May 26, 2022  
Undergraduate Record 2007-2008 
    
Undergraduate Record 2007-2008 [ARCHIVED RECORD]

Course Descriptions


 

Art History

  
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    ARTH 522 - Byzantine Art


    Studies the art of Byzantium and its cultural dependencies from its roots in the late Antique period to the last flowering under the Palaeologan dynasty. (IR)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: Instructor permission.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ARTH 533 - Italian Fifteenth Century Painting I


    Studies the major and minor masters of the Quattrocento in Florence, Siena, Central Italy, Venice, and North Italy. (IR)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: Instructor permission.

    Credits: 3
  
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    ARTH 536 - Italian Sixteenth-Century Painting


    Studies the High Renaissance, Mannerism, the Maniera, and related movements in Cinquecento painting. (IR)

    Credits: 3
  
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    ARTH 537 - Italian Renaissance Sculpture I


    Studies the major developments in Italian sculpture from the late Dugento through the early Quattrocento. (IR)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: Instructor permission.

    Credits: 3
  
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    ARTH 547 - Dutch Painting in the Golden Age


    Surveys the major artists and schools of the United Provinces from about 1580-1680, including Rembrandt, Frans Hals, Vermeer, and Jacob van Ruisdael, seen in the context of Dutch culture and history. Emphasizes the iconographic method of interpreting daily-life genre and landscape, the role of theory in Dutch art, and the character of Dutch realism. (IR)

    Credits: 3
  
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    ARTH 561 - Approaches to American Art


    Introduces historiography and methodology of American art history from earliest discussions to the present, through an analysis of one particular mode (e.g., portraiture, landscape, genre) over time. (IR)

    Credits: 3
  
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    ARTH 562 - Representations of Race in American Art


    Examines the depiction of Asian, Blacks, Indians, and Latinos in American art from colonial times to the present, in order to identify and describe some of the ways in which visual images have functioned in the construction and reinforcement of racial mythologies. (IR)

    Credits: 3
  
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    ARTH 583 - African Art


    Surveys Africa’s chief forms of visual art from prehistoric times to the present. (IR)

    Credits: 3
  
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    ARTH 590 - Museum Studies


    A lecture course on the nature of public art collections, how they have been formed, and the role they play in society. Examines the concept of connoisseurship and its role in collecting art for museums. (Y)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: 9-12 credits in art history or instructor permission.

    Credits: 3
  
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    ARTH 591 - Advanced Readings in the History of Art


    (S)

    Credits: 3
  
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    ARTH 592 - Advanced Readings in the History of Art


    (S)

    Credits: 3

Asian & Middle Eastern Langs & Culture in Trans

  
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    MEST 311 - Women and Middle-Eastern Literatures


    Explores some of the basic issues of women’s identity in Middle Eastern literature. In a variety of readings (poetry, short-story, novel, and autobiography) by men and women, it explores both the image and presence of women in a rich and too-often neglected literature. (IR)

    Credits: 3
  
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    MEST 511 - Women and Middle-Eastern Literatures


    Explores some of the basic issues of women’s identity in Middle Eastern literature. In a variety of readings (poetry, short-story, novel, and autobiography) by men and women, it explores both the image and presence of women in a rich and too-often neglected literature. (IR)

    Credits: 1 to 3

Asian and Middle Eastern Languages and Culture

  
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    ARAB 587 - Media Arabic II


    A survey of print and electronic media, news and news reports, analysis, commentaries from or about the Arab world, intended to increase students’ familiarity with the language used in news as reported in Arabic-media venues. (IR)   

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite:  ARAB 585, completion of ARAB 583 and 584 or permission of instructor.

    Credits: 3
  
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    CHIN 346 - Chinese Culture and Society through Films


    An integral part of the UVa summer Chinese language study abroad program intended specifically for students who take intensive Readings in Modern Chinese (CHIN 301 and CHIN 302) during the 8 week summer abroad program in Shanghai.  Will view and study Chinese films made in China to learn, to think and to discuss specific topics of Chinese culture.  May be offered on an irregular basis during fall or spring terms for 3 credits. (SS)

    Credits: 2 to 3
  
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    CHIN 546 - Chinese Culture and Society through Films


