Aug 19, 2022  
Undergraduate Record 2017-2018 
    
Undergraduate Record 2017-2018 [ARCHIVED RECORD]

Course Descriptions


 

French

  
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    FREN 4584 - Advanced Topics in French Cinema


    Advanced seminar in French and Francophone cinema. Topics vary. May be repeated for credit for different topics. Prerequisites: FREN 3032 and 3584, or instructor permission.



    Credits: 3
  
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    FREN 4585 - Advanced Topics in Cultural Studies


    Advanced seminar in French and Francophone literature and culture. Topics vary. May be repeated for credit for different topics. Prerequisite: At least one literature or culture course beyond FREN 3032.



    Credits: 3
  
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    FREN 4586 - Topics in Literature and Film


    Studies the relation between three or four French films and their sources in French literature and culture. Prerequisite: FREN 3032 and FREN 3584, or instructor permission.



    Credits: 3
  
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    FREN 4743 - Africa in Cinema


    Study of the representation of Africa in American, Western European and African films. Ideological Constructions of the African as ‘other’. Exoticism in cinema. History of African cinema. Economic issues in African cinema: production, distribution, and the role of African film festivals. The socio-political context. Women in African cinema. Aesthetic problems: themes and narrative styles. Prerequisite: FREN 3032 and FREN 3584 or another 3000-level literature course in French.



    Credits: 3
  
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    FREN 4744 - The Occupation and After


    After an initial examination of the political and social conditions in France under the Nazi regime during World War II, this seminar explores the enduring legacy of those “Dark Years” by investigating how the complex (and traumatic) history of the Occupation has impacted French culture during the last half of the twentieth century and into the twenty first. Prerequisite: FREN 3032 and another FREN course beyond 3034.



    Credits: 3
  
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    FREN 4750 - From Literature to Film: Screening “Dangerous Liaisons”


    We will explore the international dissemination, through filmic adaptations, of a single literary work written at the end of the 18th century: Laclos’ famous novel “Les Liaisons dangereuses”. After examining the novel itself and its significance in the context of pre-revolutionary France, we will study several movies shot between 1960 and 2012 by directors from China, Korea, Czechoslovakia, France, Great-Britain and the USA



    Credits: 3
  
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    FREN 4811 - Francophone Literature of Africa


    Surveys the literary tradition in French, emphasizing post-World War II poets, novelists, and playwrights. Examines the role of cultural reviews in the development of this literary tradition. Prerequisite: FREN 3032 and at least one FREN course numbered 3041 to 3043 (or instructor permission).



    Credits: 3
  
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    FREN 4813 - Introduction to the Francophone Caribbean (Martinique, Guadeloupe, Haiti)


    Focuses on the literature, culture and arts of the Francophone Caribbean (Martinique, Guadeloupe, Haiti). Issues of colonialism and postcolonialism, slavery and freedom, exile and immigration, race and gender will be examined through poetry, novels, storytelling, theater, music and film analysis. Prerequisite: A 3000-level French literature course



    Credits: 3
  
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    FREN 4836 - The Culture of Commerce and Industry in France


    Americans entering the French business setting must confront specifically French cultural standards, expectations, and practices. Investigates such topics as the organization of industry, banking, marketing, and management, as well as the role of government and the educational system. Prerequisite: FREN 3032.



    Credits: 3
  
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    FREN 4838 - French Society and Civilization


    Discusses political institutions and social problems based upon readings in recent publications and an analysis of current events. Prerequisite: FREN 3032 and another FREN course beyond 3034.



    Credits: 3
  
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    FREN 4857 - French Comedy


    Studies dramatic comedy in France from the Middle Ages to the twentieth century, with comparison between comedy and other dramatic forms such as ‘tragi-comedy’ and ‘theatre of the absurd.’ Texts by such authors as Corneille, Molière, Regnard, Marivaux, Musset, Feydeau, Jarry, and Beckett. Prerequisite: FREN 3032 and either FREN 3041, 3042, or 3043.



    Credits: 3
  
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    FREN 4993 - Independent Study


    Normally, only French majors may enroll in this course and only by written permission from the department chair prior to the end of the first week of classes.



    Credits: 3
  
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    FREN 4998 - Pre-Thesis Tutorial


    Preliminary research for thesis. Prerequisite: Admission to the Distinguished Majors Program.



