Feb 05, 2023  
Undergraduate Record 2017-2018 
    
Undergraduate Record 2017-2018 [ARCHIVED RECORD]

Course Descriptions


 

Informational Technology

  
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    IT 3220 - Strategic Business Value of Information Technology


    Focuses on how to assess the value of IT investments and align technical strategies with business strategies. Introduces Porter’s Five Forces Model, the value chain, technology payoff metrics, and risk analysis. Explores ways to leverage disruptive technologies for competitive advantage.



    Credits: 3
  
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    IT 3230 - Basics of Web Design


    Master the basics of website construction, design, and maintenance using XHTML and CSS. The course provides an overview of aesthetic, business, and technical website design concepts. Attention is also given to the underlying concepts of website design such as navigation for websites, usability, accessibility issues, and the process of putting a completed website online.



    Credits: 3
  
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    IT 3240 - Enterprise Systems Architecture and Design


    Applies common frameworks and methodologies to the examination of enterprise system architecture needs. Includes coverage of the systems development life cycle and the methodologies in use characterized by their varying degrees of iteration, structure, and user involvement. Emphasizes analytical and design concepts and related tools such as use cases and Unified Modeling Language.



    Credits: 3
  
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    IT 3250 - User Requirements and Quality Assurance


    Develops the skills needed to understand user requirements, meet customer needs, and ensure client satisfaction. Emphasizes the importance of quality assurance through instruction and class exercises.



    Credits: 3
  
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    IT 3270 - Introduction to Programming Concepts


    An introductory course in programming that provides the necessary stepping stones for more advanced computer programming. Introduces the basic concepts of programming, enabling students to develop fundamental skills in translating business problems into programming solutions. This course follows the object-oriented emphasis of Java.



    Credits: 3
  
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    IT 3280 - Increasing Human Connectivity in a Post-Social Media Society


    Examines contemporary questions about media, technology, sociality, and society in a variety of settings. Establishes both theoretical and experiential foundations for making personal decisions and judgements regarding the relationship between mediated communications and the human community.



    Credits: 3
  
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    IT 3290 - Ethical Issues in Technology


    Examines ethical issues including privacy, system abuse, and ethical practices in information technology. Explores how to make sound ethical choices and resolve legal and moral issues that arise in information technology.



    Credits: 3
  
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    IT 3300 - Introduction to Web Content Development


    Introduction to Web Content Development



    Credits: 3
  
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    IT 3310 - Management Information Systems Fundamentals


    Introduces students to the field of technological advances in computer systems affected by advancing technology. Explores computer-based information systems in response to management needs as well as trends and developments in the IT fields.



    Credits: 3
  
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    IT 3320 - Advanced Web Technologies


    Introduces students to emerging programming languages such as XML and the many tools used to display content on wireless and mobile computing devices. Examines the latest software in order to gain an understanding of tools that work best to solve problems, enhance workforce and meet goals.



    Credits: 3
  
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    IT 3330 - Writing for the Web


    Writing for the Web



    Credits: 3
  
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    IT 3340 - Fundamentals of E-Business and Web Marketing


    Study how business is conducted online with a review of e-commerce terminology and industry practices. Concentration is given to sharpening Web marketing skills and developing strategies to reach your intended audience.



    Credits: 3
  
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    IT 3350 - Agile Project Management


    Introduces the principles of Agile Project Management and covers the frameworks and practices used by agile teams. Explores innovative ways of gathering requirements, estimation, release planning, performance metrics, and scaling with the Agile Manifesto in mind. Emphasizes software development while applying the principles to any type of project..



    Credits: 3
  
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    IT 3360 - Fundamentals of Search Engine Optimization


    Examines how to optimize a Web site to obtain a better search engine positioning on popular search engines and directories using target keywords, and phrases. Includes topics on how to further increase a site’s compatibility with search engines and how to optimize a site that uses more complex design technologies such as dynamic content, Flash, and tables.