    An integral part of the UVa summer Chinese language study abroad program intended specifically for students who take intensive Readings in Modern Chinese (CHIN 301 and CHIN 302) during the 8 week summer abroad program in Shanghai.  Will view and study Chinese films made in China to learn, to think and to discuss specific topics of Chinese culture.  May be offered on an irregular basis during fall or spring terms for 3 credits. (SS)

    Credits: 2 to 3
  
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    MESA 100 - From Genghis Khan to Stalin: Invasions and Empires of Central Asia


    Survey of Central Asian civilizations from the first to the twenty-first centuries, with particular emphasis on nomadism, invasions, conquests, and major religious-cultural developments. (Y)

    Credits: 3
  
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    MESA 365 - Introduction to Linguistic Typology


    Human languages appear on the surface to be very different from one another. Closer examination reveals that languages differ in systematic ways and that more than half of them can be divided into a relatively small number of basic types. In this course we will identify and study some of these basic patterns and explore possible reasons for their existence. The course will introduce students to basic grammatical structure and function. (IR)

    Credits: 3
  
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    MESA 494 - Independent Study


    Independent study in a special field under the direction of a faculty member in MESA-LC. (SI)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: Instructor permission.

    Credits: 1 to 3
  
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    MESA 497 - South Asian and Middle Eastern Studies Senior Thesis


    Thesis research under the direction of a MESA-LC faculty member serving as thesis advisor and a second faculty member serving as second reader. The second faculty member may be from outside MESA-LC. (S)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: DMP major and instructor permission

    Credits: 3
  
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    MEST 247 - Reflections of Exile: Jewish Languages and their Communities


    Covers Jewish languages Yiddish, Judeo-Arabic, Ladino, and Hebrew from historical, linguistic, and literary perspectives. Explores the relations between communities and languages, the nature of diaspora, and the death and revival of languages. No prior knowledge of these languages is required. This course is cross-listed with ANTH 247. (Y)

    Credits: 3
  
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    MEST 347 - Language and Culture in the Middle East


    Introduction to peoples, languages, cultures and histories of the Middle East. Focuses on Israel/Palestine as a microcosm of important social processes-such as colonialism, nationalism, religious fundamentalism, and modernization-that affect the region as a whole. This course is cross-listed with ANTH 347. (Y)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: Prior coursework in anthropology, middle east studies, or linguistics, or permission of the instructor.

    Credits: 3

Astronomy

  
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    ASTR 121 - Introduction to the Sky and Solar System


    A study of the night sky primarily for non-science majors. Provides a brief history of astronomy through Newton. Topics include the properties of the sun, earth, moon, planets, asteroids, meteors and comets; origin and evolution of the solar system; life in the universe; and recent results from space missions and ground-based telescopes. (S)

    Credits: 3
  
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    ASTR 124 - Introduction to Stars, Galaxies, and the Universe


    A study of stars, star formation, and evolution primarily for non-science majors. Topics include light, atoms, and modern observing technologies; origin of the chemical elements; supernovae, pulsars, neutron stars, and black holes; structure and evolution of our galaxy; nature of other galaxies; active galaxies and quasars; expanding universe, cosmology, the big bang, and the early universe. (S)

    Credits: 3
  
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    ASTR 130 - Introduction to Astronomical Observation


    Primarily for non-science majors. An independent laboratory class, generally meeting at night, in which students work individually or in small groups on observational projects that focus on the study of constellations, planets, stars, nebulae, and galaxies. Binoculars, 6- through 10-inch telescopes, and imaging equipment are used extensively at the department’s student observatory. Some projects use computers to simulate observations taken with much larger telescopes. (S)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite/corequisite: ASTR 121 or 124, or instructor permission. Note: All astronomy courses may be used to satisfy the College natural sciences area requirements. Both ASTR 121 and 124 cover complementary subject matter at an introductory level. Each

    Credits: 3
  
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    ASTR 170 - Seminar


    Primarily for first and second year students, taught on a voluntary basis by a faculty member. Topics vary. (SI)

    Credits: 1
  
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    ASTR 171 - Seminar


    Primarily for first and second year students, taught on a voluntary basis by a faculty member. Topics vary. (SI)

    Credits: 1
  
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    ASTR 174 - Introduction to Astronomical Reseach


    Intended for first and second year students considering Astronomy/Astronomy-Physics as a major as well as newly declared majors. Participants meet with a different Astronomy faculty member each week to discuss ongoing reseach in order to acquaint students with both the subject matter and required physical, mathematical, and computational background of contemporary astronomy research. Potential long term undergraduate research projects will be emphasized. (Y)

    Credits: 1
  
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    ASTR 211 - General Astronomy


    Primarily for science majors. A thorough discussion of the basic concepts and methods of solar system, stellar, galactic, and extragalactic astronomy with an emphasis on physical principles. Topics include recent research developments, such as black holes, pulsars, quasars, and new solar system observations from the space program. (Y)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite/corequisite: MATH 121 or 131, PHYS 151 or 231, or instructor permission; ASTR 211 and 212 form a sequence and should be taken in that order.