    Credits: 3
  
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    FREN 4999 - Thesis


    Composition and defense of thesis. Prerequisite: FREN 4998 and good standing in the Distinguished Majors Program. Note: The prerequisite to all 5000-level literature courses is two 4000-level literature courses with an average grade of B, or the instructor’s permission.



    Credits: 3

French in Translation

  
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    FRTR 2510 - Topics in Medieval Literature


    An introduction to the culture of the High Middle Ages in France. Topics vary and may include love literature, family relations, war, and science and religion. May be repeated for credit for different topics.



    Credits: 3
  
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    FRTR 2530 - Topics in French Baroque and Classical Culture


    An introduction to seventeenth century French literature, both fiction and non-fiction, against the background of the period’s political, religious, and philosophical controversies and of its plastic arts.



    Credits: 3
  
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    FRTR 2552 - French Culture (subtitle will be added to reflect chosen topic)


    Course will offer a transhistoric and interdisciplinary approach to French culture through the lens of a given theme (e.g., food, travel, politics, societies and institutions). Lectures, readings and exams in English.



    Credits: 3
  
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    FRTR 2553 - J-Term in Paris


    January Term study abroad course conducted on-site in Paris. Readings in literature, ethnography, history, and urban studies, along with discussions of photographs, paintings, and films, will inform daily walking tours and site visits. Specific topics may vary. Course taught in English.



    Credits: 3
  
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    FRTR 2579 - Contemporary Caribbean Culture


    Comparative examination of contemporary culture in the Caribbean region with an emphasis on literature. Considers historical writing (essays), musical forms, and film as manifestations of the process of creolization in the area. Questions of ethnic diversity and nation-building are central to the course.



    Credits: 3
  
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    FRTR 2580 - Topics in French and Francophone Culture


    Introduces the interdisciplinary study of culture in France or other French-speaking countries. Topics vary from year to year, and may include cuisine and national identity; literature and history; and contemporary society and cultural change. Taught by one or several professors in the French department.



    Credits: 3
  
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    FRTR 2850 - French Thought


    A study of major French non-fiction from the Renaissance until today, including essays, discourses, sermons, autobiographies, and editorials, within the historical circumstances of production and reception and with respect to thematic and formal qualities. Class and all readings are in English. This course does not count toward the major or minor in French.



    Credits: 3
  
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    FRTR 3584 - Topics in French Cinema


    Studies topics relating to concepts of film structure, history, and criticism in French and within the French tradition. Topics offered include Introduction to French Cinema and Written Text/Film Text.



    Credits: 3
  
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    FRTR 3814 - Gender, Sexuality, Identity in Premodern France


    This course will explore religious, social, scientific and legal views on gender, sexuality and identity that may extend from medieval through early modern Europe with an emphasis on the French tradition. Readings will include literary texts and cultural documents as well as current scholarship on questions of sexuality, gender, and identity politics.



    Credits: 3
  
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    FRTR 4540 - The International Enlightenment


    The Enlightenment laid the foundations for our current conceptions of democratic government, religious toleration, freedom of speech, and the scientific method. The readings for this course may include texts by on works by Locke, Voltaire, Rousseau, Jefferson, and Kant .



    Credits: 3

General Linguistics

  
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    LNGS 2000 - Grammatical Concepts in Foreign Language Learning


    Intended for all students interested in language. Treats the grammatical concepts traditionally considered relevant in the teaching and study of foreign languages, including the study of English as a second language. Prerequisite: Some foreign language experience strongly recommended.



    Credits: 3
  
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    LNGS 2220 - Black English


    Introduces the history and structure of what has been termed Black English Vernacular or Black Street English. Focuses on the sociolinguistic factors that led to its emergence, its present role in the Black community, and its relevance in education and racial stereotypes.



    Credits: 3
  
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    LNGS 2240 - Southern American English


    An examination of the structure, history, and sociolinguistics of the English spoken in the southeastern United States.



    Credits: 3
  
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    LNGS 2500 - Topics in Linguistics


    Miscellaneous studies in Linguistics



    Credits: 3
  
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    LNGS 3250 - Introduction to Linguistic Theory and Analysis


    Introduces sign systems, language as a sign system, and approaches to linguistics description. Emphasizes the application of descriptive techniques to data.



    Credits: 3
  
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    LNGS 3251 - Introduction to Linguistic Theory and Methodology Discussion


    Introduction to Linguistic Theory and Methodology Discussion. Prerequisite: Enrollment in LNGS 3250.



