May 25, 2022  
Undergraduate Record 2007-2008 
    
Undergraduate Record 2007-2008 [ARCHIVED RECORD]

Course Descriptions


 

Biology

  
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    BIOL 402 - Ecology and Evolutionary Genetics


    Examines the mechanisms of evolution within populations, molecular evolution, and the process of speciation. Topics include genetics of adaptation and speciation, natural selection, and the processes influencing the evolution of genes and genomes at the molecular level. (E)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: BIOL 301.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    BIOL 403 - Evolutionary Biology Laboratory


    Analyzes important concepts in evolution, and experimental techniques used in evolutionary ecology and population genetics—field research, experimental populations, molecular markers, phylogenetic reconstruction—including aspects of experimental design and statistical analysis of data. Includes a weekend field trip to Mountain Lake Biological Station. (O)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: BIOL 301, MATH 131.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    BIOL 404 - Laboratory in Cell Biology


    Introduces the theory and practice of important laboratory techniques used in cell biology research. Studies techniques such as microscopy, electrophoresis, and cell culture. One laboratory lecture and one afternoon laboratory per week. (Y)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: BIOL 320.

    Credits: 3
  
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    BIOL 405 - Developmental Biology


    Explores the processes of embryonic development in plants and animals, emphasizing the experimental basis of contemporary knowledge in embryo-genesis, morphogenesis and in cell and tissue differentiation. Lecture and occasional evening discussions. (Y)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: BIOL 301.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    BIOL 407 - Developmental Biology Laboratory


    This course offers laboratory experience illustrating a number of principles and processes in the early development of both plants and animals. Laboratory work includes the use of basic microscopy and imaging techniques to study embryonic processes such as fertilization, oogenesis, gastrulation, and tissue interactions. Students will learn basic molecular techniques used to study gene expression and patterning in the embryo. Students will also develop skills in observation, experimental design, and data presentation. (Y)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: BIOL 321.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    BIOL 408 - Neuronal Organization of Behavior


    Lectures and discussions addressing behavior and sensory processing from the perspective of the neural elements involved. Topics include neuronal substrates (anatomical and physiological) of startle reflexes, locomotory behaviors, visual and auditory processing, echolocation mechanisms, calling song recognition, and the neuronal organization underlying some types of functional plasticity. (Y)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: BIOL 317 or equivalent.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    BIOL 411 - Genetics Laboratory


    A research experience in developmental genetics that uses Drosophila melanogaster as a model system. (Y)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: BIOL 301, 322.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    BIOL 413 - Population Ecology and Conservation Biology


    The mathematical foundations of population dynamics and species interactions as applied to population and community ecology and problems in conservation biology. (Y)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: BIOL 302 or EVSC 320, and a course in calculus.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    BIOL 416 - Functional Genomics


    The first half of the course serves as an introduction to basic bioinformatics and genomics. The second half of the course concentrates on the rapidly evolving discipline of Functional Genomics, which takes advantage of the dramatic increase in the amount of known genome sequences to address biological questions at a genome-wide level. Areas of Functional Genomics that will be covered during the lectures and computer labs of this course include RNA profiling, proteomics, and systems biology. Recent articles from the scientific literature will be used to illustrate these topics. This course includes lectures, computer labs, and literature discussions.

    Credits: 3
  
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    BIOL 417 - Cellular Neurobiology


    Explores a cellular approach to the study of the nervous system. Topics include the structure and function of ionic channels in cell membranes; the electrochemical basis of the cell resting potential; the generation and conduction of nerve impulses; and synaptic transmissions. Three lecture and demonstration/discussion credits. Class meetings include lectures, discussion, student presentations, and computer simulations of neurophysiology with NeuroDynamix. (Y)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: BIOL 317 or equivalent; BIOL 300.

    Credits: 3
  
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    BIOL 419 - Biological Clocks


    Introduces biological timekeeping as used by organisms for controlling diverse processes, including sleep-wakefulness cycles, photoperiodic induction and regression, locomotor rhythmicity, eclosion rhythmicity, and the use of the biological clock in orientation and navigation. (O)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: BIOL 300, 301.