    Credits: 3
  
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    IT 3370 - Network Administration


    Introduces current networking standards, the OSI Model, various protocols and topologies, the interconnections between various hardware components, network operating systems, DNS, DHCP, TCP/ IP, Ethernet, wired and wireless transmission and security.



    Credits: 3
  
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    IT 3380 - Information Assurance Fundamentals


    Introduces technological advances in information risk assessment and security management, as well as environments affected by advancing technology. Reviews risks involved in computing, threats to security in computing, encryption, programming controls, operating systems controls, law and ethics, network controls, administrative controls, law and ethics, and information risk mitigation protocols to make highly secured information systems.



    Credits: 3
  
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    IT 3390 - Building and Leading Effective Teams in Information Technology


    Examines and introduces the skills necessary to excel as a leader including dealing with conflict, developing leadership skills, recruiting and developing employees, and leading remote and virtual teams. Introduces students to the general challenges of management as well as the challenges unique to leading teams of technology professionals.



    Credits: 3
  
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    IT 3400 - Database Management and Business Intelligence/Analytics


    Learn and apply the fundamentals of relational database modeling and database management systems technology in the development of business information systems. Encompasses entity/relationship diagrams, relational theory, normalization, integrity constraints, the Structured Query Language (SQL), and physical and logical design. Students will also be exposed to core concepts and tools associated with data warehousing.



    Credits: 3
  
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    IT 3401 - Smart Cities Enabling Sustainability


    Introduces smart cities within the context of sustainability: economic, environmental, and equity. Provides a multidisciplinary look at innovative smart city approaches to solve complex problems on the local level with global impact; includes topics from environmental studies, information technology, data science, engineering, and social science.



    Credits: 3
  
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    IT 3500 - Business Analytics for Decision Making


    Introduces students to the technological advances in business analytics for decision making. This course will review the concept of business analytics for developing various models for understanding useful information from historical data, the effect of uncertainty on decision making, and eventually choosing the best decision based on the available data.



    Credits: 3
  
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    IT 4210 - JAVA II: Applying Data Structures using JAVA


    JAVA II: Applying Data Structures using JAVA



    Credits: 3
  
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    IT 4400 - Web Application Development - Building Dynamic Websites


    This course serves as a capstone course to be taken after all other required courses in the program. Using a project-based approach, students will develop Web applications using the PHP scripting language and MySQL databases. Topics include PHP scripting, data-driven interactivity, writing secure PHP programs, and code frameworks.



    Credits: 3

Interdisciplinary Studies

  
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    INST 1500 - Interdisciplinary Studies


    Individual faculty may teach these courses with the approval of the Dean’s Office, which acts for the Committee on Education Policy and the Curriculum. A maximum of 3.0 credits count toward the B.A. or B.S. in the College. INST courses count as non-College credits.



    Credits: 1 to 3
  
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    INST 1550 - Interdisciplinary Studies-Student Initiated Courses


    With sponsorship and supervision by a faculty member and approval of the Dean’s Office, acting for the Committee on Educational Programs and the Curriculum, students may initiate a course in which they provide the instruction. The grade is determined by the faculty member. These courses count as “outside the College.” Students in the College may offer no more than 3.0 credits for the B.A. or B.S. Consult the INST course web page at http://www.uvastudentcouncil.com/student-services/initiatives/cavalier-education-program/ (copy and paste Web address into browser) for specific descriptions.



    Credits: 1 to 3
  
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    INST 1601 - Honor and Ethics in Everyday Life


    An introduction to the philosophy and mechanics of the Honor System, with a focus on the concepts of ethics and integrity within the context of both the Honor System/Committee and the broader University community.



    Credits: 1
  
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    INST 1605 - History of Mr. Jefferson’s University


    History of Mr. Jefferson’s University



    Credits: 1
  
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    INST 2500 - Interdisciplinary Studies International Residential College


    Individual faculty and advanced graduate students may teach these courses with the approval of the Dean’s Office, which acts for the Committee on Education Policy and the Curriculum. A maximum of 3.0 credits count toward the B.A. or B.S. in the College. INST courses count as non-College credits.



