Oct 22, 2019  
Graduate Record 2011-2012 
    
Graduate Record 2011-2012 [ARCHIVED RECORD]

Course Descriptions


 

Biomedical Sciences

  
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    BIMS 9640 - Clinical Oncology for Basic and Translational Scientists


    This course is designed to present an overview of selected aspects of clinical cancer diagnosis and care by cancer practitioners, with a view toward developing new clinical and translational research initiatives. Selected vignettes demonstrating technologies and problems will be presented, together with a discussion of cutting edge approaches and current problems confronting clinicians, patients, and researchers. The level of presentation will be for the non-specialist in each area, addressing trainees and basic science investigators, but providing challenging thought for established clinicians. At least a third of each session will be dedicated to interaction between investigators and clinicians, with the emphasis on identifying opportunities for basic-clinical (or translational) collaboration. Prerequisite: Instructor permission



    Credits: 1
  
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    BIMS 9998 - Non-Topical Research


    Preparation for Doctoral Research prior to completion of candidacy examination.



    Credits: 1 to 12
  
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    BIMS 9999 - Non-Topical Research


    For doctoral dissertation following advancement to PhD candidacy.



    Credits: 1 to 12

Biophysics

  
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    BIOP 5050 - Biophysical Literature


    A journal club. Students present recent research papers in biophysics and/or report on progress of their own research projects. Students learn how to effectively read, critique, and present science research progress.



    Credits: 1
  
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    BIOP 5060 - Molecular Physiology: From Molecular Machines to Biological Information Processing


    Various aspects of molecular and cellular physiology and biophysics, including structural biology, quantitative studies of molecular interactions, biomolecular spectroscopy, proteomics, membrane biophysics, electron microscopy of large complexes, and advanced optical microscopy.



    Credits: 4
  
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    BIOP 5559 - New Course in Biophysics


    New course in the subject of biophysics.



    Credits: 1 to 4
  
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    BIOP 7051 - Directed Reading


    Designed on an individual basis, students who have deficiencies in particular areas pertaining to biophysics will be advised by a faculty member to read texts in that area and will discuss the contents with the faculty mentor on a regular basis.



    Credits: 1 to 5
  
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    BIOP 7559 - New Course in Biophysics


    New course in the subject of biophysics.



    Credits: 1 to 4
  
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    BIOP 8010 - Special Topics in Biophysics


    A seminar series comprised of 45-minute informal talks given by students, faculty, and guest speakers.



    Credits: 1
  
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    BIOP 8020 - Advanced Protein Crystallography


    An in-depth assessment of the current methodology in macromolecular crystallography. In addition to formal lectures, a number of hands-on sessions introduce students to experimental aspects of crystallization and sample preparation, data collection, as well as selected problems in computing. The lectures cover selected aspects of crystal symmetry, diffraction theory including diffraction by helical structures and fiber diffraction, methods of data collection and structure solution, with emphasis on the contemporary approaches utilizing synchrotron radiation and exploiting anomalous scattering. Refinement and model assessment and selected papers are discussed.



    Credits: 3
  
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    BIOP 8030 - Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy of Macromollecules


    The course focuses on the application of NMR spectroscopy to protein structure determination. Topics include classical and quantum description of NMR, density matrix theory and relaxation mechanisms, multi-dimensional homo/heteronuclear NMR, pulse sequence design, structure calculation from NMR data, molecular dynamics calculations. Two additional lectures each are devoted to solid-state NMR and EPR.



    Credits: 3
  
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    BIOP 8559 - New Course in Biophysics


    New course in the subject of biophysics.



    Credits: 1 to 4
  
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    BIOP 9559 - New Course in Biophysics


    New course in the subject of biophysics.



    Credits: 1 to 4
  
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    BIOP 9995 - Biophysics Research


    Independent study, other than non-topical research, for course credits.



    Credits: 3 to 12
  
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    BIOP 9998 - Non-Topical Research, Preparation for Doctoral Research


    For doctoral research, taken before a dissertation director has been selected.



    Credits: 3 to 12
  
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    BIOP 9999 - Non-Topical Research


    For doctoral research, taken under the supervision of a dissertation director.



