Apr 12, 2024  
Undergraduate Record 2017-2018 
    
Undergraduate Record 2017-2018 [ARCHIVED RECORD]

Course Descriptions


 

Media Studies

  
  • MDST 3500 - Topics in the History of Media


    Topics have historical breadth and cover the historical development of media institutions, technology, or forms in areas of television, journalism, graphic media, film, print and publication history, digital media or other relevant areas. These courses may be repeated for credit if course content is sufficiently distinct to merit. Decision about repeated credit is at the discretion of the Director of Media Studies. Prerequisite: MDST 2000 or instructor permission.



    Credits: 3
  
  • MDST 3501 - Special Topics in Directors and Auteurs


    This course will offer historical, comparative, and critical perspectives on a selected major directors and auteurs each semester. Directors might include Hitchcock, Welles, Heckerling, Ray, Speilberg, Renoir, Truffaut, etc.



    Credits: 3
  
  • MDST 3502 - Special Topics in Film Genre


    This course will offer historical and critical perspectives on a selected film genre each semester. Genres might include Noir, war, romance, musicals, gangster, New Wave, etc.



    Credits: 3
  
  • MDST 3503 - Special Topics - Issues and Controversies in Media


    This course will consider recent and current controversies in media and media studies. It surveys a series of “hot” topics within media. In each case it examines issues both historically and theoretically. The purpose of the course is to provide students with the tools and habits of thought to delve into the background and issues surrounding controveries so that the shallow presentation of the controversy does not remain the dominant frame.



    Credits: 3
  
  • MDST 3504 - Special Topics in Non-U.S. Media


    This course will offer historical, comparative, critical, and/or media industry perspectives on transnational, global, international, or region specific media. Topics may include non-US national media systems, studies of non-US media textual traditions, international media flows, changes to society due to media globalization, the role of new media technologies in international affairs, and the role of transnationalism in national and international



    Credits: 3
  
  • MDST 3505 - Special Topics in Diversity and Identity in Media


    This course will offer historical, comparative, and critical perspectives on issues of diversity and identity in media studies. Topics may include the relationship between media and underrepresented groups, media use in identity construction, masculinity and feminine role models in media, media power, etc. Prerequisite: MDST Major and Minors or Instructor Permission



    Credits: 3
  
  • MDST 3584 - Global Cinema


    This course entails study of films originating from and/or identified with non-US nations and cultures. Topics include: introduction to a nation’s cinematic achievements (e.g., Korean cinema); in-depth study of one or more influential cinematic movements (e.g., French New Wave; Italian Neo-Realism); exploration of a particular historical period (e.g., German silent cinema). The course fulfills the non-US requirement for the Media Studies major.



    Credits: 3
  
  • MDST 3600 - Women and Television


    Examines how television addresses women, how it represents women, and how women respond to the medium. Explores the relationship between the female audience and television by focusing on both contemporary and historical issues. Areas of particular concern include: how women have responded to television as technology; how specific genres have targeted women; how female-focused specialty channels have addressed women; and how specific programming and genres have mediated the changing status of women from the 1950s to the present. Prerequisite: MDST 2000 or instructor permission.



    Credits: 3
  
  • MDST 3601 - Screening History: Media and Cultural Memory


    The overall goal of the course is for students to recognize the ways in which film and TV representations of history are constructed through struggles in the present. Students will evaluate different narrative and formal strategies used to remember the past for their ideological, historical, ethical and commercial implications. We will discuss the uses of the past in the present, including nostalgia and the politics of counter-memory.



    Credits: 3
  
  • MDST 3602 - Television, New Media, and Society


    For the last 60 years, TV has been one of the most important cultural forms in the American mediascape. Mindful of this past, this course will explore contemporary issues in television studies as we enter the digital age. How does time-shifting technology fundamentally alter our conceptions of TV? What does Hulu mean for the television industry? What does the emergence of ‘quality TV’ imply imply aboutTV’s rich past as ashared cultural product?



    Credits: 3
  
  • MDST 3620 - World Cinema


    This course offers a survey of the cinemas of Europe, Africa, Central and South America, the Middle East, India, and Asia, with an introduction to the film histories and stylistic tendencies of each region. Explores classical, avant-garde, and ‘third cinema’ aesthetics, post-colonial theory, and transnational filmmaking. Equivalent course to GETR 3620. Students in GETR section focus on comparative topics related to German film.



