Jun 27, 2022  
Undergraduate Record 2007-2008 
    
Undergraduate Record 2007-2008 [ARCHIVED RECORD]

Course Descriptions


 

Chinese

  
  •  

    CHIN 101 - Elementary Chinese


    (Y)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: CHIN 101 and 102 are beginning-level courses in Modern Standard Mandarin Chinese for students with little or no prior experience in the language. The courses are not intended for native and near-native speakers of Chinese. The courses provid

    Credits: 4
  
  •  

    CHIN 102 - Elementary Chinese


    (Y)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: CHIN 101 or equivalent (as demonstrated in the placement test). CHIN 101 and 102 are beginning-level courses in Modern Standard Mandarin Chinese for students with little or no prior experience in the language. The courses are not intended fo

    Credits: 4
  
  •  

    CHIN 106 - Accelerated Elementary Chinese


    Specifically intended for students with native or near-native speaking ability in Mandarin Chinese, but little or no reading and writing ability. The course focuses on reading and writing Chinese. The goals of this course are to help students: (a) achieve control of the Chinese sound system (the 4 tones and Pinyin) and basic components of Chinese characters; (b) be able to write 400-500 characters, (c) express themselves clearly in written form on a variety of covered topics using learned grammar patterns and vocabulary, (d) improve their basic reading skills (including learning to use a Chinese dictionary). (Y)

    Credits: 4
  
  •  

    CHIN 201 - Intermediate Chinese


    (Y)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: for CHIN 201: CHIN 102 or equivalent (as demonstrated in the placement test). CHIN 201, 202 are the continuation of CHIN 102. They are not intended for native or near-native speakers of Chinese. The goals of this course are to help students

    Credits: 4
  
  •  

    CHIN 202 - Intermediate Chinese


    (Y)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: CHIN 201, 202 are the continuation of CHIN 102. They are not intended for native or near-native speakers of Chinese. The goals of this course are to help students improve their spoken and aural proficiency, achieve a solid reading level, and

    Credits: 4
  
  •  

    CHIN 206 - Accelerated Intermediate Chinese


    This course is specifically designed for students with native or near-native speaking ability in Mandarin Chinese, but with reading and writing ability equivalent to a student who has completed CHIN 102. The course focuses on reading and writing Chinese. The goals of this course are to help students: (a) achieve a basic level of reading competency with a vocabulary of 1000 characters; (b) express themselves clearly in written Chinese on a variety of topics using learned grammar patterns and vocabulary. (Y)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: CHIN 106 or equivalent (as demonstrated in the placement test).

    Credits: 4
  
  •  

    CHIN 301 - Readings in Modern Chinese


    These courses are the continuation of Intermediate Chinese (CHIN 202). They are not intended for native or near-native speakers of Chinese. All four basic skills (listening, speaking, reading, and writing) are equally stressed. Readings and discussions are related to various aspects of modern China. The class is conducted mainly in Mandarin Chinese. (Y)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: CHIN 202 or equivalent (as demonstrated in the placement test).

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    CHIN 301H - Language House Conversation


    For students residing in the Chinese group in Shea House. (Y)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: instructor permission.

    Credits: 1
  
  •  

    CHIN 302 - Readings in Modern Chinese


    (Y)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    CHIN 302H - Language House Conversation


    For students residing in the Chinese group in Shea House. (Y)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: instructor permission.

    Credits: 1
  
  •  

    CHIN 305 - Accelerated Readings in Modern Chinese


    Part of the series of courses designed for students who already speak Chinese, but cannot read or write the Chinese language, CHIN 305 focuses on reading and writing skills at the advanced level, with substantial cultural content. (Y)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: CHIN 206 or permission of instructor.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    CHIN 401 - Advanced Readings in Modern Chinese


    The goal of these courses is to help students understand journalistic essays and some literature pieces through systematic study of sentence patterns and formal writing styles. In addition students are introduced to the culture of contemporary China in CHIN 401 and the changes in Chinese thought during the past 90 years in CHIN 402702. By the end of the course the students should be able to read authentic materials with the help of a dictionary and be able to write essays of 500 words in length on assigned topics. (IR)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: CHIN 302, 502 or equivalent (as demonstrated in the placement test).

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    CHIN 402 - Advanced Readings in Modern Chinese


    (IR)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: CHIN 302, 502 or equivalent (as demonstrated in the placement test).

