Sep 21, 2020  
Graduate Record 2011-2012 
    
Graduate Record 2011-2012 [ARCHIVED RECORD]

Course Descriptions


 

Urban and Environmental Planning

  
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    PLAC 5851 - Global-Local Connections in Community Food Systems


    Using case studies of cities and regions in the U.S. and throughout the world, this course explores global health issues through the lens of food systems. The purpose is to reveal how food production and distribution are key indicators of environmental and economic health.



    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    PLAC 5852 - Community Food System Assessment


    Students will learn the fundamentals of food system assessment for community sustainability - its importance, methods, and applications. They will design and conduct a food system assessment for a local community, while using best practices for community engagement.



    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    PLAC 5860 - Green Cities/Green Sites


    This course teaches students how to redesign city properties to reduce runoff pollution and follow environmentally sensitive design principles. By assessing the city’s existing ‘greenfrastructure’ and retrofitting city lands and buildings, students learn how the city can demonstrate environmentally sensitive design, protect public health and provide more opportunities for environmental education and healthful recreation. The course works with a different local partner each semester.



    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    PLAC 5870 - Environmental Impact Statements


    This course is intended to provide students with a broad background of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA) and the subsequent laws and administrative processes from which developed the environmental impact assessment, particularly the environmental impact statement. The course introduces a framework for conducting environmental impact assessments, technological methods for predicting changes in environmental characteristics, considerations involved in interpreting significance of predicted impacts, techniques for accomplishing public participation, and practical considerations for writing environmental impact statements as applied to a local project. Students will also discuss the future of Environmental Impact Assessments, Community Impact Assessments, Health Impact Assessments and other similar tools.



    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    PLAC 5880 - Coastal Planning Issues


    Explores the special characteristics of coastal and island settings for their planning significance. Addresses natural hazard mitigation, wetlands, and biodiversity.



    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    PLAC 5993 - Applied Independent Study


    Applied independent study.



    Credits: 1 to 3
  
  •  

    PLAC 7500 - Topical Offerings in Planning


    Topical Offerings in Planning



    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    PLAC 8060 - Urbanism Design Studio


    This design studio pulls together many issues that graduate students have studied individually in design technology, theory and history courses into a complex and integrated section of a living and working community. This research looks at integrating infrastructure systems as a community connection system, energy producing ecology and as a civic public space symbol. Pre-Requisites: ARCH/LAR 7010



    Credits: 6
  
  •  

    PLAC 8500 - Topical Offerings in Planning


    Topical Offerings in Planning



    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    PLAN 5020 - Planning Design


    Explores methods of urban design analysis, stressing observational and representational methods. Emphasizes relationships among public and private buildings, spaces, and transportation corridors in commercial centers. Cross-listed with PLAN 2020.



    Credits: 4
  
  •  

    PLAN 5110 - Digital Visualization for Planners


    Digital technology for representing and analyzing planning data will include photo-editing, web page design, geographic information system mapping, spreadsheet modeling, and document layout and production. The major emphasis will be on two- and three- dimensional representation of spaces common to planning: streetscape, neighborhoods, communities and regions. Representation of the past, the present and prospective futures to both professional and citizen audiences will receive critical attention. Cross-listed with Plan 211.



    Credits: 4
  
  •  

    PLAN 5120 - Geographic Information Systems


    Reviews the use of computers in planning, emphasizing geographic information systems for collection, analysis, and display of spatial information in urban and environmental contexts.



    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    PLAN 5140 - Advanced Design Themes of Great Cities


    This course discusses the design qualities of the world’s great cities. Each session focuses on the defining characteristics of different cities such as their natural settings, public spaces, transportation systems, types of buildings, and everyday details.



    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    PLAN 5240 - Collaborative Planning for Sustainability


    Examines the processes by which consensus can be developed, focusing general negotiation theory and skill development, including the concept of principled negotiation; the conflict landscape, including government and non-government organizations; and negotiation resources and opportunities, including organizations, processes, and enabling legislation.



    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    PLAN 5250 - Mediation Theory and Skills


    Examines both the theory and practice of public involvement in planning. Explores the planner’s responsibility to the public and techniques for effective engagement.



    Credits: 1
  
  •  

    PLAN 5300 - Preservation Planning


    Studies current literature on the identification, evaluation, and treatment of historic places. Develops techniques for surveying, documenting, evaluating, and planning for preservation. Analyzes current political, economic, and legal issues in preservation planning.



