Aug 19, 2022  
Undergraduate Record 2017-2018 
    
Undergraduate Record 2017-2018 [ARCHIVED RECORD]

Course Descriptions


 

English-Renaissance Literature

  
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    ENRN 4410 - Shakespeare Seminar


    Topics vary from year to year. For more details on this class, please visit the department website at http://www.engl.virginia.edu/courses.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ENRN 4500 - Advanced Studies in Renaissance Literature


    Topics vary from year to year. Recent examples are `Renaissance Word and Image’ and `Masks of Desire.’ For more details on this class, please visit the department website at http://www.engl.virginia.edu/courses.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ENRN 4530 - Seminar in Medieval and Renaissance Studies


    Interdisciplinary seminar whose topics vary from year to year. For more information on this class, please visit the department website at http://www.engl.virginia.edu/courses.



    Credits: 3

English-Restoration and Eighteenth-Century Lit

  
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    ENEC 3110 - English Literature of the Restoration and Early Eighteenth Century


    Surveys representative writers, themes, and forms of the period 1660-1740. For more details on this class, please visit the department website at http://www.engl.virginia.edu/courses.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ENEC 3120 - English Literature of the Late Eighteenth Century


    Surveys representative writers, themes, and forms of the period 1740-1800. For more details on this class, please visit the department website at http://www.engl.virginia.edu/courses.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ENEC 3130 - English Literature of the Restoration and Eighteenth Century


    Surveys representative writers, themes, and forms of the period 1660-1800. For more details on this class, please visit the department website at http://www.engl.virginia.edu/courses.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ENEC 3200 - Eighteenth-Century Women Writers


    For more details on this class, please visit the department website at http://www.engl.virginia.edu/courses.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ENEC 3400 - Restoration and Eighteenth-Century Drama


    Introduces students to major plays, playwrights, and theatrical issues of the late seventeenth and eighteenth centuries in Britain. For more details on this class, please visit the department website at http://www.engl.virginia.edu/courses.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ENEC 3500 - Eighteenth-Century Topics


    Topics vary from year to year. For more details on this class, please visit the department website at http://www.engl.virginia.edu/courses.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ENEC 3600 - The English Novel I


    Studies the rise and development of the English novel in the 18th century. For more details on this class, please visit the department website at http://www.engl.virginia.edu/courses.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ENEC 4300 - Gothic Spaces


    This seminar explores early gothic novels (from /The Castle of Otranto/ to /Frankenstein/) in their contexts of eighteenth-century art, architecture, music, history, politics, religion, and sexuality.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ENEC 4500 - Advanced Studies in Eighteenth-Century Literature I


    Limited enrollment. Topics vary from year to year. For more details on this class, please visit the department website at http://www.engl.virginia.edu/courses.



    Credits: 3

English-Special Topics in Literature

  
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    ENSP 1060 - Introduction to Academic Conversations


    This class welcomes students to the university and to the ways academics read, discuss, and respond to intellectual conversations. Students will read and analyze college-level texts, practice stages of the composing process, and present responses orally in discussions and brief presentations. This course develops the strategies necessary to achieve proficiency in future writing classes as well as courses across the curriculum



    Credits: 3
  
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    ENSP 1600 - Public Speaking


    The development of skills in the preparation, delivery, and criticism of speeches, with emphasis on the function of audience analysis, evidence, organization, language, and style. For more details on this class, please visit the department website at http://www.engl.virginia.edu/courses.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ENSP 2610 - Point of View Journalism


    This course analyzes ‘point-of-view’ journalism as a controversial but credible alternative to the dominant model of ”objectivity’ in the U.S. news media. It will survey point-of-view journalists from Benjamin Franklin to the modern blog.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ENSP 2810 - Women and Media in the Global South


    This course examines women and media in the Middle East, South Asia, and North Africa through the lenses of new media, journalism, feminism, and gender studies, with cross-cultural comparisons to the U.S.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ENSP 3200 - An Irish Sense of Place: Literature, Language, Music, and the Arts


    This course will bind a series of Irish texts, musical compositions, works in the visual arts, and ideas about Irish sign language to their original settings or places of creation; our readings will span from the medieval to the contemporary, and we will visit the places we read about, see, and hear about.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ENSP 3300 - Literary Editing