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    CHIN 406 - Accelerated Advanced Readings in Modern Chinese


    The goal of CHIN 406 is to continue enhancing students’ reading comprehension and writing skills by systematically exposing them to formal written Chinese, works of literature, and vigorous writing exercises. By the end of the course the students should be able to read authentic materials with the help of a dictionary and be able to write essays of 500 words in length on assigned topics. (Y)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: CHIN 306 or equivalent (as demonstrated in the placement test).

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    CHIN 493 - Independent Study in Chinese


    (Y)

    Credits: 1 to 3
  
  •  

    CHIN 494 - Independent Study in Chinese


    (Y)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    CHIN 501 - Readings in Modern Chinese Literature


    Studies modern Chinese at the advanced level. Includes listening comprehension, reading and discussion in Chinese of various aspects of Chinese culture, society, and literature, using radio broadcasts and selections from newspapers, recent essays, short stories, etc. (Y)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: CHIN 202 or equivalent, or instructor permission.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    CHIN 502 - Readings in Modern Chinese Literature


    Studies modern Chinese at the advanced level. Includes listening comprehension, reading and discussion in Chinese of various aspects of Chinese culture, society, and literature, using radio broadcasts and selections from newspapers, recent essays, short stories, etc. (Y)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: CHIN 202 or equivalent, or instructor permission.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    CHIN 523 - Chinese Conversation and Composition (in Chinese)


    Development of writing and speaking skills at a higher level than CHIN 502. (Y)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: CHIN 502 or equivalent, or instructor permission.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    CHIN 524 - Advanced Chinese Conversation and Composition (in Chinese)


    Further develops writing and speaking skills to an advanced level. (Y)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: CHIN 523 or equivalent, or instructor permission.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    CHIN 528 - History of the Chinese Language (in Chinese)


    Examination of the evolution of the spoken and written language, diachronically and synchronically, from syntactic, phonological, lexical, and graphic perspectives. (Y)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: CHIN 323, 523, or equivalent, or instructor permission.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    CHIN 550 - Introduction to Chinese History, Culture and Society


    An integral part of the UVa summer Chinese language program in Shanghai, this course combines lectures and guest presentations with field trips, using the resources specifically available in Shanghai and other parts of China to offer an introduction to China’s long history, splendid culture, and dynamic and changing society. Taught in English. (SS)

    Credits: 1 to 3
  
  •  

    CHIN 581 - Media Chinese I


    Studies electronic and print media in Chinese, emphasizing current events as reported in the Chinese speaking world, to further develop oral and written proficiency. (Y)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: CHIN 502 or equivalent, or instructor permission.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    CHIN 582 - Media Chinese II


    A continuation of CHIN 581. Studies the electronic and print media in Chinese with special emphasis on current events as reported in the Chinese speaking world. (Y)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: CHIN 581 or equivalent, or instructor permission.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    CHIN 583 - Introduction to Classical Chinese


    Introduction to the grammar and structure of classical Chinese. (Y)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    CHIN 584 - Introduction to Classical Chinese


    Introduction to the grammar and structure of classical Chinese. (Y)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: CHIN 583 or equivalent, or instructor permission.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    CHIN 585 - Classical Chinese Literature


    Advanced readings in classical Chinese. (SI)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: CHIN 583-584 or equivalent.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    CHIN 586 - Classical Chinese Literature


    Advanced readings in classical Chinese. (SI)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: CHIN 583-584 or equivalent.

    Credits: 3

Chinese in Translation

  
  •  

    CHTR 280 - Chinese Calligraphy


    Introduction to the history, masters, styles and techniques of Chinese brush calligraphy. Enhances familiarity with use of brush and ink; active and passive differentiation of styles and techniques; and appreciation of Chinese Calligraphy as an art form. (SI)

    Credits: 1 to 3
  
  •  

    CHTR 301 - Legendary Women in Early China


    Examines the biographies of female heroines and villains as found in the early Chinese text Tradition of Exemplary Women (ca. 18 B.C.). Students gain a familiarity with (a) the history of women in early China, (b) the evolving codes of behavior that shaped women’s’ culture for two millennia, and (c) the way in which the Chinese understand gender. Enhances an understanding of the function of role models in both ancient China and their own lives. Fulfills the non-Western perspectives requirement. (Y)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    CHTR 321 - Chinese Literature in Translation


    Study of the literary heritage of China. Examines the major genres through selected readings of representative authors. Taught in English. Fulfills the non-Western perspectives requirement. (Y)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    CHTR 322 - Gender, Family, and Sexuality in Chinese Fiction@


    (Y)

