Jun 27, 2022  
Undergraduate Record 2007-2008 
    
Undergraduate Record 2007-2008 [ARCHIVED RECORD]

Course Descriptions


 

Anthropology

  
  •  

    ANTH 281 - Human Origins


    Studies the physical and cultural evolution of humans from the initial appearance of hominids to the development of animal and plant domestication in different areas of the world. Topics include the development of biological capabilities such as bipedal walking and speech, the evolution of characteristics of human cultural systems such as economic organization and technology, and explanations for the development of domestication. (Y)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ANTH 282 - Rise of Civilization


    Surveys patterns in the development of prehistoric civilizations in different areas of the world including the Inca of Peru, the Maya, the Aztec of Mexico, and the ancient Middle East. (Y)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ANTH 285 - American Material Culture


    Analysis of patterns of change in American material culture from the seventeenth through the nineteenth centuries. Consideration of how these changes reflect shifts in perception, cognition, and worldview. (Y)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ANTH 289 - Unearthing the Past


    The study of past cultures through their material remains. Students gain an understanding of how archaeologists study ancient civilizations as well as the everyday lives of people who lived in these societies. Archaeological methods are reviewed to demystify the process of reconstructing the past. The course also covers some of the major developments in prehistory such as the origins of modern humans, the rise of the first villages and cities, and the emergence of ancient civilizations in North America. (J)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ANTH 290 - The Cultural Politics of American Family Values


    This course provides a broad, introductory survey of the range of cultural understandings, economic structures, and political and legal constraints that shape both dominant and alternative forms of kinship and family in the United States. (Y)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ANTH 301 - Theory and History of Anthropology


    Overview of the major theoretical positions which have structured anthropological thought over the past century. (S)

    Credits: 4
  
  •  

    ANTH 305 - Travel Accounts of Africa


    Analysis of how travel accounts of Africa during the 18-19th centuries influence anthropological practices and contemporary representations of the Continent. (Y)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: ANTH 101 or instructor permission.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ANTH 317 - Visual Anthropology


    The study of visual means of representation in Anthropology. (Y)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ANTH 318 - Social Histories of Commodities: Linkages between Africa and the Americas


    Following the social history of three of the major world commodities the course situates the current discourse on globalization within a socio-historical and cultural context. It offers a comparative analysis of the cultural dynamics associated with the production, exchange and consumption of sugar, coffee and tobacco as they have unfolded in different times and places. (Y)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: ANTH 101 or instructor permission.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ANTH 320 - Marriage, Gender, Political Economy


    Cross-cultural comparison of marriage and domestic groups, analyzed as a point of intersection between cultural conceptions of gender and a larger political economy. (Y)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ANTH 321 - Kinship and Social Organization


    Cross-cultural analysis and comparison of systems of kinship and marriage from Australian aborigines to the citizens of Yankee city. Covers classic and contemporary theoretical and methodological approaches. (IR)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: ANTH 101 or instructor permission.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ANTH 322 - Introduction to Economic Anthropology


    Comparative analysis of different forms of production, circulation, and consumption in primitive and modern societies. Exploration of the applicability of modern economic theory developed for modern societies to primitive societies and to those societies being forced into the modern world system. (IR)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ANTH 323 - Introduction to Legal Anthropology


    Comparative survey of the philosophy and practice of law in various societies. Includes a critical analysis of principles of contemporary jurisprudence and their application. (IR)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: ANTH 101 or instructor permission.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ANTH 324 - Plantations in Africa and the Americas


    Comparative analysis of plantation culture, economy and polity in Africa, the US, and the Caribbean. (Y)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: ANTH 101 or instructor permission.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ANTH 325 - Anthropological Perspectives on the Third World


    (Y)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ANTH 326 - Globalization and Development


    Explores how globalization and development affect the lives of people in different parts of the world. Topics include poverty, inequality, and the role of governments and international agencies. (Y)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: one course in Anthropology or instructor permission.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ANTH 327 - Political Anthropology