    Credits: 3
  
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    BIOL 425 - Human Genetics


    Focuses on the fundamental knowledge about organization, expression, and inheritance of the human genome. Reviews classical Mendelian genetics and human genetic (pedigree) analysis. Emphasizes understanding human genetics in molecular terms. Includes gene mapping procedures, methodologies for identifying genes responsible for inherited diseases, the molecular basis of several mutant (diseased) states, the human genome project, and discussions about genetic screening and gene therapy. (Y)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: BIOL 301.

    Credits: 3
  
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    BIOL 426 - Cellular Mechanisms


    Includes basic information about important issues in cell biology coupled with critical analysis of pertinent scientific literature. Integrates basic scientific findings with clinical situations, emphasizing the importance of basic research in understanding and combating disease. (Y)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: BIOL 300 and 301.

    Credits: 3
  
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    BIOL 427 - Animal Behavior Laboratory


    Provides direct experience in approaches used to study animal behavior. Each lab concentrates on a particular aspect of behavior. Student experiments relate to central nervous systems; sensory perception; sign stimuli, feeding behavior; social behavior; reproductive behavior; biological timing; and animal observation in the laboratory and field. (Y)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: BIOL 325 recommended.

    Credits: 3
  
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    BIOL 431 - Sensory Biology


    Examines the anatomy, physiology, and molecular biology of many sensory modalities such as vision, audition, such chemosensation. General features of sensory systems are described. (Y)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: BIOL 317  

    Credits: 3
  
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    BIOL 433 - Wiring the Brain


    This course will cover the current state of knowledge for how neurons form connections in the brain. The course will initially focus on how relatively simple model systems have provided the critical clues as to how specific synaptic connections form. This will be followed by a discussion of how this knowledge can be applied to the understanding and treatment of human neural disorders. About a quarter of the course will be standard lectures and the remainder student-led discussion of primary literature.  (Y)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisites: BIOL 300 and BIOL 301; BIOL 317 or Psych 220.

    Credits: 3
  
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    BIOL 441 - Molecular Biology and Genetics


    A survey of contemporary issues in molecular biology and genetics. The course will be a combination of text based lectures and discussions of the current literature emphasizing the development of critical reading techniques. (O)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: BIOL 300, 301.

    Credits: 4
  
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    BIOL 448 - Structure and Function of Complex Macromolecules


    Exploration, in depth, of principles underlying protein and nucleic acid structures and the techniques used to determine those structures. (Y)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: BIOL 300, biochemistry, or two semesters of organic chemistry.

    Credits: 3
  
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    BIOL 481 - Seminar in Biological Research


    One-hour, weekly discussions on recent advances in biology, as well as more practical matters, such as how to write grant applications, make seminar presentations, apply to graduate programs, and other skills essential to professional success in biology. (S)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: Fourth-year DMP in Biology.

    Credits: 1
  
  •  

    BIOL 482 - Seminar in Biological Research


    One-hour, weekly discussions on recent advances in biology, as well as more practical matters, such as how to write grant applications, make seminar presentations, apply to graduate programs, and other skills essential to professional success in biology. (S)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: Fourth-year DMP in Biology.

    Credits: 1
  
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    BIOL 485 - Seminar in Environmental and Conservation Biology


    In-depth investigation of current research and practice in environmental and biological conservation. Format will include the discussion of fundamental and recent readings in conservation and guest speakers from the local scientific and conservation communities. Cross-listed with EVSC 483.  (Y)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: BIOL 301 or EVSC 320, and a course in conservation biology (e.g., BIOL 345, BIOL 413, or EVSC 222).

    Credits: 2
  
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    BIOL 491 - Independent Research


    Independent research for qualified undergraduates under the direction of a faculty member. (S)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: Instructor permission.

    Credits: 3
  
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    BIOL 492 - Independent Research


    Independent research for qualified undergraduates under the direction of a faculty member. (S)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: Instructor permission and BIOL 491.

