Aug 19, 2022  
Undergraduate Record 2017-2018 
    
Undergraduate Record 2017-2018 [ARCHIVED RECORD]

Course Descriptions


 

Environmental Sciences

  
  •  

    EVSC 4470 - Introduction to Climatological Analysis


    Examination of various techniques for the analysis of climatological data sets at a variety of temporal and spatial scales. Topics include large-scale atmospheric circulation, synoptic climatology, air quality, extreme event analysis, agricultural climatology, climatic water balance, and biometeorology. Prerequisite: EVSC 3300.



    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    EVSC 4490 - Air Pollution


    Study of formation, atmospheric transport, and deposition of airborne pollutants. Prerequisites: Introductory chemistry or instructor permission.



    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    EVSC 4630 - Land-Atmosphere Interaction


    Study of energy, water, and carbon exchange between the atmosphere and the land surface. Prerequisite: Must have completed EVSC 3300 or EVSC 3600



    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    EVSC 4640 - Applied Hydrology


    Introduces hydrology as applied to environmental problems including water resources, systems analysis, and the effects of urbanization and land use on the hydrological cycle. Three hours lecture, two hours laboratory. Prerequisite: EVSC 3600.



    Credits: 4
  
  •  

    EVSC 4650 - Water Sustainability


    In this course we will explore the dimensions of what “sustainability” and “sustainable development” mean in the context of water use and management. We will examine the different ways in which water is used, valued, and governed, examining sustainability through different lenses and perspectives.The course will NOT count for the Math/Science area requirement in the College.



    Credits: 1
  
  •  

    EVSC 4660 - Hydrological Field Methods and Data Analysis


    Hydrological instruments are introduced; students employ the instruments to make field measurements and perform a range of data analysis exercises. Prerequisite: EVSC 3600.



    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    EVSC 4710 - Environmental Geochemistry


    This lecture course focuses on the occurrence and distribution of chemical elements and the processes influencing that distribution among the various reservoirs of the Earth-surface environment, including rocks, soil, water, and air. Prerequisite: CHEM 1410 or CHEM 1420 (one semester of college-level chemistry) and EVSC 2800 (one semester of college-level geology)



    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    EVSC 4810 - Petrology


    Study of the origin and classification of igneous, metamorphic, and sedimentary rocks. Emphasizes rock series and tectonic associations of rock types. Study of thin sections and hand samples in the laboratory. Field experience and laboratories are included. Prerequisite: Required prerequisite course EVSC 2800 or equivalent college-level introductory geology course by transfer credit.



    Credits: 4
  
  •  

    EVSC 4820 - Geology and Ecology of U.S. Ore Deposits


    The seminar will primarily be an interdisciplinary study group to examine the interrelationships of geology, ecology and land-use issues during the exploration for, the exploitation of, and the environmental legacy of the mineral resources of the United States. Additional outside readings specific to the deposits will be utilized for environmental issues and concerns. Prerequisites: Required prerequisite course EVSC 2800 or equivalent college-level introductory geology course by transfer credit.



    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    EVSC 4830 - Geological Field Methods in Environmental Sciences


    This course will integrate lectures, field exercises and trips, and computational techniques to develop solid skills important for Geosciences. Specific projects may include surveying, geologic mapping, soils descriptions, stream and groundwater monitoring, flooding hazards, use of tracers, sampling techniques and various other tools of the trade. Prerequisite: Required prerequisite course EVSC 2800 or equivalent college-level introductory geology course by transfer credit.



    Credits: 4
  
  •  

    EVSC 4832 - Water-Rock Interactions Seminar


    Reading and discussion of the research literature linking hydrological and geochemical processes in the environment. Prerequisites: One geology, geochemistry, or hydrology course, or permission of instructor.



    Credits: 1
  
  •  

    EVSC 4850 - Coastal Processes


    Reviews wave generation, wave prediction, wave refraction, transformation, shoaling, and associated inshore currents. Topics include the generation of littoral drift and shallow water surge; beach and barrier island geomorphology and problems of erosion. Includes the historical development of research in coastal processes and a quantitative analysis of spatial patterns along sandy coasts. Prerequisite: EVSC 2800; corequisite: EVSC 4851.