    Credits: 3
  
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    ASTR 212 - General Astronomy


    Primarily for science majors. A thorough discussion of the basic concepts and methods of solar system, stellar, galactic, and extragalactic astronomy with an emphasis on physical principles. Topics include recent research developments, such as black holes, pulsars, quasars, and new solar system observations from the space program. (Y)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite/corequisite: MATH 121 or 131, PHYS 151 or 231, or instructor permission; ASTR 211 and 212 form a sequence and should be taken in that order.

    Credits: 3
  
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    ASTR 313 - Observational Astronomy


    Primarily for science majors. A laboratory course, generally meeting at night, that deals with basic observational techniques in astronomy. Students use observational facilities at the McCormick and Fan Mountain Observatories. (Y)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: ASTR 211, 212, or instructor permission.

    Credits: 3
  
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    ASTR 314 - Introduction to Observational Radio Astronomy


    An introduction to the tools, techniques, and science of radio astronomy. Discussion includes fundamentals of measuring radio signals, radiometers, antennas, and interferometers, supplemented by illustrative labs; radio emission mechanisms and simple radiative transfer; radio emission from the Sun and planets, stars, galactic and extragalactic sources, and the cosmic microwave background. (Y)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: ASTR 211, 212.

    Credits: 3
  
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    ASTR 324 - Teaching Astronomy


    A seminar-style class offered primarily for non-majors planning to teach science or looking to improve their ablility to communicate science effectively. In addition to astronomy content, students will learn effective teaching strategies and gain practical experience by developing and implementing their own concept-based astronomy lessons. (Y)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: ASTR 121, 124; instructor permission

    Credits: 3
  
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    ASTR 341 - Archaeo-Astronomy


    Open to non-science students. Discussion of prescientific astronomy, including Mayan, Babylonian, and ancient Chinese astronomy, and the significance of relics such as Stonehenge. Discusses the usefulness of ancient records in the study of current astrophysical problems such as supernova outbursts. Uses current literature from several disciplines, including astronomy, archaeology, and anthropology. (Y)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite/corequisite: A 100- or 200-level ASTR course, or instructor permission.

    Credits: 3
  
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    ASTR 342 - Life Beyond the Earth


    Open to non-science students. Studies the possibility of intelligent extraterrestrial life; methods and desirability of interstellar communication; prospects for humanity’s colonization of space; interaction of space colonies; and the search for other civilizations. (Y)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite/corequisite: A 100- or 200-level ASTR course or instructor permission.

    Credits: 3
  
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    ASTR 346 - Development of Modern Astronomy


    A reading course dealing with the history of astronomy. (SI)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: Instructor permission.

    Credits: 3
  
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    ASTR 347 - Science and Controversy in Astronomy


    Open to non-science students. Investigates controversial topics in science and pseudo-science from the astronomer’s perspective. Analyzes methods of science and the nature of scientific evidence, and their implications for unresolved astrophysical problems. Topics include extraterrestrial life, UFO’s, Velikovsky, von Daniken, and astrology. (Y)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite/corequisite: ASTR 121 or 124, or instructor permission.

    Credits: 3
  
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    ASTR 348 - Introduction to Cosmology


    Open to first-year students; primarily for non-science students. A descriptive introduction to the study of the ultimate structure and evolution of the universe. Covers the history of the universe, cosmological speculation, and the nature of the galaxies. Provides a qualitative introduction to relativity theory and the nature of space-time, black holes, models of the universe (big bang, steady-state, etc.) and methods of testing them. (Y)

    Credits: 3
  
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    ASTR 351 - Planetary Astronomy


    The goal of this course is to understand the origins and evolution of bodies in the solar system. The observations of atmospheres and surfaces of planetary bodies by ground-based and orbiting telescopes and by spacecraft will be described. The principal topics will be the interpretation of remote sensing data for atmospheres and surfaces of planetary bodies, the chemistry and dynamics of planetary atmospheres, the interactions of these atmospheres with the surfaces and with the local plasma, and the role of meteorite and comet impacts on surfaces of planetary bodies. (SI)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: Calculus or permission of instructor. Primarily for science majors.