    Credits: 3

Christianity

  
  •  

    RELC 121 - Hebrew Bible/Old Testament


    Studies the history, literature, and religion of ancient Israel in the light of the Hebrew Bible/Old Testament. Emphasizes methods of contemporary biblical criticism. Cross listed as RELJ 121. (Y)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    RELC 122 - New Testament and Early Christianity


    Studies the history, literature, and theology of earliest Christianity in light of the New Testament. Emphasizes the cultural milieu and methods of contemporary biblical criticism. (Y)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    RELC 200 - The Bible and Its Interpreters


    Surveys Jewish and Christian interpretations of the Torah (the first five books of the Bible). Examines how the Bible becomes sacred scripture for Jews and Christians. (IR)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    RELC 205 - History of Christianity I


    Surveys the development of Christianity from the time of Jesus to the 11th century. (Y)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    RELC 206 - History of Christianity II


    Survey of Christianity in the Medieval, Reformation, and Modern Periods. (Y)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    RELC 233 - History of Christian Social and Political Thought I


    Surveys the history of Christian social and political thought from the New Testament to 1850 including the relation of theological ideas to conceptions of state, family, and economic life. (E)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    RELC 234 - History of Christian Social and Political Thought II


    Surveys the history of Christian social and political thought from the rise of Social Gospel to the contemporary scene. Considers “love” and “justice” as central categories for analyzing different conceptions of what social existence is and ought to be. (IR)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    RELC 236 - Elements of Christian Thought


    Examines the theological substance of Christian symbols, discourse, and action. (Y)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    RELC 240 - History of American Catholicism


    Historical survey of American Catholicism from its colonial beginnings to the present. (Y)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    RELC 246 - Aspects of the Catholic Tradition


    Studies the distinctive theological aspects of the Catholic tradition, such as the sacramental system, the nature of the church, and the role of authority. (Y)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    RELC 303 - The Historical Jesus


    Topics include the problems of sources and methods; modern development of the issue of the historical Jesus; and the character of Jesus’ teaching and activity. (Y)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    RELC 304 - Paul: Letters and Theology


    Intensive study of the theological ideas and arguments of the Apostle Paul in relation to their historical and epistolary contexts. (O)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    RELC 320 - Medieval Church Law


    Surveys the origins and development of the law of the Christian Church, the canon law, from its origins to its full elaboration in the “classical period”, 1140-1348. Readings and exercises from original sources will focus on general principles of the law, using marriage law as the particular case. (IR)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    RELC 324 - Medieval Mysticism


    Introduces the major mystical traditions of the Middle Ages and the sources in which they are rooted. (O)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    RELC 325 - Medieval Christianity


    Studies the development of Christianity in the Middle Ages and how it reflected upon itself in terms of theology, piety, and politics. Cross-listed as HIEU 318. (E)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    RELC 326 - Reformation Europe


    Surveys the development of religious reform movements in continental Europe from c. 1450 to c. 1650 and their impact on politics, social life, science, and conceptions of the self. Cross-listed as HIEU 326. (Y)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    RELC 327 - Salvation in the Middle Ages


    Studies four topics in medieval Christian thought: How can human beings know God? How does Jesus save? How does grace engage free will? How does posing such questions change language? Authors include Athanasius, Irenaeus, Augustine, Pseudo-Dionysius, Anslem, Aquinas, Bernard of Clairvaux, Julian of Norwich, Martin Luther, and some modern commentators. (Y)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    RELC 328 - Eastern Christianity


    Surveys the history of Christianity in the Byzantine world and the Middle East from late antiquity (age of emperor Justinian) until the fall of Constantinople. (O)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    RELC 336 - Judaism and Christianity


    Studies the relationship between Judaism and Christianity from the origins of Christianity as a Jewish sect through the conflicts of the Middle Ages and modernity; and current views of the interrelationship. (Y)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    RELC 347 - Christianity and Science


    Christian Europe gave rise to modern science, yet Christianity and science have long appeared mutual enemies. Does science undermine religious belief? Can human life and striving really be explained in terms of physics and chemistry? In this course we explore the encounter between two powerful cultural forces and study the intellectual struggle to anchor God in the modern world. (Y)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    RELC 348 - Dynamics of Faith


    Studies a variety of contrasting contemporary accounts of the character and status of “religious faith.” (IR)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    RELC 350 - American Feminist Theology