    Credits: 3 to 12

Business

  
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    BUS 5010 - Information Security Management


    This foundation course provides managers with the essential framework needed to design and develop an effective information security program. Explores methods used to raise general security awareness, reviews current industry practices, and develops expertise needed to adapt policies to safeguard proprietary information.



    Credits: 3
  
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    BUS 5020 - Security Policy Development and Assessment


    Effective security managers must know how to develop a security policy that will be adopted by all employees and supported by executive management. This course examines the steps required in policy development including risk assessment, identification of internal and external threats, legal and privacy issues, creating reports, and escalation procedures. Related topics such as access controls, security standards, and policy implementation are covered in depth.



    Credits: 3
  
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    BUS 5030 - Designing Dynamic Security Architecture


    Students explore the basic building blocks needed to implement a life-cycle security system. Instruction focuses on how to analyze internal applications, computing platforms/network infrastructure, and corporate objectives with an eye toward designing flexible security architecture that is best suited for the enterprise. Case studies are used to illustrate key security architecture concepts and methods. Visiting experts from the field of ISM enrich classroom discussions.



    Credits: 3
  
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    BUS 5040 - Creating and Conducting a Security Audit


    Investigate the key role the information security manager plays in designing and conducting both limited and full-scale security audits. Students review the essential components of a security audit and learn how to integrate methodology with company needs. The pitfalls connected with conducting a security audit are covered in full to assure that best practices are incorporated for effective results. Creating audit reports, identifying areas of vulnerability, and responding to third party audits are also addressed. Case studies reviewing government and private audits are used to illustrate course concepts.



    Credits: 3
  
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    BUS 5050 - Threat Assessment and Security Measures


    The security manager must be equipped to identify and protect against all forms of internal and external threats. This computer lab-based course examines common security threats including hacker attacks, incursions, backdoor programs, email borne viruses, and the potential for internal sabotage. Students also learn how to anticipate and respond to such threats using an arsenal of security tools, appliances, and devices including firewalls, intrusion detection systems, vulnerability assessment systems, single sign on, virtual private networks, and authentication systems. Course work also touches on implementing practical network security measures including the importance of hardening operating systems and critical applications to eliminate vulnerabilities.



    Credits: 3
  
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    BUS 5060 - Understanding Technology Used in an Open Access Environment


    Students develop an understanding of the technology used to distribute information in support of eBusiness and the security concerns inherent in an open access environment. Instruction surveys the technologies that are key for backend integration (XML, CORBA, DCOM and JavaBeans) and front-end deployment (HTML and Java). Course work reviews the strengths and weaknesses of common operating systems such as Windows NT, Linux, and Unix as well as the risks versus benefits of deploying one system over another. Communications concepts such as TCP/IP, ISP delivery channels, and wireless technology are discussed in detail. Performance and security issues relative to each technology introduced in this course are discussed in depth.



    Credits: 3
  
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    BUS 5070 - ISC2 Commong Body of Knowledge and C I S S P Exam Preparation


    Explores the 10 domains of the ISC2 Common Body of Knowledge to prepare students for the Certified Information system Security Professional (CISSP) examination.



    Credits: 3
  
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    BUS 5080 - Understanding Cybercrime and Implementing Mitigating Countermeasures


    Examines the ever changing and fast pace of technology in relation to cybercrimes and cyber terrorism. Explores the threats of cybercrime, bullying, and terrorism and the countermeasures used against such threats. Includes a review of current cyber policy issues in the private and public sectors.



    Credits: 3
  
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    BUS 5090 - Converged Networks: Design, Security and Simulation


    Examines Internet security concerning two key network design issues: securely integrating and converging network applications; and transport technologies. Explores the technical tools that protect information from internal and external threats including various network security technologies and protection systems.



    Credits: 3
  
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    BUS 5300 - Leadership in the Technology Organization


    Investigates the complex and rapidly changing nature of technology organizations. Teaches the transition to management and leadership roles, the importance of organizational vision and values, assessing and capitalizing on human resources, and managing scarce resources in a technology organization.



    Credits: 3
  
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    BUS 5310 - Financial Management


    Examines how value is measured, created, and maximized. Beginning with an introduction to accounting, instruction covers the fundamentals of measuring and reporting revenue, costs, cash flow, assets, liabilities, and equity. Explores the financial decisions that management must make, including break-even analysis, budgeting, investment in assets, and funding with debt equity.