    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    PLAN 5310 - Adv. History Cities & Planning


    An overview of the planning profession with emphasis on 19th- and 20th-century American urban history.



    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    PLAN 5400 - Housing and Community Development


    Provides an introduction to the housing and community development area of planning practice. Topics include the housing and development industries, neighborhood change processes, social aspects of housing and development, and housing and development programs and policy issues.



    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    PLAN 5410 - Economic Built Environment


    Economics studies the efficient allocation of scarce resources. Efficiency is achieved when an economy cannot make anyone economically better off without making someone else worse off. In most mixed economies, like the U.S., there is a dominant market system of organizing economic activity that coordinates the basic questions of allocation: what, how and for whom to produce.



    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    PLAN 5420 - Economic Development


    Explores the economy of a community, neighborhood, or region as an essential element, in livability and sustainability. Planners engage economic development by working with the community to assess needs and opportunities, through public-private business partnerships, and in development review.



    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    PLAN 5440 - Neighborhood Planning


    As the “building blocks” of cities, neighborhood plans involve citizens in addressing issues of housing, jobs, public services, education, recreation, and transportation.



    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    PLAN 5450 - Healthy Communities


    Explores connections between the built environment and community health, with an emphasis on re-integrating planning with its original roots in public health.



    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    PLAN 5470 - Development Dynamics


    Examines the roles of developers, investors, designers, planners, and others, identifying the objectives each have in the development decision process. Discusses the interplay and communications of what constitutes sound economics and good design.



    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    PLAN 5500 - Special Topics in Planning


    Varies annually to meet the needs of graduate students.



    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    PLAN 5580 - Short Courses in Planning


    A series of one-credit short courses, whose topics vary from semester to semester.



    Credits: 1
  
  •  

    PLAN 5600 - Land Use and Growth Management


    Introduces the theory and practice of land use planning and growth management as they have evolved historically and as expressed in contemporary practice. Addresses the need and rationale for land use planning as well as its tools.



    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    PLAN 5620 - Sustainability and Adaptive Infrastructure


    Infrastructure mediates between the needs of our urban communities and the systems, natural and constructed, which support them. This course is focused on the infrastructure of cities and urbanizing regions and includes topics such as transportation, drinking water, waste water, energy, schools, parks, recycling, and public safety. The course will examine current challenges and a range of means for responding to and funding needed changes.



    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    PLAN 5630 - Design of Cities


    Cities are physical artifacts that are experienced psychologically and socially. This course investigates the theories surrounding these processes to reach an understanding of humanistic urban design intentions. Experiential realities are explored through case studies, readings, and mapping exercises.



    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    PLAN 5640 - Adv. Town Design


    This course will investigate the generic principles and strategies that shape the form and character of towns and discuss influential towns that over the past several generations have, at least to their advocates, represented ‘good’ planning and design. While recognizing the importance of social and economic factors, the course will emphasize the physical, visual, and experiential qualities of towns.



    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    PLAN 5650 - Brownfields Redevelopment


    This course analyzes the challenges and opportunities posed by the development of environmentally impaired properties. It explores the legal, political, and philosophical underpinnings of environmental regulation. The course includes fundamentals of real estate finance, including risk dynamics and debt capital, and assesses community involvement in redevelopment solutions.



    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    PLAN 5670 - Place Making


    Seminar that explores the interconnections between infrastructure’ecological systems, transportation, and water supply’and the form and vitality domestic urban landscape. Readings, discussions and research papers examine contemporary case studies, from the Charlottesville Urban Habitats Design Competition to ideas for rebuilding New Orleans.



    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    PLAN 5770 - Plan Implementation


    Emphasizes the use of zoning, subdivision, and other regulations to implement comprehensive plans. Attention is given to capital facilities programming and building codes.



    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    PLAN 5810 - Sustainable Communities


    Examines sustainable communities and the environmental, social, economic, political, and design standards that underlie them. Focuses on reviewing case studies of cities, towns, and development projects that reflect principles of sustainability.



    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    PLAN 5830 - Environmental Policy and Planning


    Examines contemporary environmental policy and practice, including exploration of the normative-philosophical debate surrounding environmental issues. Emphasizes understanding the political and institutional framework for establishing policy and programs; exploring the action approaches to environmental planning including moral suasion, regulation, public investment, and public incentives; and case studies of environmental planning at the federal, state, and local levels.