    Reviews the variety of political systems found outside the Western world. Examines the major approaches and results of anthropological theory in trying to understand how radically different politics work. (Y)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: ANTH 101 or instructor permission.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ANTH 329 - Marriage, Fertility, and Mortality


    Explores the ways that culturally formed systems of values and family organization affect population processes in a variety of cultures. (Y)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ANTH 330 - Tournaments and Athletes


    A cross-cultural study of sport and competitive games. (Y)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: ANTH 101 or instructor permission.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ANTH 332 - Shamanism, Healing, and Ritual


    Examines the characteristics of these nonmedical practices as they occur in different culture areas, relating them to the consciousness of spirits and powers and to concepts of energy. (Y)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: At least a 200-level ANTH course, or instructor permission.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ANTH 333 - Ethnopoetics


    An exploration of the form and meaning of traditional art, poetry, and song in various ethnographic contexts. (IR)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: ANTH 101 or instructor permission.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ANTH 334 - Ecology and Society: An Introduction to the New Ecological Anthropology


    Forges a synthesis between culture theory and historical ecology to provide new insights on how human cultures fashion, and are fashioned by, their environment. (Y)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: ANTH 101 or significant/relevant exposure to courses in EVSC, BIOL, CHEM, or HIST (which tie in to concerns of this course), or instructor permission.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ANTH 335 - The Museum in Modern Culture


    Topics include the politics of cultural representation in history, anthropology, and fine arts museums; and the museum as a bureaucratic organization, as an educational institution, and as a nonprofit corporation. (Y)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ANTH 336 - Life History and Oral History


    Introduces oral history methodology and life history as a sociocultural document. Readings focus on various uses that have been made of oral history and of life histories. Students conduct interviews and write a life history. (O)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ANTH 337 - Power and the Body


    Studying the cultural representations and interpretations of the body in society. (Y)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: ANTH 101 or permission of the instructor.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ANTH 340 - Structure of English


    Introduces students to the descriptive grammar of English and methods of reasoning about linguistic structure.  Covers units of sound and phonemic transcriptions, word building and inflectional forms, lexical categories, basic sentence types, common phrase and clause patterns, and syntactic transformations. (IR)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ANTH 341 - Sociolinguistics


    Reviews and findings of sociolinguists and others concerning the way language is used to express identity and relations of social superiority and inferiority. (Y)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: ANTH 101 or instructor permission.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ANTH 345 - Native American Languages


    Introduces the native languages of North America and the methods that linguists and anthropologists use to record and analyze them. Examines the use of grammars, texts and dictionaries of individual languages and affords insight into the diversity among the languages. (Y)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ANTH 347 - Language and Culture in the Middle East


    Introduction to peoples, languages, cultures and histories of the Middle East. Focuses on Israel/Palestine as a microcosm of important social processes-such as colonialism, nationalism, religious fundamentalism, and modernization-that affect the region as a whole. This course is cross-listed with AMEL 347. (Y)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: Previous course in anthropology, linguistics, Middle East Studies or permission of instructor.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ANTH 348 - Language and Prehistory


    This course covers the basic principles of diachronic linguistics and discusses the uses of linguistic data in the reconstruction of prehistory. (E)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ANTH 349 - Language and Thought


    (IR)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ANTH 350 - Readings in Ethnography


    Studies ethnographies, assessing the resources and devices of ethnographic writing through close readings of six or more examples. The ethnographies, for the most part, are concerned with non-Western cultures. (Y)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ANTH 352 - Amazonian Peoples


    Analyzes ethnographies on the cultures and the societies of the South American rain forest peoples, and evaluates the scholarly ways in which anthropology has produced, engaged, interpreted, and presented its knowledge of the “Amerindian.” (IR)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ANTH 353 - Anthropology of Eastern Europe


