Jun 27, 2022  
Undergraduate Record 2007-2008 
    
Undergraduate Record 2007-2008 [ARCHIVED RECORD]

Course Descriptions


 

American Literature to 1900

  
  •  

    ENAM 385 - Folklore in America


    Surveys the traditional expressive culture of various ethnic and religious groups in America, including songs, folk narratives, folk religion, proverbs, riddles. Emphasizes southeastern Anglo-Americans. (IR)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ENAM 387 - Literature of the West


    Analyzes selected works by writers of the Western United States from the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Emphasizes the Anglo-American exploration, settlement, and development of the West, as well as readings from other ethnic groups, including Native and Hispanic Americans. (IR)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ENAM 388 - The Literature of the South


    Analyzes selected works of poetry and prose by major Southern writers. (IR)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ENAM 389 - Mass Media and American Culture


    Studies the development and impact of mass forms of communication in America including newspapers, magazines, film, the wireless and the radio, television, and the Internet. (IR)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ENAM 481 - Advanced Studies in American Literature I


    Limited enrollment. Topics vary from year to year. (IR)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ENAM 481B - Afro-American Women Authors


    (Y)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ENAM 482 - Advanced Studies in American Literature II


    Limited enrollment. Topics vary from year to year. (IR)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ENAM 484 - Black Women Writers


    (Y)

    Credits: 3

American Politics

  
  •  

    PLAP 101 - Introduction to American Politics


    Surveys the fundamentals of American government and politics, systematically covering the major institutions of our system (the presidency, the Congress, the courts) as well as the system’s essential processes. (S)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    PLAP 227 - Public Opinion and Political Behavior


    Study of the nature of public opinion and its relationship to politics and public policy. (Y)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    PLAP 230 - Politics, Science and Values: An Introduction to Environmental Policy


    Introduces a wide variety of domestic and international environmental policy issues.  Explores how political processes, scientific evidence, ideas, and values affect environmental policymaking.  (Y)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Cross listed as EVSC 230 and ETP 230.

  
  •  

    PLAP 266 - Ideas, Institutions, and Public Policy


    Examines and critically assesses the ideas, institutions, and public policies that constitute the foundation and have influenced the development of liberal democracy in the United States. (Y)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    PLAP 314 - Mass Media and American Politics


    Examines the role of mass media in the political process including such topics as print and broadcast news, media and election campaigns, political advertising, and media effects on public opinion and political participation. (Y)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    PLAP 315 - Political Psychology of Citizen Politics


    Examines the role of individual and collective psychology in political processes and behavior, with a particular emphasis on citizen psychology, including political information processing and reasoning, stereotyping and prejudice, and group identity, conflict and violence. (Y)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    PLAP 319 - Judicial Process and Policy-Making


    Survey of empirical and, to a lesser extent, normative questions concerning actors and institutions in American judicial politics. Topics include the selection of judges, judicial decision making, the legal profession, the impact of court decisions, and the role of judges in a democracy. (Y)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: PLAP 101 or permission of instructor.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    PLAP 321 - Political Parties and Group Politics


    Introduces the roles of parties, interest groups, public opinion, and elections in democratic government. (Y)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    PLAP 322 - President and Congress


    Studies the political bases, structures, and functions of Congress and the institutionalized presidency, and their interaction in political leadership and policy making. (Y)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    PLAP 324 - Political Communication


    Examines the process of communicating politics from multiple angles, including the rhetoric of political leaders, campaign communications, political discussion with friends and acquaintances, political representation in the mass media, and growing forms of alternative personal media.  (Y)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    PLAP 331 - American Presidency


    Examines the power, purposes, and problematics of the presidency as a role of national leadership in the American and political constitutional system. While the emphasis is on the modern presidency (1933-present), attention is given to its historical development. (IR)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: Two courses in PLAP, or instructor permission.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    PLAP 335 - American Congress


    Focuses on the contemporary organization and workings of the United States Congress. Emphasizes elections, the committee system, political parties, staff, and the law-making process, as well as the role of Congress in the national policy making system. (Y)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: Two courses in PLAP or instructor permission.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    PLAP 338 - Politics of the Policy Process


