Apr 13, 2024  
Undergraduate Record 2017-2018 
    
Undergraduate Record 2017-2018 [ARCHIVED RECORD]

Course Descriptions


 

Interdisciplinary Studies-Social Sciences

  
  • ISSS 4030 - Media and Children’s Development


    Media and Children’s Development



    Credits: 3
  
  • ISSS 4040 - The Rise and Fall of Public Controversies


    The Rise and Fall of Public Controversies



    Credits: 3
  
  • ISSS 4041 - Crime, Misery and Vice: The Victorian Underworld


    Explores in their original contexts the social, cultural, economic and political themes of works such as The Return of Sherlock Holmes, Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde, The Time Machine, and Dracula, through a combination of class discussion and written assignments. Examines the attitudes, ideals and values associated with the Victorian era.



    Credits: 3
  
  • ISSS 4050 - American Society and War from Vietnam to the War in Iraq


    American Society and War from Vietnam to the War in Iraq



    Credits: 3
  
  • ISSS 4060 - War and World Politics


    Explores the causes of war, evolution and advances in military strategy, historical case studies, and contemporary issues of nuclear weapons, humanitarian war, and war against terrorism through major scholarly works, primary documents, films, class discussions, papers, and lectures.



    Credits: 3
  
  • ISSS 4061 - Kipling’s Raj: The Cutting Criticism of British Ex-Patriot Society


    Explores the marvelous world depicted in Kipling’s Indian Tales from the perspective of the commentary they provide on British Ex-Patriot society. Discusses how Kipling has often been viewed as a critic of Indian society, when in fact he is a critical of the British. Examines the work of Clifford Geerts and other anthropologists to provide a rounded picture of Kipling as an analyst of cultural systems.



    Credits: 3
  
  • ISSS 4062 - Introduction to International Politics


    Develops methods, examines issues, and discusses the roles of various actors in world politics. Examines the international system and analyzes the crisis of the Westphalian State System. Provides understanding of conflicts, foreign policy, power, security, alliances, deterrence, bargaining, cooperation, globalization, institutions, and law in international politics.



    Credits: 3
  
  • ISSS 4063 - Hell’s Angel: How Hunter Thompson Kept America Honest


    Examines the work of Hunter Thompson in a study of how ‘Gonzo’ changed greater American journalism as a whole. Demonstrates how Thompson’s role as a public intellectual spread into wider journalism, such as Doonesbury. Portrays Thompson as a premier political critic of each administration who exerted near unparalleled social influence.



    Credits: 3
  
  • ISSS 4064 - Remembering the Future: How Historical Vision has Shaped Modern Politics


    Analyzes how history has shaped decisions about war, peace, and political order in the modern era. Includes close examination of the French Revolution, the World Wars, the Cuban Missile Crisis and, Vietnam. Combines policy analysis and historical study to understand the past’s paradoxical role in designing the modern world.



    Credits: 3
  
  • ISSS 4070 - Principles of Criminal Law


    Examines basic principles of Anglo-American criminal law. Evaluates ethical and philosophical questions that emerge from legal issues such as the justification of punishment, the nature and extent of criminal liability, strict liability statutes, victimless crimes, the insanity defense, legally mandated hospitalization for mental illness, and capital punishment.



    Credits: 3
  
  • ISSS 4071 - International Law and Organizations


    Studies the fundamentals of international law. Analyzes relevant concepts, basic definitions, and main traditions of international law that will be fundamental to the more complex ideas of the course. Focuses on the nature and sources of international law, treaties, and international conflicts, as well as international economy, organizations, regimes, and municipal law.



    Credits: 3
  
  • ISSS 4080 - Religion and Politics


    Religion and Politics



    Credits: 3
  
  • ISSS 4100 - Exploring Theory Through American Culture


    This course will use the lens of contemporary American culture to explore the work of some major social and cultural theorists of the past two centuries, including Marx, Durkheim, Debord, Foucault, Baudrillard, and the thinkers of the Frankfurt School. Particular areas of focus will include technology and its impact on society and culture, the socio-economic transitions involved in the globalization of contemporary capitalism, and the idea of the ‘postmodern.’