    This course covers contemporary literary editing techniques and teaches students how to publish book-length works using modern print and electronic processes. The course may require students to purchase/lease computer software in addition to textbooks.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ENSP 3500 - Studies in Special Topics in Literature


    Topics vary from year to year. For more details please visit the department website at http://www.engl.virginia.edu/courses.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ENSP 3610 - Narratives of Illness and Doctoring


    Illness experience and medical practice alike are steeped in stories, narrative being a fundamental way we make sense of self and world (including illness and loss). This course inquires into connections among narrative, literature, and medicine through study of literary and other narratives that address a range of illnesses/conditions, the experience of doctoring, and important issues in contemporary medicine and culture. For more details on this class, please visit the department website at http://www.engl.virginia.edu/courses.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ENSP 3620 - Modern Women Authors


    For more details on this class, please visit the department website at http://www.engl.virginia.edu/courses.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ENSP 3650 - Images of Women in 19th and 20th Century Fiction


    Images of Women in 19th and 20th Century Fiction



    Credits: 3
  
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    ENSP 3850 - The Dark Side of Hollywood: Film Noir


    Course focuses on directorial and photographic styles, the Expressionist legacy, and varieties of visual coherence in selected films noirs of Forties and Fifties Hollywood. For more details on this class, please visit the department website at http://www.engl.virginia.edu/courses.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ENSP 3860 - Game of Thrones


    A study of George R. R. Martin’s fantasy series and the television series based on it, exploring notions of literary and visual representation, racialism, fan fiction, and the gendered dimensions of power.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ENSP 4301 - Global Indigenous Media


    Close study of contemporary media produced by members of indigenous communities worldwide. Readings in media studies, critical theory, and critical anthropology. Seminar with presentations, short papers, and a research paper. For more details on this class, please visit the department website at http://www.engl.virginia.edu/courses. Prerequisite: one course in Media Studies, English, Anthropology, or a related discipline.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ENSP 4500 - Advanced Studies in Special Topics in Literature


    Limited enrollment. Topics vary from year to year. For more details on this class, please visit the department website at http://www.engl.virginia.edu/courses.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ENSP 4800 - The Bible


    Analyzes readings in the English Bible. Designed to familiarize or re-familiarize the literary student with the shape, argument, rhetoric, and purposes of the canon; with the persons, events, and perspectives of the major narratives; and with the conventions, techniques, resources, and peculiarities of the texts. For more details on this class, please visit the department website at http://www.engl.virginia.edu/courses.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ENSP 4995 - Research Leading to an Essay on London


    Undergraduates who have successfully completed a summer program taught in Britain (‘The Culture of London: Past and Present’) will draw upon the on-site experiences to develop an independent research program pursued through the length of a semester. In regular consultation with the faculty advisor, each student will develop a coherent plan of inquiry into a London-related topic. The outcome of the research will be a 12-15 page essay. For more details on this class, please visit the department website at http://www.engl.virginia.edu/courses.



    Credits: 3

Entrepreneurship

  
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    ENTP 1010 - Startup: An Introduction to Entrepreneurship


    The Startup class is a fourteen-week course-plus-simulation designed to provide students with not only the basic tools and vocabulary of new ventures, but also a sense of what it feels like to start, fund, and manage such a venture. The course, by way of in-class case discussions, mentored group work, and startup simulations introduces students to a broad range of issues faced by founders and funders of both for-profit and non-profit ventures.



    Credits: 3
  
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    ENTP 4000 - Launch


    Launch is a class-as-accelerator, through which a select group of admitted students would further develop over the course of a semester a venture of their own design. The course experience is comprised of not only a curriculum focused upon customer, product, and venture development, but also the mentoring of ventures by experienced founders, investors, lawyers, and other members of the new venture community.



    Credits: 3

Environmental Sciences

  
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    EVSC 1010 - Introduction to Environmental Sciences


    Introduces the principles and basic facts of the natural environment. Topics include earth materials, land forms, weather and climate, vegetation and soils, and the processes of environmental change and their implications to economic and human systems.