    Credits: 3
  
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    BIOL 493 - Independent Research


    Independent research under the guidance of a departmental faculty member. Students who have completed BIOL 491, 492 may enroll in BIOL 493, 494 as a second year of independent research. (S)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: BIOL 492.

    Credits: 3
  
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    BIOL 494 - Independent Research


    Independent research under the guidance of a departmental faculty member. Students who have completed BIOL 491, 492 may enroll in BIOL 493, 494 as a second year of independent research. (S)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: BIOL 493.

    Credits: 3
  
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    BIOL 495 - Independent Research


    Independent research for qualified undergraduates under the direction of a faculty member. (S)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: Instructor permission and BIOL 494.

    Credits: 3
  
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    BIOL 496 - Independent Research


    Independent research for qualified undergraduates under the direction of a faculty member. (S)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: instructor permission and BIOL 495.

    Credits: 3
  
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    BIOL 497 - Independent Research


    Independent research under the guidance of a departmental faculty member. (S)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: Instructor permission.

    Credits: 3
  
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    BIOL 498 - Independent Research


    Independent research under the guidance of a departmental faculty member.  (S)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite:  Instructor permission and BIOL 491, BIOL 493, BIOL 495, or BIOL 497.   

    Credits: 3
  
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    BIOL 501 - Biochemistry


    Structure and function of the major constituents of cells—proteins, nucleic acids, lipids and carbohydrates—and the relationship to cellular metabolism and self-replication. Lectures and discussion. (Y)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: BIOL 300; organic chemistry.

    Credits: 4
  
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    BIOL 507 - Practical Aspects of Light Microscopy in the Biological Sciences


    Practical usage of various microscopy imaging methodologies to study the morphology and cellular function in various biological systems from single cell to single molecule in cells and tissues. Topics include basics theory of microscopy, imaging and image analysis to solve various biological questions, fluorophore labeling, technical and hands on training on various microscopy techniques applied in different biological and biomedical investigations. Lectures, discussion, student presentations and laboratory.
    (Y)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite:  Instructor permission.  

    Credits: 3
  
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    BIOL 508 - Developmental Mechanisms


    Analyzes the cellular and molecular basis of developmental phenomena, reviewing both classical foundations and recent discoveries. Lectures focus on the major developmental systems used for analysis of embryogenesis (e.g., mouse, frog, and fly) and concentrate on several themes that pervade modern research in this area (e.g., signal transduction mechanisms). Readings are from the primary research literature, supplemented by textbook assignments. Lectures and discussion. (Y)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: BIOL 301.

    Credits: 4
  
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    BIOL 509 - Current Topics in Plant Molecular Biology


    Discussion of current literature and selected topics on the biochemical and molecular genetic basis for plant cellular growth and differentiation. Weekly readings and student presentations. (SI)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: Instructor permission.

    Credits: 2
  
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    BIOL 537 - Epidemiology and Evolution of Infectious Disease


    Discussion of current literature and selected topics on theoretical and empirical studies of disease dynamics and genetic change in plant, animal and human populations.  There will be lectures, weekly readings, plus a student project and presentation. (Y)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: Biol 309 or Instructor Permission.

    Credits: 3

Biomedical Engineering

  
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    BIOM 200 - Biomedical Engineering Design and Discovery


    Provides overview of the BME discipline and major sub-disciplines (biomechanics, genetic engineering, tissue engineering, bioelectricity, imaging, cellular engineering, computational systems biology), covers conceptual and detail design processes, and introduces quantitative tools utilized throughout the BIOM curriculum. A major focus of the class will be formulation and execution of a design project. (Y)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: CS 101, PHYS 142, and ENGR 162, or instructor permission.

    Credits: 3
  
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    BIOM 201 - Physiology I


    Studies how excitable tissue, nerves and muscle, and the cardiovascular and respiratory systems work. Focuses on understanding mechanisms, and includes an introduction to structure, an emphasis on quantitative function, and integration of hormonal and neural regulation and control. (Y)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: CHEM 151 and PHYS 241E, or instructor permission.