    Credits: 3
  
  • ISSS 4130 - Developmental Psychology and Public Policy


    Developmental Psychology and Public Policy



    Credits: 3
  
  • ISSS 4131 - Mental Health Disorders of Modern Society


    Introduces students to psychological disorders and mental health concerns prevalent in today’s society via memoirs and classic texts from psychological literature. Examines the symptoms of each disorder. Explores common misperceptions related to the disorders and current treatment options. Includes discussion and familiarization with available resources.



    Credits: 3
  
  • ISSS 4132 - Psychological Testing: Measuring Minds and Behavior


    Explores the history and major forms of psychological testing. Studies the definition and measurement of intelligence. Learn the history of attempts to measure intelligence and other human qualities. Understand behaviors, and current uses of formal assessment measures, and testing ethics. Prior coursework in psychology and/or statistics is helpful but not required for taking this course.



    Credits: 3
  
  • ISSS 4140 - The Self in History and Society


    Explores the relationship among self-identity, society, and history. Addresses the ways that scholars have explored the relationships between self and society in a philosophical fashion and major historical and theoretical developments that help explain contemporary self-identity.



    Credits: 3
  
  • ISSS 4150 - The Psychology of Freedom, Independence and Conformity


    This course explores the nature of human freedom and the degree to which the discipline of psychology has addressed this concept. Specifically, students will investigate the empirical evidence for and against the proposition of human freedom through the lens of Solomon E. Asch’s classic studies on independence and conformity. Using both published and unpublished accounts, students will engage in a process of discovery to determine the current status of several relevant issues and the implications of such empirical research for the concept of human freedom.



    Credits: 3
  
  • ISSS 4200 - Creative Power: The History of Modern Technology


    In this course students will investigate the history of technology, especially since the eighteenth century, when humans first learned to harness the sources of power that have set modern times apart from all past ages. The conflict between technology’s creative and destructive power will be emphasized. Students will study historical technologies, and also their relations to society, culture and religion.



    Credits: 3
  
  • ISSS 4210 - Contemporary Issues in Technology


    Explores significant questions, challenges, and controversies in technology over time. Examines key debates and provides an understanding related to the role of technology in a healthy and prosperous society.



    Credits: 3
  
  • ISSS 4220 - Sociology of the Internet


    Examines the social aspects and issues of humanity, including what people do in politics, economics, culture, and scientific studies as a consequence of this ‘electronic highway.’ Increases skills by using the Internet to do sociological research and cross-cultural analysis, and also to explore the emerging field of sociology of cyberspace.



    Credits: 3
  
  • ISSS 4270 - Imagining the City: An Interdisciplinary Approach


    Explores the idea of the city from an interdisciplinary perspective that begins with Plato’s influential rendering of an imaginary city ruled by philosopher-kings and continues through the urban core of modern Charlottesville. Allows students to examine the physical world by sharing ideas, observing, writing, and thinking critically.



    Credits: 3
  
  • ISSS 4271 - Emergence of Cities and States


    Focuses on the emergence and collapse of complex societies in both the Old (Mesopotamia and Egypt) and New (Valley of Mexico and Maya Lowlands) Worlds. Combines archaeological, textual and ethnographic evidence to understand the establishment of villages at the end of the Ice Age, and the origin of the first cities and their abandonment.



    Credits: 3
  
  • ISSS 4272 - The Collapse of Ancient States and Civilizations


    Explores the questions of why and how societies collapse and whether or not they can, instead, choose to succeed. Focuses on understanding the development of complex societies and the sociopolitical, economic and ecological processes surrounding their collapse.



    Credits: 3
  
  • ISSS 4273 - Modern France: Republic or Empire?


    Examines the competition in French politics between between creating an ideal republic and defending national interests starting with the 1789 Revolution which led to Napoleon’s rule in Europe, moving on to the Third Republic’s renewed drive for empire in Africa and Asia, and closes with postcolonial France’s efforts to reconcile the welfare state with the demands of globalization.