    Credits: 3
  
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    EVSC 1020 - Practical Concepts in Environmental Sciences


    Practical concepts and problem solving in environmental sciences through demonstrations, hands-on activities, structured discussions, and problem sets beyond those of traditional lectures or discussion groups. Emphasizes experience and critical thinking in the four core areas: geology, hydrology, atmospheric sciences, and ecology.



    Credits: 1
  
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    EVSC 1040 - Virginia’s Environments


    A general survey of the basic foundation, concepts, and dynamics of the total Earth system with natural Virginia as the unifying concept. Understanding is built on the foundation of geological and geomorphological processes that form and modify the landscape of Virginia, including basic geology, processes of mountain building, flooding, and erosion. Also examined are various ecosystems in the state, especially the Chesapeake Bay, and the human impact of these varied landscapes, particularly through exploitation of mineral and water resources, waste disposal and pollution, and land use issues.



    Credits: 3
  
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    EVSC 1050 - Ethics, Protocols, and Practice of International Research


    Ethics, Protocols, and Practice of International Research



    Credits: 3
  
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    EVSC 1080 - Resources and the Environment


    Explores the impact of people on the environment in the past and present with projections for the future. Addresses the phenomena and effects of food and energy production and industrial processes, including such topics as lead pollution, acid rain, the greenhouse effect, and the disposal of radioactive waste. Demonstrates how the environment works in the absence of humans and discusses how human use of resources perturbs the environment.



    Credits: 3
  
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    EVSC 1200 - Elements of Ecology


    Introduces the science of ecology and its application to current environmental issues. A number of topics relating to population growth and regulation, biodiversity, sustainability, and global change are used as a framework to investigate basic ecological principles. Emphasizes the application of basic science to the understanding and mitigation of current environmental problems.



    Credits: 3
  
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    EVSC 1300 - Earth’s Weather and Climate


    An overview of the atmospheric sciences primarily for non-science majors. Topics include weather forecasting, the greenhouse effect and global warming, ozone depletion, El Niño, air pollution, atmospheric optical effects, global climate, and the impacts of weather on human health. Three lectures per week. No science/math background is required.



    Credits: 3
  
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    EVSC 1450 - An Inconvenient Truce: Climate, You and CO2


    Carbon is the building block of life, the way we trap the energy of the sun to feed all biological systems, and the way we power human civilization. It is also the driver of global climate change. How does the climate system work? How has climate changed? How will it change in the coming decades? What are the likely impacts on humanity and the ecosystems on which we depend? What can we do about it? We explore climate change, top to bottom.



    Credits: 3
  
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    EVSC 1600 - Water on Earth


    Studies the natural history of the Earth’s hydrosphere, including its origin, evolution, and importance in Earth processes. Introduces the hydrological cycle and the role of water in a variety of Earth processes. Discusses human influences on the hydrosphere and current topics in hydrological science and water resources, such as contamination and resource allocation, emphasizing the scientific basis for past, present, and future decisions.



    Credits: 3
  
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    EVSC 2010 - Materials That Shape Civilizations


    Reviews the structure, properties, methods of production, uses, and world supply of the materials on which present and past civilizations have been based; including materials used in heavy industry, construction, communications, medicine, as well as textiles and naturally occurring organic materials. Emphasizes the effects of environment on materials and energy relationships. Cross-listed as MSE 2010.



    Credits: 3
  
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    EVSC 2030 - Politics, Science, and Values: An Introduction to Environmental Policy


    Introduces a wide variety of domestic and international environmental policy issues. Explores how political processes, scientific evidence, ideas, and values affect environmental policymaking. This class satisfies the social sciences area requirement and not the natural sciences/mathematics area requirement, since EVSC 230 is devoted to the subject of environmental policy. Cross listed as ETP 230 and PLAP 230.



    Credits: 3
  
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    EVSC 2050 - Introduction to Oceanography


    Analyzes the principles that govern the world’s oceans and their integration into an understanding of the major marine environments. Topics include marine pollution, global climate, and marine policy.