    Credits: 3
  
  • MDST 3630 - Screening Terrorism


    This course examines contemporary cinematic & televisual representations of terrorism. It aims to do the following: to promote critical awareness of the ways in which terrorism is depicted on screen, particularly in the post-9/11 world; to encourage exploration of the complex ways in which real acts of terror involve performance & theatrics; to address the ethics and responsibilities of film and TV in re-creating acts of terror on screen.



    Credits: 3
  
  • MDST 3640 - American Gangster Film


    This course offers in-depth examination of American gangster films, tracing the genre’s development from early silent film to the present. It investigates the extensive influence the genre has had on the nature of the American film industry and explores how the representation of gangster life on screen articulates crucial anxieties, frustrations, and desires circulating in American society at the time of the film’s creation.



    Credits: 3
  
  • MDST 3650 - Shooting the Western


    This course provides an overview of the enduring genre of the American Western in its classic and revised forms. The course will address the social and historical contexts informing the films. Students will be asked to perform both cultural and formal analysis of the cinematic texts.



    Credits: 3
  
  • MDST 3670 - Sports, Media and Society


    This course will explore the role that sports have played in the development of media and society, primarily but not exclusively in the United States. It will consider such issues as amateurism, labor, performance-enhancing drugs, race, gender, sexuality, body image, and the role of sports within American universities. Prerequisite: MDST 2000.



    Credits: 3
  
  • MDST 3680 - The News Media


    This course is a real time snapshot of the news media; how it operates, where it succeeds, where it fails, and why. We will examine ways to better evaluate the news. What is the mainstream media today? Is it worth your trust and why? Why is Fake News successful? Has the digital revolution, and social media, helped or harmed the quality of news reporting? What’s disturbing about a President and White House intent on denying basic facts?



    Credits: 3
  
  • MDST 3690 - Sports Journalism


    This course will cover all manner of media as it relates to sports journalism. Students will analyze published work across various mediums, learn the tools for reporting and writing different types of coverage, including features, profiles, long-form, game stories and more. Students will write articles, interview subjects, analyze sports journalism, participate in peer reviews and hear from some of the most prominent figures in sports journalism.



    Credits: 3
  
  • MDST 3700 - Newswriting II


    This advanced newswriting course trains students to practice ‘point-of-view’ journalism, and to understand it as a controversial but credible alternative to the dominant model of ‘objectivity’ on the part of the news media. Prerequisite: Basic newswriting course and/or experience working on college newspaper (or equivalent) or literary maga- or e-zine.



    Credits: 3
  
  • MDST 3701 - New Media Culture


    A survey of issues in the study of new media and of new media artifacts. Objects studied may include films with digital special effects, digital animation, digital video, video games, digital art, internet art, and others. Theories of new media, media art, media change. Taught primarily via discussion with some lectures. Short papers, class participation, final project. Prerequisite: one course in Media Studies, English, Art History, or a related discipline.



    Credits: 3
  
  • MDST 3703 - Introduction to the Digital Liberal Arts


    Students will gain a practical and critical introduction to key technologies that are shaping research, innovation, and critical thinking across the liberal arts curriculum: specific technologies, including a programming language, that will empower them to better envision and develop technology-mediated projects in the arts, humanities, social sciences, and natural sciences. Students will reflect on the history and discourse in these areas.



    Credits: 3
  
  • MDST 3705 - Code, Language, and Media


    Introduction to the theory and practice of the database as media form in the context of the digital liberal arts. Students review critical literature about databases, study examples of their use in projects from a variety of disciplines, and engage in the actual design of a database application as a course project. Topics include cross-cultural modes of classification, data models, big data, visualization, and building web-based databases.



    Credits: 3
  
  • MDST 3706 - Media in China: Technology, Policy and Commerce


    The growth of media industries in China sits at the intersection between commerce, technology and policy. The objective of the course is to cultivate a rigorous understanding of the theoretical underpinnings of these three areas within the context of China’s global expansion. Students will also be expected to develop fresh critical perspectives on the significance of analysis of industry practice as a means to critique media texts.



    Credits: 3
  
  • MDST 3740 - Cultures of Hip-Hop


    This course explores the origins and impacts of American hip-hop as a cultural form in the last forty years, and maps the ways that a local subculture born of an urban underclass has risen to become arguably the dominant form of 21st-century global popular culture. While primarily focused on music, we will also explore how forms such as dance, visual art, film, and literature have influenced and been influenced by hip-hop style and culture.



