Apr 13, 2024  
Undergraduate Record 2017-2018 
    
Undergraduate Record 2017-2018 [ARCHIVED RECORD]

Course Descriptions


 

Interdisciplinary Studies-Social Sciences

  
  • ISSS 3042 - Women’s Photography and Feminist Aesthetics


    Introduces students to feminist criticism and especailly to feminist aesthetic theory. Examines feminist criticism and theory through women’s photography.



    Credits: 3
  
  • ISSS 3043 - Women Writing for Change


    Examines the rhetorical choices women have made from Medieval times to the present to create public arguments for social change in the face of cultural pressure to remain silent. Analyzes how women writers deliberately worked with cultural narratives of gender and used traditional and alternative texts. Explores how those decisions shape expectations of women in the public sphere today.



    Credits: 3
  
  • ISSS 3045 - Science and Practice of Mindfulness


    Considers the latest scientific findings about the mind-body connection, offers students the opportunity to experience them through direct mindfulness meditative practices. Explores formal and informal mindfulness practices, the contextual background of mindfulness, and applies them to a variety of professions and settings. Covers a range of contemplative exercises that cultivate emotional balance and the ability to cope with stress.



    Credits: 3
  
  • ISSS 3050 - Evolution of International Relations


    Evolution of International Relations



    Credits: 3
  
  • ISSS 3051 - International Political Economy of the Middle East


    Provides essential background information on the Middle East’s culture and history, geopolitics, politics of religion, colonialism, and the rise of nationalism. Analyzes political economic development and ther resuergence of religious extremism. Analyzes the recent revolutions in Tunisia and Egypt and their ramifications for the Middle East.



    Credits: 3
  
  • ISSS 3060 - Military Force in International Relations


    Examines the threat and use of military force in international relations. Topics include deterrence theory and recent critiques, ethical and international legal considerations, domestic constraints, and the postwar U.S. and Soviet experiences with the use of force.



    Credits: 3
  
  • ISSS 3061 - World Military History: Thermopylae to Sedan


    Examines the doctrinal, technological, and cultural influences upon the art and science of war from ancient times to the mid-late nineteeth century. Includes readings from Sun Tzu, Vegetius, Mao Zedong, Clausewitz, Jomini and other primary sources. Examines war from the perspective of politics, economics, and society.



    Credits: 3
  
  • ISSS 3070 - Perspectives on International Studies


    Examines issues that arise as one studies individual and societal activities from an international perspective. Provides tools that will assist students in more individualized explorations of international studies.



    Credits: 3
  
  • ISSS 3080 - Islam


    Provides students with refined knowledge which is relevant in both the professional and private spheres. Focusing on both the history of Islam, from its founding through the present day, and (more specifically) on the principles of Islam and how different Muslim theologians and statesmen have interpreted and applied those principles throughout Islam’s history. The course is a purposeful mix of anthropology, history and political science.



    Credits: 3
  
  • ISSS 3090 - Religion in America


    Examines the concept of America and to what extent it is a product of religious mindsets of particular times. Explores multi-media materials, including: Hollywood films, 20th Century folk music, literature of the west, 18th Century primary sources, 19th Century theses on American identity, and 20th Century journalism and criticism.



    Credits: 3
  
  • ISSS 3110 - Meeting the New Shamans


    Examines the major autobiographical works of the new shamans and some of the commentary arguing about their veracity in Native American and scholarly circles. Develops an interactive map of theories, methods, and background of the major writers in the movement to lesser-known writers and the outer fringes of what is sometimes called the New Age.



    Credits: 3
  
  • ISSS 3121 - Ancient Greek Culture Through Modern Eyes


    Examines ancient Greek myth, literature, and philosophy through the lens of modern psychology.



    Credits: 3
  
  • ISSS 3150 - Constitutional Law


    Introduces students to the study of constitutional law and provides a good grounding in the methods the U.S. Supreme Court uses to interpret our Constitution. Examines the generally accepted methods of constitutional analysis through in-depth studies of landmark cases both historical and contemporary. Lays an initial foundation in an overview of federal judicial, legislative and executive powers.