    Credits: 3
  
  • ISSS 4280 - U.S. Military History


    This course will examine the foundation and growth of the United States military establishment and the exercise of and changes in military strategy and policies as shaped by political, social, and economic factors.  While focusing on the period “book-ended” by the Civil War and Vietnam, the course goes beyond the study of the usual generals, government leaders, and battles and discusses subjects like technology, professionalism, administration, and military policy. 



    Credits: 3
  
  • ISSS 4281 - The US Navy in Social and Global Contexts 1776-2000


    Examines the development of the American Navy, its strategies, vessels, institutions and bureaucracies, and their political contexts and social dimensions, such as those of gender and race. Considers technological aspects such as weapons and communications systems, manufacturing, and construction that remade the experience and development of ships and social arrangements on land and at sea.



    Credits: 3
  
  • ISSS 4285 - US Strategic Intelligence


    Explores the current structure, function, capabilities, and contributions of individual US national intelligence organizations. Examines the intelligence cycle including planning, collection, exploitation, analysis, production, and dissemination phases, as well as intelligence oversight/restrictions.



    Credits: 3
  
  • ISSS 4290 - An Alternative History of Early America


    Examine America’s colonial period (to the eve of the American Revolution) as that of a foreign country. Investigates the people, cultures, institutions, and events of the period on their own terms rather than through the lens of modern America. Uncovers the origins of many later American issues and debates;freedom and slavery; warfare; religion and revival; sectionalism; race; class; and commercialism.



    Credits: 3
  
  • ISSS 4291 - Virginia Elections: 1619-2009


    Explores elections in Virginia from 1619 to 2009. Examines the electoral and political history of Virginia, as well as stereotypes associated with voting. Analyzes key aspects of many elections so that one can determine whether present-day electoral conditions are significantly different than past electoral conditions.



    Credits: 3
  
  • ISSS 4292 - Liberalism and Conservatism in Modern America


    Examines the fundamental clashes between liberals and conservatives, including how this split in perspectives developed our modern culture. Focuses on a tolerant, open-minded, and balanced investigation that seeks a broader understanding and appreciation of these diverse perspectives.



    Credits: 3
  
  • ISSS 4300 - America in the 1960’s: A Decade of Turbulence


    Examines the issues of ideology, race, gender, faith, war, the youth movement, as well as the politics of the Great Society social programs and voting rights. Explores music, the draft, and the counter culture, including a new conservatism also present amidst the violence at home and abroad.



    Credits: 3
  
  • ISSS 4301 - History of Social Protest Movements Through Music


    Examines the history of American protest movements by looking at music from the 1900s to 2000. Analyzes readings and analyzes music from that period. Explores movements such as the populist movement, labor movements, anti-war protests, the civil rights movement, the women’s movement, peace movements, and environmental movements.



    Credits: 3
  
  • ISSS 4310 - History of Love, Marriage and Other Western Delusions


    Examines the relationship between romantic love, both heterosexual and non-heterosexual, as well as other forms of love; family, country, and God. Explores the understanding of love in our popular culture and involves the close study of philosophical, religious, literary, and historical texts together with a careful viewing of several films.



    Credits: 3
  
  • ISSS 4311 - History of Art Controversies in the United States


    Explores the most significant art controversies in the history of the United States and places them in their appropriate cultural and historical contexts.



    Credits: 3
  
  • ISSS 4313 - Varying Contexts of Love and Relationships


    Utilizes philosophical, religious, literary, and historical texts to examines the relationship between romantic love, both heterosexual and non-heterosexual, and the love of family, country, and God.



    Credits: 3
  
  • ISSS 4314 - The World of Theodore Roosevelt


    Explores Theodore Roosevelt’s life. Investigates key political, economic, social, and cultural developments of the late 19th and early 20th centuries that Roosevelt experienced and, in some cases, influenced.



    Credits: 3
  
  • ISSS 4315 - The World of Jane Austen: Exploring the Novels in Historical Context


    Analyzes the major works of Jane Austen. Explores the social, cultural, economic, and political themes of the novels in their original contexts through a combination of class discussion and written assignments. Considers the resurgence in popularity of Austen’s works in recent years, especially film and television portrayals of her novels.