    Credits: 1
  
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    LNGS 3260 - Introduction to Comparative-Historical Linguistics


    Surveys the elements of comparative-historical linguistics. Prerequisite: LNGS 3250 or instructor permission.



    Credits: 3
  
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    LNGS 4500 - Topics in Linguistics


    Miscellaneous studies in Linguistics



    Credits: 3
  
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    LNGS 4993 - Independent Study in General Linguistics


    For students who wish to pursue linguistic theory and the application of linguistic methodology to data beyond the introductory level.



    Credits: 1 to 6

German

  
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    GERM 116 - Intensive Introductory German


    This is the non-credit option for GERM 1016.



    Credits: 0
  
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    GERM 126 - Intensive Introductory German


    This is the non-credit option for GERM 1026.



    Credits: 0
  
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    GERM 216 - Intensive Intermediate German


    This is the non-credit option for GERM 2016.



    Credits: 0
  
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    GERM 226 - Intensive Intermediate German


    This is the non-credit option for GERM 2026.



    Credits: 0
  
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    GERM 1010 - Elementary German


    Introduces the essentials of German structure and syntax; emphasizes oral and written proficiency in German. Five class sessions. Language laboratory required. Followed by GERM 2010, 2020.



    Credits: 4
  
  •  

    GERM 1015 - German for Reading Knowledge


    For graduate students requiring reading knowledge of German. Open to 4th year undergraduates, but does not count toward fulfillment of the language requirement. Please note: graduate students may enroll for C/NC or as auditors. However, graduates must enroll via the GSAS Office, rather than on SIS. For more details on this class, please visit the department website at: http://www.virginia.edu/german/Undergraduate/Courses.



    Credits: 3
  
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    GERM 1016 - Intensive Introductory German


    This intensive course begins with instruction in basic oral expression, listening comprehension, elementary reading and writing, and continues with further development of these four skills at the intermediate level. Part of the Summer Language Institute.



    Credits: 3
  
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    GERM 1020 - Elementary German


    Introduces the essentials of German structure and syntax; emphasizes oral and written proficiency in German. Five class sessions. Language laboratory required. Followed by GERM 2010, 2020.



    Credits: 4
  
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    GERM 1025 - Reading Course in German


    For Graduate of Arts and Sciences students who want a reading knowledge of German for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy. Open to 3rd and 4th year undergraduates, but does not count toward fulfillment of the language requirement or permit admission to German courses with a spoken component.



    Credits: 3
  
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    GERM 1026 - Intensive Introductory German


    This intensive course begins with instruction in basic oral expression, listening comprehension, elementary reading and writing, and continues with further development of these four skills at the intermediate level.Part of the Summer Language Institute. Prerequisites: GERM 1016 or equivalent.



    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    GERM 1110 - Accelerated German I


    Introduces basic skills in listening, speaking, writing and reading at an accelerated pace. Introduces essential elements of German grammar and syntax. Develops basic knowledge of contemporary German-speaking world. Five class sessions. Language laboratory required. With instructor permission, students may continue in the accelerated track and enroll in GERM 2120 or switch to the non-accelerated track and continue with GERM 2010.



    Credits: 4
  
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    GERM 2010 - Intermediate German


    Increases accuracy and fluency through authentic literary and cultural materials with a focus on reading. Reviews essentials of German grammar and syntax. Exposes students to a wide variety of topics relating to contemporary Germany. Internet news and cultural programming in the classroom. Language laboratory required. Prerequisite: GERM 1020, or equivalent



    Credits: 3
  
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    GERM 2016 - Intensive Intermediate German


    This intensive course begins with instruction in intermediate level oral expression, listening comprehension,reading and writing, and continues with further development of these four skills. Part of the Summer Language Institute. Prerequisites: GERM 1016 & 1026 or equivalent.



    Credits: 3
  
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    GERM 2020 - Intermediate German


    Builds upon skills developed in GERM 2010. Continues the review of grammar. Continues to expose students to a wide variety of topics relating to contemporary Germany. Includes a contemporary play and film. Internet news and cultural programming in the classroom. Language laboratory required. Prerequisite: GERM 2010, or equivalent.



    Credits: 3
  
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    GERM 2026 - Intensive Intermediate German


    This intensive course begins with instruction in intermediate level oral expression, listening comprehension, reading and writing, and continues with further development of these four skills. Part of the Summer Language Institute. Prerequisites: GERM 1016, 1026, & 2016 or equivalent.