    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    EVSC 4851 - Coastal Processes Laboratory


    Laboratory analysis of sediment, map, and aerial photo data sets. Lab demonstrations with the wave tank and rapid sediment analyzer. Weekly exercises and research projects required. Corequisite: EVSC 4850.



    Credits: 1
  
  •  

    EVSC 4860 - Geology of Virginia


    The course examines the geological evolution of the state and mid-Atlantic region in the context of plate tectonics, including stratigraphy, mountain building, metamorphism and deformation, and geomorphic processes. The human impact on this landscape through the exploitation of mineral resources is examined. Field trips to the various provinces of the state will help provide fundamental understanding of the state’s foundation. Prerequisite: Required prerequisite course EVSC 2800 or equivalent college-level introductory geology course by transfer credit.



    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    EVSC 4870 - Global Biogeochemical Cycles


    Studies the processes that regulate the cycling of carbon, nitrogen, sulfur, and phosphorus within and between oceans, continents, and atmosphere. Prerequisite: One semester of college chemistry and one or two of the EVSC core classes.



    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    EVSC 4880 - Groundwater Geology


    Study of the mechanics of groundwater flow, with attendant heat and mass transport; regional geological controls on groundwater occurrence and movement; and the role of groundwater in geological processes. Prerequisite: EVSC 2800, 3600.



    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    EVSC 4890 - Planetary Geology


    Studies the origin and evolution of the solar system, emphasizing the geology of the planets and satellites of the inner solar system and the satellites of the gaseous planets. Compares and contrasts the Earth with Venus and Mars. Prerequisite: Introductory course in geosciences or astronomy.



    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    EVSC 4891 - Planetary Geology Lab


    Optional laboratory for EVSC 4890 students that will expose students to sources and types of information about processes and materials on planetary bodies as well as techniques for interpreting and mapping the surface features and geologic history of planetary objects.



    Credits: 1
  
  •  

    EVSC 4991 - The Theory and Practice of Biodiversity Conservation


    The goal of this class is to rigorously compare real-life conservation program implementation with the theoretical goals of conservation science. This course is a senior-level offering designed to serve as a capstone class for students enrolled in the Environmental and Biological Conservation Specialization program and will be presented in a seminar format where a theoretical presentation of conservation science within the context is presented. Prerequisite: EVSC 3200 (fund. of Ecology) or BIOL 3020 (Evolution and Ecology)



    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    EVSC 4993 - Independent Study


    Specialized topics in ecology, atmosphere, hydrology, environmental geology, or environmental systems not normally covered in formal classes under the direction of the faculty. Prerequisite: Instructor permission.



    Credits: 1 to 6
  
  •  

    EVSC 4995 - Supervised Research


    Original research usually involving a field or laboratory problem in the environmental sciences under the direction of one or more faculty members. The results may form the basis of an undergraduate thesis which is required to partially fulfill the Distinguished Majors Program in environmental sciences. Prerequisite: Instructor permission.



    Credits: 1 to 6
  
  •  

    EVSC 4999 - Thesis Research


    Provides credit for doing work in pursuit of the undergraduate thesis option for majors in Environmental Science



    Credits: 3

Enviromental Thought and Practice

  
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    ETP 2020 - Global Sustainability


    Earth’s ecosystems are threatened by accelerated population growth, depletion of natural resources, environmental degradation, and loss of biodiversity. This interdisciplinary course prepares students to understand and lead efforts to address these challenges. It provides foundational knowledge and challenges participants to deepen their understanding by working collaboratively to develop and implement a real-world, local sustainability project.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ETP 2030 - Politics, Science, and Values: An Introduction to Environmental Policy


    Introduces a wide variety of domestic and international environmental policy issues. Explores how political processes, scientific evidence, ideas, and values affect environmental policy making. This class satisfies the social sciences area requirement and not the natural sciences/mathematics area requirement, since ETP 2030 is devoted to the subject of environmental policy. Cross listed as EVSC 2030 and PLAP 2300.