    Credits: 3
  
  • ISSS 4320 - Colonial America


    Examines America’s colonial period to the eve of the American Revolution. Investigates people, cultures, institutions, and events of the period. Explores later American issues and debates, such as freedom and slavery, warfare, religion and revival, race, class, and how they influenced commercialism.



    Credits: 3
  
  • ISSS 4330 - Readings in History of Women in America


    Explores the changing roles and often negelected contributions of women in America as “founding mothers,” participants in the workforce, and leaders in civil and political life. Discusses the diversity of women’s experiences, including those of Native-American and African-American women.



    Credits: 3
  
  • ISSS 4351 - Seminar in Medieval Studies


    Examines the political history, economic structures and conditions, religion, philosophy, literature, art, and music of the Medieval period.



    Credits: 3
  
  • ISSS 4361 - Historiography


    Investigates a variety of approaches to the historical discipline, focusing on schools of thought, methodological approaches, and analytical perspectives. Provides a sweeping overview of historians’ conceptual tools and methods, while also supplying a sense of the way the field has changed over the past two centuries.



    Credits: 3
  
  • ISSS 4370 - Visual Representations of Space through Time: A History of Maps


    Surveys a wide variety of maps from different societies and periods of history, considering them as social, philosophical and political documents as well as technical achievements in the representation of space.



    Credits: 3
  
  • ISSS 4400 - Quantitative Analysis and Methods for Problem Solving


    This course is designed to teach students the basic concepts of quantitative research methods and data analysis in research crossing a broad range of types within the social sciences.  By the end of this term, students should be able to) apply the principles of quantitative analysis in their own research and in evaluating the research of others, b) perform and interpret inferential statistical analyses using SPSS, and c) communicate research findings to a broad audience. 



    Credits: 3
  
  • ISSS 4410 - Qualitative Inquiry and Methodology


    This field-based course guides the students through the complete qualitative process and teaches them to understand and apply methods of qualitative research through a field-based project; to call into question taken-for-granted assumptions about the purpose of research, uses of methods, nature of social science knowledge and personal biases in the understanding of social processes; to develop an ability to examine social situations from multiple perspectives through classroom discussions of research experiences; and to develop a personal philosophy of inquiry and successfully apply knowledge of various methods of qualitative data collection, data analysis, and report presentation to complete a field-based qualitative research project.



    Credits: 3
  
  • ISSS 4420 - Speaking with Numbers: The Effective Use of Statistics


    Provides a basis for evaluating the claims of others while also choosing the best analysis methods for supporting ideas. Examines how quantitative analysis can inform decisions, how to select the appropriate tools for the situation, how to interpret the results, and how to effectively communicate the results.



    Credits: 3
  
  • ISSS 4421 - Consumer Demand and Behavior


    Examines the microeconomic foundations of consumer demand analysis. Examines the psychological factors influencing consumer’s purchase decisions. Reviews methods for forecasting, measuring, and testing consumer demand.



    Credits: 3
  
  • ISSS 4429 - Competing Economic Theories


    Examines competing schools of thought through seminal works by economic writers such as Smith, Marx, Ricardo, and Keynes. Compares and contrasts competing theories’ systems, institutions, and performance based on their goals and objectives. Considers the fundamental social and political issues central to economic thought.



    Credits: 3
  
  • ISSS 4430 - Topics in Developmental Psychology


    Studies how psychological abilities grow and change over time. Introduces students to topics in both cognitive and social development. Addresses how we become who we are; how we learn to think about ourselves and our environments; how we learn to communicate; and how we relate to others.



    Credits: 3
  
  • ISSS 4440 - An Introduction to Jungian Psychology


    Contextualizes Jung’s ideas by comparing and contrasting them to Freud’s, and setting them broadly in the framework of academic psychology as a whole. Analyzes Jung’s ideas by describing and discussing the elements of Jung’s model of the psyche, the dynamics of Jung’s model in the moment, and the dynamics of the model over the life-span of an individual.