    Credits: 3
  
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    GERM 2050 - German Express


    Intensive intermediate course in German language. The course teaches all four language skills (reading, writing, speaking and listening comprehension), covering the same material as GERM 2010-2020, including a component in German culture. German Express allows students to acquire language skills at an accelerated pace, preparing them for advanced courses (300-level and above) and study abroad in German-speaking countries. Prerequisite: GERM 1020.



    Credits: 4
  
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    GERM 2120 - Accelerated German II


    Covers the material of intermediate German. Builds upon skills developed in GERM 1110 and1020. Continues review of grammar exposes students to a variety of topics relating to contemporary Germany. Internet news and cultural programming in the classroom. Language laboratory required. Prerequisite: GERM 1110, GERM 1020, or instructor permission. With instructor permission, students may enroll directly in 3000-level courses after GERM 2120.



    Credits: 4
  
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    GERM 2525 - Intermediate German, Topics


    uilds upon GERM 2010 and is equivalent to GERM 2020. Develops the four essential skills in language learning (listening, speaking, reading, writing) on the basis of a theme-based approach that may be project-oriented. Topics vary per semester and instructor. Pre-requisites: GERM 2010 or equivalent.



    Credits: 3
  
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    GERM 3000 - Grammar in Use


    This course builds on the first and second year German sequence and seeks to increase students’ level of competence in both grammar and vocabulary. Students will produce more accurate and complex language and begin to discuss a diverse range of topics in German culture. Grammatical accuracy will be a central focus but also register, appropriacy, and fluency. Prerequisite: GERM 2020 or equivalent, or instructor permission



    Credits: 1 to 3
  
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    GERM 3010 - Texts and Interpretations


    Employing a broad definition of text, this course allows students to develop a complex understanding of the relationship between meaning and linguistic form. Course readings may include poems, novels, films, historical documents, letters, memoirs etc. Specific grammatical topics will be addressed on the basis of the given material. This course is the prerequisite for all GERM 3000- level courses. Prerequisite: GERM 2020 or instructor permission.



    Credits: 3
  
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    GERM 3110 - Survey of Literature II


    German literature from 1890 to the present. For more details on this class, please visit the department website at: http://www.virginia.edu/german/Undergraduate/Courses. Prerequisite: GERM 3010.



    Credits: 3
  
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    GERM 3120 - Survey of Literature I


    German literature from 1750 to 1890. Prerequisite: GERM 3010.



    Credits: 3
  
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    GERM 3220 - German Drama: Stage Production


    Interprets and stages a representative play in German with students as actors and producers. May be taken more than once for credit, but only once for major credit. Prerequisite: GERM 2020 or comparable language proficiency.



    Credits: 1 to 3
  
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    GERM 3230 - Intermediate Composition and Conversation I


    Using mentor texts based on digital cultural programming, students focus on a range of topics of culture and civilization in the contemporary German-speaking world. Beyond cultural competence, the writing assignments test command of mature grammatical structures, contemporary language, advanced idioms, and punctuation. The goal, following Goethe Institute guidelines, is to write comprehensive texts on a range topics. Prerequisite: GERM 3000.



    Credits: 3
  
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    GERM 3240 - Intermediate Composition and Conversation II


    Designed to expand and refine German writing skills, this course assumes mastery of the German language sufficient to write with progressive length and complexity. Using mentor texts based on digital cultural programming, the course focuses on contemporary issues related to the culture of German-speaking lands. The writing assignments test command of cultural competence, mature grammatical structures, advanced idioms, and punctuation. Prerequisite: GERM 3230 or Instructor Permission.



    Credits: 3
  
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    GERM 3250 - German for Professionals


    Prepares students to communicate and interact effectively in the business environment of German-speaking countries. Emphasis is placed on practical, career-usable competence. Prerequisite: GERM 3000 or equivalent



    Credits: 3
  
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    GERM 3260 - German for Professionals


    Continuation of GERM 3250. Prerequisite: GERM 3250.



    Credits: 3
  
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    GERM 3290 - Conversation


    May be taken more than once for credit, but only once for major credit. For more details on this class, please visit the department website at: http://www.virginia.edu/german/Undergraduate/Courses.



    Credits: 1
  
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    GERM 3300 - Conversation


    May be taken more than once for credit, but only once for major credit.