    Credits: 3
  
  • MDST 3800 - Field Experience in Media Studies


    Provides an opportunity for students to get credit for field work, in the area of media studies. Students must put a proposal together for the project with a faculty sponsor, which must be approved by the add/drop deadlines. Restricted to Media Studies Majors.



    Credits: 1
  
  • MDST 3801 - Research in Practice


    This is a course designed specially for MDST students pursuing a DMP. This course blends a traditional internship experience with in-the-field research and allows students to have a critical understanding of the media organization in which they intern. Students who wish to pursue MDST 3801 must apply to the Director of the Program who oversees and supervises the course. MDST 3801 is available only to students who are part of the MDST DMP.



    Credits: 3
  
  • MDST 3804 - Scriptwriting for Film & TV


    This practicum will examine the dynamics of writing for film and television and aid students in the creation and development of original story ideas. The course will focus on the creative aspects of writing, as well as the structural aspects within the Hollywood context.



    Credits: 3
  
  • MDST 3809 - New Media in New York


    How do the contemporary media industries work? How did they develop in this fashion? How can an analysis of the ‘business of entertainment’ enable a greater understanding of contemporary media aesthetics and culture? Students must apply to enroll in this course. Enrollment is open to media studies majors only. Priority will be given to Fourth Years and Distinguished Majors.



    Credits: 3
  
  • MDST 3830 - History of Film I


    Analyzes the development of the silent film, 1895 to 1928; emphasizes the technical and thematic links between national schools of cinema art and the contributions of individual directors. Includes weekly film screenings.



    Credits: 3
  
  • MDST 3840 - History of Film II


    Analyzes the development of film art from the inception of sound to the 1950s. Includes weekly film screenings. Pre-requisites: DRAM 2810 or 3830, or instructor permission.



    Credits: 3
  
  • MDST 3850 - History of Film III


    A history of narrative, documentary and experimental film, 1955-77. Developments in the aesthetics of film are examined in the context of socio-economic, political and cultural conditions specific to different historical moments. Includes weekly film screenings. Students should have completed DRAM/MDST 3830 and 3840 prior to requesting permission to enroll. Prerequisite: Instructor Permission



    Credits: 3
  
  • MDST 3900 - Specialized Field Experience in Media Studies


    This course is reserved for Media Studies students interested in receiving credit for participation in student-led and UVA-affiliated enterprises that are media-related under the guidance of a faculty member or industry professional in the area of media studies. Students must put a proposal together for the project with a faculty sponsor, which must be approved by the add/drop deadlines. Restricted to Media Studies Majors.



    Credits: 1 to 3
  
  • MDST 4000 - Media Theory and Methods


    An introduction to advanced theory and research methods in Media Studies. Intended as a foundation for thesis work to be conducted in a student’s fourth year of undergraduate study (usually to fulfill Distinguished Majors Program requirements). Covers subjects such as historiography and proper use of historical records, survey methodology and ethics, and ethnographic methods. Prerequisite: MDST 3000.



    Credits: 3
  
  • MDST 4010 - Distinguished Majors Thesis Writing or Research Project


    Writing of a thesis or production or a project with appropriately researched documentation, under the supervision of the faculty DMP thesis readers or project supervisor.



    Credits: 3
  
  • MDST 4101 - Privacy & Surveillance


    Can we preserve dignity and privacy in the age of Facebook? This seminar will consider the history and current applications of technologies & cultures of surveillance. How & why did we get to the point where almost all of our activities leave a trace? What sorts of laws and policies do we need to protect our sense of personal integrity? Students will conduct two brief oral presentations (accompanied by a video) & produce a 20-page research paper.



    Credits: 3
  
  • MDST 4102 - Qualitative Methods in Media Audience Research


    This course is designed to be a practical introduction to how to do audience research in the field of culturally-oriented communication study. The primary work students will be doing is to prepare research projects illustrating the in-depth application of one (or possibly multiple) methods of research employed in studying the cultural audience.



    Credits: 3
  
  • MDST 4103 - Representing Violence


    The course will discuss the relationship between the mediation of different types of violence and the cultures of (in)justice where these representations exist. Central concerns are how different representational practices construct violence as public or private, proximate or distant, and the challenge of representing traumatic violence.