    Contemporary theological models for American Christian feminists. The primary goal is to understand the various types of Christian feminism that exist in America today and how these theologies contribute to or challenge American feminism. (IR)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: introductory religious studies and SWAG courses recommended.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    RELC 355 - Faith and Reason


    Studies approaches to the relation between reason, faith, doubt, and certainty in selected classical writings (e.g., Aquinas, Pascal, Kant, Kierkegaard, William James). (E)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    RELC 358 - The Christian Vision in Literature


    Studies selected classics of the Christian imaginative traditions; examines ways in which the Christian vision of time, space, self, and society emerges and changes as an ordering principle in literature and art up to the beginning of the modern era. (E)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    RELC 361 - Female Saints in the Western Tradition


    This course is a study of the lives of female saints from the early Christianity through the present. The course focuses on the theological writings of female saints as well as exploring the cultural/historical importance of canonization. (Y)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: one religious studies course.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    RELC 365 - Systems of Theological Ethics


    Examines one or more contemporary systems of Christian ethics, alternating among such figures as Reinhold Niebuhr, C.S. Lewis, Jacques Ellul, and Jacques Maritain. (O)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    RELC 368 - Social Problems of American Catholicism


    Studies the history of Catholicism in America from the viewpoint of the rise of cities, urbanizing immigrant groups, and tension between ethnic groups in the cities and between Catholics and Protestants. (SI)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    RELC 369 - The Gospel and Letters of John and the Book of Revelation


    Explores the five New Testament books associated with the name of John. Emphasizes the various genres and historical settings in which the books were written, key theological themes, and recent interpretations. (IR)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    RELC 379 - Augustine of Hippo


    Examines the life and thinking of Augustine of Hippo, a major figure in Christian history and a formative influence on Christian thought to this day. (IR)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: Any RELC course or instructor permission.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    RELC 381 - Cultural Catholicism


    Exploration of Roman Catholic experience outside structure of the Holy See (for example, devotions, pilgrimages, shrines, art, fiction, cinema, television), particularly as committed Catholics argue over how to honor their spiritual tradition in day-to-day life. Study of current challenges wrought by women, Jews, and gays. Special attention paid to contemporary intellectuals and artists who criticize John Paul II while fiercely guarding their own Catholic identities. Can we reduce Catholicism to a set of rules? If instead Catholicism asserts itself as a way of living, how does this mindset take shape and from where does it take its spiritual cues? (Y)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    RELC 389 - Christianity in Africa


    Historical and topical survey of Christianity in Africa from the second century c.e. to the present. Cross listed with RELA 389. (E)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: a course in African religions or history, Christianity, or instructor permission.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    RELC 391 - Women and the Bible


    Surveys passages in the Old Testament/Hebrew Bible and the New Testament that focus specifically on women or use feminine imagery. Considers various readings of these passages, including traditional Jewish and Christian, historical-critical, and feminist interpretations. Cross-listed as RELJ 391. (Y)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: Any religious studies course or instructor permission.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    RELC 504 - The Apocalyptic Tradition


    The tradition of apocalyptic thought, as expressed in ancient Jewish and Christian literature and in selected contemporary literature. Emphasizes literary forms and features, historical and theological presuppositions, and primary themes. (SI)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    RELC 510 - Natural Law in Judaism and Christianity


    Studies the concept of natural law in Jewish and Christian theology and how these respective religious traditions dealt with a concept that claims that all morality is not the direct result of specific religious prescription. (Y)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: Courses in religious thought and/or philosophy.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    RELC 511 - Phenomenology and Christology


    A systematic exposition of the phenomenon of selfhood on the basis of traditional materials from Christology and recent investigations in phenomenology. (SI)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    RELC 512 - Development of Nineteenth and Twentieth Century Catholic Liberalism


    Analyzes and interprets major currents in liberal catholic thought in the 19th and 20th centuries, from the Thomistic revival (1878), through the condemnation of Modernism (1907), to the emergency of the “New Theology” with such theologians as Karl Rahner, Yves Congar, and Henri deLubac. (IR)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    RELC 513 - Being and God


    A constructive treatment of questions related to the possibility of the experience of being and God or the being of God. (IR)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    RELC 519 - Theology in the Nineteenth Century


    Analysis and interpretation of the theology of major thinkers in the 19th century, with special attention to Kant, Hegel, and Schleiermacher. (E)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    RELC 520 - Contemporary Theology


    A survey, analysis, and interpretation of major developments in philosophical theology in the 20th century, beginning with dialectical theology in the 1920s. (E)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    RELC 530 - Early Christianity and Classical Judaism