    Credits: 3
  
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    BIOM 202 - Physiology II


    Introduces the physiology of the kidney, salt and water balance, gastrointestinal system, endocrine system, and central nervous system, with reference to diseases and their pathophysiology. (Circulation and respiration are covered in the fall semester course, BIOM 201). (Y)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: BIOM 201 or instructor permission.

    Credits: 3
  
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    BIOM 204 - Cell and Molecular Biology for Engineers


    Introduces the fundamentals of cell structure and function, emphasizing the techniques and technologies available for the study of cell biology. A problem-based approach is used to motivate each topic. Divided into three general sections: cell structure and function includes cell chemistry, organelles, enzymes, membranes, membrane transport, intracellular compartments and adhesion structures; energy flow in cells concentrates on the pathways of glycolysis and aerobic respiration; information flow in cells focuses on modern molecular biology and genetic engineering, and includes DNA replication, the cell cycle, gene expression, gene regulation, and protein synthesis. Also presents specific cell functions, including movement, the cytoskeleton and signal transduction. (Y)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: CHEM 151 or instructor permission.

    Credits: 3
  
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    BIOM 310 - Biomedical Systems Analysis and Design


    Presents the analytical tools used to model signals and linear systems. Specific biomedical engineering examples include multicompartment modeling of drug delivery, modeling of dynamic biomechanical systems, and electrical circuit models of excitable cells. Major topics include terminology for signals and systems, convolution, continuous time Fourier transforms, Laplace transforms, electrical circuits with applications to bioinstrumentation and biosystems modeling, and applications of linear system theory. Students cannot receive credit for both this course and ECE 323. (Y)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: APMA 213, CS 101, and PHYS 142, or instructor permission.

    Credits: 3
  
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    BIOM 315 - Computational Biomedical Engineering


    Introduces techniques for constructing predictive or analytical engineering models for biological processes. Teaches modeling approaches using example problems in transport, mechanics, bioelectricity, molecular dynamics, tissue assembly, and imaging. Problem sets will include (1) linear systems and filtering, (2) compartmental modeling, (3) numerical techniques, (4) finite element/finite difference models, and (5) computational automata models. (Y)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: BIOM 201, BIOM 204,  BIOM 310, and BIOM 322, or instructor permission.

    Credits: 3
  
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    BIOM 322 - Biomechanics


    Introduces the principles of continuum mechanics of biological tissues and systems. Topics include (1) review of selected results from statics and strength of materials, continuum mechanics, free-body diagrams, constitutive equations of biological materials, viscoelastic models, and fundamental concepts of fluid mechanics and mass transport; (2) properties of living tissue; (3) mechanical basis and effects of pathology and trauma, (4) introduction to mechanotransduction, circulatory transport, growth and remodeling, and tissue-engineered materials, and (5) low Reynolds number flows in vivo and in microsystems. (Y)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: APMA 212, APMA 213, and BIOM 201, or instructor permission.

    Credits: 3
  
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    BIOM 324 - Biotransport


    Biotransport in biological living systems is a fundamental phenomenon important in all aspects of the life cycle.  Course will introduce principles and application of fluid and mass transport processes in cell, tissue and organ systems.  Topics include, introduction to physiological fluid mechanics in the circulation and tissue, fundamentals of mass transport in biological systems, effects of mass transport and biochemical interactions at the cell and tissue scales, and fluid and mass transport in organs. (Y)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    APMA 212, 213, BIOM 201, BIOM 204 or equivalent, BIOM 322, or instructor permission.

    Credits: 3
  
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    BIOM 345 - Neural Network Models of Cognition and Brain Computation


    An introductory course to neural networks research, specifically biologically-based networks that reproduce cognitive phenomena. The goal of this course is to teach the basic thinking and methodologies used in constructing and understanding neural-like networks.  Cross-listed as NESC 533. (Y)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    CS 101; and BIOM 201; or permission of the instructor.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    BIOM 380 - Biomedical Engineering Integrated Design and Experimental Analysis (IDEAS) Laboratory I


    First half of a year-long course to integrate concepts and skills from prior courses in order to formulate and solve problems in biomedical systems, including experimental design, performance, and analysis. Lab modules include testing in tissues/cells and manipulation of molecular constituents of living systems to determine their structural and functional characteristics for design of therapeutic or measurement systems. Methods include biochemical, physiological, cell biology, mechanical, electrical and computer, systems, chemical, imaging, and other approaches. (Y)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: APMA 212, APMA 213, APMA 311, BIOM 201, BIOM 204, and BIOM 322, or instructor permission; corequisite: BIOM 310 or instructor permission.