    Credits: 3
  
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    EVSC 2070 - Earth Systems Technology & Management


    Earth Systems Engineering Management (ESEM) is a comprehensive perspective that combines engineering, environmental science and psychology to explore how human beings can take care of the ecosystem. Students will listen to lectures and discuss background readings from a variety of perspectives related to ESEM. Then they will apply what they have read to a practical problem: identifying and managing national parks and other national entities.



    Credits: 3
  
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    EVSC 2200 - Plants, People and Culture


    This course will explore the interrelationships between humans and plants. An introduction to basic plant biology provides a framework for exploring the process of plant domestication and the economic and cultural consequences for humans, including plant diversity and use of indigenous plants. The origin and dispersal of major plants used by humans as food, drink, fiber, medicine and fuel will be considered.



    Credits: 3
  
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    EVSC 2220 - Conservation Ecology: Biodiversity and Beyond


    Studies ecological science relevant to sustaining populations, species, ecosystems, and the global biosphere. Includes discussion of genetic inbreeding, critical population size, community structure and organization, maintenance of critical ecosystem function, and global biogeochemistry. Case studies from around the world demonstrate links between human-driven environmental change and the health of the biosphere, at all levels, from the organism to the planet.



    Credits: 3
  
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    EVSC 2221 - Conservation Ecology Laboratory


    This course offers hands-on study of ecological science relevant to sustaining populations, species, ecosystems and the global biosphere. The laboratory includes three modules that teach the scientific method while exposing students to current topics in conservation ecology. Modules include assessment of land use change in various localities based on the students’ origin, assessment of stream health in the Rivanna watershed, and assessment of soil fertility under alternative land management. Case studies in the local community will demonstrate links between human-driven environmental change and the health of the biosphere. Offered to complement EVSC 2220, but may be taken on its own.



    Credits: 1
  
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    EVSC 2800 - Fundamentals of Geology


    Studies the composition, structure, and internal processes of earth; the classification, origin, and distribution of earth materials; earth’s interior; and the interpretation of geological data for the solution of problems of the natural environment. Recommended: At least one semester of college chemistry with lab such as CHEM 1410, 1420.



    Credits: 3
  
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    EVSC 2801 - Fundamentals of Geology Laboratory


    Field and laboratory experimentation into the nature of earth materials and processes, especially as applied to use and human problems. Corequisite: EVSC 2800.



    Credits: 1
  
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    EVSC 2900 - Beaches, Coasts and Rivers


    Studies the geologic framework and biophysical processes of the coastal zone, and the role of the major river systems in modifying the coastal environment. Emphasizes human modifications, including case studies along the Atlantic, Gulf, and Pacific coasts.



    Credits: 3
  
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    EVSC 3020 - GIS Methods


    Explores the theory of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and their applications in a range of disciplines using various GIS software packages. Example applications are from physical and social sciences, often with a focus on the Charlottesville-Albemarle area. For students interested in immediate applications of GIS in their work. Experience with word processing, file managers, and other computing skills is essential. Prerequisite: The equivalent of the College natural science/mathematics and social science area requirements.



    Credits: 4
  
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    EVSC 3060 - Biomechanics of Organisms


    This course explores interactions between biology and the fluid within which terrestrial organisms (air) and aquatic organisms (water) function. Topics covered include locomotion, heat exchange, diffusion and mass exchange, bio-acoustics, and bio-optics in the two different fluids, as well as living at the interface between air and water. Prerequisite: MATH 1190 or MATH 1210 or MATH 1310 or APMA 1090.



    Credits: 3
  
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    EVSC 3200 - Fundamentals of Ecology


    Studies energy flow, nutrient cycling and allocation in natural ecosystems, organization of species at the population and community levels, and interaction between people and the biosphere. Prerequisite: One semester of calculus; recommended; at least one semester of college-level chemistry and biology with labs such as CHEM 1410, 1420, and BIOL 2020.



    Credits: 3
  
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    EVSC 3201 - Fundamentals of Ecology Laboratory


    Field and laboratory experimentation illustrative of ecological systems, and their checks, balances, and cycles. Corequisite: EVSC 3200.