    Credits: 3
  
  • ISSS 3151 - Law and Society


    Introduces students to the interaction between law and society. Surveys various theoretical approaches to the study of law before moving on to empirical studies focused on the U.S. legal system. Examines how the sociology of law can be used by those wishing to reform or find alternatives to the current legal system.



    Credits: 3
  
  • ISSS 3160 - Democracy in America


    Examines democracy, free speech, elections and the press; considers the role of a free press in a time of civil discord, challenges to free speech in America at large and on college campuses; evaluates threats to democracy and the electoral process by analyzing Russian hacking and the role of PACs and Super PACs; examines mainstream and social media, “fake news” and posits if democracy can survive in a culture of 24/7 news coverage and “tweets.”



    Credits: 3
  
  • ISSS 3170 - The Bill of Rights in the 21st Century


    This course examines the origins of the Bill of Rights and the specific rights listed, as well as the contours of those rights as they have been interpreted by the Supreme Court. The course addresses contemporary issues, including the right to bear arms, the relation between religion and government, and use of high-tech criminal investigative tools.



    Credits: 3
  
  • ISSS 3180 - Critical Issues in Democracy


    Explores several critical issues in democracy, relating to both the United States and countries abroad, such as: the examination of ancient and modern theories of democracy, political parties, the Presidency, voting, foreign policy, and the development of international relations.



    Credits: 3
  
  • ISSS 3190 - American Political Development


    Examines the history of American politics since the 1960’s. Key areas of study include political factors that influence the way U.S. presidents design their domestic and foregin policy agenda, the role of opposing views from special interest groups and political parties in decision making, and critical decisions made by presidents from civil rights legislation to the Iraq and Afghanistan War and Obamacare and how they affect our daily lives.



    Credits: 3
  
  • ISSS 3191 - Twentieth-Century America


    Studies US political, social and cultural history from 1900 to 2000 through historical documents, images, and film. Examines not only history but how to be a historian. Investigates a historical problem of choice in a research paper.



    Credits: 3
  
  • ISSS 3200 - Britain and Its Empire: Art, Media, and other Cultural Forms


    Introduces major events and themes in the history of Britain and the British Empire, and places these developments in wider context of world history. Prioritizes non-traditional approaches and sources (paintings, engravings, film and television) to explore the past. Challenges national and ethnic stereotypes, and pursues a definition of British “character”.



    Credits: 3
  
  • ISSS 3201 - Happy Wars and Sad Love Songs: A History of Ireland


    Examines Ireland’s contributions to the wider history of the British Isles and Europe, as well as the consequences of the Irish diaspora in the modern era. Utilizes a broad range of primary sources, including imaginative literature and music. Addresses the major trends in the history of Ireland from earliest times to the present day.



    Credits: 3
  
  • ISSS 3210 - Soviet and Post-Soviet Politics


    Soviet and Post-Soviet Politics



    Credits: 3
  
  • ISSS 3260 - The Emergence of Modern America, 1877-1920


    In the four decades following the period of Reconstruction, the extent to which the United States changed was remarkable. A reform impulse swept the nation in the first 2 decades of the twentieth century as America attempted to come to terms with its modernity. Americans living in the Gilded Age and Progressive Era saw political, social, economic, cultural, artistic, and intellectual life metamorphose. The nation on the eve of World War I in many ways barely resembled the nation of the Reconstruction Era. The developments of the late nineteenth and early twentieth century laid the foundation for the nation in which we live today. This course will attempt to study this most complex and important period of American history as thoroughly as possible.



    Credits: 3
  
  • ISSS 3261 - Books Behind Bars: Life, Literature, and Community Leadership: 21st Ce


    Offers an integrated academic-community engagement curriculum, and provides an opportunity for service learning, leadership, and teaching by facilitating discussions about course readings with residents at a local juvenile treatment center. Provides a first-hand appreciation of cultural diversity and an appreciation of how the study of literature can contribute to positive social change.



