Jun 27, 2022  
Undergraduate Record 2007-2008 
    
Undergraduate Record 2007-2008 [ARCHIVED RECORD]

Course Descriptions


 

Computer Science

  
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    CS 494 - Special Topics in Computer Science


    Content varies annually, depending on instructor interests and the needs of the department. Similar to CS 551 and CS 751, but taught strictly at the undergraduate level. (S)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: Instructor permission; additional specific requirements vary with topics.

    Credits: 1 to 3
  
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    CS 551 - Selected Topics in Computer Science


    Content varies annually, depending on students’ needs and interests. Recent topics included the foundations of computation, artificial intelligence, database design, real-time systems, Internet engineering, and electronic design automation. (S)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: Instructor permission.

    Credits: 1 to 3
  
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    CS 586 - Real-Time Systems


    This course presents the underlying theory, concepts, and practice for real-time systems, such as avionics, process control, space travel, mobile computing and ubiquitous computing. The goals of the course include: introducing the unique problems that arise when time constraints are imposed on systems, identifying basic theory and the boundary between what is known today and what is still research, stressing a systems integration viewpoint in the sense of showing how everything fits together rather than presenting a collection of isolated solutions, and addressing multiprocessing and distributed systems. This course also presents some of the basic results from what might be called the classical technology of real-time computing and presents these results in the context of new applications of this technology in ubiquitous/pervasive computer systems. (Y)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: CS 333 and 414 with grades of C- or higher.

    Credits: 3
  
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    CS 587 - Security in Information Systems


    This course focuses on security as an aspect of a variety of software systems. We will consider software implementations of security related policies in the context of operating systems, networks, and data bases. Topics include: operating system protection mechanisms, intrusion detection systems, formal models of security, cryptography and associated security protocols, data base security, worms, viruses, network and distributed system security, and policies of privacy and confidentiality. (Y)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: CS 340 and either CS/ECE 457 or CS 414 with grades of C- or higher.

    Credits: 3
  
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    CS 588 - Cryptology: Principles and Applications


    Introduces the basic principles and mathematics of cryptology including information theory, classical ciphers, symmetric key cryptosystems and public-key cryptosystems. Develops applications of cryptology such as anonymous email, digital cash and code signing. (Y)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: CS 302 with a grade of C- or higher.

    Credits: 3

Criminal Justice

  
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    CJ 210 - Basics in Criminal Justice Research


    Instructs students how to use electronic and print academic resources from the Web homepage of the FBI Library, the Internet, and onsite facilities. It covers improving searching abilities and information-gathering skills needed by the law enforcement community. Offered only as an elective.  (Y)

    Credits: 1
  
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    CJ 211 - Introduction to Microcomputers in Law Enforcement


    This course is designed for the law enforcement officer who has little or no experience with microcomputers. Primary goals are to provide an orientation to the fundamentals of microcomputer operation and to help the student cultivate computer learning skills. Major software applications in the Windows operating environment are covered. Does not meet course requirement for Leadership Development; offered only as an elective. (Y)

    Credits: 2
  
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    CJ 312 - Drugs, Society, and Contemporary Issues in Law Enforcement


    This course provides to the law enforcement supervisor an interdisciplinary analysis of contemporary drug issues and problems.  The course will examine physiological, social, legal, and historical aspects of drug use and abuse.  This class will also analyze the external influences that impact the decision making process, and to synthesize these concepts into a comprehensive strategy for effective drug unit management.  (Y)

     

    Credits: 3

  
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    CJ 313 - Counterterrorism Strategies: Understanding and Responding to the Threat


    Course is for seasoned law enforcement executives seeking to understand and identify their roles in the nation’s counterterrorism effort in order to implement valuable counterterrorism initiatives in their respective agencies and communities.  While this course deals with the counterterrorism mission as it relates to U.S. geographical, social, and legal issues, international executives can still benefit from participating in the course because the conceptual and strategic nature of the course content can be applied in other environments. (Y)

    Credits: 3
  
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    CJ 314 - Intelligence Led Policing


    This course introduces the concepts and applications of the intelligence process of law enforcement problems, with an emphasis on requirements for the local agencies.  Students will gain a solid understanding of what intelligence is and how to apply analytic methods and techniques practiced at the national level to local enforcement problems.  The course also introduces best practices for implementing an intelligence structure within a bureaucracy and effectively communicating intelligence insights.