    Credits: 1 to 3
  
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    INST 2550 - Interdisciplinary Studies Hereford College


    Individual faculty and advanced graduate students may teach these courses with the approval of the Dean’s Office, which acts for the Committee on Education Policy and the Curriculum. A maximum of 3.0 credits count toward the B.A. or B.S. in the College. INST courses count as non-College credits.



    Credits: 1 to 3
  
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    INST 2570 - Interdisciplinary Studies Brown College


    Individual faculty and advanced graduate students may teach these courses with the approval of the Dean’s Office, which acts for the Committee on Education Policy and the Curriculum. A maximum of 3.0 credits count toward the B.A. or B.S. in the College. INST courses count as non-College credits.



    Credits: 1 to 3
  
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    INST 2600 - Facilitating Honor and Ethics in Everyday Life


    Students in this course facilitate the small group portion of LASE 1510. Prerequisite: Instructor permission and training as an Honor support officer.



    Credits: 2
  
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    INST 3150 - CavEd Pedagogy Seminar


    This pedagogy seminar will provide Cav Ed student instructors the theoretical underpinnings of teaching in higher education as well as practical advice on ways to implement the ideas explored. The class explores also specific challenges instructors face in the classroom. Prerequisites: Open to students who are teaching CavEd courses, admission by instructor permission



    Credits: 1
  
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    INST 3600 - The Best of UVA: A Collection of Unforgettable Lectures


    The Best of UVA: A Collection of Unforgettable Lectures



    Credits: 1
  
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    INST 4200 - Lawn Seminar


    Being a responsible leader requires a broad interest and understanding of the world in all its facets: arts, science, literature, philosophy, history, politics, and current affairs. The Lawn Seminar is designed to empower students to pursue rigorous inquiry into contemporary issues using a foundation in the liberal arts. This seminar is modeled after the famous undergraduate liberal arts seminar lead by Earnest “Boots” Mead at the University.



    Credits: 1
  
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    INST 4993 - Independent Study


    Faculty working with one or more students on independent projects that fit more easily in an interdisciplinary format than departmental lines of inquiry may use INST 4993 for this purpose. Both the instructor and the Office of the Dean of the College need to approve such an enrollment. These credits count as non-CLAS credits, i.e. not among the 102 liberal arts credits required for the B.A. or B.S. in the College.



    Credits: 1 to 3

Interdisciplinary Studies-Business

  
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    ISBU 3270 - Investment Analysis


    Students learn to understand basic investment principles including the risks and rewards of securities, the power of compounding and the significance of global capital markets. Corporate finance, investments, and financial institutions will be covered in this course and several cases will be used to augment the theoretical material.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ISBU 3281 - The Art of Public Speaking


    Examines the five canons of the art of public speaking allowing students to learn and practice the skills needed to speak persuasively, confidently, forcefully, and intelligibly to an audience.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ISBU 3282 - Effective Business Writing and Speaking


    Develops communication possibilities through a number of writing and speaking activities. Emphasizes plain English style writing, essential for clear, concise messages. Examines how to create and deliver clear, persuasive, and professional short speeches and includes learning to write effective email, letters and memos. Explores online writing environments. Develops awareness of self and others.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ISBU 3410 - Commercial Law


    Surveys the American legal system and principles of constitutional, criminal, and tort law, emphasizing legal issues related to contracts, agency, corporations, and partnerships.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ISBU 3422 - Managing your Emotions in the Workplace


    Gives a fundamental overview of Emotional Intelligence and shows how understanding Emotional Intelligence leads to a beneficial working career and personal life. Presents an E.I. competence framework and reviews basic domains, such as self-awareness, self-management, social awareness, and relationship management through various methods to promote learning by doing. Applies theoretical concepts to real world situations.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ISBU 3451 - Fundamentals of Marketing