    Credits: 1
  
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    EVSC 3300 - Atmosphere and Weather


    Introduces the physical laws governing atmospheric behavior and examines atmospheric variables and their role in the fluid environment of the earth. Prerequisite: MATH 1190 or MATH 1210 or MATH 1220 or MATH 1310 or MATH 1320 or MATH 2310 or APMA 1090 or APMA 1110 or APMA 2120.



    Credits: 3
  
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    EVSC 3301 - Atmosphere and Weather Laboratory


    Studies the principles of measurements, instrumentation for measuring atmospheric parameters, and methods of observing and calculating atmospheric variables. Corequisite: EVSC 3300.



    Credits: 1
  
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    EVSC 3600 - Physical Hydrology


    Studies the physical principles governing the flow of water on and beneath the earth’s surface, including fundamental concepts of fluid dynamics applied to the description of open channel hydraulics, ground water hydraulics, and dynamics of soil moisture. Introduces elements of surface water and ground water hydrology and explores humanity’s influence on its hydrological environment. Prerequisite: One semester of calculus.



    Credits: 3
  
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    EVSC 3601 - Physical Hydrology Laboratory


    Field and laboratory experimentation illustrative of the hydrological cycle, including energy and mass transfer in surface and ground water. Corequisite: EVSC 3600.



    Credits: 1
  
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    EVSC 3660 - Tropical Field Ecology


    This course is designed to introduce students to the plants and animals found in the tropical marine environment of the Caribbean and to study their adaptations in the context of community ecology.  Fishes, invertebrates, and marine plants will be in the major groups encountered.  Cross-listed with BIOL 3500.  Prerequisite:  BIOL 2010 or instructor permission.



    Credits: 4
  
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    EVSC 3665 - Tropical Ecology and Conservation in Belize


    This course is an introduction to the organisms and ecosystems of Belize, including fresh water, marine and terrestrial examples. Special emphasis will be placed on the interactions of the ecosystem components and on the conservation of specific ecosystems and locales. Prerequisites: BIOL 2010, 2020, 2030, 2040 or EVSC 3200, 3201 or permission of instructor.



    Credits: 3
  
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    EVSC 3810 - Earth Processes as Natural Hazards


    Studies the dynamic processes of Earth’s interior and surface and the impact of natural hazards on society. Geological topics, including earthquakes, volcanoes, landslides, and floods, will be described. Observations and geological data will be used to make decisions about risk to human life and property. Prerequisite: Required prerequisite course EVSC 2800 or equivalent college-level introductory geology course by transfer credit.



    Credits: 3
  
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    EVSC 3840 - Earth Surface Processes and Landforms


    Examines erosional processes and their role in creating landforms. Explores the influence of processes and landforms on land use and the human environment, including hazards from floods and landslides. Prerequisite: EVSC 2800 or instructor permission.



    Credits: 3
  
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    EVSC 3841 - Earth Surface Processes and Landforms Lab


    Examines erosional processes and their role in creating landforms. Explores the influence of processes and landforms on land use and the human environment, including hazards from floods and landslides. Prerequisite: EVSC 2800 or instructor permission.



    Credits: 1
  
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    EVSC 3850 - Geodynamics


    Studies the basic principles of continuum mechanics and their application to problems in the geological sciences, including the behavior of the Earth’s lithosphere, rock mechanics, and flow of water. Prerequisite: EVSC 2800, calculus, and physics.



    Credits: 3
  
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    EVSC 3860 - Introduction to Geochemistry


    Studies the principles that govern the distribution and abundance of the elements in the Earth’s lithosphere, hydrosphere, biosphere, and atmosphere. Prerequisite: CHEM 1410, 1420 and EVSC 2800.



    Credits: 3
  
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    EVSC 3880 - Watersheds of Lewis and Clark


    Explores geological and hydrological processes that form and modify the landscape of the American West. Following the route of Lewis and Clark, the processes of mountain building, glaciation, flooding, and erosion are studied. Also considered are the human impact on this landscape, particularly through exploitation of mineral and water resources. Prerequisite: One course (including high school) in geology, Earth Sciences, or environmental sciences, or instructor permission.



