Aug 19, 2022  
Undergraduate Record 2017-2018 
    
Undergraduate Record 2017-2018 [ARCHIVED RECORD]

Course Descriptions


 

Arabic

  
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    ARAB 2250 - Conversational Arabic


    Introduces students to spoken Arabic, with oral production highly emphasized. Prerequisite: ARAB 2020 or equivalent, or instructor permission.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ARAB 2256 - Introduction to Levantine Arabic-I


    This course intends to introduce the students to colloquial Levantine Arabic by enabling them to communicate in Levantine Arabic, the colloquial spoken in Syria, Lebanon, the Holy Land, and Western Jordan Prerequisite: First Year Arabic



    Credits: 1.5
  
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    ARAB 2260 - Conversational Arabic


    Practice of conversation based on everyday situations. Enables communication with native speakers. Prerequisite: ARAB 2250 or equivalent, or instructor permission.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ARAB 2266 - Introduction to Levantine Arabic II


    This course is a continuation of ARAB 2256 and it intends to introduce the students to colloquial Levantine Arabic by enabling them to communicate in Levantine Arabic, the colloquial spoken in Syria, Lebanon, the Holy Land, and Western Jordan Prerequisite: ARAB 2256



    Credits: 1.5
  
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    ARAB 3010 - Advanced Arabic I


    The goal of this course is to increase the student’s knowledge of the Arabic language and culture via a communicative-based approach, meaning that though the students will be expected to learn grammatical structures emphasis will be placed on the functional usage of the language and on communication in context. Prerequisites: ARAB 2020 or equivalent, or instructor permission.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ARAB 3019 - Language House Conversation


    For students residing in the Arabic group in Shea House. Prerequisite: instructor permission.



    Credits: 1
  
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    ARAB 3020 - Advanced Arabic II


    The goal of this course is to increase the student’s knowledge of the Arabic language and culture via a communicative-based approach, meaning that though the students will be expected to learn grammatical structures emphasis will be placed on the functional usage of the language and on communication in context. Prerequisites: ARAB 3010 or equivalent, or instructor permission.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ARAB 3029 - Language House Conversation


    For students residing in the Arabic group in Shea House. Prerequisite: instructor permission.



    Credits: 1
  
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    ARAB 3230 - Arabic Conversation and Composition


    Emphasizes development of writing and speaking skills, with special attention to grammar, syntax, vocabulary, and the organization and style of different genres. Prerequisite: ARAB 3020 or instructor permission.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ARAB 3240 - Advanced Arabic Conversation and Composition


    Develops oral and written proficiency to an advanced level of fluency, with emphasis on speaking and writing. Prerequisite: ARAB 3230 or equivalent, or instructor permission.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ARAB 3310 - Introduction to the Arab World and Its Languages


    A general survey of the linguistic, geographical, historical, social, religious, cultural, and artistic aspects of the modern Arab world. Attention given to the Arabic language, family, gender relations, the Arab experience in the U.S., Arab American relations, the role of the past and of social change, and Arab art and music.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ARAB 3330 - Arabic of the Quran and Hadith I


    Studies the language of the Quran and its exegesis, and the Hadith. Prerequisite: ARAB 2020 or higher, or permission of instructor.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ARAB 3340 - Arabic of the Quran and Hadith II


    Studies the language of the Quran, its exegesis, and the Hadith. Prerequisite: ARAB 3330 or permission of instructor.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ARAB 3672 - Advanced Arabic Grammar


    In this course students will develop a mastery of core items relevant to Modern Standard Arabic grammar, a mastery which will enable them to produce discreet, sophisticated sentences, as well as to compose paragraphs and essays, all while utilizing the grammar points covered in this class. Those interested in taking this course are required to have completed ARAB 2020 or equivalent, or to receive approval of instructor.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ARAB 3810 - Modern Arabic Fiction


    Students are introduced to twentieth-century Arabic fiction, and to the varied genres of prose including letters, memoirs, short stories, travelogues, and novels. Topics include autobiography, war and nation construction, fantasy, and political and sexual identity crises. Students become acquainted with different schools of modern Arabic literary criticism, and learn to analyze texts using critical analysis and specific theoretical terminology. Prerequisite: ARAB 3020 or equivalent, or instructor permission.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ARAB 4010 - Advanced Arabic III