    Introduction to marketing principles and activities in both profit and non-profit enterprises, from the conception of goods and services to their consumption. Participants study consumer behavior as well as ethical, environmental, and international issues in marketing. Prerequisite: ECON 201 and 202 or equivalents, or instructor permission.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ISBU 3602 - Risk in Society and Business


    Examines the risks experienced by individuals, society, and businesses. Explores the origins of concepts related to risk. Assesses attitudes toward risk and the impact of attitude on individual behavior. Examines the sources of risk to societies and businesses, and evaluates options for their mitigation.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ISBU 3610 - Organizational Behavior


    Studies the basic theories and research related to the practices of contemporary organizational behavior. Emphasizes the interpersonal skills that promote individual, group, and organizational effectiveness. Class activities are interactive and include experiential exercises, case analyses, and collaborative learning.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ISBU 3710 - Managerial Finance


    Principles and practices of business finance focusing on managerial decision-making in financial policy. Topics include capital structure, types of securities and their use in raising funds, risk, valuation, and allocating resources for investment. Prerequisite: ISBU concentration prerequisites or instructor permission.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ISBU 3770 - The Challenge of Leadership


    In this course, students will reflect on the limits of the management versus leadership debate, consider the critical role self-knowledge plays in being an effective managerial leader and review the relevance of some basic system theory ideas to the understanding of organizational dynamics and managerial leadership.  The course also will include an examination of the organizational basis of managerial leadership and seek an understanding of leadership as a systematic process as opposed to a set of discrete activities and appreciation of organizational change as the contemporary context of management. 



    Credits: 3
  
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    ISBU 3772 - Global Leadership Fundamentals for All Industries


    Investigates current leadership thinking and behavior in for-profit and non-profit work environments, as well as the role leadership has played in past decision making processes, and what we can learn from the decisions that were made by those leaders. Examines real world examples throughout this course, leveraging the theory and practical applications of leadership.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ISBU 3810 - Ethical Issues


    Introduces the philosophical concept of the ethical discrimination of actions. Examines primary sources in some detail by presenting prevailing philosophical systems. Studies decision-making in the context of the contemporary world using examples such as business environment, faith and religion, and the political arena.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ISBU 3840 - International Business


    An introduction to the practice and theory of international business. Consideration given to global trade and economic integration theory; the major instruments and procedures needed for management and operation of an international business; modes of international market entry and foreign direct investment; strategies appropriate to managing an international business; global environmental issues; and the importance of culture and ethics in international business. Prerequisite: ISBU concentration prerequisites or instructor permission.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ISBU 3880 - Data Analytics and Decision Making


    Introduces the analytics process from question formulation to data gathering, processing, and decision making; highlights and explores differences among methods using large data sets, and case studies from various industries to illustrate and understand concepts. Utilizes statistical software and applies analytical methods through exercises, case study examination, and a final project. Prerequisite: ISBU 4420



    Credits: 3
  
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    ISBU 3880 - Data Analytics and Decision Making


    Introduces the analytics process from question formulation to data gathering, processing, and decision making; highlights and explores differences among methods using large data sets, and case studies from various industries to illustrate and understand concepts. Utilizes statistical software; applies analytical methods through exercises, case study examination, and a final project. Prereq: foundational knowledge of statistics or instructor permission



    Credits: 3
  
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    ISBU 3887 - Educational Technology in the Information Age


    Focuses on ongoing societal debates over educational technology while exploring local technology resources available at UVa and on the Web in general. Explores web-based tools, information websites, and interactive databases that support communication, research, and design skills, as well as creativity and knowledge presentation in online environments.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ISBU 3888 - Looking Through the Philosophic Lens of Technology


    Explores ways in which the history and philosophy of technology can inform today’s liberal arts students about the role of technology in our society. Covers current and historical topics as well as explores and develops a personal philosophic approach to the application of technology.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ISBU 3889 - Web-Database Integration for Beginners: A Quick Route to Content Production