    Credits: 3
  
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    BUS 5320 - Communications and Team Development


    Today’s leaders must be skilled in both communicating with diverse audiences and maintaining effective teams in order to succeed in a technology organization. Communications topics include addressing technical and non-technical audiences using presentations, interpersonal skills, and writing skills. Team development instruction focuses on managing teams, identifying and understanding the leadership role, the importance of shared leadership, product teams, and team decision-making.



    Credits: 3
  
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    BUS 5340 - Employee Recruitment and Development


    Topics include recruitment in a tight labor market, employee selection and incentives, performance assessment, mentoring and career planning, workforce diversity, understanding organizational change, and developing a learning organization.



    Credits: 3
  
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    BUS 5350 - Understanding Technology Operations


    Examines a number of topics that can have a significant impact on the extent to which a firm attains world class standards. Topics include operations strategy, product/service selection and design, business process reengineering, capacity planning, quality management, facility location and layout, and supply chain management.



    Credits: 3
  
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    BUS 5360 - Introduction to E-Commerce


    Explores the principal components and driving forces behind electronic commerce. Develops an understanding of Internet business practices including key terms and concepts related to emerging technologies and network architecture. Discussions analyze the socio-economic and technical impact that e-commerce has on conducting business-to-business and business-to-consumer transactions in the global marketplace.



    Credits: 3
  
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    BUS 5370 - Managing and Maintaining an E-Commerce Website


    Develops skills needed to manage and maintain a Web Site in this hands-on course that takes one from the design stage through online implementation. Teaches basic site architecture, standards and protocols, the role of databases, methods for capturing and tracking customer data, how to register a domain name, and writing content for the Web.



    Credits: 3
  
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    BUS 5380 - Web Marketing: Building Awareness on the Internet


    Examines the application of marketing principles and practices in an Internet environment. Identifies principles of marketing with a Web-based focus. Topics include changing marketing environments in an Internet society, marketing communications, management, company image, product/brand awareness, promotion and service information, e-retail and online catalogs, and pre- and-post-sales support.



    Credits: 3
  
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    BUS 5390 - E-Commerce Law


    Focuses on maintaining organizational and consumer privacy, locating vulnerabilities, encryption methods, management of intellectual property, and procedures for secure web transactions



    Credits: 3
  
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    BUS 5400 - Financial Management for Web-based Businesses


    Examines basic financial management and accounting techniques such as review of e-business P & L statements and balance sheets, cash flow analysis, supply-chain management, and other rules of thumb. Topics include a review of stock options and their role as a tool for recruitment and retention of employees, as well as a conceptual understanding of accounting and financial reporting for stock options.



    Credits: 3
  
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    BUS 5410 - Strategic Management of E-Commerce Technology


    Expands on strategic management principles in the context of e-commerce and the global marketplace. Through discussions, analysis, and case studies, students sharpen the skills needed to manage innovation within their companies by learning to develop and protect e-business infrastructure, identify lucrative business opportunities, execute implementation plans, and evaluate key success factors.



    Credits: 3
  
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    BUS 5420 - Emerging Business Models in E-Commerce


    This capstone course examines e-commerce start-up success stories, effective business models, and the innovative use of Internet communications in business. Participants plan, organize, coordinate, and evaluate e-commerce initiatives and make informed decisions when implementing new strategies.



    Credits: 1
  
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    BUS 5993 - Independent Study


    Explores material on an independent basis under the guidance of a faculty member.



    Credits: 3
  
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    BUS 6000 - Applied Wireless Network Security


    Provides students with practical, real-world experience with the various wireless network security core competencies. Examines the most popular hacking, cracking, and wireless security network analysis tools on a CD ROM, and trains students to use them to test and secure wireless networks.



    Credits: 3

Cell Biology

  
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    CELL 5010 - Gross Anatomy and Development of the Human Body


    Provides a thorough understanding of the structure and development of body form and organ systems. Emphasizes the relation between structure and function and focuses on clinical applications. Includes embryology in order to present a complete picture of organs and body form from their earliest beginnings to their adult condition.



    Credits: 6
  
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    CELL 5020 - Gross Anatomy and Development of the Human Body


    Continuation of CELL 5010.