    Credits: 3
  
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    ASTR 395 - Tutorial


    Studies a topic of special interest to the student under individual supervision by a faculty member. May be repeated once for credit. (S)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: Instructor permission.

    Credits: 3
  
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    ASTR 444 - The Nature of Discovery in Astronomy


    Studies selected topics concerning the people, ideas, and principles that motivate the advance of twentieth-century astronomy. (SI)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: Instructor permission.

    Credits: 3
  
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    ASTR 451 - Introduction to Astrophysics


    Basic concepts in mechanics, statistical physics, atomic and nuclear structure, and radiative transfer are developed and applied to selected fundamental problems in the areas of stellar structure, stellar atmospheres, the interstellar medium, and extragalactic astrophysics. (Y)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: ASTR 211, 212; PHYS 252, or instructor permission.

    Credits: 3
  
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    ASTR 498 - Senior Thesis


    May be repeated once for credit. (S)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: Instructor permission.

    Credits: 3
  
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    ASTR 511 - Astronomical Techniques


    Surveys modern techniques of radiation measurement, data analysis, and image processing, and their application to astrophysical problems, especially the physical properties of stars and galaxies. Relevant laboratory experiments and observations with the department’s telescopes are included. Students are expected to develop a familiarity with programming and other basic computer skills if they do not already possess them. (O)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: ASTR 211-212; PHYS 342, 343 or instructor permission.

    Credits: 3
  
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    ASTR 534 - Introductory Radio Astronomy


    Studies the fundamentals of measuring power and power spectra, antennas, interferometers, and radiometers. Topics include thermal radiation, synchrotron radiation, and line frequency radiation; and radio emission from the planets, sun, flare stars, pulsars, supernovae, interstellar gas, galaxies, and quasi-stellar sources. (E)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: MATH 325, PHYS 252.

    Credits: 3
  
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    ASTR 535 - Introduction to Radio Astronomy Instrumentation


    An introduction to the instrumentation of radio astronomy. Discussion includes fundamentals of measuring radio signals, noise theory, basic radiometry, antennas, low noise electronics, coherent receivers, signal processing for continuum and spectral line studies, and arrays. Lecture material is supplemented by illustrative labs. (O)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: ASTR 534 or instructor permission.

    Credits: 3
  
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    ASTR 539 - Topical Seminar


    Detailed study of a current topic. Topic to be covered appears in the Course Offering Directory for the semester in which it is given. (IR)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: Instructor permission.

    Credits: 3
  
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    ASTR 540 - Topical Seminar


    Detailed study of a current topic. Topic to be covered appears in the Course Offering Directory for the semester in which it is given. (IR)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: Instructor permission.

    Credits: 3
  
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    ASTR 542 - Interstellar Medium


    Topics include the physics of interstellar gas and grains, the distribution and dynamics of the gas, and cosmic radiation and interstellar magnetic fields. (E)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: Instructor permission.

    Credits: 3
  
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    ASTR 543 - Stellar Astrophysics


    Studies observed properties and physics of stars including radiative transfer; stellar thermodynamics; convection; formation of spectra in atmospheres; equations of stellar structure; nuclear reactions; stellar evolution; and nucleosynthesis. Includes applicable numerical techniques. (O)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: Instructor permission.

    Credits: 3
  
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    ASTR 544 - Stellar Astrophysics


    Studies observed properties and physics of stars including radiative transfer; stellar thermodynamics; convection; formation of spectra in atmospheres; equations of stellar structure; nuclear reactions; stellar evolution; and nucleosynthesis. Includes applicable numerical techniques. (O)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: Instructor permission.

    Credits: 3
  
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    ASTR 545 - High Energy Astrophysics


    Introduces the physics of basic radiation mechanisms and particle acceleration processes that are important in high energy phenomena and space science. Discusses applications to pulsars, active galactic nuclei, radio galaxies, quasars, and supernovae. (E)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: Instructor permission.