    Trains students how to construct functional interactive websites and participate in the process of reading and writing about the evolution of the Internet, its impact on socitey, and its place in the history of technology in general. Encourages students to be producers as well as consumers of information on the Internet.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ISBU 3899 - Case Studies in Technology Management and Policy


    Special topics course; topics vary but each explores how technology, management, and policy issues interact within a specific context. Possible contexts include a business organization; an industry; a governmental sector; specific legislation; a judicial ruling; a social issue; a historical era; or a combination of these.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ISBU 4070 - Business Claims Exposure


    Examines the sources, nature, and legal framework of the most common claims encountered in the operation of business. Explores the most frequently encountered business claims that have the potential to interrupt business operations, disrupt personnel energies, divert resources, and upset financial stability.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ISBU 4071 - International Law and Organizations


    Studies the fundamentals of international law. Analyzes relevant concepts, basic definitions, and main traditions of international law that will be fundamental to the more complex ideas of the course. Focuses on the nature and sources of international law, treaties, and international conflicts, as well as international economy, organizations, regimes, and municipal law.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ISBU 4075 - Literature of Business: Insights on Management from Great Literature


    Examines values, biases, and preconceptions about the world through the study of business literature. Studies models on how to come to an understanding of basic needs such as the need for self-esteem, identity, power, acceptance, security, and recognition. Explores the realization that it is only through self-definition that we can begin to understand human motives.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ISBU 4420 - Speaking with Numbers: The Effective Use of Statistics


    Provides a basis for evaluating the claims of others while also choosing the best analysis methods for supporting ideas. Examines how quantitative analysis can inform decisions, how to select the appropriate tools for the situation, how to interpret the results, and how to effectively communicate the results.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ISBU 4421 - Consumer Demand and Behavior


    Examines the microeconomic foundations of consumer demand analysis. Examines the psychological factors influencing consumers purchase decisions. Reviews methods for forecasting, measuring, and testing consumer demand.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ISBU 4641 - Advanced Public Speaking


    Utilizes several active learning activities when considering classical rhetorical elements, audience analysis, speech organization, and strategies for improvement in the structure and delivery of extemporaneous and impromptu speeches. Work with conceptual methods, observe exemplary models of good speech making, explore personal communication apprehension, and hone individual rhetorical style.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ISBU 4670 - Organizational Change and Development


    This course is designed to equip anyone who has a role to play in organizational change (employees and associates at all levels, supervisors and managers, information technology consultants, and a variety of organizational stakeholders) with the basic tools required to analyze change and its consequences.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ISBU 4680 - Entrepreneurship


    Explores the process of creating and managing new ventures. Study of financing for initial capital and early growth of the enterprise; legal and tax issues associated with a new business; how to identify opportunity areas; and the characteristics of successful entrepreneurs. Prerequisite: ISBU concentration prerequisites or instructor permission.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ISBU 4700 - Strategic Management Consulting


    This course develops the practical, strategic-thinking and behavioral skills required to operate in a double-hatted mode. It focuses on identifying, diagnosing, and resolving client issues; introduces students to the strategy, process, and technology of consulting; reviews change-management methodologies; considers the “psychological stance” required to succeed in the consultant role; and compares and contrasts the roles of external and internal consultants.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ISBU 4750 - Intergroup Relations


    Examines the basic cognitive and motivational processes involved in intergroup relations, while also considering the roles of stereotyping, prejudice, and discrimination in everyday life.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ISBU 4850 - Strategic Management


    Examines the basic elements, processes, and techniques of strategic planning. Focuses on the development of the student’s decision-making abilities as a manager and calls upon the student to synthesize material learned across the concentration. Case studies, interactive classes, and business simulations are used to develop student’s managerial skills. Prerequisite: ISBU concentration prerequisites or instructor permission.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ISBU 4851 - Strategy and Sustainability in Business Decisions


    Develops the concept of stakeholder analysis by exploring the open systems environment in which firms operate while focusing on assessing and prioritizing stakeholder interests. Develops strategic plans for businesses and stakeholder groups handling issues of sustainability.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ISBU 4993 - Independent Study


    In exceptional circumstances and with the endorsement of an approved faculty member and the B.I.S. director, a student may undertake a rigorous program of independent study in business. Such study would be designed to explore a subject not currently being taught and/or to expand upon regular offerings.