    Credits: 3
  
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    EVSC 3881 - Watersheds of Lewis and Clark Laboratory


    In-depth exploration of some of the geological and hydrological aspects of the concurrent lecture course, with particular emphasis on the use of maps and the completion of hands-on activities. Observation, identification, and data analysis will be developed as tools useful in the study of the landscape. The laboratory section is an optional experience for students enrolled in the lecture course. Several field trips will be conducted.



    Credits: 1
  
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    EVSC 4002 - Undergraduate Seminar


    A weekly, one-hour seminar series for majors, other interested undergraduates, and the University community dealing with environmental processes, research, issues, careers, and graduate study.



    Credits: 1
  
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    EVSC 4010 - Introduction to Remote Sensing


    Introduction to the physics and techniques of remote sensing. Prerequisite: at least one year of college-level chemistry or physics, or instructor permission.



    Credits: 4
  
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    EVSC 4020 - Dryland Ecohydrology


    Study of ecohydrologic processes characteristic of arid and semiarid regions. Prerequisites: Any introductory hydrology course or instructor permission.



    Credits: 2
  
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    EVSC 4030 - Environmental Policymaking in the United States


    Exploration of the possibilities for, and constraints on, domestic environmental policymaking. Examination of the roles of Congress, the executive branch, and the courts in environmental policymaking. Critical analysis of the analytical principles and values commonly employed in environmental policymaking. Prerequisite: Completion of Natural Sciences/Mathematics area requirement and third- or fourth-year standing, or instructor permission.



    Credits: 3
  
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    EVSC 4040 - Climate Change: Science, Markets & Policy


    We will explore what many consider the greatest environmental issue of our time. Co-taught by professors in the Department of Environmental Sciences and the School of Law, our objective is to help students develop an integrated view of anthropogenic climate change and possible responses to it. We will review the evidence and critiques of it, impacts of climate change, and potential for markets and institutions to address/mitigate impacts.



    Credits: 3
  
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    EVSC 4050 - Topics in Oceanography


    Introduces oceanography together with a survey of marine resources and the scientific bases for their management. Prerequisite: One year college-level science.



    Credits: 3
  
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    EVSC 4070 - Advanced GIS


    Explores advanced Geographic Information Systems concepts through use of Arc/Info, Erdas Imagine, and other GIS software in individual and group projects. Topics include data management, raster modeling, image manipulation, and 3-D visualization. Prerequisite: An introductory GIS course.



    Credits: 3
  
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    EVSC 4082 - Geology and Ecology of U.S. National Parks


    The seminar will involve a close reading of the text with additional outside readings from peer-reviewed journals and books. Students will lead discussions on geological and ecological topics specific to the parks. The impacts of humans on the ecosystems of the specific parks will also be a major topic of investigation and analysis. Prerequisites: Required prerequisite course EVSC 2800 or EVSC 3200



    Credits: 2
  
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    EVSC 4090 - Analytical Chemistry


    Study of the utilization of modern analytical instrumentation for chemical analysis. Includes emission and mass spectrometry, ultraviolet, visible, and infrared absorption spectroscopy, atomic absorption, electrical methods of analysis, chromatography, neutron activation analysis, and X-ray methods. Prerequisites: CHEM 1420 or CHEM 1620 or CHEM 1810.



    Credits: 3
  
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    EVSC 4100 - Management of Forest Ecosystems


    An ecosystem course which treats the ecology of forests and consequences of forest processes in natural and managed systems. The class emphasizes the “pattern and process” concept that is the central theme in modern vegetation sciences at increasing scales: from form and function of leaves and other parts of trees through population, community and landscape ecology to the role of forests in the global climate and carbon-cycling. Pre-requisites: EVSC 3200, 3400, or 3500 recommended.



    Credits: 4
  
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    EVSC 4110 - Estuarine Ecology


    An interdisciplinary course covering the physical, biogeochemical and ecological aspects of coastal estuaries. Prerequisites: EVSC 3200



    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    EVSC 4122 - Coastal Ecology Seminar


    A graduate/undergraduate seminar on current topics in coastal ecology.