    Credits: 3
  
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    ASTR 546 - Binary Stars


    Topics include the determination of orbital elements, the mass-luminosity-radius relation, formation of binary systems, the Roche model, mass loss, mass transfer, circumstellar material, accretion disks, evolution of close interacting binaries, and some special classes of binaries such as cataclysmic variables, RS CVn binaries, Algol-type binaries, and X-ray binaries. (SI)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: Instructor permission.

    Credits: 3
  
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    ASTR 548 - Evolution of the Universe


    Studies the origin and evolution of structure in the universe. Topics include the formation and evolution of galaxies, and tests of the theory based on observations of large-scale structure and the properties of galaxies as a function of look-back time. (O)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: Instructor permission.

    Credits: 3
  
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    ASTR 551 - Galactic Structure and Stellar Populations


    Explores the structure and evolution of star clusters and galaxies, with emphasis on the kinematics, chemistry, ages, and spectral energy distributions of stellar populations. The course introduces fundamental tools of Galactic astronomy, including methods for assessing the size, shape, age, and dynamics of the Milky Way and other stellar systems, galaxy formation, interstellar gas and dust, dark matter, and the distance scale. (O)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

    Credits: 3
  
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    ASTR 553 - Extragalactic Astronomy


    This course provides an overview of extragalactic astronomy. Topics include both qualitative and quantitative discussion of various types of galaxy (ellipticals, spirals, dwarf, starburst); results from theory of stellar dynamics; groups and clusters of galaxies; active galaxies; high-redshirt galaxies; galaxy evolution; the intergalactic medium; and dark matter. The course is intended for advanced undergraduate astrophysics majors and first and second year graduate students. (O)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: Physics and Math through PHYS 251, MATH 325 (or equivalent); ASTR 211, 212 (or equivalent).

    Credits: 3
  
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    ASTR 571 - Fundamental Concepts in Astronomy


    Subject matter is the same as ASTR 121, 124, with special reading assignments and consultation on topics in astronomical education. Offered concurrently with undergraduate section. (S)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: Curry School students; instructor permission.

    Credits: 3
  
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    ASTR 572 - Fundamental Concepts in Astronomy


    Subject matter is the same as ASTR 121, 124, with special reading assignments and consultation on topics in astronomical education. Offered concurrently with undergraduate section. (S)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: Curry School students; instructor permission.

    Credits: 3
  
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    ASTR 573 - Laboratory Concepts in Astronomy


    Subject matter is the same as ASTR 130, with special reading assignments and consultation on topics in astronomical education. Offered concurrently with undergraduate section. (S)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: Curry School students; instructor permission.

    Credits: 3
  
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    ASTR 575 - General Topics in Astronomy


    The subject matter of these courses is the same as ASTR 341, 342, 347, 348, respectively. Students are offered special reading assignments and consultation on topics in astronomical education. Offered concurrently with undergraduate sections. (S)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: Curry School students; instructor permission.

    Credits: 3
  
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    ASTR 578 - General Topics in Astronomy


    The subject matter of these courses is the same as ASTR 341, 342, 347, 348, respectively. Students are offered special reading assignments and consultation on topics in astronomical education. Offered concurrently with undergraduate sections. (S)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: Curry School students; instructor permission.

    Credits: 3
  
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    BIOL 465 - Molecular Biology of Human Disease


    This course addresses molecular mechanisms of gene regulation and cell division in the context of identifying new therapeutic targets and to explore novel treatment options for infections and fenetic diseases. (Y)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisites: BIOL 300, BIOL 301

    Credits: 3

Atmospheric Sciences

  
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    EVAT 541 - Atmospheric Dynamics


    Introduces theoretical meteorology encompassing dry and moist air thermodynamics, the mechanics of atmospheric motion, and the dynamics of atmospheric weather systems. (Y)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: MATH 131, 132 and PHYS 231, 232; or equivalent.

    Credits: 4
  
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    EVAT 542 - Microclimate


    Examines principles of radiation transfer, soil heat flux, atmospheric heat transfer, atmospheric moisture, evapotranspiration, motions near the Earth’s surface, and surface energy balances to provide a basis for describing the microclimate of various surfaces. (Y)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: EVSC 350 or equivalent, or instructor permission.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    EVAT 550 - Environmental Climatology


    An advanced survey of the theoretical and experimental research areas in climatology and meteorology, emphasizing environmental problems associated with the atmosphere. Fundamental principles used in these studies are introduced and discussed, along with procedures used to present and analyze atmospheric information. (O)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Corequisites: EVSC 350 or the text The Science and Wonders of the Atmosphere, or equivalent.