    Study of the politics of American national policymaking. Course examines the dynamics of agenda-setting and policy implementation; the policymaking role of elected officials, interest groups, and the media; and the substance of current policy debates in areas including welfare and education. (Y)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: One course in PLAP or instructor permission.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    PLAP 341 - State and Local Politics


    Investigates the political dynamics of subnational political institutions, parties, and elections. Includes state parties and elections, intergovernmental relations and institutional powers, representation and democracy in federal systems, and subnational policy processes. (Y)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: One course in PLAP or instructor permission.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    PLAP 344 - Urban Government and Politics


    (Y)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    PLAP 355 - Gender Politics


    Examines the legal and political status of women, and the politics of changes in that status. How are gender identities forged, and how do they affect law, public policy, political rhetoric, and political movement? Explores, more generally, the clash between “difference” and “equality” in democratic societies, using gender as a case-study. (Y)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: Two social science courses or instructor permission.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    PLAP 361 - Introduction to Public Administration


    Studies the role of public administration in contemporary government, emphasizing administrative structure, control, and relations with other branches of government. (S)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: PLAP 101, PLCP 101, or instructor permission.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    PLAP 370 - Racial Politics


    Examines how attributions of racial difference have shaped American Politics. Topics include how race affects American political partisanship, campaigns and elections, public policy, public opinion, and American political science. (Y)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: One course in PLAP or instructor permission.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    PLAP 381 - Constitutional Interpretation: Separation of Powers and Federalism


    Studies the legislative, executive, and judicial branches and the functional and territorial distribution of powers as reflected by Supreme Court decisions. Includes the nature of the judicial process. (No CR/NC enrollees.) (Y)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    PLAP 382 - Constitutional Limitations: Civil Liberties and Civil Rights


    Studies judicial construction and interpretation of civil rights and liberties reflected by Supreme Court decisions. Includes line-drawing between rights and obligations. (No CR/NC enrollees.) (Y)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    PLAP 412 - Electoral Behavior and Political Participation


    Surveys current theories and research on electoral behavior, including political participation, partisanship, voting behavior, and the impact of electoral institutions. (IR)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: PLAP 227.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    PLAP 413 - Citizen Competence in American Democracy


    Considers what democracy asks of citizens, the extent to which citizens achieve various normative ideals, and the role that key mediating institutions play in promoting or inhibiting citizen competence. (Y)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: One course in PLAP or permission of instructor.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    PLAP 415 - Political Psychology


    A seminar introducing students to the study of political psychology. Topics include authoritarianism, tolerance, altruism, ethnocentrism, the role of affect and cognition in political choice, the role of racial stereotyping in political campaigns, and psychological challenges to rational choice models of political decision-making. (Y)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: One course in PLAP or instructor permission.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    PLAP 424 - Seminar: Topics in American Politics


    Investigates a selected issue in American government or American political development. (S)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: One course in PLAP or instructor permission.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    PLAP 430 - Political Analysis


    Seminar examining basic issues in the design, execution, analysis, and interpretation of political research. Familiarizes students with practical tools, such as quantitative analysis and computing skills, which enable them to carry out an original research project. (Y)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: One course in PLAP or instructor permission.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    PLAP 434 - American Political Leadership


    Studies the theory and practice of political leadership at the national level with comparisons to state, local, and foreign government. Includes leadership in different institutional and policy settings, techniques of leadership, types of leaders, bargaining among leaders, experience of specific leaders, and conditions and opportunities of leadership. (IR)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: PLAP 101 or instructor permission.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    PLAP 436 - Campaigns and Elections


    Reviews and analyzes the techniques and technologies of modern American election campaigns. Enrollment is limited. (Y)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: Instructor permission.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    PLAP 438 - The Politics of the Policy Process


    Analyzes cross-institutional and inter-level (federal/state/local) public policy processes. Emphasizes how domestic policy issues are defined and treated by executive and legislative units, as well as interest group involvement. (Y)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: PLAP 101 or instructor permission.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    PLAP 450 - Voting Rights and Representation