    Credits: 3
  
  • ISSS 4450 - Sociology of the American Family


    Explores the sociology of the American family, including: family change through American history; poverty and family life; alternative families (including single-by-choice parenting and gay marriage), and the effects of marriage and divorce on the lives of adults and children.



    Credits: 3
  
  • ISSS 4451 - Business, Government and Society


    Examines the complex interrelationships of business with the external environments that involve political, economical, social, technological factors, and nature to understand the conflicts, resolutions, opportunities and threats that arise from these intersections.



    Credits: 3
  
  • ISSS 4454 - Emotion, Emotional Intelligence, and Meditation


    Examines the neurological basis of emotion and the content of emotional intelligence which includes social competence in relationships, impulse control, empathy and compassion, resilience, motivation, and optimism. Discusses the underlying neurological mechanisms through which mindfulness meditation exerts its impact on emotion regulation and emotional intelligence.



    Credits: 3
  
  • ISSS 4455 - Social Inequality


    This course explores systems of social inequality: feudalism, caste and slavery, class, and status groups, primarily in American society, but with reference to Europe and the Indian sub-continent as well. Starting with the fundamental concepts of Karl Marx and Max Weber, students will discuss the theoretical constructs that define systems of inequality, consider some historical examples, and then examine “social stratification” in our own country. Does the United States have a class system? If so, what are its characteristics? Joining the scholarly debate on this issue, students will consider the meaning of equal opportunity and social mobility for achieving the “American dream.” The course also explores the empirical consequences of social inequality for every day life: in health and wellness, housing, education, and family structure.



    Credits: 3
  
  • ISSS 4456 - Russian-American Relations


    Focuses on the post-1945 period and the evolution of Russian-American relations since the fall of the Soviet Union, through an interdisciplinary lense based on contributions from international relations scholars and practitioners as well as historians, economists, philosophers, and political psychologists in historical and contemporary perspectives.



    Credits: 3
  
  • ISSS 4457 - Post-Soviet Political Challenges: Nationalism and Ethnic Conflict


    Focuses on the origins of nationalism, separatism, sessesions, and irredentist claims in the Russian Federation and other former Soviet republics.



    Credits: 3
  
  • ISSS 4458 - The Cold War


    This course examines both Russian and American foreign policy at several critical points during the conflict. Through major scholarly works, primary documents, films, class discussions, papers, and lectures students will work together to better understand the Cold War and gain a fuller understanding of its political, military, cultural, economic, and ideological impact at home and abroad. The following questions will be explored: 1) How did the Cold War start?; 2) What were some of the important decisions made during the conflict, and why?; 3) Why did the Cold War end the way it did?



    Credits: 3
  
  • ISSS 4459 - The Unknown Europe: Understanding Eastern Europe


    Explores the rich cultural, political, religious, social, and historical diversity of Eastern Europe. Introduces East European films and short literary works by which students learn to better understand historic experiences and modern life of Russians, Poles, Czechs, Slovaks, Ukrainians, Lithuanians, Croats, Serbs, Bosnians, Hungarians, Romanians, and other East Europeans.



    Credits: 3
  
  • ISSS 4610 - Economics of Climate Change


    Examines all aspects of global warming, emphasizing appropriate government policies such as carbon taxes, cap and trade systems, and clean technologies to limit future carbon emissions. Provides students with economic backround and tools to address the public policy issues related to climate change.



    Credits: 3
  
  • ISSS 4640 - The Economics of Medical Care


    Focuses on the trade-off between economic efficiency as reflected by the need to contain medical care costs, and equity considerations of increased access to the health care system. Explores the concepts of: moral hazards, asymmetric information, defensive medicine, allocate efficiency, tax subsidies, and managed care versus fee-for-service.



    Credits: 3
  
  • ISSS 4641 - Advanced Public Speaking


    Utilizes several active learning activities when considering classical rhetorical elements, audience analysis, speech organization, and strategies for improvement in the structure and delivery of extemporaneous and impromptu speeches. Work with conceptual methods, observe exemplary models of good speech making, explore personal communication apprehension, and hone individual rhetorical style.