    Studies early Christian writings directed to Judaism; the role of Judaism in shaping the Christian intellectual tradition; the Christian interpretation of Jewish scripture. (IR)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    RELC 531 - Early Christianity and Greco-Roman Culture


    Pagan criticism of Christianity and the response of Christian apologists; and Christianity and the Greek philosophical traditions, especially Stoicism and Platonism. (IR)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    RELC 551 - Seminar in Early Christian Thought


    Intensive consideration of a selected issue, movement or figure in Christian thought of the second through fifth centuries. (E)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: RELC 205 or instructor permission.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    RELC 552 - Seminar in American Catholic History


    Examines a selected movement, issue, or figure in the history of Catholicism in America. (O)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: Instructor permission.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    RELC 564 - Seminar in Modern Christian Thought


    Examines a major modern Christian thinker or movement, or a major problem in modern Christian thought. (Y)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    RELC 567 - Early Christian Ethics


    Studies the nature of ethical responsibility as seen by several New Testament figures and documents (Jesus, Matthew, Paul, John, James). (SI)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    RELC 580 - Advanced Exegesis of the New Testament I


    Reading and interpretation of the Greek text of one of the Gospels. (SI)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: Intermediate knowledge of Hellenistic Greek.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    RELC 581 - Advanced Exegesis of the New Testament II


    Reading and interpretation of the Greek text of one or more of the Epistles. (SI)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: Intermediate knowledge of Hellenistic Greek.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    RELC 583 - Love and Justice in Christian Ethics


    Examines various conceptions of love and justice in selected Protestant and Catholic literature mainly from the last fifty years. (O)

    Credits: 3

Civil Engineering

  
  •  

    CE 201 - Civil Engineering Techniques


    This course will introduce and familiarize students with fundamental knowledge and skills necessary for civil engineering project design and development. The focus is on: engineering economics, surveying, and engineering graphics. Particular emphasis is placed on providing hands-on experience with the latest equipment and technology used in the profession. The course serves as a foundation for higher-level civil engineering design courses and as the cornerstone of the Infrastructure Management proficiency area. (Y)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: ENGR 162 and Civil Engineering major or instructor permission.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    CE 205 - Introduction to Environmental Engineering


    Focuses on society’s interaction with water, air, and soil systems. Management of these major environmental components is examined, considering health and ecological needs and technical limitations. This course may stand alone as introduction to the current environmental challenges that we face, or as the foundation for further study in the field of environmental engineering. (Y)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: College chemistry.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    CE 230 - Statics


    Basic concepts of mechanics: systems of forces and couples: equilibrium of particles and rigid bodies; analysis of structures: trusses, frames, machines; internal forces, shear and bending moment diagrams; distributed forces; friction, centroids and moments of inertia; principle of virtual work; and computer applications. Cross-listed as MAE 230. (Y)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: PHYS 142E.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    CE 231 - Strength of Materials


    Stress and strain definitions: Normal stress and strain, thermal strain, shear stress, shear strain; transformations of stress and strain; Mohr’s circle for plane stress and strain; stresses due to combined loading; axially loaded members; torsion of circular and thin-walled closed sections; deformation, strains and stresses in beams; deflections of beams; stability of columns; and energy concepts in mechanics. Cross-listed as MAE 231. (Y)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: CE 230, APMA 212.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    CE 232 - Dynamics


    Reviews kinematics and kinetics of particles and the kinematics of rigid bodies, including translation and fixed-axis rotation relative to translating axes; general planar motion; fixed point rotation; and general motion and the kinetics of rigid bodies, specifically center of mass, mass moment of inertia, product of inertia, principal-axes, parallel axis theorems, planar motion, and the work-energy method. Cross-listed as MAE 232. (Y)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: PHYS 142E and CE 230.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    CE 315 - Fluid Mechanics


    Studies the statics and dynamics of incompressible fluids, primarily water. The basic principles of fluid flow, energy equation, and momentum equation, are presented and applied to closed conduit flow, open channel flow, and problems of flow measurement pertinent to civil engineering practices. (Y)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: CE 230 or equivalent.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    CE 316 - Introduction to Geotechnical Engineering


    Introduces the fundamental principles of particulate mechanics with an emphasis on soil strength, consolidation behavior, and fluid flow. Concepts of theoretical soil mechanics and soil physics combined with laboratory investigation of soil behavior. Three lecture and three laboratory hours. (Y)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: CE 231.