    Credits: 5
  
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    CELL 5030 - Cell and Tissue Structure


    Presents an integrated picture of morphological, biochemical, and functional aspects of cells, tissues, and organs. Emphasizes fundamental concepts of the structure of cells and its relationship to function. The labs emphasize the morphological aspects of cells, tissues, and organs at both the light and electron microscopical levels.



    Credits: 6
  
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    CELL 5050 - Methods and Applications in Biotechnology


    Introduces a broad range of basic research techniques used in biomedical research. Emphasizes both theory of, and practical experience with, each procedure. The procedures include electron and light microscopy, tissue culture, autoradiography, immunocytochemistry, molecular separation and isolation techniques, and radio immunology.



    Credits: 4
  
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    CELL 5060 - Laboratory Rotations


    Graduate students carry out limited research projects in two or three department research laboratories. Emphasizes designing and executing experiments.



    Credits: 4
  
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    CELL 5559 - New Course in Cell Biology


    New course in the subject of cell biology.



    Credits: 1 to 4
  
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    CELL 5950 - Journal Survey in Cell & Developmental Biology


    Readings and oral presentations taken from the primary literature in Cell Biology and related fields.



    Credits: 1 to 12
  
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    CELL 7010 - Structure and Function of the Cell


    Surveys modern cell biology emphasizing the interrelationship between structure and function. Utilizes a combination of textbook readings and original literature. Emphasizes biological membranes, cell adhesion, cytoskeleton, mitosis and cell cycle, cell signaling, and cancer.



    Credits: 5
  
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    CELL 7559 - New Course in Cell Biology


    New course in the subject of cell biology.



    Credits: 1 to 4
  
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    CELL 8030 - Advanced Gross Anatomy of the Human Body


    A laboratory demonstration/dissection course systematically reviewing the gross anatomy of the human body. Emphasizes the functional and surgical aspects of the morphology.



    Credits: 1 to 12
  
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    CELL 8040 - Advanced Gross Anatomy of the Human Body


    Continuation of CELL 8030. Prerequisite: CELL 5020 or equivalent.



    Credits: 1 to 12
  
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    CELL 8559 - Molecular & Cellular Mechanisms of Animal Development


    This course will cover aspects of the mechanisms controling the development of the embryo both at the molecular and cellular levels. It will be done for graduate students (if the number is too small, postdocs would be welcome to participate too) and will be organized during the fall semester.



    Credits: 5
  
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    CELL 8650 - Colloquium in Developmental Biology


    Discusses selected topics related to growth, cell differentiation, organogenesis, and regeneration. Includes current topics in developmental biology as a basis for normal and abnormal development.



    Credits: 2
  
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    CELL 8660 - Colloquium in Cell Biology


    Considers selected topics on the structure of the cell and the relationship of this structure to cellular functions focusing on the ultrastructure of animal cells and the functioning of their subcellular components. The topics emphasize current advances in cell biology.



    Credits: 2
  
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    CELL 9030 - Research in Cell Biology


    Research in Cell Biology



    Credits: 1 to 12
  
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    CELL 9040 - Research in Cell Biology


    Research in Cell Biology



    Credits: 1 to 12
  
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    CELL 9559 - New Course in Cell Biology


    New course in the subject of cell biology.



    Credits: 1 to 4
  
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    CELL 9995 - Non-Topical Research, Preparation for Research


    For master’s research, taken before a thesis director has been selected.



    Credits: 3 to 12
  
  •  

    CELL 9998 - Non-Topical Research, Preparation for Doctoral Research


    Non-Topical Research, Preparation for Doctoral Research



    Credits: 1 to 12
  
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    CELL 9999 - Non-Topical Research


    For doctoral dissertation, taken under the supervision of a dissertation director.



    Credits: 1 to 12

Chemical Engineering

  
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    CHE 5561 - Special Topics in Chemical Engineering


    Applies engineering science, design methods, and system analysis to developing areas and current problems in chemical engineering. Topics are announced at registration.



    Credits: 1.0-3.0
  
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    CHE 6438 - Process Control and Dynamics


    Introduction to dynamics and control of process systems, controllers, sensors, and final control elements. Development and application of time- and frequency-domain characterizations of subsystems for stability analyses of closed control loops. State-space models, principles of sampled-data analysis and digital control techniques. Elementary systems identification with emphasis on dead time, distributed parameters, and nonlinearities. Prerequisite: Instructor permission.