    Credits: 3
  
  • ISSS 3262 - Globalization, Liberalism, and Reform in the 19th Century


    Surveys major trends in 19 century world history. Explores a representative sample of peoples and cultures of the period. Considers how societies in Europe, the Americas, Africa, the Middle East, and Asia coped with similar problems and innovations. Introduces students to theoretical frameworks for world and comparative history. Explores the processes of cultural interaction and globalization. Introduces students to a broad range of sources.



    Credits: 3
  
  • ISSS 3280 - The American Built Environment: “Place” in America


    Examines the various architectures and landscapes that Americans have inhabited, from colonial times to the present. Focuses on homes, businesses and institutions, cities, sites of transport, and places of public assembly. Considers technological developments, such as those in communications and surveillance, that remake the experience and understanding of place.



    Credits: 3
  
  • ISSS 3281 - The Art of Public Speaking


    Examines the five canons of the art of public speaking allowing students to learn and practice the skills needed to speak persuasively, confidently, forcefully, and intelligibly to an audience.



    Credits: 3
  
  • ISSS 3282 - Effective Business Writing and Speaking


    Develops communication possibilities through a number of writing and speaking activities. Emphasizes plain English style writing, essential for clear, concise messages. Examines how to create and deliver clear, persuasive, and professional short speeches and includes learning to write effective email, letters and memos. Explores online writing environments. Develops awareness of self and others.



    Credits: 3
  
  • ISSS 3290 - History of Virtual Worlds


    Examines the historical, technological, and literary roots of today’s virtual worlds, beginning with Plato’s “allegory of the cave” and ending with recent research into social relations within Second Life.



    Credits: 3
  
  • ISSS 3291 - Revolutionary Ideas


    Investigates ideas inherited from the past that are shaping the world of tomorrow. Explores recognized ideas such as evolution and socialism, as well as some that are not often described as ideas, including happiness through consumption, germs, and disease. Examines historical documents and goes beyond the individuals who introduced them by examining how these ideas changed lives.



    Credits: 3
  
  • ISSS 3300 - Issues in Cultural Anthropology


    The course includes a general review of key concepts and problems in anthropology, including the concept and nature of culture, its relationship to language, economics, politics, kinship and religion as documented among different societies around the globe. The course focuses on ethnographies and on contemporary anthropological research (the study of identity, race and ethnicity).



    Credits: 3
  
  • ISSS 3301 - Human Origins


    Provides an overview and assessment of the theory, methods and data used by anthropologists to reconstruct human physical and cultural evolution. Examines the time from the initial appearance of hominins to the period when modern humans first began to conduct agriculture. Reviews Darwin and evolutionary theory as well as the controversy surrounding that theory.



    Credits: 3
  
  • ISSS 3302 - Ritual and Peace Building


    Explores the anthropological literature on ritual and its application in contemporary peace building and community healing.



    Credits: 3
  
  • ISSS 3303 - Meditation in Action: The Contemplative Sciences


    Examines the history, goals, and impact of a new academic discipline called the contemplative sciences in which meditation and non-western healing practices are brought to bear on a variety of 21st century problems from violence to the environment. Studies meditation and contemplative methods from the world’s religions and will research their use in secular settings.



    Credits: 3
  
  • ISSS 3305 - The Impact of Media on the Development of Popular Culture


    Examines the media’s role in conveying cultural meaning through popular culture. Analyzes the histories and theories underlying media and popular culture; focusing on print, film, radio, television, the internet, and social media. Critiques contemporary popular culture through music, movies, tv programming, advertising, sports, fashion, celebrity culture, language, and collective public expression.



    Credits: 3
  
  • ISSS 3350 - The Nature of Oral Narratives: How and Why We Tell Stories


    The course will focus on the nature of oral poetry and on the culturally specific ways of generating verbal art (ethnopoetics). Poetry (and oral poetry) has usually excluded narratives, which have been considered as ‘prose’. Recent studies have found that orally transmitted stories, tales and legends may be organized in ways that make them also a kind of poetry. The course will examine a variety of stories, the form they take, and their meanings to the people who tell and hear them. General questions about such narratives will be taken up (orality in relation to literacy, oral-formulaic composition and performance, parallelism as the main feature of poetry, and notions of the structure of narrative). 