    Credits: 1
  
  •  

    GERM 3340 - German and Austrian Culture, ca. 1900


    Studies literature, the arts, politics, and social developments between 1870 and 1918. Prerequisite: GERM 3010 or 3230.



    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    GERM 3350 - Weimar Republic and Nazi Germany


    Studies German life between 1918 and 1945. Prerequisite: GERM 3010 or 3230.



    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    GERM 3510 - Topics in German Culture


    Studies selected aspects of German culture, such as opera. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: GERM 3010 or 3230.



    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    GERM 3515 - Postwar German Culture


    Readings in the cultural, social, and political histories of the German-speaking countries since 1945. Prerequisite: GERM 3010 or 3230.



    Credits: 3
  
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    GERM 3526 - Topics in Business German:


    Interdisciplinary seminar in German business. Topics vary annually and may include: green business practices, business ethics, the European Union, or the challenges of globalization. Taught in German. For more details on this class, please visit the department website at: http://www.virginia.edu/german/Undergraduate/Courses. Prerequisites: GERM 3000.



    Credits: 3
  
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    GERM 3590 - Topics in German Literature


    Seminar in German literature. May be repeated for credit. For more details on this class, please visit the department website at: http://www.virginia.edu/german/Undergraduate/Courses. Prerequisite: GERM 3010.



    Credits: 3
  
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    GERM 3610 - Lyric Poetry


    Major forms and themes in German lyric poetry. Prerequisite: GERM 3010.



    Credits: 3
  
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    GERM 3620 - Novelle


    Analyzes and discusses representative German novelle from Kleist to the present. Prerequisite: GERM 3010.



    Credits: 3
  
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    GERM 3630 - Drama


    Investigates dramatic theory and practice emphasizing major German authors and movements. Prerequisite: GERM 3010.



    Credits: 3
  
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    GERM 3660 - Romanticism


    German literature from 1800 to 1830 and its influence. Prerequisite: GERM 3010.



    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    GERM 3680 - Postwar Literature


    Representative German authors since 1945. Prerequisite: GERM 3010.



    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    GERM 3700 - Bertolt Brecht


    Studies Brecht’s life and works, including plays, poems, and theoretical writings.



    Credits: 3
  
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    GERM 4450 - Advanced Composition and Conversation


    This is the capstone course for German language skills. Using digital mentor texts, students focus on a contemporary issues in German-speaking lands, to compose writing assignments that test mature language structures (including idiomatic expressions) and specialized vocabularies. The goal, following Goethe Institute guidelines, is to attain the ability to write in context and in the appropriate stylistic register. Prerequisite: GERM 3240 or permission of instructor.



    Credits: 3
  
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    GERM 4600 - Fourth-Year Seminar


    Literary analysis for advanced students. Prerequisite: GERM 3010 and other literature courses.



    Credits: 3
  
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    GERM 4990 - Honors Thesis


    Directed research for, and composition of, an extended essay. Prerequisite: Admission to the DMP, permission of undergraduate advisor and a supervising faculty member.



    Credits: 3
  
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    GERM 4993 - Independent Study


    Prerequisite: Approval by a supervising faculty member.



    Credits: 1 to 3
  
  •  

    GERM 4995 - Honors Research and Thesis


    Prerequisite: Admission to the DMP, permission of undergraduate advisor and a supervising faculty member.



    Credits: 6
  
  •  

    GERM 4998 - Honors Research and Thesis


    This is the first semester of the year-long DMP thesis. Students who enroll in it will only receive a grade when the complete its sequel, GERM 4999, at which point they will receive 6 credits. Prerequisite: Admission to the DMP, permission of undergraduate advisor and a supervising faculty member.



    Credits: 0
  
  •  

    GERM 4999 - Honors Research and Thesis


    This is the second semester of the year-long DMP thesis. Students should enroll in this course only if they have completed GERM 4998, and must enroll in GERM 4999 to receive credit for GERM 4998. Prerequisite: Admission to the DMP, permission of undergraduate advisor and a supervising faculty member; GERM 4998.



    Credits: 6

German in Translation

  
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    GETR 2770 - Berlin and the Geography of Memory


    In this course we study Berlin not only as admixture of streets, buildings and passers-by but as historical text to be read, studied, and patiently engaged. Berlin, like any city, has various layers to its history, and these layers sometimes conflict or bump right up against one another. This course, concerns how one culture remembers and memorializes a difficult and still-evolving history. In encountering and reading these sites of mem



    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    GETR 3330 - Introduction to German Studies


    A survey of German cultural history from the enlightenment to the present, and an introduction to the field of German Studies. For more details on this class, please visit the department website at: http://www.virginia.edu/german/Undergraduate/Courses. .