    Studies empirical and normative issues of representative government, with special attention to what is meant by representation, what constitutes fair representation, and what institutions can best promote fair representation. (Y)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: Two courses in Politics or permission of instructor.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    PLAP 460 - Democracy in America


    Democracy in America

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    PLAP 471 - Values, Resources, and Public Policy


    Examines the political, economic, and ethical content of enduring domestic policy issues. (Y)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: Any course in PLA, economics, or philosophy, or instructor permission.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    PLAP 480 - Politics of the Environment


    Examines environmental issues that originate in, and that affect, the United States, including most forms of pollution and natural resource depletion.  Focuses on how political processes, economic factors, and social/cultural constructs affect environmental policymaking. Cross listed with ETP 480.  (Y)   

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite:  Course in ETP, Environmental Sciences or Politics.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    PLAP 481 - Class, Race and the Environment


    Focuses on the intersections among class, race and the environment. The course goals are to achieve an understanding of central environmental policy issues, to consider what ‘class’ and ‘race’ mean, and to examine the distribution of environmental hazards across people of different classes and races. (Cross listed with ETP 481)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: Course in ETP, Environmental Sciences, or Politics

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    PLAP 483 - First Amendment


    Examines the constitutional law of the first amendment from the founding of the United States to the present. Considers and analyzes Supreme Court decisions and scholarly works. (Y)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: PLAP 382 or fourth-year government major.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    PLAP 484 - Race and Constitution


    Examines the constitutional law of racial discrimination in the United States from the founding to the present. Considers Supreme Court decisions and congressional civil rights acts. (No CR/NC enrollees.) (S)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: PLAP 381 or 382, or instructor permission.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    PLAP 498 - Senior Thesis


    Supervised work on a thesis in American politics for especially motivated students. (S)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: Three courses in PLAP and instructor permission.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    PLAP 514 - Sex Differences: Biology, Culture, Politics and Policy


    An exploration of sex and gender differences—in traits such as sexuality, cognition, nurturance, and aggression—with a consideration of their causes, significance, and political/policy implications. (Y)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: Instructor permission.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    PLAP 516 - Advanced Topics in Political Communication


    Advanced Topics in Political Communication

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    PLAP 530 - Politics of Mental Health


    A seminar examining the relationships between politics, policy and psychological well-being. Topics include institutionalization, deinstitutionalization, civil rights, mandated treatment, the role of government in service delivery and insurance coverage, social determinants of health, public opinion about mental health and illness. (IR)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: One course in PLAP or instructor permission.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    PLAP 545 - Virginia Government and Politics


    Analyzes Virginia government at the state, county, municipal, and special district levels. Considers legislative, executive, judicial organization, intergovernmental relations, and structural and political arrangements in the existing and emerging metropolitan areas. Limited enrollment. (Y)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: Instructor permission.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    PLAP 546 - Politics of Budgetary Process


    Explores the philosophy and processes of fiscal management and control, including budget preparation, legislative consideration and authorization, budget execution, debt management, and audit. Examines problems and proposals such as zero based budgeting, sunset legislation, program evaluation, policy analysis, and intergovernmental financial relationships. (IR)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    PLAP 565 - Economics, Values, and Public Policy


    Introduces economic concepts of special relevance to administrative and political decision making. Some attention is also given to critics of economic perspectives on public policy. (Y)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    PLAP 570 - Racial Politics


    Racial Politics

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    PLAP 585 - Seminar on Constitutional Law and Theory


    An examination of classic and contemporary theories, partial theories, and perspectives on constitutional interpretation. (Y)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    PLAP 592 - Judicial Policymaking


    Examines the structure and process of judicial policymaking, focusing on agenda-setting, deciding cases and opinion writing, implementation, compliance, and impact. Particular attention is given to the United States Supreme Court and its relationship to lower federal and state courts and the political environment. (Y)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: Nine credits in PLAP and instructor permission.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    PLAP 595 - Selected Problems in American Politics


    Independent study under faculty supervision, for students who are preparing for intensive research on a specific topic. (S)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: Instructor permission.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    PLAP 770 - Racial Politics


    Racial Politics

    Credits: 3

American Sign Language

  
  •  

    ASL 101 - Elementary American Sign Language


    Introduces receptive and expressive American Sign Language skills, including basic vocabulary, sentence structure, classifiers, use of space, non-manual type indicators, and fingerspelling. Examines signing deaf people as a linguistic/cultural minority. (Y)

    Credits: 4
  
  •  

    ASL 102 - Elementary American Sign Language


    Introduces receptive and expressive American Sign Language skills, including basic vocabulary, sentence structure, classifiers, use of space, non-manual type indicators, and fingerspelling. Examines signing deaf people as a linguistic/cultural minority. (Y)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: ASL 101 or successful completion of placement exam.