    The main goal at this stage is to reach a superior level of Modern Standard Arabic with due attention paid to all four language skills: speaking, listening, reading and writing in addition to culture. Acquisition of more advanced grammatical structures will take place primarily through directed in-class drilling, coupled with an emphasis on the functional use of language through communication in context. Prerequisite: ARAB 3020 or equivalent, or instructor permission.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ARAB 4020 - Advanced Arabic IV


    The main goal at this stage is to reach a superior level of Modern Standard Arabic with due attention paid to all four language skills: speaking, listening, reading and writing in addition to culture. Acquisition of more advanced grammatical structures will take place primarily through directed in-class drilling, coupled with an emphasis on the functional use of language through communication in context.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ARAB 4120 - Introduction to Arabic Drama


    This course introduces students to modern Arabic drama from the early pioneers’ period in the 20th century to the contemporary era. We will study different forms of this genre including: musicals, traditional, experimental, feminist, and social drama. Further, students become acquainted with different schools of modern Arabic literary criticism and learn to analyze dramatic texts using critical analysis and specific theoretical terminology. Prerequisites: ARAB 5830 or 5840, or instructor’s permission.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ARAB 4230 - Love, War, and Diaspora in Hoda Barakat’s Writings


    In this course, we will examine the themes of love, war, and diaspora in the literature of the Lebanese writer, Hoda Barakat. Some of the topics that will interest us are: the role of the author as a witness to the Lebanese civil war, the challenges of rewriting history, recreating the homeland’s image in diasporic locales, collective and individual memories and its role in trauma recall and testimony.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ARAB 4245 - Readings in Classical Arabic Prose


    Students will gain insight and learn to appreciate some of the most influential “Arab” literary figures and some of the most celebrated classical Arabic prose masterpieces. Students will also broaden their critical and comparative perspectives with regard to some of the most important literary and cultural issues related to the overall poetics and politics of the Arabic-Islamic heritage.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ARAB 4450 - The Other in Premodern Arabic Sources


    This course explores the unduly studied corpus of Arabic writings that describes the encounters with and perception of the Other. Much effort will be devoted to investigate medieval and early modern Arab-Muslim views of the Other in a cross-generic selection of non-religious Arabic prose such as travelogues, diplomatic memoirs, captivity reports, marvels, folktales, literary debates/boasting, and poetry. Prerequisite: ARAB 3020



    Credits: 3
  
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    ARAB 4993 - Independent Study in Arabic


    Independent Study in Arabic



    Credits: 1 to 3

Arabic in Translation

  
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    ARTR 2500 - Taboo and the Arabic Novel


    This class introduces the contemporary Arabic novel as it deals with religious and social taboo. The course surveys major works of Arabic literature that generated confrontations with the State, readers, or religious movements. It looks at the reception of texts in the Arabic world, the texts’ intersection with social and political taboos, and the problems of censorship and confiscation of artistic work. Texts include work by Naguib Mahfouz.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ARTR 3245 - Arabic Literary Delights


    In this course, we will venture into the fascinating words and worlds of premodern Arab-Islamic leisure and pleasure. We will focus specifically on the literary representation of and socio-cultural/theosophical debate on humor, pleasantry, wit, frivolity, eating, feasting, banquets crashing, dietetics, erotology, aphrodisiacs, sexual education and hygiene.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ARTR 3290 - Modern Arabic Literature in Translation


    Introduction to the development and themes of modern Arabic literature (poetry, short stories, novels and plays). Taught in English.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ARTR 3350 - Introduction to Arab Women’s Literature


    A comprehensive overview of contemporary Arab women’s literature, this course examines all Arab women’s literary genres starting from personal letters, memoirs, speeches, poetry, fiction, drama, to journalistic articles and interviews. Selected texts cover various geographic locales and theoretical perspectives. Special emphasis will be given to the issues of Arab female authorship, subjectivity theory, and to the question of Arab Feminism.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ARTR 3390 - Love, Alienation, and Politics in the Contemporary Arabic Novel


    Introduction to the Arabic Novel with emphasis on a medium for expounding political issues of the Arab World.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ARTR 3490 - Arab Cinemas


    The course will concentrate on cinemas of Egypt, the Maghrib (Morocco, Algeria, Tunisia) as well as Syrian and Palestinian films. It will examine major moments in the history of these cinemas and the political developments that have inevitably had a major influence on filmmaking in the region.