    Credits: 3
  
  • ISSS 4651 - Bioethics in Healthcare


    Introduces the applied ethical subspecialty of bioethics, particularly as related to healthcare and human services. Each day brings advancements in healthcare: multi-organ transplants, “Octo Moms” and expanded viability on both ends of the life continuum. Society applauds these miraculous manipulations of the human essence, yet opposes healthcare agents ‘playing God’. Examines the complexity of society’s response to bioethical dilemmas.



    Credits: 3
  
  • ISSS 4670 - Organizational Change and Development


    Explores system theories, organizational structure and design, organizational culture, organizational diagnosis, and several basic frames of reference for understanding change.



    Credits: 3
  
  • ISSS 4710 - The Consultant’s Stance: Getting Things Done When You’re Not in Charge


    The Consultant’s Stance: Getting Things Done When You’re Not in Charge



    Credits: 3
  
  • ISSS 4750 - Intergroup Relations


    In this course, students develop an understanding of the basic cognitive and motivational processes involved in inter-group relations. They are encouraged to consider the roles of stereotyping, prejudice, and discrimination in everyday life. Topics include: variations in racist and sexist beliefs; the effect of stereotypes on how we perceive others and interact socially; and the psychological processes that may change stereotypes and reduce prejudice.



    Credits: 3
  
  • ISSS 4760 - Organizations that Learn


    This seminar takes an interdisciplinary look at some of the characteristics which enable diverse sorts of organizations to learn, grow, thrive and innovatively adapt to their environment. Readings and discussion topics are drawn from a wide range of areas including psychology, philosophy, evolutionary biology, education, system dynamics, organizational behavior, anthropology, and more. The seminar is project driven and both group-intensive and group-reflexive.



    Credits: 3
  
  • ISSS 4770 - Concepts in Leadership


    A study of the basic theory, knowledge, and skills of effective leadership in today’s world.  Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to use the four leadership frames of Lee Bolman and Terrence Deal (Reframing Organizations: Artistry, Choice, and Leadership, 2003) as the theoretical construct for both defining effective leadership in today’s world and developing/refining their own skills as leaders.  As such, they will also develop both a theoretical and practical understanding of the role of the leader in effecting and managing change.  This course will be conducted as a hybrid of independent study, online learning, and live class interaction.  More specifically, the course pedagogies will include lecture presentations, online and in-class discussion, case study projects, and interviews. 



    Credits: 3
  
  • ISSS 4790 - Personality Theory


    The study of personality deals with questions about what personality is and what it does, and what influences (internal and external, biological and learned) help determine our thoughts, emotions and behavior.  This course, which focuses on both theory and personality as an empirical field, will provide the student with an introduction to the study of personality in current and historical context. 



    Credits: 3
  
  • ISSS 4800 - Shamanism in the New Age


    Explores how elements of wisdom are carried in the healing, shamanic traditions of the wounded. Explores how we can collectively respond to violence in constructive ways on community and global issues.



    Credits: 3
  
  • ISSS 4810 - Exploring Mahatma Gandhi’s Non-Violent Resistance


    Explores Gandhi’s discussion of satyagraha through the actions, writings and speeches of the Nobel Peace Laureates. Delves into research in the emerging anthropology of violence and peace to find out how and why societies turn to peaceful, rather than violent responses to conflict. Explores the dynamics of violence in the world and the belief that violence is inevitable.



    Credits: 3
  
  • ISSS 4811 - New Age, Ancient Roots: The Culture of the New Thought Movement in the U.S.


    Explores the roots and offshoots of the New Thought Movement in the U.S. from the 17th century into the present. Analyzes the psychic phenomena that catalyzed the formation of the New Age, the founding of Christian Scientism and the Mormon faith, the seeding of American Buddhism, Hinduism, and shamanism, and many progressive changes in U.S. law and policy.



    Credits: 3
  
  • ISSS 4820 - American Political Thought and Institutions


    This course analyzes America’s governing institutions (including the presidency, Congress, the courts, and political parties) through the political thought that informs American constitutionalism. This course, then, is about political ideas as they have appeared and developed in the United States and the manner in which they have influenced and shaped the development of governing institutions. Particular attention will be paid to how these institutions interact, overlap, and intersect.