    This course explores Eastern European societies through an examination of the practices of everyday social life. Topics include the changing cultural meanings of work and consumption, the nature of property rights and relations, family and gender, ethnicity and nationalism, religion and ritual. (Y)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: one course in anthropology or permission of the instructor.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ANTH 354 - Indians of the American Southwest


    Ethnographic coverage of the Apaches, Pueblos, Pimans, and Shoshoneans of Arizona, New Mexico, Nevada, Utah, and Northwestern Mexico. Topics include prehistory, socio-cultural patterns, and historical development. (O)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ANTH 355 - Anthropology of Everyday American Life


    Provides an anthropological perspective of modern American society. Traces the development of individualism through American historical and institutional development, using as primary sources of data religious movements, mythology as conveyed in historical writings, novels, and the cinema, and the creation of modern American urban life. (Y)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: ANTH 101 or instructor permission.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ANTH 357 - Peoples, Cultures, and Societies of the Caribbean


    Explores the histories and politics that have shaped the nations and dependencies that are geographically and politically defined as Caribbean, including French, English, and Spanish. Takes a regional and a national perspective on the patterns of family and kinship; community and household structures; political economy, ethnicity and ethnic relations; religious and social institutions; and relations between Caribbeans abroad and at home. (Y)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: ANTH 101 or instructor permission.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ANTH 358 - Native American Mythology


    Focuses on the myths of Native Americans north of Mexico and their roles in Native American cultures. Students research and write a paper on the place of mythology in a particular culture, or on the forms and uses of a particular type of myth. (IR)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ANTH 360 - Sex, Gender, and Culture


    Examines the manner in which ideas about sexuality and gender are constructed differently cross-culturally and how these ideas give shape to other social phenomena, relationships, and practices. (E)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ANTH 362 - Cinema in India


    An explanation of film culture in India. (IR)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: 200-level ANTH course or instructor permission.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ANTH 363 - Social Structure of China


    Analyzes various features of traditional Chinese social organization as it existed in the late imperial period. Includes the late imperial state; Chinese family and marriage; lineages; ancestor worship; popular religion; village social structure; regional systems; and rebellion. (E)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: ANTH 101 or instructor permission.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ANTH 364 - Ethnology of Southeast Asia


    Explores the ethnology and social anthropology of major cultures and societies of mainland (and insular Southeast Asia from prehistoric beginnings to contemporary national adaptations. (Mainland: Burma, Thailand, Cambodia, Laos, Vietnam, Malaysia; Insular: Singapore, Indonesia, Philippines, and portions of other nations abutting the area.) (E)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: ANTH 101 or instructor permission.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ANTH 365 - Asian American Ethnicity


    Problems in ethnicity are posed through study of the experiences of the Chinese, Japanese, Filipinos, Koreans, and Vietnamese in the United States. Topics include the history of immigration, early communities in the U.S., race relations, recent changes in immigration and communities, family values, and questions of identity. (Y)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ANTH 366 - China: Empire and Nationalities


    Explores the distant and recent history of Han and non-Han nationalities in the Chinese empire and nation-state. Examines the reaction of minority nationalities to Chinese predominance and the bases of Chinese rule and cultural hegemony. (Y)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: ANTH 101 or equivalent, a course in Chinese history, or instructor permission.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ANTH 369 - Sex, Gender, and Culture


    (Y)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ANTH 370 - Contemporary India


    A study of selected interrelated major cultural, religious and political changes for comprehending India after independence. The course will focus on major urban centers for explicating changing family, marriage and caste relationships; middle class Indians; status of women and Dalits; and rising religious/ethnic violence, including Hindu religious politics and religious nationalism. (E)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: One course in Anthropology or permission of instructor.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ANTH 371 - Cities in History


    An introduction to the history of cities around the world, from the beginnings of cities to the present, locating urban forms in their social, cultural, political and symbolic contexts, with each class meeting examining a single city in depth. Cross-listed with AR H 371. (Y)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ANTH 379 - Gender, Science and Culture


    (Y)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ANTH 381 - Field Methods in Archaeology