    Credits: 3
  
  • MDST 4105 - Media and Citizenship


    This course provides a critical perspective on the relationships of media to citizenship. It asks questions central to explaining the role of media in political and national life, including the following: What notions of national and political membership are forwarded by mainstream media? What media spaces are viable for the political agency of racial, sexual, and economic minorities and how do these spaces work?



    Credits: 3
  
  • MDST 4106 - Media and the Kennedy Era


    This course examines mass media ‘network television, journalism, advertising, cinema’ both during the Kennedy years and after to explore the impact, ideas, ideals, and iconography of this presidency. Prerequisites: MDST 2000 or permission of instructor



    Credits: 3
  
  • MDST 4107 - Feminism and the Public Sphere


    This class will examine the normative basis of the public sphere and critiques of its current structure and ask: What would a more inclusive vision of political participation and communication look like? In attempting to build an answer, we will examine a number of works on communication ethics, politics and media, with an emphasis on feminist and queer scholarship.



    Credits: 3
  
  • MDST 4108 - Media, Drugs, and Violence in Latin America


    This course will give you a critical understanding of the complex relationships between social violence, drug cartels, media, and Latin American nations. Together we will wrestle with the way Mexican, Colombian, and Brazilian drug violence has impacted and shaped new artistic forms and media practices that confront or, complexly, support the violence.



    Credits: 3
  
  • MDST 4109 - Civil Rights Movement and the Media


    Course examines the crucial relationship between the Civil Rights Movement and mass media from 1950s through early 1970s, looking at a variety of media forms: Hollywood cinema, network television, mainstream newspapers, photojournalism, the black press, and news as primary documents that can tell us something about American race relations during this period and how the nation responded to challenges posed by a powerful social change movement. Prerequisite: Students should have completed either MDST 2000 Introduction to Media Studies or AMST 2001 Formations of American Cultural Studies.



    Credits: 3
  
  • MDST 4110 - Gender Non-Conformity in Media Culture


    As one of the primary cultural drivers of common sense, shared values, and political ideology, media are certainly influential storytellers. This course creates space for considering media’s role in articulating and fashioning the limits and possibilities of gender identity. We will pay particular attention to representations of gender non-conformity in popular culture such as female masculinity, male femininity, and transgender subjectivity.



    Credits: 3
  
  • MDST 4200 - Sex and Gender Go to the Movies


    This course will examine the ways in which different mass media help to define our cultural ideas about gender differences and the ways in which feminist scholars have responded to these definitions by criticizing existing media images and by creating some alternatives of their own. The course will examine the notion that the mass media might influence our development as gendered individuals and consider different forms of feminist theory.



    Credits: 3
  
  • MDST 4210 - Global Environmental Media


    From analysis of documentary, narrative film, animation, gaming, experimental video, and social media, the class will provide students with the tools to bridge the gap between media and scientific messages about environmental issues. Students will develop critical tools to understand the aesthetic, environmental and industrial characteristics of different media practices related to some of the most significant issues facing our world.



    Credits: 3
  
  • MDST 4211 - Kungfu and Korean Dramas: Transnational Asian Media


    Film production between Asian and Euro-American companies is rapidly on the rise. The fundamental objective of the course is to cultivate a rigorous theoretical understanding of the media industries within a global Asian network. We will ask: What are the cultural, political and economic implications of transnational co-productions both for global and domestic film markets?



    Credits: 3
  
  • MDST 4301 - Global Indigenous Media


    Close study of contemporary media produced by members of indigenous communities worldwide. Readings in media studies, critical theory, and critical anthropology. Seminar with presentations, short papers, and a research paper. Prerequisite: one course in Media Studies, English, Anthropology, or a related discipline.



    Credits: 3
  
  • MDST 4310 - Celebrity Studies


    This course explores celebrity, stardom, fame, and self-branding as it is produced, circulated, and consumed for and by people of color. Paying particular attention to how race and ethnicity intersect with the phenomenon of celebrity in the media, this highly student-driven class will investigate celebrities of color through both historical and analytical lenses.