    Credits: 3
  
  • ISSS 3360 - Making Sense of the News


    Develops thoughtful and informed perspectives on some of the most intriguing news stories of our times. Examines aspects of current event topics. Students will have opportunities to share their discoveries and report their findings and judgments and discuss the relevant issues.



    Credits: 3
  
  • ISSS 3370 - Introduction to Archeological Research


    Explores the principles required in the design, implementation, analysis, and interpretation of archaeological research. Considers archaeological fieldwork conceptualized at multiple scales. Introduces students to archaeological survey and excavation by conducting field research at Monticello.



    Credits: 3
  
  • ISSS 3380 - Sociology and Self-Narrative


    Explores how a person’s biography is a product of history and society. Discusses the sociological importance of self-narratives and what philosophers and other scholars have said about the significance of rewriting one’s biography.



    Credits: 3
  
  • ISSS 3381 - The Sociology of Violence


    Explores the causes and consequences of violence. Emphasizes the role of culture, beginning with the social processes of violence, and then covers the individual psychology. Examines how people cope with violence, moving from the individual mind to popular culture and politics. Discusses topics such as violence and honor, the Holocaust, rape, terrorism, and posttraumatic stress disorder.



    Credits: 3
  
  • ISSS 3382 - History of Genocide


    Explores the history of genocide and other forms of one-sided, state-sponsored mass killing in the twentieth century. Includes such case studies as the Armenian genocide, the Holocaust, the Rwandan genocide, and the mass killings that have taken place under Communist regimes (e.g., Stalin’s USSR, Mao’s China, Pol Pot’s Cambodia).



    Credits: 3
  
  • ISSS 3383 - The Dark Side of the Twentieth Century


    Enables students to reflect on what was perhaps the greatest downfall into barbarity, genocide and mass oppression. Examines first-hand accounts of both the Holocaust and crimes of the Communist regimes in the Soviet Union, Eastern Europe, China, and Cambodia. Explores historical, intellectual, cultural, and psychological roots of Nazism and Communism.



    Credits: 3
  
  • ISSS 3390 - Language Acquisition and Development


    Addresses how children acquire language and how their language learning abilities change over the course of development. Explores what infants and children know about language at various points in development, how researchers test children’s understanding and use of language, how psychological theories explain children’s language development, and how language acquisition varies throughout life.



    Credits: 3
  
  • ISSS 3400 - Psychology and Human Behavioral Processes


    This is course is an introduction to the scientific study of psychology and human behavior. The course will cover the basic disciplines of psychological research, developmental psychology, social psychology, and clinical psychology.  Included in this will be areas of more advanced study. 



    Credits: 3
  
  • ISSS 3401 - Smart Cities Enabling Sustainability


    Introduces smart cities within the context of sustainability: economic, environmental, and equity. Provides a multidisciplinary look at innovative smart city approaches to solve complex problems on the local level with global impact; includes topics from environmental studies, information technology, data science, engineering, and social science.



    Credits: 3
  
  • ISSS 3410 - Abnormal Psychology: Disorders and Treatment


    Explores major mental illness, including such diagnoses as depression, anxiety, schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and personality disorders.  Examines biological and genetic predispositions for various types of mental illness. Explores current treatment models for mental illness, including medication and therapy interventions.



    Credits: 3
  
  • ISSS 3411 - Personality Psychology: Theory and Application


    Surveys the major theoretical approaches to understanding the development, structure, and dynamics of personality. Covers classical psychoanalytical theories, trait theories, humanistic theories, social-cognitive, and biological and evolutionary theories. Presents methods of assessing and understanding the psychology of personality. Discusses the applications of personality theories in real life situations.



    Credits: 3
  
  • ISSS 3412 - Developmental and Psychological Models of Self-Awareness


    Introduces students to the concept of self-awareness. Explores in depth, various psychological models of self-awareness including a centuries old psychological system, and a modern personality inventory in order for students to gain historical perspective, and personal insight, greater awareness, and understanding on the study of the self on a historical as well as a personal level.