    Credits: 3
  
  • ISSS 4821 - Key Concepts in Cultural Analysis


    Examines the’ human’ not as a fixed and immutable category or essence, but as a result of specific historical conjunctures, differing intellectual frameworks and varying modes of social production and reproduction. Considers the transmission of ideas across cultures and historical periods and the traveling of texts-through the press, translations-as contributing to the production of the ‘human’.



    Credits: 3
  
  • ISSS 4831 - Four Women Activists for Sustaining Food, Water and Biodiversity in India


    Examines the ethical values and interpretations of political engagement of three Indian and one American female activist (Vandana Shiva, Arundhati Roy, Medha Patkar, and Martha Nussbaum).



    Credits: 3
  
  • ISSS 4850 - Great Books in Globalization


    This course addresses major topics dealing with the phenomenon known as ‘globalization’ - the ever spreading reduction of barriers to the exchange of goods services, and ideas across national borders. The method of exploration will involve reading a combination of classical and contemporary works (some books, some articles) from leaders and thinkers grappling with globalization, and its various ripple effects and challenges. Revolving around core themes of responsibility and community, democracy and culture, and prosperity and poverty in the age of globalization, readings will include works from Plato, Thucydides, Milton Friedman, Peter Singer, Thomas Friedman, Moises Naim, Robert Kaplan, Bernard Lewis, Aung San Suu Kyi, Salman Rushdie, and Amartya Sen.



    Credits: 3
  
  • ISSS 4993 - Independent Study


    Independent Study for students working on Capstone Proposals and Proseminar work.



    Credits: 1 to 3

Interdisciplinary Thesis

  
  • IMP 2010 - The Arts and Sciences in Theory and Practice


    This course is an inquiry into the nature and purpose of the historic set of disciplines comprising liberal learning with the goal of determining the intellectual passions they share, the methods and canons unique to them, and the prospects for articulating a unity among them. The course seeks to attain this goal by looking at theoretical issues such as the nature of verification and meaning, and by examining critically the actual conversations among the scholars of the arts and sciences fields over points of agreement and points of divergence.



    Credits: 3
  
  • IMP 4600 - Echols Thesis


    Optional Thesis for Echols Interdisciplinary Majors



    Credits: 3
  
  • IMP 4970 - Interdisciplinary Thesis


    Required Thesis for Interdisciplinary majors.



    Credits: 3
  
  • IMP 4971 - Interdisciplinary Thesis


    Required Thesis for Interdisciplinary majors.



    Credits: 3

Italian

  
  • ITAL 116 - Intensive Introductory Italian


    This is the non-credit option for ITAL 1016.



    Credits: 0
  
  • ITAL 126 - Intensive Introductory Italian


    This is the non-credit option for ITAL 1026.



    Credits: 0
  
  • ITAL 216 - Intensive Intermediate Italian


    This is the non-credit option for ITAL 2016.



    Credits: 0
  
  • ITAL 226 - Intensive Intermediate Italian


    This is the non-credit option for ITAL 2026.



    Credits: 0
  
  • ITAL 1010 - Elementary Italian I


    Introduction to speaking, understanding, reading, and writing Italian. Five class hours and one language laboratory hour. Followed by ITAL 1020.



    Credits: 4
  
  • ITAL 1016 - Intensive Introductory Italian


    This intensive course begins with instruction in basic oral expression, listening comprehension, elementary reading and writing, and continues with further development of these four skills at the intermediate level. Part of the Summer Language Institute.



    Credits: 3
  
  • ITAL 1020 - Elementary Italian II


    Continuation of ITAL 1010. Prerequisite: ITAL 1010.



    Credits: 4
  
  • ITAL 1026 - Intensive Introductory Italian


    This intensive course begins with instruction in basic oral expression, listening comprehension, elementary reading and writing, and continues with further development of these four skills at the intermediate level. Part of the Summer Language Institute. Prerequisites: ITAL 1016 or equavalent.