    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ETP 3220 - Uranium and the American West


    The epic of atomic physics from the Curies to Fermi’s chain reaction; the Manhattan project and the tragedy of Robert Oppenheimer; nuclear weapons testing, power, and environmental consequences. Cross listed with Chem 3220. One year of university-level Chemistry or Physics.



    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ETP 4010 - Environmental Decisions


    This team-taught, capstone seminar for the Environmental Thought and Practice major helps students integrate the broad range of ideas and information employed in environmental decision-making. A case study approach is used to examine the scientific, historical, cultural, ethical and legal dimensions of selected environmental issues. Prerequisite: Declaration of ETP major.



    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ETP 4693 - The Business of Saving Nature


    Human activities are currently resulting in an unprecedented decline in the biological diversity of our planet. The conversion of natural lands for agriculture and urbanization, together with the alteration of wetlands and aquatic ecosystems, is resulting in the extinction of species that depend on these ecosystems as essential habitat. Recognition of the impacts of human activity on biological diversity has led to a growing international environmental movement to promote the preservation of natural ecosystems. The preservation of biological diversity is dependent on the integration of conservation objectives into the framework of regional economic development, which will require a blending of our scientific and economic understanding about these issues. This course focuses on the scientific and economic issues related to the conservation and preservation of natural ecosystems via an insitutional learning experience.



    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ETP 4800 - Politics of the Environment


    Examines environmental issues that originate in, and that affect, the United States, including most forms of pollution and natural resource depletion.  Focuses on how political processes, economic factors, and social/cultural constructs affect environmental policymaking.  (Cross listed with PLAP 4800)  Prerequisite:  Course in ETP, Environmental Sciences or Politics.



    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ETP 4810 - Class Race & the Environment


    Focuses on the intersections among class, race and the environment. The course goals are to achieve an understanding of central environmental policy issues, to consider what ‘class’ and ‘race’ mean, and to examine the distribution of environmental hazards across people of different classes and races. (Cross listed with PLAP 4810)



    Credits: 3

Federal Acquisition

  
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    FAC 3010 - Federal Regulations I


    Introduces the Federal Acquisition Regulations (FAR) and the Defense Federal Acquisition Regulation (DFAR). Explores the contracting environment, available resources, and the acquisition planning process within the federal government.



    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    FAC 3011 - Federal Regulations II


    Examines the regulations required to conduct the federal government solicitation and evaluation process, and covers the Federal Acquisition Regulation (FAR) and the Defense Federal Acquisition Regulation (DFAR).



    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    FAC 3012 - Federal Regulations III


    Examines the regulations required to conduct contract initiation, management and modifications within the federal government. Covers the Federal Acquisition Regulation (FAR) and the Defense Federal Acquisition Regulation (DFAR).



    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    FAC 3020 - Federal Contract Management


    Covers the business decisions necessary to meet customer needs throughout the contract life cycle, and those that are necessary to perform as contracting officers within the federal government. Explores how to shape business relationships, how to plan for and execute a contract, and how to manage a contract after award.



    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    FAC 3030 - Federal Cost and Price Analysis I


    Examines the principles of cost and price analysis, and related regulations required to perform proposal and contract modification analysis.



    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    FAC 3031 - Federal Cost and Price Analysis II


    Covers specific topics related to cost and price analysis, such as small business programs, performance based pay, cash flow, GSA contracting, and e-Business.



    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    FAC 3101 - Federal Contracting Internship I


    Meets the Federal Acquisition Certification internship requirement. Prerequisite: Students must be enrolled in the Federal Acquisition Certificate Program.