    Credits: 4
  
  •  

    ASL 201 - Intermediate American Sign Language


    Continues training in American Sign Language, with focus on more complex sentence types, signs, and idioms. Considers ASL literary forms such as poetry, theater, and storytelling, as well as deaf history and other related topics. (Y)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: ASL 102 or successful completion of placement exam.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ASL 202 - Intermediate American Sign Language


    Continues training in American Sign Language, with focus on more complex sentence types, signs, and idioms. Considers ASL literary forms such as poetry, theater, and storytelling, as well as deaf history and other related topics. (Y)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: ASL 201 or successful completion of placement exam.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ASL 301 - Conversational ASL


    Continues language and cultural instruction with emphasis on everyday conversation. Topics include common idioms and slang, explaining rules, discussing finances and major decisions, and storytelling techniques such as role-shifting and narrative structure. Students will be required to interact with deaf signers. (SI)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: ASL202 or successful completion of placement interview.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ASL 355 - Comparative Linguistics: ASL and English


    English Language and Literature (IR)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ASL 475 - Topics in Deaf Studies


    Examines such topics as American deaf history; ASL linguistics; deaf education; cultural versus pathological views of deaf people; controversies over efforts to eliminate sign language and cure deafness; ASL poetry and storytelling; deafness in mainstream literature, film, and drama; deafness and other minority identities; and the international deaf community. (SI)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ASL 481 - Deafness in Literature and Film


    Studies representations of deaf people in literature and film over the last three centuries. Takes a contrapuntal approach, juxtaposing canonical literature and mainstream films with works (in either English or American Sign Language) by relatively unknown deaf artists. (SI)

    Credits: 3

American Studies

  
  •  

    AMST 201 - Major Works for American Studies


    A small lecture course enrolling between 35 and 60 students, AMST 201 offers students significant texts or works of American culture, texts or works that are printed, graphic, artifactual, material or oral. Although one faculty member will teach the course, guest lecturers from various disciplines may contribute as well. The goal of this course is to show students what kinds of insights and syntheses result from juxtaposing works across disciplinary boundaries and from different methodological perspectives. (IR)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    AMST 301 - Introduction to the American Studies Major


    A year-long sequence of two small seminars, this course will introduce majors both to the history of American Studies and to various theories and methods for the practice of American Studies. The three goals of these seminars are (1) to make students aware of their own interpretive practices; (2) to equip them with information and conceptual tools they will need for advanced work in American Studies; and (3) to provide them comparative approaches to the study of various aspects of the United States. (Y)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    AMST 302 - Introduction to the American Studies Major


    A year-long sequence of two small seminars, this course will introduce majors both to the history of American Studies and to various theories and methods for the practice of American Studies. The three goals of these seminars are (1) to make students aware of their own interpretive practices; (2) to equip them with information and conceptual tools they will need for advanced work in American Studies; and (3) to provide them comparative approaches to the study of various aspects of the United States. (Y)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    AMST 401 - Fourth-Year Seminar in American Studies


    This seminar is intended to focus study, research, and discussion on a single period, topic, or issue, such as the Great Awakening, the Civil War, the Harlem Renaissance, the Great Depression, or the 1960s. Topics vary. (Y)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    AMST 453 - Independent Study in Asian Pacific American Studies


    An elective course for students in the Asian Pacific American Studies minor. Students will work with an APAS core faculty member to support the student’s own research. Topics vary, and must be approved by the APAS Director.  (SI)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    AMST 493 - Independent Study