    Credits: 3
  
  • ISSS 3413 - Learning From Others


    Examine research then make live observations to discover how people learn when to trust and when to be skeptical.



    Credits: 3
  
  • ISSS 3414 - Culture and Psychology


    Reviews definitions of culture and cultural studies. Focuses on the impact culture, race, ethnicity, socioeconomic status, and community context has on children and families. Covers mental health, human development, and social behavior.



    Credits: 3
  
  • ISSS 3416 - Social Psychology


    Examines the field of social psychology, the scientific study of social influence and human relations and interaction. Focuses on the major theories, research findings and the application of social psychology methodologies. Discusses how people’s cognition, feelings, and behaviors are influenced by others.



    Credits: 3
  
  • ISSS 3420 - Human Thought and Behavior


    Students will explore a variety of psychological topics in depth, from these major disciplines within psychology: Developmental, Social, Clinical, and Cognitive, and discuss their impact on the field of psychology and how they apply to behavior and life experience. Learning will be assessed by essay responses to questions posed from journal articles, book chapters, and class discussions and demonstrations.



    Credits: 3
  
  • ISSS 3421 - The Psychology of Music


    Examines research, illusions, popular texts, and case studies (e.g., musical savants) to learn about the fundamentals of sound, music perception, and the influence of developmental and cultural experiences.



    Credits: 3
  
  • ISSS 3422 - Managing your Emotions in the Workplace


    Gives a fundamental overview of Emotional Intelligence and shows how understanding Emotional Intelligence leads to a beneficial working career and personal life. Presents an E.I. competence framework and reviews basic domains, such as self-awareness, self-management, social awareness, and relationship management through various methods to promote learning by doing. Applies theoretical concepts to real world situations.



    Credits: 3
  
  • ISSS 3430 - Women and Global Change


    Studies women’s activism from a global perspective, and its relationship with feminism.



    Credits: 3
  
  • ISSS 3431 - Feminist Theory in the United States


    Examines the major trends of the 1st, 2nd, and 3rd Waves of feminist theory in the United States, particularly as impinged on questions of social identity and the ways we culturally value knowledge, skills, and experience for men and women. Explores the interrelationship between gender, race, ethnicity, sexual orientation, and class both as described in theory and lived in personal experience.



    Credits: 3
  
  • ISSS 3432 - Science and Society: How Social Paradigms Inform Science


    Explores how society informs science through the lens of social foundations, societal movements, causes, politics, feminism and science; covers some real science content such as theoretical physics and string theory. Focuses on a combination of feminism, social foundations, history, and science and will require new ways of thinking about what it means to be scientifically literate in the modern world.



    Credits: 3
  
  • ISSS 3440 - Gender and Society


    Focuses on the social and cultural construction of gender differences and the ways in which gender norms and stereotypes are prescribed and reinforced for a societys members, depending on their sex. Explores the history of feminist thought and practice, while also attending to contemporary issues at the intersections of gender and race, nation, class, age and sexuality.



    Credits: 3
  
  • ISSS 3450 - Sociology of the Family


    This course offers comparisons of family organizations in relation to other social institutions in various societies and an introduction to the theory of kinship and marriage systems. 



    Credits: 3
  
  • ISSS 3452 - The History of American Foreign Relations in the 20th Century


    The History of American Foreign Relations in the 20th Century



    Credits: 3
  
  • ISSS 3453 - Food for Thought: An Exploration of the Way We Eat


    Looks at ways food has influenced western culture, and its significance in our lives from the invention of agriculture to the contemporary debate about health foods; examines films and texts to find womans role in food production, how religious beliefs, economic factors, and ideas about health influence why and what we eat. Should we live to eat or eat to live? Where do we eat? What forces shape our choice of foods? That’s plenty to chew on!



    Credits: 3
  
  • ISSS 3454 - Body Image, Media & Eating: A Socio-Psychological Perspective


    Understand that body image and eating attitudes develop through a complex interplay of biological, psychological, and socio-cultural factors. Specifically explores cultural influences reflected in the media including print, film, and television. Particular attention will be given to the interaction of gender and culture, through discussion of viewed media content and relevant research.