    Credits: 1
  
  •  

    FAC 3102 - Federal Contracting Internship II


    Meets the Federal Acquisition Certification internship requirement. Prerequisite: FAC 3101



    Credits: 1
  
  •  

    FAC 3103 - Federal Contracting Internship III


    Meets the Federal Acquisition Certification internship requirement. Prerequisite: FAC 3102



    Credits: 1

French

  
  •  

    FREN 116 - Intensive Introductory French


    This is the non-credit option for FREN 1016.



    Credits: 0
  
  •  

    FREN 126 - Intensive Introductory French


    This is the non-credit option for FREN 1026.



    Credits: 0
  
  •  

    FREN 216 - Intensive Intermediate French


    This is the non-credit option for FREN 2016.



    Credits: 0
  
  •  

    FREN 226 - Intensive Intermediate French


    This is the non-credit option for FREN 2026.



    Credits: 0
  
  •  

    FREN 1000 - Reading


    Reading



    Credits: 0
  
  •  

    FREN 1010 - Elementary French I


    Development of basic oral expression, listening and reading comprehension, and writing. Language laboratory work is required. Followed by FREN 1020. Prerequisite: Limited or no previous formal instruction in French.



    Credits: 4
  
  •  

    FREN 1016 - Intensive Introductory French


    This intensive course begins with instruction in basic oral expression, listening comprehension, elementary reading and writing, and continues with further development of these four skills at the intermediate level. Part of the Summer Language Institute.



    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    FREN 1020 - Elementary French II


    Designed for students with an elementary knowledge of French. Further develops the skills of speaking, listening, comprehension, reading, and writing. Language laboratory work is required. Followed by FREN 2010. Prerequisite: FREN 1010 or one or two years of previous formal instruction in French and appropriate SAT score.



    Credits: 4
  
  •  

    FREN 1026 - Intensive Introductory French


    This intensive course begins with instruction in basic oral expression, listening comprehension, elementary reading and writing, and continues with further development of these four skills at the intermediate level. Part of the Summer Language Institute. Prerequisites: Fren 1016 or equivalent.



    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    FREN 1050 - Accelerated Elementary French


    Reviews basic oral expression, listening, reading comprehension, and writing. Covers the material in the FREN 1010-1020 text in one semester at an accelerated pace. Language lab required followed by FREN 2010. Prerequisite: Previous background in French (more than two years of French in secondary school) and an achievement test score below 540 or a placement score below 378, or permission of the department.



    Credits: 4
  
  •  

    FREN 2010 - Intermediate French I


    Develops the skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Focuses on reading skill development through readings on contemporary Francophone culture and short stories. Followed by FREN 2020. Prerequisite: FREN 1020 or one to three years of formal instruction in French and appropriate SAT score.



    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    FREN 2016 - Intensive Intermediate French


    This intensive course begins with instruction in intermediate level oral expression, listening comprehension, reading and writing, and continues with further development of these four skills. Part of the Summer Language Institute. Prerequisites: FREN 1016, 1026 or equivalent.



    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    FREN 2020 - Intermediate French II


    Designed for continued development of the four skills at an advanced level. Readings emphasize contemporary Francophone culture and include a modern French play. Prerequisite: FREN 2010 or one to three years of formal instruction in French and appropriate SAT score.



    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    FREN 2026 - Intensive Intermediate French


    This intensive course begins with instruction in intermediate level oral expression, listening comprehension, reading and writing, and continues with further development of these four skills. Part of the Summer Language Institute. Prerequisites: FREN 1016, 1026, 2016 or equivalent.



    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    FREN 2320 - Intensive Intermediate French


    This in-depth, intermediate-level course is recommended for students whose placement scores nearly exempt them from FREN 2020, and for any students who wish to refine and expand their mastery of French grammar before taking 3000-level courses. Students who have completed FREN 2020 may take 2320 as an elective to fine-tune their language skills. Prerequisite: Appropriate placement score or departmental permission (contact the Language Program Director).



    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    FREN 2935 - Writing Workshop in French


    Improves skills in analytic and expository writing in French. Intensive exercises in composition and rewriting, including peer editing. May not be used for major or minor credit. Prerequisite: FREN 3032.