    Credits: 3

Biology

  
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    BIOL 106 - Principles of Nutrition


    Topics include the chemical composition of the body; the molecular structure and function of different kinds of nutrients required by humans; the metabolic processes that transform food into energy and the chemical blocks for the creation and renewal of cellular structures; and the basic scientific principle of energy balance that determines weight gain or loss as governed by diet and exercise. (Y)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    BIOL 121 - Human Biology and Disease


    Introduces basic biological principles as illustrated in the human organism. Emphasizes the disruption of normal functions by disease either inherited or acquired. (Y)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    BIOL 149 - Survival Biology for the New Millennium


    Biological/Biomedical research has advanced to the extent that everyone’s lives are likely to be deeply affected. BIOL 149 will introduce a select set of new technologies and concepts such as genetically modified organisms, cloning animals including humans, stem cells and the human genome. No science background required. (Y)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    BIOL 201 - Introduction to Biology: Cell Biology and Genetics


    Intensive introduction to modern biology designed for natural science majors. Biological structure and function at various levels of organization, cell biology, genetics, development and evolution are covered. This course is required for all biology majors and is a prerequisite for most upper-level biology courses. Lectures and recitation/review. (Y)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    BIOL 202 - Introduction to Biology: Organismal and Evolutionary Biology


    Intensive introduction to modern biology designed for natural science majors. Biological structure and function at various levels of organization, cell biology, genetics, development and evolution are covered. This course are required for all biology majors and is a prerequisite for most upper-level biology courses. Lectures and recitation/review. (Y)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: BIOL 201.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    BIOL 203 - Introduction to Biology: Cell Biology and Genetics Laboratory


    Laboratory exercises in introductory biology to illustrate experimental techniques and strategies used to elucidate biological concepts. (Y)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Corequisite: May be taken independently (labs are not sequenced), or in conjunction with BIOL 201. 

    Credits: 2
  
  •  

    BIOL 204 - Introduction to Biology: Organismal and Evolutionary Biology Laboratory


    Studies life forms, from simple to complex organization, demonstrating the unique properties of living organisms. (Y)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Corequisite: May be taken independently (labs are not sequenced), or in conjunction with BIOL 201, 202.

    Credits: 2
  
  •  

    BIOL 206 - Human Physiology and Anatomy I


    Includes basic information regarding the chemistry and organization of living matter needed to understand cellular, tissue, and organ function. The morphology and physiological functions of the integumentary, skeletal, muscular, and neurosensory organ systems will also be covered. Designed as a basic course for students in the allied health sciences. (Y)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    BIOL 206L - Human Physiology and Anatomy I Laboratory


    Optional laboratory class to accompany BIOL 206. Includes simple anatomical, physiological and chemical exercises, clinical exercises, dissections, and microscopic examination of tissues that demonstrate and supplement topics covered in the lecture. (Y)

    Credits: 1
  
  •  

    BIOL 207 - Human Physiology and Anatomy II


    Covers the morphology and physiology for the cardiovascular, lymphatic, immune, endocrine, digestive, respiratory, excretory and reproductive organ systems. Designed as a basic course for students in the allied health sciences. (Y)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    BIOL 207L - Human Physiology and Anatomy II Laboratory


    Optional laboratory class to accompany BIOL 207. Includes simple anatomical, physiological, and chemical exercises, clinical exercises, dissections, and microscopic examination of tissues that demonstrate and supplement topics covered in the lecture. (Y)

    Credits: 1
  
  •  

    BIOL 300 - Cell Biology and Biochemistry


    Examines the fundamental principles of eukaryotic cell biology at the molecular level with particular emphasis on biochemical approaches and mechanisms.  Topics will include:  structure and function of the plasma membrane, transport of small molecules, ions and macromolecular complexes across membranes, protein trafficking, the cytoskeleton, signal transduction pathways , and the control of cell division and cellular proliferations.  Examples of perturbations of these processes in human diseases (e.g., lysosomal disorders, hypercholesterolemia, and cancer) will be discussed throughout the course.  Required for all Biology majors. (Y)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: BIOL 201, CHEM 141, 142.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    BIOL 301 - Genetics and Molecular Biology