    Credits: 1 to 3

Interdisciplinary Studies-Capstone Project

  
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    ISCP 3991 - Capstone Project I


    Explores the process of basic research and project design. Working with a faculty mentor, students develop a proposal for the Capstone Project. The completed proposal must be approved before students may register for ISCP 4991.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ISCP 4991 - Capstone Project II


    Students design, develop, produce, and evaluate a semester-long project that synthesizes their educational experiences and professional interests. Done individually or occasionally in teams and supervised by a faculty mentor, the proposal for the project must be approved before students may register for this course. Prerequisite: grade of C or better in ISCP 3991, Capstone Project I.



    Credits: 3

Interdisciplinary Studies-Code of Inquiry

  
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    ISIN 4510 - Special Topics in Conduct of Inquiry: Social Sciences


    Introduces students to methodologies, content areas, and contributions of social sciences. Provides students with framework for studying and articulating arguments in the social sciences. Students learn similarities among social science disciplines and what differentiates them from the humanities and sciences.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ISIN 4520 - Special Topics in Conduct of Inquiry: Humanities


    Introduces students to methodologies, content areas, and contributions of humanities. Provides students with framework for studying and articulating arguments in the humanities. Students learn similarities among humanities disciplines and what differentiates them from the social sciences and sciences.



    Credits: 3

Interdisciplinary Studies-General Elective

  
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    ISGE 3700 - Financial Planning Strategies


    Covers income, money management, spending, credit, saving, and investing. Focuses on helping students organize their financial futures and expand their knowledge of various aspects of finance.



    Credits: 3

Interdisciplinary Studies-Humanities

  
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    ISHU 3030 - The Tragic and the Demonic


    Students address issues of evil in the more specific context of the tragic and the demonic. The tragic will be explored through the genre of tragedy, which reveals the intertwining of guilt, innocence, accountability, and divine malice. Emphasis will be placed on close readings of philosophical, theological, and literary texts.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ISHU 3040 - Home Runs, Assassinations, & Surgical Strikes: Contemp American Literature in the Age of Television


    Through post-WWII novels and essays, this course examines claims about truth and authenticity in a world largely experienced through the mass media.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ISHU 3042 - Women’s Photography and Feminist Aesthetics


    Introduces students to feminist criticism and especailly to feminist aesthetic theory. Examines feminist criticism and theory through women’s photography.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ISHU 3043 - Women Writing for Change


    Examines the rhetorical choices women have made from Medieval times to the present to create public arguments for social change in the face of cultural pressure to remain silent. Analyzes how women writers deliberately worked with cultural narratives of gender and used traditional and alternative texts. Explores how those decisions shape expectations of women in the public sphere today.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ISHU 3044 - Remakes & Adaptions: Rewriting across the Genres


    Review creative works that arise from a long history of repetition and innovation. Respond to literary texts from different genres, which have been adapted for the movies and theater. Practice how to ‘read’ written and visual texts, and how to write about both.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ISHU 3050 - Issues in Philosophy


    Students practice skills and methods of philosophical inquiry and analysis. Issues of free will and determinism, ethical decision-making, the mind-body problem, the nature and existence of God, and the relationship of the individual to society will be explored. Tensions among various conceptions of human existence are a central theme. Emphasis is placed upon writing critical responses to articles written by leading philosophers.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ISHU 3060 - Religious Diversity and Assimilation in American Life