    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    FREN 3010 - Oral and Written Expression in French


    Improves student’s command of present-day spoken French. Includes conversation on topics of current interest, advanced vocabulary, some individualized writing practice. Limited enrollment. May not be used for major or minor credit Prerequisite: FREN 2320 or equivalent; instructor permission for those who completed only FREN 2020; students who completed FREN 3032 are excluded and must take FREN 3034.



    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    FREN 3028 - Language House Conversation


    For students residing in the French House.



    Credits: 1
  
  •  

    FREN 3029 - Language House Conversation


    For students residing in the French House.



    Credits: 1
  
  •  

    FREN 3030 - Phonetics


    Reviews pronunciation, phonetics, and phonology for undergraduates. Prerequisite: FREN 2020 or equivalent.



    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    FREN 3031 - Finding Your Voice in French


    In this course, students explore and develop their own “voice” in written and spoken French. Through reading and viewing a variety of cultural artifacts in French, and completing a series of individual and collaborative creative projects, students will improve their skills in grammar, communication, self-expression and editing. Prerequisite: FREN 2020, 2320, or the equivalent, or appropriate AP, F-CAPE, or SAT score.



    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    FREN 3032 - Text, Image, Culture


    In this course, students will discover and engage critically with a broad sampling of French and Francophone cultural production representing a variety of periods, genres, approaches, and media. Students will read, view, write about and discuss a range of works that may include poetry, painting, prose, music, theater, films, graphic novels, photographs, essays, and historical documents. Prerequisite: FREN 3031.



    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    FREN 3034 - Advanced Oral and Written Expression in French


    Improves command of present-day spoken French. Conversation on topics of current interest; advanced vocabulary; some individualized writing practice. Enrollment limited. Prerequisite: FREN 3031 and either completion of FREN 3032 or concurrent enrollment in FREN 3032. This course is not intended for students who are native speakers of French or whose secondary education was in French schools.



    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    FREN 3035 - Business French


    In this course, students will learn about the major industries, organizational structures, and the primary positions within French and francophone businesses. They will gain experience in business research, will hone their oral and written French for use in a business-setting, will have practice job interviews, and will learn the practical aspects of living and working in French. Prerequisite: FREN 3031 and 3032



    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    FREN 3041 - The French-Speaking World I: Origins


    Survey of writing in French from the beginnings (880) to 1600. Explores various movements and trends in early French literary and cultural history; readings in modern French. Prerequisite: FREN 3032.



    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    FREN 3042 - The French-Speaking World II: Expansion


    Survey of writing in French from 1600 to 1800. Explores various movements and trends in French literary and cultural history of the classical period and the enlightenment. Prerequisite: FREN 3032.



    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    FREN 3043 - The French-Speaking World III: Modernities


    Survey of writing in French from 1800 to the present. Explores various movements and trends in French literary and cultural history of the modern and contemporary periods. Prerequisite: FREN 3032.



    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    FREN 3046 - African Literatures and Cultures


    Introduction to African cultural studies. Languages and educational policies. Oral traditions: myths, epic narratives, poetry, folktales in French translation. Modern African-language literatures. Francophone literature. Representations of the postcolonial state in contemporary arts: painting, sculpture, music, and cinema. Museums and the representation of African cultures. Prerequisite: FREN 3032.



    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    FREN 3050 - History and Civilization of France: Middle Ages to Revolution


    The social, political, economic, philosophical, and artistic developments in France from the Middle Ages to the French Revolution. Prerequisite: FREN 3032.



    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    FREN 3051 - History and Civilization of France: Revolution to 1945


    The social, political, economic, philosophical, and artistic developments in France from the Revolution until 1945. Prerequisite: FREN 3032.



    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    FREN 3509 - Topics in French Linguistics


    This course will include topics such as French outside France; regional French varieties; Romance dialectology; French socio-linguistics. Prerequisite: FREN 3031 and 3030.