    Credits: 3

Archaeology

  
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    ARCY 3993 - Independent Study


    An Independent Study in Archaeology. Subject to be determined by student and instructor.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ARCY 4998 - Undergraduate Thesis Research


    Research for a thesis of approximately 50 written pages undertaken in the fall semester of the fourth year by archaeology majors who have been accepted into the Interdisciplinary Archaeology Distinguished Majors Program. Prerequisite: acceptance into Archaeology DMP



    Credits: 3
  
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    ARCY 4999 - Undergraduate Thesis Writing


    Writing of a thesis of approximately 50 written pages undertaken in the spring semester of the fourth year by archaeology majors who have been accepted into the Interdisciplinary Archaeology Distinguished Majors Program. Prerequisite: acceptence into DMP program



    Credits: 3

Architectural History

  
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    ARH 1000 - History of Architecture: Survey


    The history of Western architecture from ancient times to the present.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ARH 1004 - History of Architecture


    Surveys architecture from the Ancient to the present.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ARH 1010 - History of Architecture I


    We will explore how architecture affects us, as well as how it informs us about past societies. In what ways does architecture shape our experiences; how does it enhance or detract from human activities? This course will cover material from the pre-historic period through c. 1420 largely in Europe with some examples from Asia, Africa and the Americas. Classes will be a combination of lectures and in-class activities.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ARH 1020 - History of Architecture II


    This course will examine architecture and urbanism from around 1400 C.E. to the present, tracing connections and distinctions that have guided the design, uses, and meanings of built environments around the globe. You will be introduced to celebrated buildings and less well-known sites and cities, with particular attention to the aesthetic, social, cultural, and institutional situations in which they developed.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ARH 1700 - Thomas Jefferson’s Architecture


    Surveys Jefferson’s architectural world with special emphasis on the Lawn.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ARH 2251 - Italian Renaissance Art


    Studies painting, architecture, and sculpture in Italy from the close of the Middle Ages through the sixteenth century. Focuses on the work of major artists such as Giotto, Donatello, Botticelli, Leonardo, and Michelangelo. Detailed discussion of the social, political, and cultural background of the arts.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ARH 2252 - High Renaissance and Mannerist Art


    Studies the painting, architecture, and sculpture or the sixteenth century, emphasizing the works of major artists, such as Leonardo, Michelangelo, Raphael, Giorgione, and Titian. Detailed discussion of the social, political, and cultural background of the arts.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ARH 2401 - History of Modern Architecture


    Tracing the history of architecture and urbanism from 1870 through the 1970s, this course considers how architecture has participated in and responded to shifting aesthetic, technological, social, environmental, and theoretical challenges during this period. While Europe is an important terrain of investigation, the course emphasizes networks of exchange with Latin America, North Africa, Turkey, India, and Japan.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ARH 2500 - Special Topics in Architectural History


    Topical offerings in architectural history.



    Credits: 1 to 3
  
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    ARH 2700 - Thomas Jefferson and American Architecture


    To Thomas Jefferson architecture was an art that encompassed more than simply shelter but embodied cultural and political values. This course will focus on his architectural and other designs (gardens, interiors, towns, campuses) and his interest in the arts.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ARH 2753 - Arts & Cultures of the Slave South


    This interdisciplinary course covers the American South to the Civil War. While the course centers on the visual arts, architecture, material culture, decorative arts, painting, and sculpture; it is not designed as a regional history of art, but an exploration of the interrelations between history, material and visual cultures, foodways, music and literature in the formation of Southern identities.