    Credits: 3
  
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    CHE 6442 - Applied Surface Chemistry


    Factors underlying interfacial phenomena, with emphasis on thermodynamics of surfaces, structural aspects, and electrical phenomena; applications such as emulsification, foaming, detergency, sedimentation, flow through porous media, fluidization, nucleation, wetting, adhesion, flotation, electrocapillarity. Prerequisite: Instructor permission.



    Credits: 3
  
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    CHE 6447 - Biochemical Engineering


    Introduction to properties, production, and use of biological molecules of importance to medicine and industry, such as proteins, enzymes, and antibiotics. Topics may include fermentation and cell culture processes, biological mass transfer, enzyme engineering, and implications of recent advances in molecular biology, genomics, and proteomics. Prerequisite: Instructor permission.



    Credits: 3
  
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    CHE 6448 - Bioseparations Engineering


    Principles of bioseparations engineering including specialized unit operations not normally covered in regular chemical engineering courses. Processing operations downstream of the initial manufacture of biotechnology products, including product recovery, separations, purification, and ancillary operations such as sterile processing, clean-in place and regulatory aspects. Bioprocess integration and design aspects. Prerequisite: Instructor permission.



    Credits: 3
  
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    CHE 6449 - Polymer Chemistry and Engineering


    Analyzes the mechanisms and kinetics of various polymerization reactions; relations between the molecular structure and polymer properties, and how these properties can be influenced by the polymerization process; fundamental concepts of polymer solution and melt rheology. Applications to polymer processing operations, such as extrusion, molding, and fiber spinning. Three lecture hours. Prerequisite: CHE 3321 or instructor permission.



    Credits: 3
  
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    CHE 6476 - Process Design and Economics


    Factors that determine the genesis and evolution of a process. Principles of marketing and technical economics and modern process design principles and techniques, including computer simulation with optimization. Prerequisite: Instructor permission.



    Credits: 4
  
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    CHE 6615 - Advanced Thermodynamics


    Development of the thermodynamic laws and derived relations. Application of relations to properties of pure and multicomponent systems at equilibrium in the gaseous, liquid, and solidphases. Prediction and calculation of phase and reaction equilibria in practical systems. Prerequisite: Undergraduate-level thermodynamics or instructor permission.



    Credits: 3
  
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    CHE 6618 - Chemical Reaction Engineering


    Fundamentals of chemical reaction kinetics and mechanisms; experimental methods of determining reaction rates; introduction to heterogeneous catalysis; application of chemical kinetics, along with mass-transfer theory, fluid mechanics, and thermodynamics, to the design and operation of chemical reactors. Prerequisite: CHE 6625 and 6665.



    Credits: 3
  
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    CHE 6625 - Transport Processes


    Integrated introduction to fluid mechanics, heat transfer, and mass transfer. Development of the basic equations of change for transport of momentum, energy, and mass in continuous media. Applications with exact solutions, consistent approaches to limiting cases and approximate solutions to formulate the relations to be solved in more complicated problems. Prerequisite: Undergraduate transport processes; corequisite: CHE 6665.



    Credits: 3
  
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    CHE 6630 - Mass Transfer


    Fundamental principles common to mass transfer phenomena, with emphasis on mass transfer in diverse chemical engineering situations. Detailed consideration of fluxes, diffusion with and without convection, interphase mass transfer with chemical reaction, and applications. Prerequisite: CHE 6625 and 6665.



    Credits: 3
  
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    CHE 6665 - Techniques for Chemical Engineering Analysis and Design


    Methods for analysis of steady state and transient chemical engineering problems arising in fluid mechanics, heat transfer, mass transfer, kinetics, and reactor design. Prerequisite: Undergraduate differential equations, transport processes, and chemical reaction engineering.



    Credits: 3
  
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    CHE 7716 - Applied Statistical Mechanics


    Introduction to statistical mechanics and its methodologies such as integral equations, computer simulation and perturbation theory. Applications such as phase equilibria, adsorption, transport properties, electrolyte solutions. Prerequisite: CHE 6615, or other graduate-level thermodynamics course, and instructor permission.