    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    PLAN 5840 - Environmental Ethics and Sustainability


    Detailed exploration of the normative debate surrounding environmental issues. Focus on the foundations of environmental economics, questions about the value of endangered species, concerns of future generations, appropriateness of a sustainable society, notions of stewardship, and obligations toward equity.



    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    PLAN 5870 - Environment and Economy


    Rather than being opposite, environment and economy are both dimensions that must be addressed to achieve sustainable outcomes. This course explores these issues and students develop proposed solutions.



    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    PLAN 5890 - Sustainable International Development


    This course will explore development related root causes of environmental degradation in an international context. The course examines theoretical frameworks explaining the linkage between underdevelopment and environmental issues in a developing country context. Specifically, the course will explore the importance of overconsumption, technology, poverty, and inequality as complex set of factors contributing to the environmental crisis.



    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    PLAN 5993 - Applied Independent Study


    Individual study directed by a faculty member. Prerequisite: Planning faculty approval of topic.



    Credits: 1 to 4
  
  •  

    PLAN 6010 - Planning Process and Practice


    A practicum/problem course focusing on the use of maps and quantitative information in the planning process. Develops familiarity with types and sources of data and assesses the relevance of data for various types of problem situations. Provides experience in producing quality professional analysis. Also develops team skills and graphic presentation abilities. A core course.



    Credits: 4
  
  •  

    PLAN 6040 - Legal Aspects of Planning


    Addresses the law as it relates to planning practice. Includes substantial work in traditional areas of land-use law, but also deals with the law as an instrument for change. Emphasizes developing legal research skills and performing legal analysis. A core course.



    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    PLAN 6050 - Methods of Planning Analysis


    Applies quantitative skills to the planning process: analyzes decision situations and develops precise languages for structuring or communicating their quantitative dimensions. Includes lectures, case studies, and reviews of statistical methods, survey research methods, census data analysis, program and plan evaluation, and computer modeling. A core course.



    Credits: 4
  
  •  

    PLAN 6070 - Urban Theory and Public Policy


    Concentrates on normative and empirical urban theory central to understanding the design and effects of public policies. The theories and applications considered span a number of academic disciplines. Stresses application of theoretical perspectives to federal, state, and local policy choices. A core course.



    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    PLAN 6090 - Planning Theory and Practice


    Provides a history of the intellectual and professional roots of contemporary planning theory and practice. Analyzes these roots with an eye to stimulating new perspectives and concepts for a sustainable community orientation. A core course.



    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    PLAN 6500 - Special Topics in Planning


    Topical offerings in planning.



    Credits: 1 to 3
  
  •  

    PLAN 7993 - Independent Study


    Independent research on topics selected by individual students in consultation with a faculty advisor.



    Credits: 1 to 4
  
  •  

    PLAN 8998 - Non-Topical Research, Masters


    For Thesis Preparation, taken before a thesis director has been selected.



    Credits: 1/12/2011
  
  •  

    PLAN 8999 - Master’s Thesis


    A thesis is optional for the Master of Urban and Environmental Planning degree. Students should begin early to explore topics and to identify potential committee members. A guideline document is available.



    Credits: 3 to 6

Urdu

  
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    URDU 5010 - Advanced Urdu I


    This course is designed to expand and to consolidate the structures the student has learned through URDU 2020 by reading original Urdu texts, ranging from literary prose fiction to news media excerpts to poetry (both classical and modern). We will discuss these texts in Urdu in class, and the students will be responsible for a series of short essays throughout the semester in Urdu pertaining both to the texts and to other topics. Prerequisites: URDU 2020 or instructor permission.



    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    URDU 5020 - Advanced Urdu II


    This course is designed to expand and to consolidate the structures the student has learned through URDU 2020 by reading original Urdu texts, ranging from literary prose fiction to news media excerpts to poetry (both classical and modern). We will discuss these texts in Urdu in class, and the students will be responsible for a series of short essays throughout the semester in Urdu pertaining both to the texts and to other topics. Prerequisites: URDU 2020 or instructor permission



    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    URDU 6559 - New Course in Urdu


    This course is to allow 6000-level new courses in Urdu to be taught for one semester.



    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    URDU 8993 - Independent Study in Urdu


    Independent study in Urdu language and/or literature. Prerequisite: URDU 5010 or 5020 or equivalent, or instructor permission.



    Credits: 1 to 3
 

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