    Credits: 4
  
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    ARH 3010 - Research Studio 1


    Advanced vertical studio, exploring complex issues and sites, often through interdisciplinary design research.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ARH 3030 - World Vernacular Architecture


    Vernacular Architecture is often understood to be all the built environment that is not ‘High Architecture.’ This is a profound misunderstanding; Vernacular is any aspect of the built environment examined through the lens of the local AND it is a method of interrogating the relationship between architecture and the human experience. This lecture class enlists global examples to explore the many complex dimensions of vernacular.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ARH 3040 - Metropolis


    This lecture course focuses on cities as centers of cultural, social, and artistic activity. It considers how we define cities, the forces that create and sustain them, and what makes them culturally distinctive. It looks at several cities at their moments of cultural, political, and architectural glory: Istanbul in the 16thcentury, London in the late 17th and 18th centuries, Paris in the 19th century, New York in the 20th century, and Shanghai in the 21st century.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ARH 3100 - History of Medieval Architecture


    Examines the architecture of Medieval Western Europe, emphasizing the period from 1000-1400. Includes the iconography, function, structure and style of buildings, and the use of contemporary texts.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ARH 3101 - Early Medieval Architecture


    The architecture of Western Europe from c. 800-1150.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ARH 3102 - Later Medieval Architecture


    The architecture of Western Europe from c. 1140-1500.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ARH 3103 - Reconstructing the Medieval Haj


    Our course will reconstruct the journey of Ibn Jubayr, a twelfth century Spanish Muslim who recorded his haj from Spain to Mecca. Using his lively travel diary, we will analyze the visual culture and built environment of the medieval Mediterranean and together recreate key sites from his journey with easy to use digital tools such as Neatline.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ARH 3201 - Italian Renaissance Architecture


    This course aims to introduce the principal architects, monuments, and themes of fifteenth- and sixteenth-century Italian architecture. The lectures will be varied in approach and scope, some considering broad issues, others focusing on particular architects, buildings, or texts. Special topics will include architectural theory, patronage, villas, gardens, architectural drawing, and urban design.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ARH 3202 - Renaissance Architecture 16th Century


    Developments in classicism in Italy between 1500 and 1600.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ARH 3203 - European Classical Architecture Outside Italy, 1400-1750


    The development of classicism primarily in France, England, and Germany between 1400 and 1750.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ARH 3204 - Italy, Spain, & The Ottoman Empire


    This course will examine Islamic architecture around the Mediterranean in relation to developments in Italy. Particular problems to be considered in a cross-cultural context include those of geometry and ornament, architectural theory, the role of the architect, and garden design and conception. Also important will be issues such as the visual ideology and cultural politics of empire; and the role of the traveler, merchant and ambassador in cultural exchange. Geographical focus will be on Southern Spain, or Andalusia, on Istanbul and the Ottoman Empire, as well as on various cities and regions of Italy including Venice, Genoa, Rome, Naples and Sicily. In the case of Southern Spain, analysis will focus on the points of contact and tension between the Roman heritage, the architectural achievements of the Nasrid Empire, the Gothic tradition, and the imported Italian style. With regard to the Ottoman Empire, an attempt will be made to understand how an obsessive concern among Italian humanists, political leaders, and popes with the Ottoman threat could coincide with cultural fascination and appropriation.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ARH 3205 - Rome, Istanbul, Venice


    This course will consider architecture, urbanism and landscape in three cities with multilayered histories: Rome, Venice, and Istanbul. While conditioned by distinct historical and topographic circumstances, each city negotiated complex and varied local traditions: Roman and Medieval in Rome; Byzantine and Gothic in Venice; and Roman, Byzantine, and Ottoman in Istanbul.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ARH 3206 - Mediterranean Architecture


    This course will consider a range of buildings and landscapes from across the Mediterranean world, encompassing Italy, Spain, the Ottoman Empire, North Africa and Egypt. Its chronological and geographical scope are meant to bring into question some the conventional categories by which art and architectural history are studied: Medieval, Renaissance, Italian, Islamic, Eastern, Western, etc.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ARH 3207 - Arts and Architecture of the Islamic World