    Credits: 3
  
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    CHE 7744 - Electrochemical Engineering


    Electrochemical phenomena and processes from a chemical engineering viewpoint. Application of thermodynamics, electrode kinetics, interfacial phenomena, and transport processes to electrochemical systems such as batteries, rotating disk electrodes, corrosion of metals, and semiconductors. Influence of coupled kinetics, interfacial, and transport phenomena on current distribution and mass transfer in a variety of electrochemical systems. Prerequisite: Graduate-level transport phenomena (e.g., CHE 6625) and graduate-level mathematical techniques (e.g., CHE 6665), or instructor permission.



    Credits: 3
  
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    CHE 7796 - Graduate Seminar


    Weekly meetings of graduate students and faculty for presentations and discussion of research in academic and industrial organizations. May be repeated.



    Credits: 1
  
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    CHE 7993 - Independent Study


    Detailed study of graduate course material on an independent basis under the guidance of a faculty member.



    Credits: 1 to 12
  
  •  

    CHE 7995 - Supervised Project Research


    Formal record of student commitment to project research for Master of Engineering degree under the guidance of a faculty advisor. May be repeated as necessary.



    Credits: 1 to 12
  
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    CHE 8581 - Special Topics in Chemical Engineering


    Special subjects at an advanced level under the direction of staff members. Prerequisite: Permission of the staff.



    Credits: 1 to 3
  
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    CHE 8582 - Special Topics in Chemical Engineering


    Special subjects at an advanced level under the direction of staff members. Prerequisite: Permission of the staff.



    Credits: 1 to 3
  
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    CHE 8819 - Advanced Chemical Engineering Kinetics and Reaction Engineering


    Advanced study of reacting systems, such as experimental methods, heterogeneous catalysis, polymerization kinetics, kinetics of complex reactions, reactor stability, and optimization. Prerequisite: CHE 6618 or instructor permission.



    Credits: 3
  
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    CHE 8820 - Modeling of Biological Processes in Environmental Systems


    Use of mathematical models to describe processes such as biological treatment of chemical waste, including contaminant degradation and bacterial growth, contaminant and bacterial transport, and adsorption. Engineering analyses of treatment processes such as biofilm reactors, sequenced batch reactors, biofilters and in situ bioremediation. May include introduction to hydrogeology, microbiology, transport phenomena and reaction kinetics relevant to environmental systems; application of material and energy balances in the analysis of environmental systems; and dimensional analysis and scaling. Guest lectures by experts from industry, consulting firms and government agencies to discuss applications of these bioremediation technologies. Prerequisite: Instructor permission.



    Credits: 3
  
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    CHE 8833 - Specialized Separation Processes


    Less conventional separation processes, such as chromatography, ion-exchange, membranes, and crystallization using in-depth and modern chemical engineering methods. Student creativity and participation through development and presentation of individual course projects. Prerequisite: Instructor permission.



    Credits: 3
  
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    CHE 8897 - Graduate Teaching Instruction


    For master’s students.



    Credits: 1 to 12
  
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    CHE 8993 - Independent Study


    Detailed study of graduate course material on an independent basis under the guidance of a faculty member.



    Credits: 1 to 12
  
  •  

    CHE 8998 - Master’s Research


    Formal record of student commitment to master’s thesis research under the guidance of a faculty advisor. Registration may be repeated as necessary.



    Credits: 1 to 12
  
  •  

    CHE 9897 - Graduate Teaching Instruction


    For doctoral students.



    Credits: 1 to 12
  
  •  

    CHE 9999 - Dissertation Research


    Formal record of student commitment to doctoral research under the guidance of a faculty advisor. Registration may be repeated as necessary.



    Credits: 1 to 12

Chemistry

  
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    CHEM 5110 - Organic Chemistry III


    Systematic review and extension of the facts and theories of organic chemistry; includes the mechanism of reactions, structure, and stereochemistry. Prerequisite: One year of organic chemistry. In addition, one year of physical chemistry is recommended.



    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    CHEM 5120 - Organic Chemistry IV


    A comprehensive survey of synthetic organic reactions and their application to the design and execution of syntheses of relatively complex organic substances. Prerequisite: CHEM 5110.