    Credits: 4
  
  •  

    BIOM 390 - Biomedical Engineering Integrated Design and Experimental Analysis (IDEAS) Laboratory II


    Second half of a year-long course to integrate the concepts and skills from prior courses in order to formulate and solve problems in biomedical systems, including experimental design, performance, and analysis. Lab modules include testing in tissues/cells and manipulation of molecular constituents of living systems to determine their structural and functional characteristics and to design measurement or therapeutic systems. Methods include biochemical, physiological, cell biology, mechanical, electrical and computer, systems, chemical, imaging, and other approaches. (Y)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: BIOM 380 or instructor permission.

    Credits: 4
  
  •  

    BIOM 406 - Biomedical Applications of Genetic Engineering


    Provides a grounding in molecular biology and a working knowledge of recombinant DNA technology, thus establishing a basis for the evaluation and application of genetic engineering in whole animal systems. Beginning with the basic principles of genetics, this course examines the use of molecular methods to study gene expression, deliver viral and non-viral vectors, and its critical role in health and disease. (SI)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: BIOM 201, 202, and 204 or CHE 246, and third- or fourth-year standing, or instructor permission.

    Credits: 3
  
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    BIOM 411 - Bioinstrumentation and Design


    Introduces transducers and instrumentation systems used in measuring biological variables. Discusses the physical, electromagnetic, and chemical principles of measurement, effects of interfaces between biological systems and sensors, and design tradeoffs. Surveys major electronic circuits and signal conditioning systems for biological and medical monitoring. Laboratory experiments involve construction and characterization of simple transducers, imaging systems, and signal conditioning equipment for biological variables, such as blood pressure, displacement, force, temperature, flow, and biopotentials. Exercises cover conceptual design to detailed design specifications for selected biomedical instrumentation systems. (Y)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: BIOM 310 or ECE 203, or instructor permission.

    Credits: 3
  
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    BIOM 414 - Biomaterials


    This course will provide an introduction to biomaterials science and biological interactions with materials, including an overview of biomaterials testing and characterization.  The emphasis of this course, however, will be on emerging novel strategies and design considerations of biomaterials.  Areas of concentration will include the use of polymers and ceramics in biomaterials today, drug delivery applications, tissue engineering from both an orthopaedic and vascular perspective, and nanotechnology related to biomaterials.  Specific attention will also be paid to the in vitro and in vivo testing of biomaterials, and a review of current research in the field. (Y)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: BIOM 201, BIOM 204 or equivalent, 3rd or 4th year standing, or instructor permission.

    Credits: 3
  
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    BIOM 417 - Tissue Engineering


    Introduces the fundamental principles of tissue engineering.  Topics include: tissue organization and dynamics, cell and tissue characterization, cell-matrix interactions, transport processes in engineered tissues, biomaterials and biological interfaces, stem cells and interacting cell fate processes, and tissue engineering methods.  Examples of tissue engineering approaches for regeneration of cartilage, bone, ligament, tendons, skin and liver are presented. (Y)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: APMA 213, BIOM 201, and BIOM 204 or equivalent, or instructor permission.

    Credits: 3
  
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    BIOM 428 - Motion Biomechanics


    Focuses on the study of forces (and their effects) that act on the musculoskeletal structures of the human body. Based on the foundations of functional anatomy and engineering mechanics (rigid body and deformable approaches); students are exposed to clinical problems in orthopedics and rehabilitation. (SI)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: BIOM 201, 322, or instructor permission.