    In order to understand the production, representation and perception of space in the Islamic world, this survey course examines significant works of arts, architecture, urbanism & landscape from 650 to 1800. While studying common themes & shared values of the Islamic world, the course questions the disparities and novelties in the reception of Islam as a social, cultural & political practice, mapping distant geographies from Al-Andalus to India



    Credits: 3
  
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    ARH 3251 - Gender and Art in Renaissance Italy


    Examines how notions of gender shaped the production, patronage, and fruition of the visual arts in Italy between 1350 and 1600.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ARH 3402 - Postwar Architecture


    An examination of critical issues in the history and theory of architecture, from World War II to the present, focused particularly on how the shifting geopolitical contours of the postwar world have helped to shape key projects and debates. The course will also provide the opportunity to discuss recent studies in architectural history that have trained renewed attention on this period.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ARH 3403 - World Contemporary Architecture


    As the construction of cities redistributes its activities across the world in the twenty-first century, this course considers the ways in which architecture and architects are changed by a complex shifting field of forces. These forces include critical and ethical discourses, digital media, global finance and trade, developments in materials science, environmental awareness, and geo-political strategies.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ARH 3500 - Special Topics in Architectural History


    Topical offerings in architectural history.



    Credits: 1 to 3
  
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    ARH 3591 - Architectural History Colloquium


    The Architectural History Colloquium combines lecture and discussion. Subject varies with the instructor, who may decide to focus attention either on a particular period, artist, or theme, or on the broader question of the aims and methods of architectural history. Subject is announced prior to each registration period. Enrollment is capped at 20.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ARH 3601 - East Meets West


    Studies cultural exchanges in architecture between East and West, emphasizing master architects such as F.L. Wright and L. Kahn.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ARH 3602 - World Buddhist Architecture


    Studies the history of Buddhist architecture and allied arts in the Buddhist world, including East, South, and Southeast Asia. Lecture starts from the Indian stupas and ends in Japanese Zen gardens.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ARH 3603 - Archaeological Approaches to Atlantic Slavery


    This course explores how archaeological and architectural evidence can be used to enhance our understanding of the slave societies that evolved in the early-modern Atlantic world. The primary focus is the Chesapeake and the British Caribbean, the later exemplified by Jamaica and Nevis. The course is structured around a series of data-analysis projects that draw on the Digital Archaeological Archive of Comparative Slavery.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ARH 3604 - Historical Archaeology


    An introduction to analytical methods in historical archaeology, their theoretical motivation, and their practical application in the interpretation of the archaeological record of the early Chesapeake. The use of computers in the analysis of real archaeological data is emphasized.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ARH 3605 - Drawing Historic Architecture


    This is mainly a drawing workshop, with some lectures. Learn the classical features of historic architecture such as five orders and domes in details through drawing them. Learn the techniques of drawing the historic architecture, with pencil and pen. There is a focus topic each week to learn and draw. Some drawings are to be done with field trips in the nearby area. At the mid-term and the end of the semester there are group reviews.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ARH 3606 - Landscape Archaeology


    This course examines current archaeological approaches to the reconstruction and explanation of the ways in which humans at once shaped and adapted to past landscapes. It emphasizes current theory as well as GIS and statistical methods for the analysis of diverse data from pollen spectra to topography. The course is structured around a series of projects in which students will have an opportunity to make sense of real archaeological data.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ARH 3607 - Architecture and the Asia Trade


    This course presents a series of case studies on trading events between Asia & Europe from Renaissance to the nineteenth century,&examines how architecture &urbanism in Asia changed in response to the practical needs of foreign trade. In tracing the impact of trade on architectural traditions in both Europe and Asia,this course offers an opportunity to document,organize,analyze& theorize one of the most important forces in the devel. of the world



    Credits: 3
  
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    ARH 3701 - Early American Architecture


    American architecture from the first European contact to the death of Jefferson. Lectures and field trips.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ARH 3702 - Later American Architecture


    Surveys American architecture from 1800 to the present.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ARH 3703 - Nineteenth-Century American Architecture


    The development of architecture from Thomas Jefferson to Frank Lloyd Wright, along with consideration of issues in housing, landscape design, city planning, and influences from Europe.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ARH 3704 - Twentieth-Century American Architecture