    Credits: 3
  
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    GETR 3352 - Modern German History


    Introduces the political, social and cultural history of modern Germany from the French Revolution to the present. Cross-listed in the History department. Taught in English.



    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    GETR 3372 - German Jewish Culture and History


    This course provides a wide-ranging exploration of the culture, history and thought of German Jewry from 1750 to 1939. It focuses on the Jewish response to modernity in Central Europe and the lasting transformations in Jewish life in Europe and later North America. Readings of such figures as: Moses Mendelssohn, Heinrich Heine, Rahel Varnhagen, Franz Kafka, Gershom Scholem, Martin Buber, Karl Marx, Rosa Luxembourg, Walter Benjamin, and Freud.



    Credits: 3
  
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    GETR 3380 - Jewish Humor


    Are Jews funny? Many people think so. Humor has certainly played an important role in Jewish life. This course examines the character and function of Jewish humor in Germany and the rest of Europe, the United States, and Israel. One goal of the course is to show how humor has been used in these Jewish communities to highlight the desires, needs, and frustrations of ordinary Jews.



    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    GETR 3390 - Nazi Germany


    Detailed survey of the historical origins, political structures, cultural dynamics, and every-day practices of the Nazi Third Reich. Cross-listed in the history department. Taught in English.



    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    GETR 3391 - The Idea of the University


    This course considers how some of our contemporary questions about higher education were first formulated in early 19th-century Germany. We will also consider how these questions were taken up by Thomas Jefferson and the founding of the University of Virginia. Some of our more particular questions will include: What is the relation between the university and the state or society more broadly speaking? What is the relationship between teaching and



    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    GETR 3400 - German Intellectual History from Leibniz to Hegel


    Reading and discussion of central theoretical texts in the German tradition 1700-1810, including works by Leibniz, Herder, Lessing, Kant, Schiller, Fichte, and Hegel.



    Credits: 3
  
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    GETR 3410 - Nietzsche and Modern Literature


    Reading and thorough discussion of the major works of Nietzsche, in English translation, from the Birth of Tragedy to Twilight of the Idols. Emphasizes the impact of Nietzsche on 20th-century literature and thought in such diverse authors as Shaw, Rilke, Thomas Mann, and Kafka. A term paper submitted in two stages and a final examination.



    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    GETR 3420 - German Intellectual History From Nietzsche to the Present


    Readings in philosophical and social history of Germany from the late 19th century onward.



    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    GETR 3462 - Neighbors and Enemies


    Explores the friend/foe nexus in German history, literature and culture, with an emphasis on the 19th and 20th centuries. For more details on this class, please visit the department website at: http://www.virginia.edu/german/Undergraduate/Courses.



    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    GETR 3470 - Literature of the Holocaust


    Introduces the most significant texts of Holocaust literature and surveys important philosophical and historical reflections on the meaning of the Holocaust.



    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    GETR 3490 - Ibsen


    Discusses Ibsen’s major plays, in English translation. No knowledge of a Scandinavian language is needed; does not fulfill the language requirement.



    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    GETR 3500 - German Cinema


    Analyzes the aesthetics and semiotics of film, with a focus on German expressionism and New German Cinema.



    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    GETR 3505 - History and Fiction, Topics


    Explores the relationship between facts and fiction in the representation of the past. Course materials range from archival sources and scholarly articles to novels, films, paintings, sculptures, poems and other creative articulations of the historical imagination. The role of the new media and media analysis in the representation of history will also be examined. Topics vary annually.



    Credits: 3
  
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    GETR 3550 - Children’s Literature


    Studies the nature and aims of children’s literature, primarily European and American, from the 17th century onward.



    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    GETR 3560 - Topics in German Literature


    Examines such myths as Faust and Tristan, along with the modernist parody of them.



    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    GETR 3561 - The Frankfurt School and its American legacy


    Introduces students to the history of the Frankfurt School in Europe and the University States.



    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    GETR 3562 - New German Cinema


    Examines German art cinema from the 1960s-1980s, focusing on modernist aesthetics and filmic responses to major historical events in post-war Germany. Films by Fassbinder, Herzog, Wenders, Kluge, Sander, von Trotta, and others.



    Credits: 3
 

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