    Credits: 3
  
  • MDST 4380 - Violence & Media


    Violence in Media is a seminar in which we study different productions of the visual representation of violence in America. The course includes viewing films, looking at photographs, readings from social theory and philosophy, and writing a term paper. We raise questions around the ethics of creating and consuming representations of violence, both representations that show fictional violence, in movies, representations of real violence. Prerequisite: A minimum of two successfully completed 2000 level courses in Media Studies, Sociology, Philosophy or Politics, or comparable fields.



    Credits: 3
  
  • MDST 4411 - Media Technologies and Free Speech


    Should computer code and hyperlinks be considered speech, protected by the First Amendment? Silent film? These are just some of the questions that new communication technologies have spurred for US speech law. We will explore how different media are treated under the First Amendment and discuss key legal issues associated with communications media, including censorship, corporate speech, and conflicts between copyright and free expression.



    Credits: 3
  
  • MDST 4660 - Watching the Detectives


    This course examines a number of American detective films and how the portrait of the hard-boiled private eye dramatizes concerns about class, race, gender relations, urbanization, the rationalization of experience, the limits of self-knowledge, the blurring of boundaries between bodies and machines, and the collapse of distinction between private life and public life.



    Credits: 3
  
  • MDST 4700 - Theory of New Media


    A seminar on the theoretical study of new and/or digital media. Topics such as digital representations of history, culture, race, gender, identity, and language; the nature of new media; technological changes in media; hypertext as medium; online community. Some close readings of new media objects. Short papers, class participation, and a final paper. Prerequisite: one course in Media Studies, English, or a related discipline.



    Credits: 3
  
  • MDST 4701 - Media and Everyday Life


    This course turns a critical eye towards media’s relationship to everyday life. It conceptualize media, such as cell phones, television, and YouTube for example, as central forces in representing, demarcating and franchising the ordinary. We will explore the construction of ordinariness in media as well as the ways in which audiences engage with media in daily life to achieve `taken for grantedness’. Prerequisite: MDST 2000



    Credits: 3
  
  • MDST 4703 - Technology and Media


    This class will explore various social, cultural, legal, and political issues that have arisen in recent years as a result of new communicative technologies. The two main technological changes that will concern us are the digitization of information and culture and the rise of networks within society and politics.



    Credits: 3
  
  • MDST 4704 - Political Economy of Communication


    This survey course introduces students to the political economy of media. Central themes include political economy’s historical development, its usefulness to the study of media & communications, & its contemporary applications in scholarly research. Students will be introduced to the power dynamics & institutional forces that impact media institutions, industries, ownership, cultural production, consumption & distribution in the US & elsewhere.



    Credits: 3
  
  • MDST 4705 - Spanish Mass Media


    This is an introductory course to Spanish mass media. The course gives students a critical understandings of the roles mass media plays in Spanish society, culture, and politics. The emphasis of the course is on sociological approaches to media, in particular studies of how radio and television participate in the making and remaking of modern Spain.



    Credits: 3
  
  • MDST 4801 - Introduction to Documentary Production


    Focuses on the elements of documentary productions, including theory, ethics, and technologies.  Along with writing assignments, student will produce their own short documentaries using mini DVD cameras and non-linear systems and non-linear editing systems. Prerequisite: MDST Undergraduates



    Credits: 3
  
  • MDST 4802 - Intermediate Documentary Production


    An advanced level course that focuses on the elements and considerations that factor into documentary productions with emphasis on aspects dealing with the planning and execution of creating a documentary film.



    Credits: 3
  
  • MDST 4960 - Advanced Independent Projects in Media Studies


    This course is designed to allow students to pursue independent research and study of a topic that is not contained within the course offerings of Media Studies. Restricted to Media Studies majors.



    Credits: 3
  
  • MDST 4970 - Distinguished Majors Thesis Writing or Research Project


    Independent research, writing or production under the supervision of the faculty DMP thesis readers, toward the DMP thesis or project. Prerequisite: Acceptance to the Media Studies DMP.



    Credits: 3

Medieval Studies

  
  • MSP 3801 - Exploring the Middle Ages


    Discussion and criticism of selected works of and on the period. Taught by different members of the medieval faculty.



    Credits: 3
  
  • MSP 4801 - Seminar in Medieval Studies


    For advanced students dealing with methods of research in the field. Taught by different members of the medieval faculty.



    Credits: 3

Middle Eastern Studies

  
  • MEST 1100 - Introduction to the Middle East


    Introduces Middle Eastern economy and environment, society, gender issues, history and politics, secularism-law-religion, languages and literatures, music and the visual arts. Emphasizes the Ottoman, colonial, and post-colonial periods.