    An elective course for American Studies majors who have completed AMST 301-302. Students will work with an American Studies faculty member to support the student’s own research. Topics vary, and must be approved by the Program Director. (SI)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: AMST 301, 302.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    AMST 494 - Independent Study


    An elective course for American Studies majors who have completed AMST 301-302. Students will work with an American Studies faculty member to support the student’s own research. Topics vary, and must be approved by the Program Director. (SI)

    Credits: 3

Anthropology

  
  •  

    ANTH 101 - Introduction to Anthropology


    This is a broad introductory course covering race, language, and culture, both as intellectual concepts and as political realities. Topics include race and culture as explanations of human affairs, the relationship of language to thought, cultural diversity and cultural relativity, and cultural approaches to current crises. (S)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ANTH 109 - Colloquia for First-Year Students


    Colloquium designed to give first-year students an opportunity to study an anthropological topic in depth in a small-scale, seminar format. Topics will vary; may be repeated for credit. (IR)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ANTH 215 - Introduction to Classical Archaeology


    Introduces the history, theory, and field techniques of classical archaeology. (O)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ANTH 220 - Dynamics of Social Organization


    (Y)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ANTH 221 - Marriage and the Family


    Compares domestic groups in Western and non-Western societies. Considers the kinds of sexual unions legitimized in different cultures, patterns of childrearing, causes and effects of divorce, and the changing relations between the family and society. (Y)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ANTH 223 - Fantasy and Social Values


    Examines imaginary societies, in particular those in science fiction novels, to see how they reflect the problems and tensions of real social life. Focuses on “alternate cultures” and fictional societal models. (Y)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ANTH 224 - Progress


    An ideal of progress has motivated Westerners since the Enlightenment, and is confirmed by rapid technological innovation. Theories of social evolution also foresaw, however, the extinction of those left behind. This course addresses the ideological roots of our notion of progress, the relation between technological and social progress, and what currently threatens our confidence in the inevitability of progress. (Y)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ANTH 225 - Nationalism, Racism, Culture, Multiculturalism


    Introductory course in which the concepts of culture, multiculturalism, race, racism, and nationalism are critically examined in terms of how they are used and structure social relations in American society and, by comparison, how they are defined in other cultures throughout the world. (Y)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ANTH 226 - Poverty and Meritocracy


    Provides an anthropological perspective on American ideas about achievement and failure in relation to individualist ideology. Readings include Locke, Rousseau, and Tocqueville; ethnographies of non-Western alternatives to modern societies; and contemporary readings on poverty, welfare, meritocracy, and social class. (S)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ANTH 227 - Race, Gender, and Medical Science


    Explores the social and cultural dimensions of biomedical practice and experience in the United States. Focuses on practitioner and patient, asking about the ways in which race, gender, and socio-economic status contour professional identity and socialization, how such factors influence the experience, and course of, illness, and how they have shaped the structures and institutions of biomedicine over time. (Y)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ANTH 228 - Introduction to Medical Anthropology


    The course introduces medical anthropology, and contextualizes bodies, suffering, healing and health. It is organized thematically around a critical humanist approach, along with perspectives from political economy and social constructionism. The aim of the course is to provide a broad understanding of the relationship between culture, healing (including and especially the Western form of healing known as biomedicine), health and political power. (Y)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ANTH 231 - Symbol and Myth


    Studies the foundations of symbolism from the perspective of anthropology. Topics include signs and symbols, and the symbolism of categorical orders as expressed in cosmology, totemism, and myth. (IR)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ANTH 232 - Anthropology of Religion


    Explores anthropological approaches to religion, in the context of this discipline’s century-old project to understand peoples’ conceptions of the world in which they live. (Y)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ANTH 234 - Anthropology of Birth and Death


    Comparative examination of beliefs, rites, and symbolism concerning birth and death in selected civilizations. (IR)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ANTH 235 - Introduction to Folklore


    Introduces the materials and methods of folklore study, emphasizing practical experience in the collection and analysis of folklore. (Y)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: ANTH 101 or instructor permission.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ANTH 236 - Don Juan and Castaneda