    Credits: 3
  
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    CHEM 5140 - Chemistry of Heterocyclic Compounds and Related Topics


    The application of the concepts of organic chemistry, especially structure and reaction mechanisms, to the discussion of heterocyclic compounds. Emphasizes heteroaromatic compounds of nitrogen, oxygen, and sulfur. Offered as required. Prerequisite: CHEM 5110.



    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    CHEM 5180 - Instrumental Theory and Techniques in Organic Chemistry


    Studies the theory and application of instrumental techniques in solving organic structural problems. Topics include ultraviolet and infrared absorption spectroscopy, nuclear magnetic resonance, mass spectrometry, rotatory dispersion, and circular dichroism.



    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    CHEM 5210 - Advanced Physical Chemistry I


    Studies introductory quantum mechanics. Topics include the application of group theory to molecular orbital theory; and rotational, vibrational and electronic spectra. Prerequisite: CHEM 3410, 3420.



    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    CHEM 5212 - Principles of Quantum Mechanics


    Development of principles of quantum mechanics and application to simple systems; and discussion of angular momentum, variation method, and perturbation theory.



    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    CHEM 5214 - Chemical Applications of Quantum Mechanics


    Application of quantum mechanics to atomic and molecular systems; includes molecular orbital and valence bond theory. Group theory is developed from first principles and applied to molecular systems.



    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    CHEM 5220 - Advanced Physical Chemistry II


    Studies the laws of thermodynamics and extra-thermodynamic principles; statistical mechanics; theory of reaction rates, and the interpretation of experimental kinetic data. Prerequisite: Instructor permission.



    Credits: 3
  
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    CHEM 5224 - Reaction Kinetics and Dynamics


    Introduces the practice and theory of modern chemical kinetics, emphasizing reactions occurring in gases, liquids, and on catalytic surfaces. Develops basic principles of chemical kinetics and describes current experimental and analytic techniques. Discusses the microscopic reaction dynamics underlying the macroscopic kinetics in terms of reactive potential energy surfaces. Develops statistical theories of reactions that simplify the description of the overall reaction dynamics. Includes the transition state theory, Rice-Ramsperger-Kassel-Marcus (RRKM) theory for unimolecular reactions, Kramers’ theory, Marcus electron transfer theory, and information theory. Presents current topics from the literature and illustrates applications of basic principles through problem-solving exercises. Prerequisite: CHEM 5210, 5220, or instructor permission.



    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    CHEM 5250 - Molecular Spectroscopy


    Studies basic theoretical principles and practical experimental methods of modern molecular spectroscopy, including microwave, infrared, Raman, visible, and ultraviolet spectroscopy. Prerequisite: CHEM 5210, 8210, or group theory equivalent to that covered in CHEM 5210 or instructor permission.



    Credits: 3
  
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    CHEM 5310 - Advanced Inorganic Chemistry I


    Introduces the electronic structure of atoms and simple molecules, including basic concepts and applications of symmetry and group theory. The chemistry of the main group elements is described using energetics, structure, and reaction pathways to provide a theoretical background. Emphasizes applying these concepts to predicting the stability and developing synthetic routes to individual compounds or classes. Prerequisite: CHEM 4320 or instructor permission.



    Credits: 3
  
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    CHEM 5320 - Advanced Inorganic Chemistry II


    Introduces the electronic structure of compounds of the transition metals using ligan field theory and molecular orbital theory. Describes the chemistry of coordination and organometallic compounds, emphasizing structure, reactivity, and synthesis. Examines applications to transformations in organic chemistry and to catalysis. Prerequisite: CHEM 4320 or instructor permission.



    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    CHEM 5330 - Physical Inorganic Chemistry


    An advanced treatment of inorganic chemistry emphasizing structure, physical properties, the physical techniques employed in inorganic chemistry, including ESR, NMR, Mossbauer, NQR and electronic spectroscopy, magneto-chemistry and high pressure chemistry. Application of the experimental and theoretical aspects to bioinorganic chemistry.



    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    CHEM 5380 - Determination of Molecular Structure by Diffraction Methods


    Studies the principles of X-ray, neutron, and electron diffraction by ordered solids; and the use of these phenomena in molecular structure determination.



    Credits: 3
 

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