    Examines the molecular nature of genes, gene function, the inheritance of genes, and the genetic basis of traits.  Major topics include Mendelian inheritance, mutation, linkage and recombination, gene regulation and interactions.  Required for all Biology majors. (Y)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: BIOL 201, 202, CHEM 141, 142.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    BIOL 302 - Evolution and Ecology


    Examines the mechanisms of evolutionary change, with an emphasis on the genetic and evolutionary principles needed to understand the diversification of life on earth.  Covers the ecology of individuals and population dynamics.  Major topics include the genetics and ecology of natural populations, adaptation, molecular evolution and macroevolution, and the application of evolutionary and ecological concepts to conservation biology.  Required for all Biology majors. (Y)   

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: BIOL 201, 202.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    BIOL 308 - Virology


    Presents an in-depth look at the molecular biology, pathogenesis and control of animal viruses. Small pox, influenza and HIV are used as model viruses for the analysis of viral replication mechanisms, viral genetics and the evolutionary relationship between the virus and its host. Epidemiology, transmission mechanisms, patterns of disease, and the societal impact of viruses are all discussed in terms of host/virus evolution. (Y)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: BIOL 201, 202, CHEM 141, 142. First semester organic chemistry suggested, but not required.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    BIOL 309 - Biology of Infectious Disease


    Emphasis is on the principles that govern disease biology, using examples from humans, plants and animals. Topics include: diversity and types of pathogens; mechanisms of transmission, pathogenicity, and resistance; epidemiology, population regulation, and extinction; disease origins; intracellular pathogens; disease and the evolution of genetic systems; and disease in biological control and conservation. (Y)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: BIOL 201, 202.

    Credits: 4
  
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    BIOL 312 - Fundamentals of Microbiology


    Explores molecular and evolutionary aspects of the structure and function of microbes. Equal emphasis is given to environmental and medical microbiology. Topics include microbial structure, diversity, metabolism, genetics, biogeochemical cycling, microbial ecology, epidemiology, medically important organisms and evolutionary adaptation. Important current event topics such as biofilms, genetically engineered microbes and ethics are also presented. (Y)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: BIOL 201, 202, CHEM 141, 142.

    Credits: 3
  
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    BIOL 314 - Biology of Aging


    This interdisciplinary course will explore our current knowledge of the biology of aging in populations of plants and animals, including humans. Topics include demographic trends across species; analysis of why organisms age in the context of evolutionary theories; analysis of how organisms age in the context of cellular and physiological theories; and the genetic basis of longevity. (Y)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: BIOL 201, 202.

    Credits: 3
  
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    BIOL 315 - Microbiology Laboratory


    An introduction to microorganisms and to basic microbiological principles through laboratory experimentation. Emphasis is on the structure, physiology and genetics of bacteria and bacterial viruses. (Y)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: BIOL 203.

    Credits: 3
  
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    BIOL 317 - Introduction to Neurobiology


    Analyzes the concepts of general neurobiology, including basic electrophysiology and electrochemistry, origin of bioelectric potentials, sensory, motor, integrative and developmental neurobiology, and conceptual models of simple learning. (Y)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: BIOL 201, 202.

    Credits: 3
  
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    BIOL 318 - Introduction to Plant Biology


    Examines basic principles of plant structure, development, classification, and physiology. (Y)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: BIOL 201, 202.

    Credits: 3
  
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    BIOL 321 - Cell, Molecular and Developmental Biology Lab


    Students will acquire basic training in cell culture, cell fractionation, microscopy, electrophoresis, spectrophotometry, chromatography, and immunological methods through a serries of lab investigatons. Contemporary molecular methods utilizing recombinant DNA and PCR will be included. (S)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: CHEM 141-142 or equivalent, BIOL 201 (prerequisite) or BIOL 300 (co-requisite), AP credit for BIOL 201 is not sufficient

    Credits: 3

  
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    BIOL 322 - Genetics, Evolution and Behavior Laboratory


    Students apply contemporary laboratory methods, analytic tools, and experimental approaches in a series of investigations that explore important, basic concepts in the fields of genetics, evolution and behavior. (S)


    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: BIOL 201 and 202

    Credits: 3

  
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    BIOL 323 - Animal Physiology


    Focuses on selected vertebrate organ systems; considers other systems where relevant. (Y)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: BIOL 201, 202.