    This course explores the links (and sometimes conflicts) between American culture and religious life. The nature of religious diversity and pluralism in America and the specific challenges the major religious groups have experienced as they adapted to are examined. Students consider the cultural dilemmas faced by indigenous religious communities, especially the Mormons in the nineteenth century and ‘new religious movements’ or cults, in the twentieth century.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ISHU 3061 - Sacred Paths: Introduction to World Religions


    Introduces six major religious traditions deeply rooted in different cultures including Hinduism, Jainism, Buddhism, Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. Examines the historical evolution, the doctrines, beliefs, practices, institutions, and cultural expressions of these religious traditions.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ISHU 3070 - Prophets and Prophecy


    Examines the phenomenon of prophecy in anthropological and theological perspective. Focuses on the way prophecy operated in ancient Israel. Explores how prophecy is the area beyond prediction, with regard to social context, ethics, theology, gender, politics, literature, and psychology.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ISHU 3071 - Jesus in History and Interpretation


    Examines the life of Jesus of Nazareth as it is analyzed by modern historians and how this life was interpreted by early believers in Jesus. Evaluates the main source of information that early Christian works called gospels, as they create their own images of Jesus of Nazareth, beginning a long tradition of interpretation.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ISHU 3080 - Islam


    Provides students with refined knowledge which is relevant in both the professional and private spheres. Focusing on both the history of Islam, from its founding through the present day, and (more specifically) on the principles of Islam and how different Muslim theologians and statesmen have interpreted and applied those principles throughout Islam’s history. The course is a purposeful mix of anthropology, history and political science.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ISHU 3081 - Buddhism and Women


    Explores the role of women in Buddhism while drawing attention to women’s changing status throughout Buddhism’s history from its origin to the present day. Examines women’s worldly and spiritual presence in various buddhist traditions and their contribution to the propagation of Buddhism.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ISHU 3082 - Tibetan Buddhism


    Explores the multi-faceted world of Tibetan Buddhism through doctrinal, instructional, contemplative, social, and historical perspectives. Examines the religious lifestyles, ritual practives, and social practives of religious specialists and lay people. Exposes students to a variety of Tibetan literary genres as well as some methodological conerns of contemporary Tibetan studies.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ISHU 3083 - Studies in Buddhist Meditation


    Explores meditation in various Buddhist texts as well as its interpretation by contemporary practitioners. Explores meditative practices in different countries such as Sri Lanka, Burma, Tibet, China, and Japan with a focus on each culture’s unique techniques of Samata (awareness), Vipassana (insight), and Tantric meditation. Introduces meditation teachers and Western modes of teaching meditation.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ISHU 3085 - Gender and Religion


    Explores historical, textual, and social questions relevant to the status of women in Eastern and Western Religions. Studies major religions such as Hinduism, Buddhism, Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. Understand where these traditions place women within their sacred texts, beliefs, and ritual practices.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ISHU 3086 - Asian Religions


    Provides a historical and thematic overview of some of the major religious traditions of Asia including Hinduism, Buddhism, Confucianism, Taoism, and Shinto, by focusing upon the forms they have taken in India, Sri Lanka, Tibet, China, and Japan. Explores how these traditions have attempted to understand the nature of the world, human society, and the individual person’s place therein.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ISHU 3090 - Religion in America


    Examines the concept of America and to what extent it is a product of religious mindsets of particular times. Explores multi-media materials, including: Hollywood films, 20th Century folk music, literature of the west, 18th Century primary sources, 19th Century theses on American identity, and 20th Century journalism and criticism.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ISHU 3100 - Advanced Writing I


    Students read, study, and practice a variety of prose forms, including narration, short stories, and non-fiction and critical essays.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ISHU 3110 - Aspects of Narrative I


    This course focuses on the writing and analysis of narrative prose, fiction or non-fiction. Full-group workshop discussion of works in progress are accompanied by discussion of short examples of published fiction and memoir and occasional writing exercises on aspects of narrative, including revision. Students write and revise at least two separate works, totaling at least 20 pages.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ISHU 3120 - Aspects of Narrative II