    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    FREN 3553 - J-Term in Paris


    January Term study abroad course conducted on-site in Paris. Readings in literature, ethnography, history, and urban studies, along with discussions of photographs, paintings, and films, will inform daily walking tours and site visits. Specific topics may vary. Course taught in French. Prerequisite: FREN 3032



    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    FREN 3570 - Topics in Francophone African Studies


    This course addresses various aspects of Francophone African Culture including , oral traditions, literature, theatre, cinema, and contemporary music and visual arts. Prerequisites: FREN 3031 & 3032



    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    FREN 3584 - Topics in French Cinema


    Studies topics relating to concepts of film structure, history, and criticism in French and within the French tradition. Topics offered include Introduction to Cinema and Texte écrit/texte filmique. Prerequisite: FREN 3032.



    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    FREN 3585 - Topics in Cultural Studies


    Interdisciplinary seminar in French and Francophone culture and society. Topics vary annually and may include literature and history, cinema and society, and cultural anthropology. Prerequisite: FREN 3032.



    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    FREN 3652 - Modern Paris


    An examination of the complex and changing urban landscape and its relationship to society as revealed in the literary and artistic output of the time. Prerequisite: FREN 3032.



    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    FREN 3655 - Victor Hugo: Poète, dramaturge, romancier, critique social, artiste


    Explores Hugo’s work and universality in all the contexts in which he worked, to appreciate Hugo’s genius, find personally-compelling perspectives, and improve French and research skills. Taught in French. Prerequisite: FREN 3032.



    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    FREN 3675 - Museums and Cultural Representation in Quebec


    In this J-term course, we visit museums in Montreal and Quebec City to examine the politics of cultural representation, asking how various kinds of group identity are exhibited in art, history, and anthropology museums. Daily museum visits are accompanied by readings and lectures.



    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    FREN 3747 - Francophone Literature & Culture


    Explores representative works of major Moroccan francophone authors in their cultural context. Prerequisite: FREN 3032.



    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    FREN 3753 - L’immigration en France


    An introduction to the variety of topics, issues and current events related to the phenomenon of immigration in France. Prerequisite: FREN 3032.



    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    FREN 3756 - Le cas Simenon


    Studies representative works of Belgian mystery novelist Georges Simenon, emphasizing the uniqueness of his genre. Prerequisite: FREN 3032.



    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    FREN 3857 - Le Rire: A Study of Laughter in French Literature


    An analysis of the universals of the comic tradition, the role of stock characters, and recurrent techniques and themes in texts drawn from the Middle Ages to the present. These texts are considered within a changing social context. Prerequisite: FREN 3032.



    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    FREN 4020 - History of the French Language


    Surveys the main currents of the French language in its development from the earliest to present times. Taught in French. Prerequisite: FREN 3030 or the equivalent or instructor permission.



    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    FREN 4031 - Grammar and Style


    In this grammar review course, students are expected to learn how best to structure the French language and how to express themselves with concision and clarity. Taught in French. Prerequisite: B+ average in FREN 3031 and FREN 3032.



    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    FREN 4035 - Tools and Techniques of Translation


    Written and oral translation exercises to and from the target language. Prerequisite: B+ average in FREN 3031, 3032, 4031.



    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    FREN 4110 - Medieval Saints’ Lives


    One of the most popular forms of entertainment, combining exciting themes (transvestism, marvelous journeys, spectacular sins, helpful animals) with edgy commentaries on hot topics (virginity vs. marriage, parent-child conflicts), saints’ Lives offer a view of their culture’s theological concerns, secular interests, and the quest of both ecclesiastical and lay people to fulfill their spiritual and terrestrial responsibilities.



    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    FREN 4123 - Medieval Love


    Love fascinated people in the twelfth and thirteenth centuries as it still does today. This course will examine understandings and uses of love in religious and secular literature, music and art. What is the relationship, for medieval writers, between the love of God and the love of human beings? What is the role of poetry in promoting and producing love? What medieval ideas about love continue to shape our modern understandings and assumption Prerequisite: FREN 3032



    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    FREN 4237 - The Culture of Renaissance Lyon


    A study of the cultural history of the city of Lyon, France, in the sixteenth century. Prerequisite: FREN 3032.