    Credits: 3
  
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    BIOM 441 - Bioelectricity


    Studies the biophysical mechanisms governing production and transmission of bioelectric signals, measurement of these signals and their analysis in basic and clinical electrophysiology. Introduces the principles of design and operation of therapeutic medical devices used in the cardiovascular and nervous systems. Includes membrane potential, action potentials, channels and synaptic transmission, electrodes, electroencephalography, electromyography, electrocardiography, pacemakers, defibrillators, and neural assist devices. (SI)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: BIOM 310 or ECE 203, BIOM 201, or instructor permission.

    Credits: 3
  
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    BIOM 453 - Biomedical Engineering Advanced Projects


    A year-long research project in biomedical engineering conducted in consultation with a department faculty advisor; usually related to ongoing faculty research. Includes the design, execution, and analysis of experimental laboratory work and computational or theoretical computer analysis of a problem. Requires a comprehensive report of the results. (Y)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: third- or fourth-year standing, and instructor permission.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    BIOM 454 - Biomedical Engineering Advanced Projects


    A year-long research project in biomedical engineering conducted in consultation with a department faculty advisor; usually related to ongoing faculty research. Includes the design, execution, and analysis of experimental laboratory work and computational or theoretical computer analysis of a problem. Requires a comprehensive report of the results. (Y)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: third- or fourth-year standing, and instructor permission.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    BIOM 463 - Biomedical Engineering Capstone Design I


    A year-long design project in biomedical engineering required for BME majors. Students select, formulate, and solve a design problem either for a device or system “design & build” project or a “design of experiment” research project. Projects use conceptual design, skills obtained in the integrated lab, and substantial literature and patent reviews. Projects may be sponsored by BME faculty, medical doctors, and/or companies. Students may work on their own with outside team members when appropriate or with other SEAS students in integrative teams. (Y)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: APMA 212, 213, 311, BIOM 201, 204, 310, 380, fourth-year standing in BME major, or instructor permission.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    BIOM 464 - Biomedical Engineering Capstone Design II


    A year-long design project in biomedical engineering required for BME majors. Students select, formulate, and solve a design problem either for a device or system “design & build” project or a “design of experiment” research project. Projects use conceptual design, skills obtained in the integrated lab, and substantial literature and patent reviews. Projects may be sponsored by BME faculty, medical doctors, and/or companies. Students may work on their own with outside team members when appropriate or with other SEAS students in integrative teams. (Y)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: APMA 212, 213, 311, BIOM 201, 204, 310, 380, fourth-year standing in BME major, or instructor permission.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    BIOM 483 - Medical Image Modalities


    An overview of modern medical imaging modalities with regard to the physical basis of image acquisition and methods of image reconstruction. Topics cover the basic engineering and physical principles underlying the major medical imaging modalities: x-ray (plain film, mammography, and computed tomography (CT)), nuclear medicine (positron-emission tomography (PET) and single-photo-emission computed tomography (SPECT)), ultrasound, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Taught concurrent with BIOM 783. (Y)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: BIOM 310 or ECE 323, or instructor permission.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    BIOM 484 - Medical Image Analysis


    Introduces the fundamental principles of medical image analysis and visualization. Focuses on the processing and analysis of ultrasound, MR, and X-ray images for the purpose of quantitation and visualization to increase the usefulness of modern medical image data. Includes image perception and enhancement, 2-D Fourier transform, spatial filters, segmentation, and pattern recognition. A weekly lab develops skill in computer image analysis with the KHOROS system. (SI)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: BIOM 310, ECE 323, or instructor permission.

    Credits: 4
  
  •  

    BIOM 490 - Molecular Bioengineering


    Uses a problem-based approach to examine a number of current bioengineering technologies applicable to tissue engineering, wound healing, drug delivery, and gene delivery. Special topics include microfluidics and low Reynolds number hydrodynamics, molecular mechanics related to cell and microparticle sorting, and micropatterning surfaces for cell and tissue engineering. (SI)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: BIOM 204 or CHE 246, BIOM 322, fourth-year standing, or instructor permission; CHE 321 is also recommended as a prerequisite or corequisite.