    Surveys American architecture emphasizing the development of modernism.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ARH 3801 - East Asia Architecture


    Surveys traditional architecture in China, Japan, and Korea, focusing on the main features and monuments of East Asian and landscape architecture.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ARH 3802 - Modern Japanese Architecture


    The history of architecture in modern Japan from Meiji period to the present. Focuses on post-WW II development; discusses the major influential architects such as Tange, Kikutake, Maki, Isozaki, Kurokawa, and Ando.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ARH 4120 - History of Landscape Design I


    This course surveys the pre-modern history of gardens and designed landscapes. The sessions follow a roughly chronological sequence, with a thematic focus appropriate to each landscape culture, e.g. water infrastructure and agricultural systems, public and private space, theater and performance, court rituals, horticultural display, natural philosophy and aesthetic theory, visual representation, and the professionalization of landscape design.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ARH 4130 - History of Landscape Design II


    This course examines gardens and landscapes of the modern period, tracing the complex relations between innovations in landscape design and social, technological, and ideological developments of the past 200 years. Case studies focus on the United States and Europe, with thematic emphasis on the rise of the bourgeoisie, the public park movement, modernism, environmentalism, the post-war consumer society, and the influence of earthworks/land art.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ARH 4201 - Art and Architecture of Venice


    This course examines the art and architecture of Venice from the fifth century until the seventeenth century. We consider the major “nuclei” of the city like Piazza San Marco and personalities that shaped the built and artistic environment - Codussi, Sansovino, Palladio, and Titian for example. Our study explores the factors that contributed to Venetian art such as political and social context and contact with Byzantine, Islamic and northern Europe.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ARH 4500 - Special Topics in Architectural History


    Topical offerings in architectural history.



    Credits: 1 to 3
  
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    ARH 4510 - J-Term Courses


    January Term courses provide students with unique opportunities: new courses that address topics of current interest, study abroad programs, undergraduate research seminars, and interdisciplinary courses. The intensive format of “J-term” classes encourages extensive student-faculty contact and allows students and faculty to immerse themselves in a particular subject.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ARH 4591 - Undergraduate Seminar in the History of Architecture


    Research seminar for majors in the department of architectural history. Topics vary.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ARH 4600 - Arch History Practicum: Preserv Intern


    Internship at World Heritage Site; Monticello or the University of Virginia. 6-8 hours weekly. Some projects have a digital component.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ARH 4993 - Independent Studies in Architectural History


    Advanced work on independent research topics by individual students.



    Credits: 1 to 4
  
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    ARH 4999 - Major Special Study: Thesis


    Advanced independent research projects by fourth year architectural history students. Prerequisite: Instructor approval and departmental approval of topic.



    Credits: 3

Architecture

  
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    ARCH 1010 - Lessons of the Lawn


    The study of architecture as a speculation on origins is located at the conjunctive core of any liberal arts curriculum and serves as the physical armature and conceptual foundation of the University. This course is concerned with the contemporary imagination, attempting to make the discipline of architecture meaningful to a wide range of citizens in its public obligation to be constructive and optimistic in the most profoundly ethical, pragmatic, and magical of terms.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ARCH 1020 - Lessons in Making


    IIn this course we explore the delights and dilemmas of design. Through writing, drawing, and making collages and models we seek to answer fundamental questions. What are the basic elements of design? What does an artist or architect do when he or she designs? Are there key principles of design? What are the difficulties of the design process? What are its rewards? To see students’ work visit: http://www.arch.virginia.edu/designfundamentals/



    Credits: 3
  
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    ARCH 1030 - Foundation Studio I


    The studio course introduces first year students from architecture, urban and environmental planning, and architectural history to the built environment related to scales from the body to buildings, landscapes, and cities.Students explore comprehensive and foundational design principles, skill sets, and critical thinking.



    Credits: 4
  
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    ARCH 1031 - Summer Foundation Studio I


    The studio course introduces architecture, urban and environmental planning, and architectural history to the built environment related to scales from the body to buildings, landscapes, and cities.Students explore comprehensive and foundational design principles, skill sets, and critical thinking.