    Credits: 3
  
  • MEST 2270 - Culture and Society of the Contemporary Arab Middle East


    Introduces the cultural traits and patterns of contemporary Arab society based on scholarly research, recent field work, and personal experiences and observations in the Arab world. Taught in English; no knowledge of Arabic is required.



    Credits: 3
  
  • MEST 2470 - Reflections of Exile: Jewish Languages and their Communities


    Covers Jewish languages Yiddish, Judeo-Arabic, Ladino, and Hebrew from historical, linguistic, and literary perspectives. Explores the relations between communities and languages, the nature of diaspora, and the death and revival of languages. No prior knowledge of these languages is required. This course is cross-listed with ANTH 2470.



    Credits: 3
  
  • MEST 2600 - Major Dimensions of Classical-Medieval Arab-Islamic Civilization


    Introducing the cultural dimensions of Classical and Medieval Arab-Islamic Civilization (600-1400 CE). We will study how Arabs approach their worldly life and pleasures through literature; organize their social domain by ethical-law; construct their spirituality and worldview through religion; react to nature by science; and attempt to resolve the internal and external inconsistencies of their culture through theology, philosophy and mysticism.



    Credits: 3
  
  • MEST 2610 - Major Dimensions of the Modern Arab World


    This class aims to develop an understanding of the global significance of the 330 million Arabs as the fourth largest community in the world and Arabic as the fifth largest spoken language in a historical and thematic manner from the Ottomans (1400 CE) to the present.



    Credits: 3
  
  • MEST 2620 - Aspects of Creativity in Arab-Islamic Heritage:Translated Classical Reading


    This course aims to expose students to samples of original translated texts from the creative heritage of the Arab-Islamic civilization



    Credits: 3
  
  • MEST 3110 - Women and Middle-Eastern Literatures


    Explores some of the basic issues of women’s identity in Middle Eastern literature. In a variety of readings (poetry, short-story, novel, and autobiography) by men and women, it explores both the image and presence of women in a rich and too-often neglected literature.



    Credits: 3
  
  • MEST 3470 - Language and Culture in the Middle East


    Introduction to peoples, languages, cultures and histories of the Middle East. Focuses on Israel/Palestine as a microcosm of important social processes-such as colonialism, nationalism, religious fundamentalism, and modernization-that affect the region as a whole. This course is cross-listed with ANTH 3470. Prerequisite: Prior coursework in anthropology, middle east studies, or linguistics, or permission of the instructor.



    Credits: 3
  
  • MEST 4991 - Middle East Studies Seminar


    Middle East Studies Seminar



    Credits: 3

Middle Eastern & South Asian Languages & Cultures

  
  • MESA 1000 - From Genghis Khan to Stalin: Invasions and Empires of Central Asia


    Survey of Central Asian civilizations from the first to the twenty-first centuries, with particular emphasis on nomadism, invasions, conquests, and major religious-cultural developments.



    Credits: 3
  
  • MESA 2010 - Literatures of South Asia and the Middle East


    An introductory course in non-Western literatures that emphasizes genres with no clear Western equivalents. The reading list varies, but the texts, read in translation, usually come from Arabic, Hebrew, Hindi, Persian, Sanskrit, Tamil and Urdu.



    Credits: 3
  
  • MESA 2110 - Intro to Middle East / South Asia Film History


    “Transnational Circuits of Cinema: An Introduction to Middle East - South Asia Film History” - Since its very inception as a traveling fairground attraction, cinema has been a globally-circulating medium. This course begins in the moment of early cinema and proceeds through the contemporary moment, with a focus on Middle East - South Asia genealogies of filmmaking.



    Credits: 3
  
  • MESA 2300 - Crossing Borders: Middle East and South Asia


    A survey of the deep cultural, religious, political and economic historical relationship between the Middle East and South Asia, suggesting we need to understand the two “regions” comprehensively and comparatively.



    Credits: 3
  
  • MESA 2350 - Women and Media in the Middle East and South Asia


    In this course we will study depictions and images of women in news media in selected countries (Egypt, Iran, Saudi Arabia, India, Pakistan) as well as in the American media. We will especially compare images of women in mainstream news media with those available in online media channels or social news networks. We will also examine the changing status of women journalists worldwide, with a special focus on their role in the Arab Spring.