    Credits: 4
  
  •  

    BIOM 495 - Special Topics in Biomedical Engineering


    Applies engineering science, design methods, and system analysis to developing areas and current problems in biomedical engineering. Topics vary by semester. Recent topics include tissue engineering and biomedical imaging systems theory. (SI)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: third- or fourth-year standing and instructor permission.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    BIOM 496 - Special Topics in Biomedical Engineering


    Applies engineering science, design methods, and system analysis to developing areas and current problems in biomedical engineering. Topics vary by semester. Recent topics include tissue engineering and biomedical imaging systems theory. (SI)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: third- or fourth-year standing and instructor permission.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    BIOM 499 - Independent Study


    In-depth study of a biomedical engineering area by an individual student in close collaboration with a departmental faculty member. Requires advanced analysis of a specialized topic in biomedical engineering that is not covered by current offerings. Requires faculty contact time and assignments comparable to regular course offerings. (S)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: instructor permission.

    Credits: 1 to 3

Buddhism

  
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    RELB 210 - Buddhism


    Theravada, Mahayana, and Tantrayana Buddhist developments in India. (Y)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    RELB 212 - Buddhist Literature


    Introduces Buddhist literature in translation, from India, Tibet, and East and South East Asia. (IR)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    RELB 213 - Taoism and Confuscianism


    Surveys the major religions of Chinese Confucianism, Taoism, and Buddhism. (O)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    RELB 245 - Zen


    Studies the development and history of the thought, practice, and goals of Zen Buddhism. (Y)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    RELB 254 - Tibetan Buddhist Culture


    Examines the Tibetan Buddhist culture, giving equal attention to religio-philosophical and contemplative systems, as well as historical and social contexts. (IR)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    RELB 300 - Buddhist Mysticism and Modernity


    (Y)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    RELB 315 - Seminar in Buddhist Studies


    Studies selected aspects of Buddhist thought and action. (Y)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    RELB 316 - The Religions of Japan


    Surveys the development of Japanese religions from pre-history to modern times. (Y)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    RELB 317 - Buddhist Meditation


    (Y)

    Credits: 3
  
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    RELB 319 - Buddhist Nirvana


    (Y)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    RELB 500 - Literary and Spoken Tibetan I


    Introduces the philosophical and spiritual texts of Tibet. Includes grammar, basic religious terminology, and structure. (E)

    Credits: 4
  
  •  

    RELB 501 - Literary and Spoken Tibetan II


    Introduces the philosophical and spiritual texts of Tibet. Includes grammar, basic religious terminology, and structure. (E)

    Credits: 4
  
  •  

    RELB 502 - Tibetan Perspectives on Tantra


    Tibetan presentations of the distinctive features of Tantric Buddhism. (O)

    Credits: 3
  
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    RELB 525 - Seminar in Japanese Buddhism


    Examines selected topics in the major schools of Japanese Buddhism, Tendai, Shingon, Pure Land, Nichiren, and Zen. (E)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: RELG 213 or 316, or instructor permission.

    Credits: 3
  
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    RELB 526 - Seminar in Tibetan Buddhism II


    Studies the theory and practice of Tibetan Buddhism. (E)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    RELB 527 - Seminar in Chinese Buddhism


    Selected doctrinal and historical issues in Chinese Buddhism. (O)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    RELB 535 - Literary and Spoken Tibetan III


    Intermediate course in the philosophical and spiritual language of Tibet, past and present. (E)

    Credits: 4
  
  •  

    RELB 536 - Literary and Spoken Tibetan IV


    Intermediate course in the philosophical and spiritual language of Tibet, past and present. (E)

    Credits: 4
  
  •  

    RELB 539 - Tibetan Buddhist Tantra Dzokchen


    Examines the Dzokchen tradition of Tibetan Buddhist Tantra focusing on its philosophical and contemplative systems and its historical and social contexts. (IR)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    RELB 543 - Sanskrit Religious Texts


    Readings in Sanskrit religious and philosophical texts, their syntax, grammar, and translation. (SI)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: SANS 501, 502, or equivalent and instructor permission.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    RELB 544 - Sanskrit Religious Texts


    Readings in Sanskrit religious and philosophical texts, their syntax, grammar, and translation. (SI)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: SANS 501, 502, or equivalent and instructor permission.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    RELB 546 - Seminar in Mahayana Buddhism


    Studies the Middle Way School of Madhyamika, including Nagarjuna’s reasoning and its intent and place in the spiritual path. (IR)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    RELB 547 - Literary and Spoken Tibetan V


    Advanced study in the philosophical and spiritual language of Tibet, past and present. (O)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: RELB 500, 501, 535, 536, or equivalent.