    Analyzes the conceptual content in Castaneda’s writings as an exploration of an exotic world view. Focuses on the concepts of power, transformation, and figure-ground reversal. (Y)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ANTH 237 - The Culture and History of Still Photography


    Covers the nature of still photography as a form of communication from its introduction in 1839 to 1940. Four broad topics are examined: the phenomenology of photography—its distinctive character, which sets it apart from other graphic media; the history of photography from its very beginning; the use of photography in “viewing” the world; and the development of documentary photography in the first half of the 20th century. This course counts toward the Humanities, rather than Social Science, distribution requirement in the College. (Y)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ANTH 240 - Language and Culture


    Introduces the interrelationships of linguistic, cultural, and social phenomena with emphasis on the importance of these interrelationships in interpreting human behavior. No prior knowledge of linguistics is required. (Y)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ANTH 242 - Language and Gender


    Studies how differences in pronunciation, vocabulary choice, non-verbal communication, and/or communicative style serve as social markers of gender identity and differentiation in Western and non-Western cultures. Includes critical analysis of theory and methodology of social science research on gender and language. (O)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ANTH 243 - Languages of the World


    An introduction to the study of language relationships and linguistic structures.  Topics covered the basic elements of grammatical description; genetic, areal, and typological relationships among languages; a survey of the world’s major language groupings and the notable structures and grammatical categories they exhibit; and the issue of language endangerment. (IR)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: One year of a foreign language or permission of instructor.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ANTH 247 - Reflections of Exile: Jewish Languages and their Communities


    Covers Jewish languages Yiddish, Judeo-Arabic, Ladino, and Hebrew from historical, linguistic, and literary perspectives. Explores the relations between communities and languages, the nature of diaspora, and the death and revival of languages. No prior knowledge of these languages is required. This course is cross-listed with AMEL 247. (Y)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ANTH 250 - The Health of Black Folks


    An interdisciplinary course analyzing the relationship between black bodies and biomedicine both historically and in the present. The course is co-taught by Norm Oliver, M.D. (UVa Department of Family Medicine), and offers political, economic, and post-structuralist lenses with which to interpret the individual and socio/cultural health and disease of African-Americans. Readings range across several disciplines including anthropology, epidemiology/public health, folklore, history, science studies, political science, sociology and literary criticism. Topics will vary and may include: HIV/AIDS; reproductive issues; prison, crime and drugs; and body size/image and obesity; the legacy of the Tuskegee Syphilis Trials. Cross listed as AAS 250. (SI)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ANTH 253 - North American Indians


    Ethnological treatment of the aboriginal populations of the New World based on the findings of archaeology, ethnography, linguistics, biological anthropology, and social anthropology. (Y)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ANTH 256 - Peoples and Cultures of Africa


    Studies African modernity through a close reading of ethnographies, social histories, novels, and African feature films. (IR)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ANTH 260 - Introduction to Civilization of India


    Introduces the society and culture of India, Pakistan, and Sri Lanka. Discussion of traditional social, political, and economic organization; religions, religious festivals, and worship; art and architecture; dance; and song. (Y)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ANTH 261 - Asian America


    An introductory survey addressing Asian/Pacific Islander experiences (over 30 ethnic groups) in America since the mid-1700s. (O)           

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ANTH 266 - Peoples of Polynesia


    The peoples of Polynesia and Indonesia, sharing a cultural and linguistic heritage, have spread from Madagascar to Easter Island. Examines their maritime migrations, the societies and empires that they built, and recent changes affecting their cultural traditions. (IR)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ANTH 267 - How Others See Us


    Explores how America, the West, and the white racial mainstream are viewed by others in different parts of the world, and at home. (Y)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ANTH 268 - Reading the New York Times


    An introduction to anthropological perspectives, using a major American newspaper as a window on contemporary culture. Articles from the daily paper will be supplemented by relevant readings by anthropologists and other culture critics. (IR)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ANTH 280 - Introduction to Archaeology


    Topics include alternative theories of prehistoric culture change, dating methods, excavation and survey techniques, and the reconstruction of the economy, social organization, and religion of prehistoric societies. (Y)

    Credits: 3
 

Page: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11Forward 10 -> 39