    Credits: 4
  
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    ARCH 1040 - Introduction to Design


    Introduction to the principles, methods, and processes that designers use to observe and design the constructed environment. Working in both two and three-dimensional analog and digital media, students will analyze inputs and propose places through innovative forms of visual communication. Spatial, conceptual, relational, and critical thinking will all be creatively explored within a lively interdisciplinary community.



    Credits: 4
  
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    ARCH 2010 - Foundation Studio II


    The foundations studios involve beginning design students in thoughtful application of fundamental design principles, foundational techniques of representation and fabrication and comprehensive critical design strategies. These courses foster the development of the beginning design student’s design methodology founded on thoughtful, creative, ethical and rigorous work practices in service of exploring meaningful formal and spatial propositions. Prerequisite: ARCH 1010, 1020, 1030.



    Credits: 6
  
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    ARCH 2011 - Summer Intro to Design Studio


    Prerequisite: For undergraduate transfer students accepted by the Dept. of Architecture only. This introductory architectural design studio explores comprehensive & foundational design principles, skill sets, & critical thinking. The material covered is presented through a series of lectures, projects, exercises,workshops, symposia & reviews involving the beginning design student in the thoughtful application of comprehensive critical design.



    Credits: 6
  
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    ARCH 2020 - Foundation Studio III


    The foundations studios involve beginning design students in thoughtful application of fundamental design principles, foundational techniques of representation and fabrication and comprehensive critical design strategies. These courses foster the development of the beginning design student’s design methodology founded on thoughtful, creative, ethical and rigorous work practices in service of exploring meaningful formal and spatial propositions. Prerequisite: ARCH 2010



    Credits: 6
  
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    ARCH 2021 - Summer Intro to Design Studio 1


    Prerequisite: ARCH 2010 or 2011, for undergraduate transfer students accepted by the Dept. of Architecture only. The second architectural studio in the core curriculum fosters the development of the beginning design student’s design methodology founded on thoughtful, creative, ethical and rigorous work practices in service of exploring meaningful formal and spatial propositions.



    Credits: 6
  
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    ARCH 2040 - Introduction to Architectural Design


    Introduction to Architectural Design



    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ARCH 2150 - Global Sustainability


    Earth’s ecosystems are unraveling at an unprecedented rate, threatening human wellbeing and posing substantial challenges to contemporary society. Designing sustainable practices, institutions, and technologies for a resource-constrained world is our greatest challenge. This integrated and interdisciplinary course prepares students to understand, innovate and lead the efforts necessary to engage in this task.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ARCH 2230 - Systems, Sites and Building


    Examines the role of design in mediating between dynamic climatic forces such as wind, energy and light and the human response to the environment. Weaving discussions of fundamental principles with case studies and illustrative exercises, the course focuses on the design of the boundary between the internal and external environments.



    Credits: 4
  
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    ARCH 2240 - Introduction to Structural Design


    A first course in structures for undergraduates to develop analytic and critical skills through both mathematical and visual investigation. Topics include statics, mechanics of materials, computer-based structural analysis, and the design and behavior of basic structural elements and systems. Prerequisite: Equivalent college-level physics.



    Credits: 4
  
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    ARCH 2500 - Special Topics in Architecture


    Topical offerings in the subject of Architecture.



    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ARCH 2710 - CAAD 3D Geometrical Modeling and Visualization


    A comprehensive hands-on course in three-dimensional computer aided design that ranges from beginning to advanced methods in geometrical modeling, macro programming, and visualization used in design related disciplines. The class explores approaches to design made possible through computer-based methods. Lectures and workshops provide a conceptual and applied framework, examine state-of-the-art techniques today,and speculate on future advances



    Credits: 3
  
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    ARCH 3010 - Research Studio I


    This studio course emphasizes conceptualization and synthesis of complex programs in contemporary contexts at multiple scales. Prerequisite: ARCH 2020



    Credits: 6
  
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    ARCH 3011 - Design Thinking Studio I


    This is a studio based course on Architectural design thinking with a focus on creative approaches to analyzing and solving diverse problems.



    Credits: 4
 

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