    Provides a comprehensive training in archaeological field techniques through participation in research projects currently in progress under the direction of the archaeology faculty. The emphasis is on learning, in an actual field situation, how the collection of archaeological data is carried out in both survey and excavation. Students become familiar with field recording systems, excavation techniques, survey methods, sampling theory in archaeology, and artifact processing and analysis. (Field methods courses outside anthropology or offered at other universities may be substituted for ANTH 381 with the prior approval of the student’s advisor.) Supporting Courses. The following list includes additional courses which have been approved for the major program. Other courses can be added, depending on the student’s area of concentration, with the approval of an advisor. (SS)

    Credits: 3 to 6
  
  •  

    ANTH 382 - Field Methods in Historical Archaeology


    Introduces the basic field methods used in conducting archaeological investigations of historic sites. Surveying, excavation, mapping, and recording are all treated. (Y)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ANTH 383 - North American Archaeology


    Surveys the prehistoric occupations of several areas of North America emphasizing the eastern United States, the Plains, California, and the Southwest. Topics include the date of human migration into the New World, the economy and organization of early Paleo-Indian populations, and the evolution of organization and exchange systems. (Y)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ANTH 384 - Archaeology of the Middle East


    This course is an introduction to the prehistory/early history of the Middle East (Egypt, Mesopotamia, the Levant and southeast Anatolia) from 10,000 to 4,000 BP. (IR)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ANTH 387 - Archaeology of Virginia


    Reviews the current state of archaeological and ethnohistoric research in Virginia. Emphasizes the history and culture of Native Americans in Virginia from the earliest paleoindian cultures to the period of European colonization. (IR)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ANTH 388 - African Archaeology


    Surveys transformations in Africa from four million years ago to the present, known chiefly through archaeology, and focusing on Stone and Iron Age societies in the last 150,000 years. (Y)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: ANTH 280 or instructor permission.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ANTH 389 - Archaeology of the American Southwestern


    The northern section of the American Southwest offers one of the best contexts for examining the evolution of local and regional organization from the prehistoric to the historic period. Readings and discussion focus on both archaeological and ethnographic studies of the desert (Hohokam), mountain (Mogollon), and plateau (Anasazi/Pueblo) cultures. (Y)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ANTH 392 - Global Relations: Marriage and Family in the New World Order


    This course focuses on the shifting nature of kinship relations in the context of the global economic restructuring, increased labor migration, and the political, religious, racial, and gender hierarchies that are characteristic of the emerging global political economy. (Y)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: One course in Anthropology.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ANTH 401 - Senior Seminar in Anthropology


    Integrates the major subdivisions of anthropology, emphasizing selected theoretical topics and primary sources. Primarily for majors in their final year. (S)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ANTH 461 - People, Culture and Environment of Southern Africa


    This course focuses on anthropogenic impacts on the environment and environmental contributions to the development of peoples and cultures in South Africa and Mozambique, with emphasis on the links between history, culture, power, and the environment. This course is offered concurrently with EVSC 461. Students must be enrolled in both. (SS)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite:  Permission of instructor

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ANTH 493 - Kinship and the New Reproductive Technologies


    The course explores the manner in which cultural understandings of kinship relations both give shape to and are transformed by the new reproductive technologies-including surrogacy, in vitro fertilization, pre-implantation diagnosis, cloning and amniocentesis. (Y)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: ANTH 290 or permission of instructor.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ANTH 496 - Independent Study in Anthropology


    Independent study conducted by the student under the supervision of an instructor of his or her choice. (SI)

    Credits: To be arranged
  
  •  

    ANTH 497 - Distinguished Majors Thesis Research


    Independent research, under the supervision of the faculty DMP thesis readers, toward the DMP thesis. (Y)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: Admission to the Distinguished Majors Program in Anthropology.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ANTH 498 - Distinguished Majors Thesis Writing