    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    FREN 4410 - The Enlightenment


    The Enlightenment laid the foundations for our current conceptions of democratic government, religious toleration, freedom of speech, and the scientific method. The readings for this course may include works by Montesquieu, Voltaire, and Rousseau. Prerequisite: FREN 3032



    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    FREN 4509 - Seminar in French Linguistics


    Topics of specific interest to faculty and advanced undergraduate students. Prerequisite: FREN 3030, 3031, and one 4000-level course in French.



    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    FREN 4510 - Advanced Topics in Medieval Literature


    Topics may vary and include individual identity, love, war, humor, and their expression through literary techniques. Texts are read in modern French translation. May be repeated for credit with different topics. Prerequisite: FREN 3032 and at least one FREN course numbered 3041 to 3043 (or instructor permission).



    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    FREN 4520 - Advanced Topics in Renaissance Literature


    Examines major works of sixteenth-century French literature situated in the larger historical and cultural context of the Continental Renaissance. Topics vary and may include, for example, humanism and reform, women writers, and urban culture. May be repeated for credit with different topics. Prerequisite: FREN 3032 and at least one FREN course numbered 3041 to 3043 (or instructor permission).



    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    FREN 4530 - Advanced Topics in Seventeenth-Century Literature


    Topics vary; may be repeated for credit. Recent topics have included classical theatre; poetics of the lyric; moralists; and fiction. May be repeated for credit with different topics. Prerequisite: FREN 3032 and at least one FREN course numbered 3041 to 3043 (or instructor permission).



    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    FREN 4540 - Advanced Topics in Eighteenth-Century Literature


    Topics in eighteenth-century French literature. Works of authors such as Beaumarchais, de Charrière, du Deffand, Diderot, Marivaux, Montesquieu, Rousseau, de Staël, Voltaire. May be repeated for credit with different topics. Prerequisite: FREN 3032 and at least one FREN course numbered 3041 to 3043 (or instructor permission).



    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    FREN 4546 - Topics on Moroccan Civilization


    The course relates to Morocco. It treats the history as well as contemporary Morocco with its social, economic and political components.



    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    FREN 4547 - Moroccan Francophone Literature


    The French-speaking Moroccan literature found its roots in Africa or it was born, in Europe through the language of colonization, in arabo-Andalusian Spain, and with the Middle-East through the Muslim civilization. This course proposes an analysis of texts which will approach the topics of the identity, exiles, the language of writing and other topics for a better comprehension of Morocco.



    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    FREN 4560 - Advanced Topics in Nineteenth-Century Literature


    Study of the various aspects of the nineteenth-century French literature. Topics vary. May be repeated for credit with different topics. Prerequisite: FREN 3032 and at least one FREN course numbered 3041 to 3043 (or instructor permission).



    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    FREN 4570 - Advanced Topics in Twentieth-Century Literature


    Readings of significant literary works of the twentieth century. The genre, theme and specific chronological concentration will vary. May be repeated for credit with different topics. Prerequisite: FREN 3032 and at least one course in the 3040 sequence.



    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    FREN 4580 - Advanced Topics in Literature


    Advanced study of transhistorical topics such as literary ideas, the novel, theater, travel literature. Prerequisite: At least one 3000-level literature course.



    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    FREN 4581 - Advanced Topics in Francophone Literature


    Topics may include historical writings and rewritings, single authors, the oral tradition, theater, the novel, poetry.



    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    FREN 4582 - Advanced Topics in French Poetry


    Aspects of French poetry. Topics vary and may range from general survey to studies of specific periods or authors; may be repeated for credit for different topics. Prerequisite: At least one literature or culture course beyond FREN 3032.



    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    FREN 4583 - Seminar for Majors


    Close study of a specific topic in French literature. Topics vary. Prerequisite: Completion of a 4000-level literature course with a grade of B- or better.



    Credits: 3
 

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