    Credits: 3
  
  • ISSS 3455 - Demystifying Diversity


    This course acknowledges the myriad overtones, undertones, complexities, shadows, and “politicizations” with which the topic of diversity is fraught and which–for many of us–make the issue hard, maybe even a little scary, to approach and difficult to understand. At bottom, however, the course will argue that diversity basically means “difference” and how we react and relate to it. The course will use a variety of social science perspectives, tools, concepts, and models (historical, sociological, political, organizational, and psychological) to explore the American experience with difference (ethnicity, race, religion, gender, etc.) from Revolutionary times through the present. It will provide the student with a robust framework for understanding and “doing” her/himself as a person of difference in an increasingly diverse society.



    Credits: 3
  
  • ISSS 3460 - Lifespan Development


    Explores an individual’s psychological development in today’s world. Investigates communication and relationships among individuals, families, and societies. Examines cognitive, social and emotional developmental changes that affect one’s self and environment. Considers how technology influences many aspects of development including research in genetics, involvement with computers and apps, application of new medical research, and aging.



    Credits: 3
  
  • ISSS 3461 - Adult Development and Aging


    Explores adulthood through the individuals’ ways of making sense of their inner and outer experience; and how the way a person makes meaning can change/develop over time. Examines a person’s meaning system as interpretive lens through which all experience is understood.



    Credits: 3
  
  • ISSS 3470 - Russian Culture and Society


    This course explores patterns in Russian literature, music, and art from 1900 to the present. Topics include the decline of the Old Regime, impact of revolution on the arts of Russia, modernism of the 1920s in literature, music, art, and film and the arts today.



    Credits: 3
  
  • ISSS 3480 - The Search for Self in Russian Classics


    From copy clerks to kings, outcasts to aristocrats, demons to dandies, the characters that populate the pages of the nineteenth-century Russian classics represent a wide range of both Russian and universal human types. Throughout this course students will explore the recurrent question: To what extent are the issues raised in the nineteenth-century Russian classics applicable to the challenges of contemporary America and to our own personal lives? Students will sample classic works from a variety of genres (short story, novel, poetry, ‘novel in verse,’ drama) and authors (Pushkin, Lermontov, Turgenev, Gogol, Tolstoy, Dostoevsky, and Chekhov).



    Credits: 3
  
  • ISSS 3485 - Childhood, Memory, and Society


    Explores changing concepts of the child from medieval times to the present by examining personal memoirs, competing social theories, and literary visions of the child. Focuses on medieval childhood, the romantic child, the Victorian child, slave children, pioneer childhood, immigrant childhood, childhood and the Great Depression, and childhood in today’s family.



    Credits: 3
  
  • ISSS 3600 - Economics and the Environment


    Establishes a framework for analyzing conflicts between economic growth and efficiency and a sustainable environment in an interdisciplinary context emphasizing the complex interrelationships among social, political, and economic goals.



    Credits: 3
  
  • ISSS 3602 - Risk in Society and Business


    Examines the risks experienced by individuals, society, and businesses. Explores the origins of concepts related to risk. Assesses attitudes toward risk and the impact of attitude on individual behavior. Examines the sources of risk to societies and businesses, and evaluates options for their mitigation.



    Credits: 3
  
  • ISSS 3610 - Contemporary Problems in Econ


    Provides students with the conceptual framework and methods of economic science necessary for analyzing a variety of contemporary economic problems. The usefulness of these economic concepts will be taught as applications to specific public policy issues.



    Credits: 3
  
  • ISSS 3611 - Cheap Eats: The Economics of the American Food Industry


    Examines the economic costs of food, including subsidies, production practices, ecological sustainability and health impacts; analyzes institutional factors contributing to potential market distortions in the food market system; evaluates the factors that characterize the current system such as the reliance on chemical pesticides and organic alternatives.



    Credits: 3
  
  • ISSS 3620 - Regional Economic Development


    Regional Economic Development



    Credits: 3
  
  • ISSS 3630 - The American Presidency in Film and Television


    Examines the representations of government, specifically by asking many questions and analyzing fictional depictions of the presidency. Examines the language of political film and television by its necessary manipulations, guided and misguided intentions, and its tangible results in society.