    Credits: 3
  
  • MESA 2360 - Women and Social Media in the Middle East and South Asia


    Women in the Middle East and South Asia have embraced social media as a tool for expressing their identities and promoting causes important to them. This course examines women’s use of social media in five selected countries -Iran, Egypt, Saudi Arabia, India, and Pakistan - and investigates how it simultaneously enables and limits women’s empowerment.



    Credits: 3
  
  • MESA 2700 - Recent Revolutions in the Islamic World


    This introductory course surveys recent revolutionary movements sweeping across the Islamic World, from North Africa, the Middle East into Asia, including the “Arab Spring.” Key course questions include: Why rebel? Why now? What for? How? Are they spreading, failing, or being ‘hijacked?’ What roles have external actors played? What would Jefferson think?



    Credits: 3
  
  • MESA 3010 - Men and Women of South Asia and the Middle East


    Focuses on literature of South Asia and the Middle East (Persian, Arabic, Hebrew, Hindi, Urdu, Sanskrit) which depicts the world as seen through the eyes of men and women; includes poetry and prose from ancient to modern times.



    Credits: 3
  
  • MESA 3120 - Classics of Islamic Literature: Islamic Mystical Writing


    This course surveys the classics of Islamic mystical writing, spanning from the Middle East to South Asia and the Arabic, Persian, Urdu, and Indian vernacular languages. With an eye to both form and content, we will examine the literary productions - both poetry and prose - of some of the most influential Sufi figures in Islamic history, including Rabi`a, Ibn al-Farid, Rumi, Hafiz, Khusrow, Bulleh Shah, and others. Readings in English translation.



    Credits: 3
  
  • MESA 3470 - Language and Culture in the Middle East


    This course provides an introduction to the peoples, cultures, and histories of the Middle East through an examination of language-use. We focus on Israel/Palestine–and the contact between Hebrew and Arabic–as a microcosm for the region as a whole. Readings present ethnographic, linguistic, and literary perspectives on language, identity, and the general processes of SELF/OTHER constructions in contexts of political and military confrontation. Prerequisites: previous coursework in Anthropology, Linguistics, or Middle East Studies.



    Credits: 3
  
  • MESA 3650 - Introduction to Linguistic Typology


    Human languages appear on the surface to be very different from one another. Closer examination reveals that languages differ in systematic ways and that more than half of them can be divided into a relatively small number of basic types. In this course we will identify and study some of these basic patterns and explore possible reasons for their existence. The course will introduce students to basic grammatical structure and function.



    Credits: 3
  
  • MESA 4991 - Four-Year Major Seminar


    Required capstone course that studies the Middle East and South Asia from a diversity of perspectives–languages, literatures, anthropology, history, politics, and religion. Prerequisite: fourth-year standing, major in Middle Eastern Studies or in South Asian Studies



    Credits: 3
  
  • MESA 4993 - Independent Study


    Independent study in a special field under the direction of a faculty member in MESALC. Prerequisite: Instructor permission.



    Credits: 1 to 3
  
  • MESA 4998 - Middle Eastern and South Asian Studies Senior Thesis


    Thesis research under the direction of a MESALC faculty member serving as thesis advisor and a second faculty member serving as second reader. The second faculty member may be from outside MESALC. Prerequisite: DMP major and instructor permission.



    Credits: 0
  
  • MESA 4999 - Middle Eastern and South Asian Studies Senior Thesis II


    Thesis composition under the direction of a MESALC faculty member serving as thesis advisor and a second faculty member serving as second reader. The second faculty member may be from outside MESALC. Prerequisite: DMP major and instructor permission.



    Credits: 6

Military Science

  
  • MISC 1010 - Introduction to Leadership, the Army and Critical Thinking


    This course introduces students to the personal challenges and competencies that are critical for effective leadership. Students learn how the personal development of life skills such as critical thinking, time management, goal setting, stress management, and comprehensive fitness relate to leadership and the Army profession.



    Credits: 1
  
  • MISC 1015 - Introduction to Applied Military Leadership


    Learn the basic military skills of land navigation, communication, and individual movement techniques. Understand the principles of followership as a member of a team.