    Writing of a thesis of approximately 50 pages, under the supervision of the faculty DMP thesis readers. (Y)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: ANTH 497.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ANTH 504 - Linguistic Field Methods


    Investigates the grammatical structure of non-European language on the basis of data collected in class from a native speaker. A different language is the focus of study each year. (Y)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ANTH 507 - History of Archaeological Thought


    Considers how archaeological thinking reflects and is related to more general ethnological theory. (Y)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ANTH 508 - Method and Theory in Archaeology


    Intensive investigation of current research in the principles, methods, findings, and analysis of anthropological archaeology. (Y)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ANTH 509 - Historical Ethnography


    Combines lectures on historical ethnography and archaeology with documentary research in primary sources on specific topics. (Y)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: At least one 300-level archaeology course or instructor permission.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ANTH 518 - Labor, Capital, and States in Contemporary Africa


    This course examines the interface between Africa and the world by focusing on the relationship between international capital, different systems of governance, and laboring people through a close reading of ethnographic case studies. (SI)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ANTH 519 - Science and Culture


    This course explores the cultural context of science and science as a cultural production. It investigates the cultural history of science as well as its national and transnational manifestations; the relation between scientific authority and social hierarchy; and the relation between cultural and scientific categories and practices. (Y)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: Previous anthropological course work or consent of instructor.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ANTH 520 - History of Kinship Studies


    Critical assessment of major theoretical approaches to the study of kinship and marriage (from the 19th century to the present), and of the central role of kinship studies in the development of anthropological theory. (O)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ANTH 521 - Reconfiguring Kinship Studies


    Examines the ways in which the forms of kinship have been reconfigured in contemporary societies, and the ways in which traditional kinship studies have been reconfigured by their intersection with culture theory, feminist theory, gender studies, postmodern theory, gay and lesbian studies, and cultural studies of science and medicine. (E)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: ANTH 520 or instructor permission.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ANTH 522 - Economic Anthropology


    Considers Western economic theories and their relevance to non-Western societies. Includes a comparative analysis of different forms of production, consumption, and circulation. (E)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ANTH 523 - Political Systems


    (IR)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ANTH 524 - Religious Organization


    Analysis and comparison of social organization in selected communities from the perspective of systems of belief, ritual, and ceremonialism. (IR)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ANTH 525 - The Experience of Illness in American Society


    Starting with the basic premise that the experience of illness/disease is at once a biological and cultural condition, the course focuses on narratives of the sick as a lens into the interrelationships between the body and society, medicine and culture. While the point of entry is the individual experience of illness and self in one Western society, the course intends to build a theoretical framework with which we can begin to conceptualize cultural institutional responses to and definitions of disease and ill-health. (Y)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ANTH 526 - History Production and Collective Memory


    This course is an examination of the meanings and relationships between the past and present, memory, and history writing in anthropological practices and debates. (SI)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ANTH 528 - Topics in Race Theory


    This course examines theories and practices of race and otherness, in order to analyze and interpret constructions, deconstructions and reconstructions of race from the late 18th to the 21st centuries. The focus varies from year to year, and may include “race, ‘progress’ and the West,” “gender, race and power,” and “white supremacy.” The consistent theme is that race is neither a biological nor a cultural category, but a method and theory of social organization, an alibi for inequality, and a strategy for resistance. Cross listed as AAS 528. (Y)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: ANTH 101, 301, or other introductory or middle-level social science or humanities course

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ANTH 529 - Topics in Social Anthropology


    Seminars and classes in topics of specific interest to faculty and advanced students will be announced prior to each semester. (Y)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ANTH 530 - Foundations of Symbolism


    Interdisciplinary course on selected topics in the study of symbolism. Emphasizes symbolic anthropology. (Y)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ANTH 531 - Feminist Theory in Anthropology


    Critical overview of the historical development of the issues central to feminist theory in anthropology and their relation both to specific ethnographic problems, and to other theoretical perspectives within and outside anthropology. (E)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ANTH 533 - Folklore and Ethnohistorical Research Methodology