    This course focuses on the writing and analysis of narrative prose, fiction or non-fiction. Full-group workshop discussion of works in progress will be accompanied by discussion of short examples of published fiction and memoir and by occasional writing exercises on aspects of narrative. Students will write and revise at least two separate works, totaling at least 20 pages. Readings, exercises, and topics focused on will be different from those in ISHU 3110.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ISHU 3121 - Ancient Greek Culture Through Modern Eyes


    Examines ancient Greek myth, literature, and philosophy through the lens of modern psychology.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ISHU 3130 - The Writing Side of Children’s Literature


    In this course, students will immerse themselves in the best of children’s literature while learning the basic tenet of effective writing for any age: easy to read, hard to write.  Students will read within seven genres of children’s literature, examine how nonfiction writers for children research, organize, and document information, examine how fiction writers create setting, plot, tone, voice, dialog, and characters.  Students will also learn how published writers self-edit and revise.  Children’s literature will also serve as a model while completing short writing exercises.  By the end of this course, students can expect to become masters of compression as they write and revise one piece of nonfiction and one piece of fiction. 



    Credits: 3
  
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    ISHU 3140 - Writing Descriptively


    Writing Descriptively



    Credits: 3
  
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    ISHU 3150 - Reading Poetry Aloud


    Students will read a variety of poems out loud.  By comparing what is written with what is read, students will arrive (maybe) at what is said.  If a reader can hear a poem as a living voice, as vivid as a friend talking over the telephone, and can reproduce what the friend has said either as a mimic, or as a reporter, then the reader understands the poem.  Further analysis is just that, a separate venture.  Understanding poetry is much like understanding other people:  No two poems are alike, and there are no right answers or this-is-it meanings.  By the end of the course, students will develop an appetite for reading poetry, and confidence in hearing and responding to others’ voices. 



    Credits: 3
  
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    ISHU 3160 - A Poetry Workshop: The Poet’s Journey


    Focuses on the process of poetry as an ongoing creative journey. Explores the ways in which poets access the subconscious and the irrational and channel them into poems, via the elements of craft including image, metaphor, tone, sound, meter, rhythm and line. Students will keep a poetry journal and write poems in response to exercises designed to help them move beyond their initial “comfort zone.”



    Credits: 3
  
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    ISHU 3170 - The Writer as Cartographer: A Class in Poetry and Memoir


    Just as a cartographer is one who makes maps, projecting an area of the earth’s surface on a flat plane, so is a writer able to transform an imagined shape into real shape. In much the manner of a cartographer, a writer must “brave the elements” in order to come closer to an understanding of what is mysterious. With a focus upon poetry and memoir, this class will ask students to read widely, to respond to assigned readings through essays and annotations, to produce creative work on a weekly basis, and to share such work openly in a workshop setting.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ISHU 3171 - Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales


    Examines the human impetus for pilgrimage using Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales as its principle text.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ISHU 3172 - Victorian Characters


    Shows the centrality of “character” to Victorian literature. Analyzes different types of literary characters and investigates how they represent the core Victorian values of “self-improvement,” “independence,” and “steadfastness” in response to the pressures of modernity.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ISHU 3180 - Roots and Stems of Effective Writing – The Essay


    Writing begins with intuition, moves towards consciousness and strives for clarity. Such movement, such unfolding, calls for a steady eye and an enduring approach. Accordingly, this class will focus upon resurrecting the fading art of patience, a faculty required for writing. The focus of the class will be on creative essays and academic essays. To convey thoughts effectively one must be willing to take the time to observe one’s subject, accurately. It is necessary to attend ardently to the language in order to articulate our explorations, to argue our viewpoints. One must keep the hand practiced in the actual activity of writing. This class will ask students to read widely, to respond to assigned readings through weekly essays and to share work openly in a workshop setting with a focus on revision.



    Credits: 3
 

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