - Intermediate Polish Language


    Second-year continuation of POL 1210, 1220. Prerequisite: POL 1210, 1220 and instructor permission.



    Credits: 3

Political and Social Thought

  
  • PST 4850 - Core Seminar in Political and Social Thought I


    Study of great political and social thinkers and movements studied from a variety of disciplinary and genre viewpoints. Readings include classic texts, plays, novels, literature, current works of advocacy. Led by the program director, with occasional guest faculty; weekly response essays required. Prerequisite: PST major.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PST 4870 - Core Seminar in Political and Social Thought II


    Continuation of PST 4850, with greater emphasis on contemporary works. Prerequisite: PST major.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PST 4980 - Workshop in Thesis Research


    Taken in the fourth year, this workshop offers discussion with PST faculty on their current research and continuing presentation of students’ developing projects. (1 credit per term; graded C/NC) Prerequisite: PST major.



    Credits: 0
  
  • PST 4989 - Workshop in Thesis Research


    Taken in the fourth year, this workshop offers discussion with PST faculty on their current research and continuing presentation of students’ developing projects. (1 credit per term; graded C/NC) Prerequisite: PST major.



    Credits: 2
  
  • PST 4993 - Independent Study in Poltical & Social Thought


    Student initiated independent study projects arranged with an individual faculty member, and approved by the Program Director. Written work is required.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PST 4998 - Thesis in Political and Social Thought


    Prepared with the advice of two faculty members, the fourth-year PST thesis is a substantial, independent, year-long project built upon the student’s prior study in the program. Prerequisite: PST major.



    Credits: 0
  
  • PST 4999 - Thesis in Political and Social Thought


    Prepared with the advice of two faculty members, the fourth-year PST thesis is a substantial, independent, year-long project built upon the student’s prior study in the program. Prerequisite: PST major.



    Credits: 6

Political Philosophy, Policy, and Law

  
  • PPL 2010 - Morality, Law and the State


    The importance of moral philosophy to the study of the legal and political institutions of the modern state. In addition to exploring the nature of morality and moral reasoning, the course deals with basic questions about the concept of law and the justification of the state. Possible topics include inalienable rights, distributive justice, civil disobedience, secession, and the priority of liberty. For more details on this class, please visit the department website at http://www.virginia.edu/ppl/.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PPL 3999 - Philosophical Perspectives on Liberty


    Examination of the nature and function of liberty and social theorists such as Adam Smith, J.J. Rousseau, Ayn Rand, John Rawls and Robert Nozick. For more details on this class, please visit the department website at http://www.virginia.edu/ppl/.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PPL 4005 - Thesis Preparation


    This course aims to prepare final year PPL students for their capstone thesis in the Spring semester. By the end of the Fall semester, in conjunction with PPL 4005, PPL students will have completed a proposal for their capstone thesis, compiled a viable bibliography, and obtained an advisor to work with them in the Spring



    Credits: 1
  
  • PPL 4010 - Research Seminar


    This seminar, designed to facilitate the production and collective evaluation of 35-page research papers, is taught annually by the Director of the PPL Program and/or members of the Committee on Political Philosophy, Policy, and Law. For more details on this class, please visit the department website at http://www.virginia.edu/ppl/. Prerequisite: Fourth-year PPL major.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PPL 4500 - Special Topics in Public Policy and Law


    Topics related to Public Policy and Law



    Credits: 3

Politics-American Politics

  
  • PLAP 1010 - Introduction to American Politics


    Surveys the fundamentals of American government and politics, systematically covering the major institutions of our system (the presidency, the Congress, the courts) as well as the system’s essential processes.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PLAP 2030 - Politics, Science and Values: An Introduction to Environmental Policy


    Introduces a wide variety of domestic and international environmental policy issues.  Explores how political processes, scientific evidence, ideas, and values affect environmental policymaking. 