    Credits: 4
  
  •  

    RELB 548 - Literary and Spoken Tibetan VI


    Advanced study in the philosophical and spiritual language of Tibet, past and present. (O)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: RELB 500, 501, 535, 536, or equivalent.

    Credits: 4
  
  •  

    RELB 549 - Religious History of Tibet


    Surveys political, social, religious, and intellectual issues in Tibetan history from the fifth to fifteenth centuries, emphasizing the formation of the classical categories, practices, and ideals of Tibetan Buddhism. (IR)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    RELB 555 - Buddhist Philosophy


    Advanced study of the stages and contents of insight according to the Pali and Sanskritic Buddhist traditions using such works as the Satipatthanasutta, Visuddhimagga, Vimuttimagga, and Abhidharmakosha (in translation). (E)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: RELB 249 or equivalent.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    RELB 560 - Elementary Pali


    Studies Pali religious and philosophical works, including grammar and translation. (SI)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: SANS 501, 502, or equivalent.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    RELB 561 - Buddhist Hybrid Sanskrit


    Studies Buddhist Hybrid Sanskrit works and their grammar and translation. (IR)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: SANS 501, 502, or equivalent.

    Credits: 1 to 3
  
  •  

    RELB 566 - Seminar on Indian Buddhism


    Investigates the techniques and presuppositions involved in the methods used to study Buddhism, including textual, historical, philosophical, and social scientific methods. (E)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    RELB 580 - Literary and Spoken Tibetan VII


    Examines the Yogachara-Svatantrika system as presented in Jang-kya’s Presentation of Tenets, oral debate, and exercises in spoken Tibetan. (Y)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: RELB 500, 501, 535, 536, 547, 548 or equivalent.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    RELB 581 - Literary and Spoken Tibetan VIII


    Examines the Yogachara-Svatantrika system as presented in Jang-kya’s Presentation of Tenets, oral debate, and exercises in spoken Tibetan. (Y)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: RELB 500, 501, 535, 536, 547, 548 or equivalent.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    RELB 587 - Colloquial Tibetan VII


    Advanced-level study of colloquial Tibetan. (Y)

    Credits: 2
  
  •  

    RELB 588 - Colloquial Tibetan VIII


    Advanced-level study of colloquial Tibetan. (Y)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: RELB 587.

    Credits: 2
  
  •  

    RELB 591 - Seminar in Chinese Buddhism


    Examines the major schools of Chinese Buddhism: T’ien-t’ai, Hua-yen, Pure Land, and Ch’an. (E)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    RELB 599 - South Asian and Inner Asian Buddhist Bibliography


    (SS)

    Credits: 3

Bulgarian

  
  •  

    BULG 121 - Introduction to Bulgarian Language


    Introduces students to the essentials of Bulgarian grammar with emphasis on speaking and reading. (IR)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: Instructor permission; some knowledge of Russian recommended.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    BULG 122 - Introduction to Bulgarian Language


    Introduces students to the essentials of Bulgarian grammar with emphasis on speaking and reading. (IR)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: Instructor permission; some knowledge of Russian recommended.

    Credits: 3

Business

  
  •  

    BUS 341 - Commercial Law I


    Analysis of the basic legal principles applicable to ordinary commercial transactions, with special emphasis on contracts, agencies, and commercial paper.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    BUS 342 - Commercial Law II


    Reviews basic legal principles applicable to formation and operation of business organizations including corporate and non-corporate entities. Also covers significant areas of legal regulation of business and property transactions.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: BUS 341.

    Credits: 3
 

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