    Credits: 3
  
  • ISSS 3660 - The Sea and Society: Producing Maritime Space 1400-2000


    Explores changes and developments in maritime history. Introduces the sea as a space apart from those spaces inhibited on land. Explores the social, cultural, economic, environmental and political characteristics of the sea.



    Credits: 3
  
  • ISSS 3670 - Ethnic and Race Relations


    Introduces the study of race and ethnic relations, including the social and economic conditions promoting prejudice, racism, discrimination, and segregation. Examines contemporary American conditions, and historical and international materials.



    Credits: 3
  
  • ISSS 3671 - Cultural Identity in the 21st Century


    Examines current cultural events and explores what individual and cultural identity will look like as the 21st century evolves. Focuses on the themes of race, gender, and religion.



    Credits: 3
  
  • ISSS 3675 - The End of Heroism


    Explores how contemporary Westerns conceptualize and relate to suffering. Addresses the current attention given to victims and victimhood and the claim that Westerners no longer value heroism or stoicism. Surveys topics as diverse as common fears of death, the increased use of therapy, soldier life, and breast cancer awareness.



    Credits: 3
  
  • ISSS 3700 - The Romans


    Incorporates important Roman works, including art and architecture. Reviews the major interpretations of modern scholarship.



    Credits: 3
  
  • ISSS 3720 - Witchcraft


    Surveys Western attitudes toward magic and witchcraft from ancient times to the present, with emphasis on the European age of witch hunting, 1450-1750.



    Credits: 3
  
  • ISSS 3730 - Miracles in Everyday Life


    Explores one’s belief in miracles, as well as related phenomena such as saints, pilgrimages, and vision. Analyzes multi-culturalism in the purest sense of the word. Examines one’s deepest beliefs in all of their variety, and richness.



    Credits: 3
  
  • ISSS 3760 - Issues in Leadership


    Designed to serve as an overview and exploration in the ever-growing field of leadership studies, the purpose of this course is to learn about leadership- to be better at leadership, whether in an organization, community, family, or some other context. A wide-range of topics and issues will be examined through historical and modern conceptions, case studies, moral and ethical sides of leadership, and focused looks at crisis leadership.



    Credits: 3
  
  • ISSS 3770 - Challenges of Leadership: Balancing Competing Values & Contradictory Logics


    Considers the limits of the management versus leadership debate. Examines the organizational basis of managerial leadership. Seeks an understanding of leadership as a systematic process.



    Credits: 3
  
  • ISSS 3771 - Historical Perspective of Leadership


    Analyzes leadership through the centuries by examining well-known leaders throughout history. Discusses the evolution of leadership throughout the ages. Examines the role of long-term social, political, and economic forces. Emphasizes the application to actual leaders within their respective contexts.



    Credits: 3
  
  • ISSS 3772 - Global Leadership Fundamentals for All Industries


    Investigates current leadership thinking and behavior in for-profit and non-profit work environments, as well as the role leadership has played in past decision making processes, and what we can learn from the decisions that were made by those leaders. Examines real world examples throughout this course, leveraging the theory and practical applications of leadership.



    Credits: 3
  
  • ISSS 3810 - The American Presidency


    This course addresses the constitutional role and historical development of the American Presidency. We will also examine the theoretical explanations of the institution’s relationship to democratic government, the separation of powers, and the expansion of national administrative power. This broad understanding of the historical and theoretical presidency will inform our consideration of current events and upcoming presidential elections.



    Credits: 3
  
  • ISSS 3820 - American National Identity


    Examines how to reconcile national unity and cultural diversity; the responsibilities of democratic citizenship with the cultural values of a consumer society; and being a patriotic American citizen with the contemporary imperative to become citizens of the world. Explores important writings by comparing American figures and ideas of 1968 to some of the key figures and ideas of 2008.