    Credits: 3
  
  • ITAL 2010 - Intermediate Italian I


    Continued grammar, conversation, composition, readings, and an introduction to Italian literature. Prerequisite: ITAL 1020 or the equivalent. Note: The following courses have the prerequisite ITAL 2010, 2020, or permission of the department.



    Credits: 3
  
  • ITAL 2016 - Intensive Intermediate Italian


    This intensive course begins with instruction in intermediate level oral expression, listening comprehension, reading and writing, and continues with further development of these four skills. Part of the Summer Language Institute. Prerequisites: ITAL 1016 & 1026 or equivalent.



    Credits: 3
  
  • ITAL 2020 - Intermediate Italian II


    Continuation of ITAL 2010.



    Credits: 3
  
  • ITAL 2026 - Intensive Intermediate Italian


    This intensive course begins with instruction in intermediate level oral expression, listening comprehension, reading and writing, and continues with further development of these four skills. Part of the Summer Language Institute. Prerequisite: ITAL 1016 , 1026 and 2016 or equivalent.



    Credits: 3
  
  • ITAL 3010 - Advanced Italian I


    Includes idiomatic Italian conversation and composition, anthological readings of literary texts in Italian, plus a variety of oral exercises including presentations, skits, and debates. Italian composition is emphasized through writing assignments and selective review of the fine points of grammar and syntax. Prerequisite: ITAL 2020.



    Credits: 3
  
  • ITAL 3020 - Advanced Italian II


    Topics include idiomatic Italian conversation and composition, anthological readings and discussions in Italian of literary texts from the past four centuries of Italian literature (from Tasso to the present), selective review of the fine points of grammar and syntax, the elements of essay writing to Italian. Prerequisite: ITAL 2020



    Credits: 3
  
  • ITAL 3030 - How to Do Things with Words


    One of three required core courses for the Italian Studies Major and Minor (with ITAL 3010 and 3020). ITAL 3030 focuses on interpretative and critical approaches to various genres of Italian textual and visual-linguistic expression. These include poetry, fiction, cinema, and theater. ITAL 3030 introduces students to the history and conventions of each genre, as well as the analytical methodologies suited to intelligent engagement with each. Prerequisites: Must be enrolled in or have taken ITAL 3010 or ITAL 3020



    Credits: 3
  
  • ITAL 3040 - Advanced Italian III


    This course aims at perfecting student’s command of Italian language, in all major skill areas: speaking, listening comprehension, reading, and writing. Selective review of the fine points of grammar and syntax. Idiomatic Italian conversation promoted via readings and discussions in Italian on current subjects. Writing proficiency promoted through composition work. In Italian. Prerequisites: Completion of ITAL 2020 or its equivalent.



    Credits: 3
  
  • ITAL 3050 - Advanced Italian IV


    Continued perfection of Italian language proficiency, in all major skill areas: speaking, listening comprehension, reading, and writing. Selective review of the fine points of grammar and syntax. Idiomatic Italian conversation promoted via readings and discussions in Italian on current subjects. Writing proficiency promoted through composition work. In Italian. Prerequisites: Completion of ITAL 3040 or its equivalent.



    Credits: 3
  
  • ITAL 3110 - Medieval and Renaissance Masterpieces


    Introduction to relevant Italian medieval and renaissance literary works. Prerequisites: ITAL 2020



    Credits: 3
  
  • ITAL 3120 - Contemporary Literature


    Study of selected masterpieces from the modern period of Italian literature. Readings and discussions in Italian. Exercises in essay writing. Prerequisite: ITAL 2020 or equivalent.



    Credits: 3
  
  • ITAL 3250 - Italian Love Poetry in the Middle Ages and Renaissance


    This course treats the production of major poets and writers of Italian Medieval and Renaissance times (Dante, Petrarca, Ariosto, and Tasso) and focuses on the theme of love. It illustrates how central the topic of love was to Italian poetry in the early modern age, its development from classical love verse, and the immense influence of Italian love poetry in the diffusion of Italian culture abroad. Taught in Italian.



    Credits: 3
 

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