    Credits: 3
  
  • PLAP 2250 - American Political Tradition


    This course explores the theoretical ideas that informed the creation and development of America’s political system and considers some of the major contemporary challenges to the maintenance of American liberal democracy. Topics to be treated include the political thought of the American Founders, the place of religion in public life, the nature of written constitutions and the role of America in the world.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PLAP 2500 - Special Topics in American Politics


    Special Topics in American Politics.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PLAP 2660 - Ideas, Institutions, and Public Policy


    Examines and critically assesses the ideas, institutions, and public policies that constitute the foundation and have influenced the development of liberal democracy in the United States.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PLAP 3140 - Mass Media and American Politics


    Examines the role of mass media in the political process including such topics as print and broadcast news, media and election campaigns, political advertising, and media effects on public opinion and political participation.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PLAP 3150 - Political Psychology of Citizen Politics


    Examines the role of individual and collective psychology in political processes and behavior, with a particular emphasis on citizen psychology, including political information processing and reasoning, stereotyping and prejudice, and group identity, conflict and violence.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PLAP 3160 - Politics of Food


    This course looks at the production and consumption of food in a political context. We will explore legislation, regulation, and other policies that affect the food system and examine their implications for the environment, public health and democratic politics. We will look closely at controversies over agricultural subsidies, labeling requirements, farming practices, food safety, advertising and education.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PLAP 3190 - Judicial Process and Policy-Making


    Survey of empirical and, to a lesser extent, normative questions concerning actors and institutions in American judicial politics. Topics include the selection of judges, judicial decision making, the legal profession, the impact of court decisions, and the role of judges in a democracy. Prerequisite: PLAP 1010 or permission of instructor.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PLAP 3210 - Political Parties and Group Politics


    Introduces the roles of parties, interest groups, public opinion, and elections in democratic government.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PLAP 3220 - President and Congress


    Studies the political bases, structures, and functions of Congress and the institutionalized presidency, and their interaction in political leadership and policy making.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PLAP 3240 - Political Communication


    Examines the process of communicating politics from multiple angles, including the rhetoric of political leaders, campaign communications, political discussion with friends and acquaintances, political representation in the mass media, and growing forms of alternative personal media.  



    Credits: 3
  
  • PLAP 3270 - Public Opinion and American Democracy


    This course examines public opinion and its place in American democracy. We study the psychological and political roots of citizens’ opinions, as well as the relationship between public opinion and political campaigns, the media, and government. This class replaces PLAP 2270 there fore you will not get credit for the course twice.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PLAP 3310 - American Presidency


    Examines the power, purposes, and problematics of the presidency as a role of national leadership in the American and political constitutional system. While the emphasis is on the modern presidency (1933-present), attention is given to its historical development. Prerequisite: Two courses in PLAP, or instructor permission.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PLAP 3340 - Race and Gender in U.S. Politics


    Scrutinizes the political analogy of race and gender in politics in the United States. Examines how race and gender have each in turn shaped public opinion, public policies, political actions like voting, campaigns, and representation, especially since the 1960s.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PLAP 3350 - American Congress


    Focuses on the contemporary organization and workings of the United States Congress. Emphasizes elections, the committee system, political parties, staff, and the law-making process, as well as the role of Congress in the national policy making system. Prerequisite: Two courses in PLAP or instructor permission.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PLAP 3370 - Workshop in Contemporary American Electoral Politics


    Provides students with the opportunity to be directly involved with the research, programming, operations, and outreach of the University’s non-profit, non-partisan Center for Politics. Includes projects focused on state and national politics, political history, civic engagement, voter behavior, media and politics, campaign finance and political analysis. Prerequisite: instructor permission.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PLAP 3380 - Politics of the Policy Process


    Study of the politics of American national policymaking. Course examines the dynamics of agenda-setting and policy implementation; the policymaking role of elected officials, interest groups, and the media; and the substance of current policy debates in areas including welfare and education. Prerequisite: One course in PLAP or instructor permission.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PLAP 3410 - State and Local Politics


    Investigates the political dynamics of subnational political institutions, parties, and elections. Includes state parties and elections, intergovernmental relations and institutional powers, representation and democracy in federal systems, and subnational policy processes. Prerequisite: One course in PLAP or instructor permission.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PLAP 3420 - Virginia Government and Politics


    Course will provide students with a comprehensive understanding of the structure, functions and processes of state and local government in Virginia and to introduce students to political leaders and policymakers of state government. When the course is finished, students should be able to answer journalist Guy Friddell’s query: “What is it about Virginia?”