    Credits: 1
  
  • MISC 1020 - Introduction to Leadership & the Profession of Arms


    This course introduces Cadets to the personal challenges and competencies that are critical for adaptive leadership. Cadets learn the basics of the communications process and the importance for leader’s to develop the essential skills to effectively communicate in the Army. Students will examine the Army Profession and what it means to be a professional in the U.S. Army.



    Credits: 1
  
  • MISC 1025 - Introduction to Applied Military Leadership


    Apply the basic military skills as a member of a squad and platoon in situationally based training exercises.



    Credits: 1
  
  • MISC 2010 - Leadership & Decision Making


    This course explores the dimensions of creative and innovative tactical leadership strategies and styles by examining team dynamics and leadership theories that form the basis of the Army leadership framework. Aspects of personal motivation and team building are practiced through planning, executing and assessing team exercises.



    Credits: 2
  
  • MISC 2015 - Intermediate Applied Military Leadership


    Learn advanced military skills of land navigation, communications and collective movement techniques.



    Credits: 1
  
  • MISC 2020 - Team Development & Army Doctrine


    This course examines the challenges of leading teams in a complex environment. It highlights dimensions of terrain analysis, platoon operations, and operation orders. Further study of the theoretical basis of the Army Leadership Requirements Model explores the dynamics of adaptive leadership in the context of military operations. Cadets develop greater self awareness of their leadership styles and practice communication and team building skills.



    Credits: 2
  
  • MISC 2025 - Intermediate Applied Military Leadership


    Apply advanced military skills as a member of a squad or platoon, serving as team leaders whenever possible in situationally based training exercises. Upon completion, each student is prepared to assume junior leadership positions within the battalion; training, mentoring and developing the first year cadets.



    Credits: 1
  
  • MISC 3010 - Unit Training & the Warfighting Functions


    Students will study, practice, and apply the fundamentals of leadership, values & ethics, personal development, and tactics. They will be capable of planning, coordinating, navigating, motivating and leading a twelve person unit in the execution of a tactical mission in a field environment. Instructors will provide continued systematic and specific feedback on students’ leader attributes, values and core leader competencies. Prerequisite: Contracted Cadets only



    Credits: 2
  
  • MISC 3015 - Advanced Applied Military Leadership


    Learn the basics of planning and executing individual and collective training as team, squad and platoon leaders. Serve as the junior leadership of the cadet battalion.



    Credits: 1
  
  • MISC 3020 - Applied Leadership in Small Unit Operations


    Students will study, practice, and apply the fundamentals of leadership, values & ethics, personal development, and tactics. They will be capable of planning, coordinating, navigating, motivating and leading a twelve person unit in the execution of a tactical mission in a field environment. Instructors will provide continued systematic and specific feedback on students’ leader attributes, values and core leader competencies. Prerequisites: Contracted Cadets only



    Credits: 2
  
  • MISC 3025 - Advanced Applied Military Leadership


    Learn the basics of planning and executing situationally based training exercises as the squad, platoon, and company level leaders. Serve as the junior leadership of the cadet battalion. Upon completion, each student is prepared to successfully complete the Leadership Development and Assessment Course at Fort Lewis Washington and to assume primary leadership positions within the battalion; training, mentoring and developing the second year cadets.



    Credits: 1
  
  • MISC 4010 - Mission Command & the Army Profession


    Introduces Cadets to the challenges of mission command and gaining an understanding of the Army Profession. Cadets learn the basics of mission command and how it is used in Army operations. Cadets will examine the Army Profession and what it means to be a professional in the Army. Cadets assume leader and staff positions within the ROTC Battalion to practice their leadership training learned throughout their ROTC career. Prerequisite: Contracted Cadets only



    Credits: 2
  
  • MISC 4015 - Advanced Applied Military Leadership


    Apply advanced planning and executing skills, attributes and knowledge; assess and critique individual military performance. Serve as the senior leadership of the cadet battalion.



    Credits: 1
  
  • MISC 4020 - Msn Cmd & Co. Grade Officer


    This course expands upon the Cadets’ knowledge of mission command and the expectations of a company grade Officer. Cadets experience the duties and responsibilities of a company grade officer by applying the Military Decision Making Process, Army writing style and the principles of the training management. Cadets assume leader and staff positions within the ROTC Battalion and prepare to transition to commissioning as an Army Lieutenant. Prerequisite: Contracted Cadets only



    Credits: 2
 

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