    Credits: 4
  
  •  

    CE 319 - Structural Mechanics


    Fundamentals of structural mechanics: equilibrium compatibility, determinacy, stability; mathematical models of structural elements: stress resultants in bars, beams, and framed structures; calculation of deflections; general analysis of structures: concepts of stiffness and flexibility, force and displacement methods of analysis. (Y)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: CE 231.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    CE 323 - Properties and Behavior of Materials


    Studies the properties and behavior of engineering materials, emphasizing construction materials, including metals, concrete, wood, and composites. Considers service conditions and underlying scientific principles related to applications and performance of materials. (Y)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: CE 231.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    CE 326 - Design of Concrete Structures


    Introduces physical properties of concrete and reinforcing steel. Design and analysis of basic structural elements of reinforced concrete including beams, slabs, columns, and footings. Consideration of construction practices and building codes. (Y)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: CE 319.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    CE 330 - Water for the World


    This course examines complex issues associated with providing potable water to the world’s population. Topics include the use of surface and ground water as potable water supplies, the fundamentals of water chemistry, the science and engineering principles used in the design of modern water and wastewater treatment and distribution systems, and the problems associated with providing potable water in economically disadvantaged communities, refugee camps, and developing and underdeveloped countries, including shortages of resources, lack of government support, inadequate institutional structures, and lack of local interest/acceptance. (SI)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisites:  CHEM 151 or equivalent, APMA 213 or equivalent, and CE 315.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    CE 336 - Water Resources Engineering


    Principles of fluid mechanics and hydrology, including open channel and groundwater flow, rainfall, evaporation, and surface runoff applied to water resources development and management. Applications include water supply, drainage, flood control, and water control, emphasizing computer simulation tools. (Y)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: CE 315.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    CE 341 - Civil Engineering Systems Analysis


    Introduces the tools of operations research and engineering economy as applied to civil engineering problems; problem formulation, linear programming, economic analysis, and decision analysis; optimization, minimum cost and utility methods; and application to structural optimization, traffic flow, resource allocation and environmental design. (IR)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    CE 344 - Transportation Facilities Design


    Analyzes of the characteristics of the driver, pedestrian, vehicle, and road; highway surveys and locations; geometric design, horizontal and vertical alignment of highway cross sections, highway drainage and drainage structures; and highway pavement design. (Y)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: CE 201 and Third-year standing in Civil Engineering or instructor permission.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    CE 363 - Materials Laboratory


    Laboratory study of the macroscopic mechanical, thermal, and time-dependent properties and behaviors of typical civil engineering construction materials (metals, concrete, wood, plastics). Students plan and conduct experiments, and prepare written reports. (Y)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Corequisite: CE 323.

    Credits: 1
  
  •  

    CE 365 - Fluid Mechanics Laboratory


    Laboratory study of the flow of fluids. Uses laboratory data to quantify hydrostatic forces, flow rates in pipes and open channels, forces due to impact, and flow regimes in open channels. Student conduct experiments and prepare written reports. (Y)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Corequisite: CE 315.

    Credits: 1
  
  •  

    CE 401 - Design of Metal Structures I


    Introduction to the design of metal structures, emphasizing the rational development of  design methods for structural members, subsystems and systems. The  objective is to develop a sound behavioral basis for interpreting design codes, using mechanics and experimental bases.  Topics include the behavior and design of tension, compression, and flexural members in metal, and the behavior and design of bolted and welded connections, using the AISC Load and Resistance Factor Design (LRFD) specification. (Y)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: CE 231, 319, or instructor permission.

    Credits: 3
  
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    CE 402 - Design of Metal Structures II


    Analyzes the behavior and design of continuous beams, plate girders, composite steel-concrete members, members subjected to combined bending and compressions, and eccentric connections usine LRFD design approach; and torsion and torsional stability of structural members. (Y)       

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: CE 401.

    Credits: 3
  
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    CE 403 - Advanced Reinforced Concrete Design


    Design of building and bridge components, including floor systems, rigid frames, retaining walls, and tanks. Introduction to pre-stressed concrete. (O)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: CE 326.

    Credits: 3
  
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    CE 404 - Concrete Technology


    Topics include the fundamentals of concrete: ingredients, hydration, and proportioning; production of concrete: batching, transport, finishing, curing, testing, and inspections; special types of concrete: high-performance, fiber-reinforced, roller compacted, polymer, shrinkage compensating, structural light-weight, and shotcrete; and design and code provisions: working stress and ultimate strength design, and provisions of ACI code. (SI)           

    Credits: 3
 

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