    Credits: 3
  
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    BIOL 324 - Introduction to Immunology


    Studies the genetics and cell biology of the vertebrate immune system, with a focus on adaptive immunity. Classic and current experimental systems are emphasized. (Y)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: BIOL 201, 202.

    Credits: 3
  
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    BIOL 325 - Introduction to Animal Behavior


    Studies the comparative aspects of animal behavior from a neuro-ethological approach; and the mechanisms employed in generating and guiding behavior. (Y)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: BIOL 201, 202.

    Credits: 3
  
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    BIOL 328 - Ornithology


    This course is an introduction to avian biology. Major topics include evolutionary history, genetics, anatomy and physiology, behavior and communication, reproduction and development, and ecology and conservation. Through the study of birds, the most diverse lineage of terrestrial vertebrates, students learn broadly applicable concepts of organismal biology and gain insight to the scientific investigation of integrated biological systems. (IR)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: BIOL 201, 202.

    Credits: 3
  
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    BIOL 329 - Ecology and Conservation of Fishes


    A laboratory course with a significant field component, an expanded version of a similar course taught at Mt. Lake Biological Station by the same instructor. Major topics of investigation center on the composition of freshwater fish assemblages and on the factors that influence distribution of fishes on multiple scales, from within stream reaches to among basins, including; physical habitat, water quality, and water flow; drainage histories and other zoogeographic processes; morphological, physiological, and life history characters of fishes; competition, predation and other biotic interactions; natural disturbance regimes; and anthropogenic impacts. The first portion of the semester provides an introduction to fish biology and systematics. (Y)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: BIOL 201, 202, 204.

    Credits: 3
  
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    BIOL 340 - Functional Morphology of Vertebrates


    Comparative investigations of functional morphology across major vertebrate lineages.  Lectures are organized into three units; 1) evolutionary history and patterns of development, 2) integumentary, skeletal and muscular systems, and 3) sensory systems, and neural and endocrine integrations.  Topics of investigation focus on biomechanical and physiological performance of biological structures, from cells to organ systems, and on the origins and diversification of form-function complexes among vertebrates.  Lab exercises include dissections, observation of prepared specimens and other material, and modeling/simulation of biomechanical systems.  This course serves as a 300-level lab requirement for either the B.A. or B.S. in biology. (Y)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: BIOL 201, 202, 204.

    Credits: 4
  
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    BIOL 345 - Biodiversity and Conservation


    Introduction to the fundamental principles of conservation biology (e.g., global species numbers, value of biodiversity, causes of extinction, genetic diversity, island biogeography, priority setting) and current topics of debate (including zoo versus field conservation, effects of global change on species extinction). Conservation case studies will allow students to judge the relevance of biological theory to practical problems in conservation. (Y)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: BIOL 201, 202.

    Credits: 3
  
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    BIOL 350 - Field Biology


    Application of field techniques for biological studies. Cross-listed with EVSC 360.(SS)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: BIOL 204 or instructor permission.

    Credits: 1 to 3
  
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    BIOL 385 - Selected Topics in Biology


    Tutorial or seminar course that allows intensive study of the literature in a particular area of biology under the guidance of a Biology faculty member. (SI)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: Instructor permission.

    Credits: 1 to 3
  
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    BIOL 386 - Selected Topics in Biology


    Tutorial or seminar course that allows intensive study of the literature in a particular area of biology under the guidance of a Biology faculty member. (SI)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: Instructor permission.

    Credits: 1 to 3
  
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    BIOL 400 - Laboratory in Molecular Biology


    Laboratory introduction to fundamental molecular techniques used in many biological research laboratories. Includes basic aseptic technique, isolation and manipulation of genetic material, electrophoresis, cloning, gene library construction/screening, Southern blot analysis, and PCR techniques. Lecture and open laboratory. (Y)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: BIOL 321.

    Credits: 3
  
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    BIOL 401 - Macroevolution


    Survey of new problems and approaches to large-scale (above the species level) ecological and evolutionary patterns. The course will emphasize modern conceptual issues and methodological advances. Laboratory work will involve computer applications in systematics and statistics. (Y)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: BIOL 301.

    Credits: 3
 

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