    Credits: 3
  
  • ISSS 3830 - Critical Issues in American Foreign Policy


    Examines the critical foreign policy challenges facing the United States in the 21st century. Explores the principal challenges and opportunities for American policymakers, such as: the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction, environmental issues, and human rights and democratization.



    Credits: 3
  
  • ISSS 3840 - The Ethical & Philosophical Primate: Evolution, Ethics and Human Altruism


    Examines evolutionary explanations for the origins of morality, philosophy and religion, and their ramifications for ethics and culture. Recognizes the views of Darwinism, Social Darwinism, and Natural Selection and identifies the cultural and ethical implications of living with each view in today’s world.



    Credits: 3
  
  • ISSS 3850 - Media and Politics


    This course will examine the role of mass media in the political process focusing on the presidency and includes such topics as print and broadcast news, social media and election campaigns, political advertising, fundraising, and media effects on public opinion and political participation.



    Credits: 3
  
  • ISSS 3851 - Screening Terrorism


    Examines cimematic and televisual representations of terrorism. Promotes critical awareness of the ways in which terrorism is depicted on screen and explores the complex ways in which real acts of terror involve performance and theatrics.



    Credits: 3
  
  • ISSS 3860 - Faith, Reason, and Science


    Explores the relationship between religious faith, forms of reasoning and scientific explanation. Utilizes the arguments of philosophers, theologians, scientists, and sociologists to examine the nature of religious faith, religious faith as a rational, irrational, or non-rational belief, reasoning’s impact on faith, and the compatibility of scientific and religious perspectives.



    Credits: 3
  
  • ISSS 3880 - Data Analytics and Decision Making


    Introduces the analytics process from question formulation to data gathering, processing, and decision making; highlights and explores differences among methods using large data sets, and case studies from various industries to illustrate and understand concepts. Utilizes statistical software and applies analytical methods through exercises, case study examination, and a final project. Prerequisite: ISBU 4420



    Credits: 3
  
  • ISSS 3880 - Data Analytics and Decision Making


    Introduces the analytics process from question formulation to data gathering, processing, and decision making; highlights and explores differences among methods using large data sets, and case studies from various industries to illustrate and understand concepts. Utilizes statistical software; applies analytical methods through exercises, case study examination, and a final project. Prereq: foundational knowledge of statistics or instructor permission.



    Credits: 3
  
  • ISSS 3887 - Educational Technology in the Information Age


    Focuses on ongoing societal debates over educational technology while exploring local technology resources available at UVa and on the Web in general. Explores web-based tools, information websites, and interactive databases that support communication, research, and design skills, as well as creativity and knowledge presentation in online environments.



    Credits: 3
  
  • ISSS 3888 - Looking Through the Philosophic Lens of Technology


    Explores ways in which the history and philosophy of technology can inform today’s liberal arts students about the role of technology in our society. Covers current and historical topics as well as explores and develops a personal philosophic approach to the application of technology.



    Credits: 3
  
  • ISSS 4000 - The Experience of the Great War: Life and Literature


    Drawing on histories and literature, including autobiographies, poetry, and novels, this course focuses on the experiences and mentalities of those who fought in World War I, as well as those who remained on the home front. The realities and myths of the Great War are explored. An emphasis is placed on British, French, and German writings about the Western Front as well as some consideration of the fighting on the Eastern Front and in Turkey.



    Credits: 3
  
  • ISSS 4005 - Irregular Warfare: Terrorists, Insurgents, and Transnational Criminals


    Examines the evolution of insurgency, counterinsurgency, and terrorism. Studies readings from Mao Zedong, David Galula, Roger Trinquier, Abu Musab al-Suri and others. Explores the risk factors that lead to the onset of insurgencies, terrorist movements, and transnational criminal groups and the strategic and ethical challenges states face in countering these types of non-state actors.



    Credits: 3
  
  • ISSS 4010 - The Second World War: Experience of Total War


    Covers military, political, social and economic aspects of history’s most devastating conflict. Explores the experiences of military personnel and civilians in Europe and Asia.



    Credits: 3
  
  • ISSS 4020 - Europe After 1945


    Europe After 1945



    Credits: 3
 

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