    Introduction to folklore, and to folklore and ethnohistorical research methods and analysis. (E)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: Graduate student standing or permission of the instructor.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ANTH 534 - Ethnographies of Illness and the Body


    It is often at moments of intense ruptures in the normalcy of the body’s functioning that individuals/societies reflect on the taken-for-granted assumptions about self, family, community, social and political institutions, the relation between normal and pathological, the roles of healers and patients, life, and death. Writing about illness and the body is a form of therapeutic action. Examines such claims and writings done by those facing bodily distress. (E)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: For undergraduates: ANTH 224 and 360, SOC 428; instructor permission for graduate students.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ANTH 535 - Folk and Popular Health Systems


    Surveys various medical beliefs and practices, considering the traditional health systems of several American groups, and examining in detail the input into local traditional health systems from various sources. (E)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ANTH 536 - Topics in Folklore


    Seminars and classes in topics of specific interest to faculty and advanced students will be announced prior to each semester. (O)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ANTH 539 - Topics in Symbolic Anthropology


    Topics of specific interest to faculty and advanced students are announced prior to each semester. (SI)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ANTH 540 - Linguistic Anthropology


    (Y)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ANTH 541 - Phonology


    An introduction to the theory and analysis of linguistic sound systems.  Covers the essential units of speech sound that lexical and grammatical elements are composed of, how those units are organized at multiple levels of representation, and the principles governing the relation between levels.  (IR)   

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ANTH 542 - Theories of Language


    Survey of modern schools of linguistics, both American and European, discussing each approach in terms of historical and intellectual context, analytical goals, assumptions about the nature of language, and relation between theory and methodology. (IR)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ANTH 543 - African Language Structures


    Introduces the major phonological and grammatical features of the languages of sub-Saharan Africa, with attention to issues in language classification, the use of linguistic evidence for prehistoric reconstruction, and sociolinguistic issues of relevance to Africa. (IR)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: One course in linguistics, or instructor permission.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ANTH 544 - Morphology


    An overview of morphological theory within the generative paradigm. Covers notions of the morpheme, theories of the phonology-syntax interface (e.g., lexical phonology, prosodic morphology, optimality theory), and approaches to issues arising at the morphology-syntax interface (e.g., inflection, agreement, incorporation, compounding). (IR)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ANTH 545 - African Languages and Folklore


    Analyzes the expressive use of language in Africa with emphasis on such traditional genres as folktales, epics, proverbs, riddles, etc. (IR)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ANTH 547 - Language and Identity


    Explores the view that language is central in the construction, negotiation, and expression of social identities by juxtaposing and critically appraising social, theoretic, and linguistic treatments of identity. (E)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: At least one other 200-level linguistics course, 300-level cultural anthropology course, or instructor permission.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ANTH 549 - Topics in Theoretical Linguistics and Linguistic Anthropology


    Seminars in topics of specific interest to faculty and advanced students will be announced prior to each semester. (IR)

    Credits: To be arranged
  
  •  

    ANTH 551 - Topics in Ethnology of North America


    Seminars on topics announced prior to each semester. (IR)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ANTH 552 - Topics in Ethnology of Latin America


    Seminars on topics announced prior to each semester. (IR)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ANTH 553 - Topics in Ethnology of Europe


    Seminars in topics announced prior to each semester. (IR)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ANTH 554 - Topics in Ethnology of Africa


    Seminars on topics announced prior to each semester. (IR)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ANTH 555 - Topics in Ethnology of the Middle East


    Seminars on topics announced prior to each semester. (IR)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ANTH 556 - Topics in Ethnology of South Asia


    Seminars on topics announced prior to each semester. (IR)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ANTH 557 - Topics in Ethnology of East Asia


    Seminars on topics announced prior to each semester. (IR)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ANTH 558 - Topics in Ethnology of Southeast Asia


    Seminars on topics announced prior to each semester. (IR)

    Credits: 3
 

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