    Credits: 1
  
  •  

    EVSC 4140 - Global Coastal Change


    A comprehensive treatment of global environmental factors affecting coastal marine systems, including climate change, sea-level rise, alterations in freshwater and sediment transport, disturbance and habitat loss, overfishing, alien species, and eutrophication. Includes case studies providing real-world examples, and detailed reviews of the evidence of changes and possible solutions.



    Credits: 3
  
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    EVSC 4150 - Terrestrial Plant Ecology


    The objective of the course is to provide students with a basic understanding of factors influencing the distribution of terrestrial plants at the local, landscape, and global scales. We will focus on the basic principles of plant biology and their role on determining the relative distributions and abundances of plant species, patterns of community structure, and ecosystem function.



    Credits: 3
  
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    EVSC 4160 - Forest Sampling


    Study of quantitative methods for sampling forest ecosystems



    Credits: 3
  
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    EVSC 4190 - Ecosystem-based Marine Conservation


    The basis in ecosystem attributes, resiliency, and sustainability for marine conservation, policy development, and management. A number of case studies will be examined from the textbook, and students will be required to develop their own case studies in partial requirement for the grade.



    Credits: 3
  
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    EVSC 4200 - The Ecology of Coastal Wetlands


    Investigates the ecology of coastal interface ecosystems, including sea grass, mangrove, and salt marsh emphasizing biogeochemisty, succession, and dynamic processes related to the development and maintenance of these systems. Explores the differences between tropical and temperate coastal systems. Prerequisite: EVSC 3200 or equivalent.



    Credits: 3
  
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    EVSC 4210 - Methods in Aquatic Ecology


    Trains students in field and laboratory techniques used in aquatic ecological research. Two weekend field trips to the Eastern Shore of Virginia serve as the foundation. Laboratory exercises include the data and samples gathered in the barrier island lagoons and in the Chesapeake Bay. Analyzes water quality and patterns of primary and secondary production in aquatic ecosystems. Prerequisite: EVSC 3200 or equivalent.



    Credits: 3
  
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    EVSC 4220 - Aquatic Plant Ecology


    Studies the physiology and ecology of aquatic plants from tropical, temperate, and polar waters. Emphasizes comparisons among major plant groups (phytoplankton, macroalgae, vascular) of fundamental physiological processes, including photosynthesis, nutrient uptake, resource allocation, and growth. Discusses iterations between plant physiology an ecosystem function and the structure of plant communities for both marine and freshwater environments. Examples of human impacts on aquatic environments, including eutrophication and global climate change, are considered in the context of plant physiology and ecology. Prerequisite: EVSC 3200 or equivalent.



    Credits: 3
  
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    EVSC 4230 - Marine Environments and Organisms


    Surveys the major habitats of marine and estuarine areas and the organisms which have adapted to life in these environments. Emphasizes the organisms and communities which have evolved in response to stress and competition in the sea, and the systematics and natural history of marine organisms. Prerequisite: EVSC 3200 or equivalent.



    Credits: 3
  
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    EVSC 4240 - Restoration Ecology


    This course examines the science of restoration ecology and the practice of ecological restoration through lectures and in-class discussion. Emphasis is on application of ecological concepts, models, and methodologies to restoration of degraded and impaired ecosystems. The potential for exploiting restoration projects as large-scale ecosystem experiments and the importance of grounding restoration efforts in basic ecological theory are discussed. Prerequisite: EVSC 3200 or equivalent.



    Credits: 3
  
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    EVSC 4250 - Ecosystem Ecology


    Study of the flows of energy and the cycling of elements in ecosystems and how these concepts connect the various components of the Earth system. Prerequisite: EVSC 3200 and one semester of chemistry or instructor permission.



    Credits: 3
  
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    EVSC 4260 - Ecology of Grasslands and Tundra


    This course will emphasize plant community and ecosystem ecology of water-limited grassland systems and energy-limited tundra systems. Various topics will be covered including water, carbon, and nitrogen cycles, primary production, plant physiology, plant competition, and plant-herbivore interactions. We will examine the environmental factors that control these systems, as well as their geographic distribution throughout the globe. Prerequisite: EVSC 3200 or instructor permission.