    Credits: 3
  
  • PLAP 3440 - Urban Government and Politics


    Urban Government and Politics



    Credits: 3
  
  • PLAP 3500 - Special Topics in American Politics


    Topical offerings in American Politics



    Credits: 3
  
  • PLAP 3510 - Minority Group Politics


    Examines the problems and politics of minority groups in the United States. Studies both the theoretical and practical aspects of minority group politics, including their comparative experience in the U.S. Prerequisite: Any course in PLAP or instructor permission.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PLAP 3610 - Introduction to Public Administration


    Studies the role of public administration in contemporary government, emphasizing administrative structure, control, and relations with other branches of government. Prerequisite: PLAP 1010, PLCP 1010, or instructor permission.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PLAP 3650 - Gender Politics


    Examines the legal and political status of women, and the politics of changes in that status. How are gender identities forged, and how do they affect law, public policy, political rhetoric, and political movement? Explores, more generally, the clash between ‘difference’ and ‘equality’ in democratic societies, using gender as a case-study. Prerequisite: Two social science courses or instructor permission.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PLAP 3700 - Racial Politics


    Examines how attributions of racial difference have shaped American Politics. Topics include how race affects American political partisanship, campaigns and elections, public policy, public opinion, and American political science. Prerequisite: One course in PLAP or instructor permission.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PLAP 3810 - Constitutional Interpretation: Separation of Powers and Federalism


    Studies the legislative, executive, and judicial branches and the functional and territorial distribution of powers as reflected by Supreme Court decisions. Includes the nature of the judicial process. (No CR/NC enrollees.)



    Credits: 3
  
  • PLAP 3820 - Civil Liberties and Civil Rights


    Studies judicial construction and interpretation of civil rights and liberties reflected by Supreme Court decisions. Includes line-drawing between rights and obligations. (No CR/NC enrollees.)



    Credits: 3
  
  • PLAP 4120 - Electoral Behavior and Political Participation


    Surveys current theories and research on electoral behavior, including political participation, partisanship, voting behavior, and the impact of electoral institutions. Prerequisite: PLAP 2270.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PLAP 4130 - Citizen Competence in American Democracy


    Considers what democracy asks of citizens, the extent to which citizens achieve various normative ideals, and the role that key mediating institutions play in promoting or inhibiting citizen competence. Prerequisite: One course in PLAP or permission of instructor.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PLAP 4140 - Gender and American Political Behavior


    A survey of the way gender ideas shape political behavior in the American political system, historically and today. Prerequisite: one course in WGS or American political behavior (PLAP 2270, 3140, 3150, 4120, 4150, 4360).



    Credits: 3
  
  • PLAP 4141 - Sex Differences: Biology, Culture, Politics and Policy


    An exploration of sex and gender differences ‘in traits such as sexuality, cognition, nurturance, and aggression’ with a consideration of their causes, significance, and political/policy implications. Prerequisite: Instructor permission.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PLAP 4150 - Political Psychology


    A seminar introducing students to the study of political psychology. Topics include authoritarianism, tolerance, altruism, ethnocentrism, the role of affect and cognition in political choice, the role of racial stereotyping in political campaigns, and psychological challenges to rational choice models of political decision-making. Prerequisite: One course in PLAP or instructor permission.



    Credits: 3
  
  • PLAP 4155 - Emotion and American Politics


    Explores the often-neglected role of emotion in shaping citizens’ political thought and action. While the Western enlightenment tradition generally treats emotion and cognition as antithetical, psychological research suggests they are in fact intimately interconnected. We will explore the nature of emotion and its interconnections with American politics and political behavior. Prerequisites: At least one course in PLAP.



    Credits: 3
 

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