    Credits: 3
  
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    EVSC 4270 - Soil Science


    Introduces the study of soils as a natural system. Topics include the fundamentals of soil chemistry, hydrology, and biology with respect to genesis, classification and utilization. Prerequisite: EVSC 2800 and 3200; one year college chemistry or instructor permission.



    Credits: 4
  
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    EVSC 4280 - Environmental Microbiology


    Analyzes the impact of microbial physiologic reactions on environmental quality: microbes as transformers of chemical pollutants; microbes as transformers of nutrient elements; microbes as agents of energy transfer in ecosystems; and microbes as contaminants. Emphasizes the quantitation of microbial activities. Prerequisite: BIOL 2010, CHEM 1410, 1420, EVSC 3200.



    Credits: 4
  
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    EVSC 4290 - Limnology: Inland Water Ecosystems


    This course will focus on lakes, rivers, streams, and reservoirs as ecosystems. The goal of the course is to provide an understanding through lectures and discussions of the main physical, chemical, and biological processes that determine similarities and differences among inland waters. Major human impacts on inland waters will also be considered. Prerequisite: EVSC 3200 and 1 semester of chemistry or instructor permission.



    Credits: 3
  
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    EVSC 4320 - Mountain Meteorology


    Examines the influence of mountains on typical and severe weather, including local wind circulations and downslope windstorms. A field study in the Shenandoah National Park provides the students with hands-on experiences in atmospheric measurement techniques and the interpretation of meteorological data obtained in mountainous terrain. Prerequisite: EVSC 3300 or instructor permission.



    Credits: 4
  
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    EVSC 4332 - Mountain Meteorology Seminar


    Mountain Meteorology Seminar



    Credits: 2
  
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    EVSC 4340 - Human Biometeorology: Weather, Climate and Human Health


    We will explore how weather and climate impact human health from the individual to the societal level. Topics will include how the human body responds to heat and cold, weather and physiological stress and strain, impacts of poor air quality on human morbidity and mortality, and the role of weather and climate in disease transmission.We will likewise examine extreme weather events at the macro-level & the role of human adaptation to climate. Prerequisites include an introductory course in atmospheric science (EVSC 1300, EVSC 3300, or the equivalent).



    Credits: 3
  
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    EVSC 4350 - Synoptic Climatology


    Studies the formation, movements, and meteorological and climatological attributes of synoptic-scale weather systems and the impact on the environment. Explores the relationship of these systems to air quality, atmospheric transport, climate change, and evaporation and precipitation regimes. Prerequisite: EVSC 3300 or equivalent, or instructor permission.



    Credits: 3
  
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    EVSC 4360 - Weather Forecasting


    This course draws upon the fundamental principles of dynamical and physical meteorology to forecast mid-latitude weather conditions with a focus on the 1-7 day time frame. The class reviews the full suite of modern meteorological observation systems and provides an introduction to numerical weather prediction. Along with lectures/discussions and classroom exercises, forecasting for various locations is a regular part of the course. Prerequisite: EVSC 3300 or instructor permission.



    Credits: 3
  
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    EVSC 4370 - Microclimatology


    Analyzes the principles governing atmospheric processes occurring at small temporal and spatial scales near the Earth’s surface, including energy, mass, and momentum transfer. Includes features of the atmospheric environment affecting plants and feedback mechanisms between plants and their local microclimates, trace gas exchange between the terrestrial biosphere and the atmosphere, energy budgets, evapotranspiration, and motions near the surface. Prerequisite: EVSC 3300 or instructor permission.



    Credits: 2
  
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    EVSC 4440 - Climate Change


    This course will focus on the history of Earth’s climate and theories of climate change across a range of temporal scales. The course will initially focus on Earth’s climate before the period of modern meteorological data collection, pre-1850. Then changes in climate during the period of instrumental data collection will be covered. The course will conclude with debates on the causes of current climate variation and potential impacts. Prerequisite: EVSC 3300 or instructor permission.



    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    EVSC 4452 - Global Climate Variability Seminar


    This seminar course will review the atmospheric and oceanic processes responsible for large-scale variability and change in Earth’s climate system through readings and discussions of recent peer-reviewed scientific publications.



    Credits: 2
 

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