    Credits: 3
  
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    CJ 324 - Interviewing Strategies through Statement Analysis


    Hands-on seminar provides a structured method of examining verbal and written statements of suspects, victims and witnesses. Provides linguistic tools to assist investigator in gaining insight to the speaker/writer and in detecting areas of deception. (Y)

    Credits: 3
  
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    CJ 327 - Interpersonal Communications for the Law Enforcement Executive


    Highly interactive course designed to acquaint the leader not only with his/her communications styles and preferences, but how the communication process influences interpersonal relationships in both social and work-related environments. Practical application a major focus. (Y)

    Credits: 3
  
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    CJ 340 - Fitness in Law Enforcement


    This course is designed to help law enforcement officers adopt and maintain behaviors associated with a healthy lifestyle. Major emphasis is place on the relationship between physical activity, exercise and wellness. Additional topics covered include balanced nutrition, stress management. and prevention of chronic conditions such as cardiovascular disease and low-back pain. (Y)

    Credits: 2
  
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    CJ 352 - Leadership for Law Enforcement


    Principles of leadership concepts and theories are identified, defined, and applied to law enforcement. Theories and practices used in industry and business are examined and evaluated, and practical problems and exercises are used to illustrate avenues to achieve objectives. (Y)

    Credits: 3
  
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    CJ 355 - Leadership, Ethics, Decision-Making


    Explores the areas of leadership, ethics, and decision-making in the context of law enforcement using class discussion and participation, small-group dynamics, and some case studies. Topics include understanding organizational culture and history, future trends, and the impact these topics have on decision making and police management. (Y)

    Credits: 3
  
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    CJ 356 - Legal Issues for Command-Level Officers


    Discusses legal considerations that impact administrative and investigative decisions of command and mid-level police administrators. Provides a review of recent developments in federal Constitutional criminal procedure. Also explores the impact of Constitutionally-based employment rights on departmental operations and the impact of Title VII and the Americans with Disabilities Act on police administration.  (Y)

    Credits: 3
  
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    CJ 357 - Labor Law Issues for Law Enforcement Administrators


    Focuses on the basics of Labor Law for police administrators. Contents of the course include forming the employment relationship; constitutional employment rights; conducting internal investigations;  the role of personnel information in criminal discovery; employment discrimination law; wage and hour statues; fitness for duty; departmental civil liability to employees; and workers compensation fees. (Y)

    Credits: 3
  
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    CJ 361 - Applied Behavioral Science for Law Enforcement Operations


    An overview of 1) the essential role of the behavioral sciences in law enforcement operations, and 2) fosters opportunity for introspection regarding vocational survival issues, given the intentional exposure of police to crises, crime, and criminal behavior.  Examines methodologies and interdisciplinary operational strategies for managing crises, investigating violent serial crimes, and de-escalating organizational toxicity to prevent or resolve workplace violence and augment opportunities to reflect upon and discuss issues affecting law enforcement practice, performance, vitality, and longevity. (Y)

    Credits: 3
  
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    CJ 367 - Effective Writing


    Explores writing as a process comprising at least five steps. Students learn methods for getting started and sound guidelines for developing a clear, organized writing style. Course is designed to help the student become a more confident and effective writer. (Y)

    Credits: 3
  
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    CJ 369 - Public Speaking


    An introduction to effective communication techniques with emphasis on oral communication. Frequent researched and rehearsed oral presentations in a variety of settings, from formal to informal, help prepare the law enforcement official to become a more articulate, confident, and fluent public communicator. (Y)

    Credits: 3
  
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    CJ 371 - Conflict Resolution for Law Enforcement Executives


    Designed to allow law enforcement executives the opportunity to learn more about the theories of conflict and how to identify and apply appropriate conflict resolution techniques.  Students will learn to identify their personal conflict resolution style, effectively utilize different conflict resolution techniques, and implement an effective departmental conflict resolution program. 

    Credits: 3
  
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    CJ 372 - Contemporary Issues in Police and Media Relations


    This course is designed for the police executive interested in exploring the relationship between law enforcement and today’s mass media and/or those interested in improving their media interview sills. The focus ison police/media relations issues with specific emphasis on a practical “hands on” approach to dealing with the news media. This course also presents a systematic approach to the process of preparing a news media interview. Class discussion centers on the nature and function of the news media in modern society, contemporary issues affecting police/media relations, and crisis planning for dealing with the news media during high visibility events. Students recently assigned to media relations positions are strongly encouraged to enroll. (Y)

    Credits: 3
  
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    CJ 374 - Computer Crimes for Police Supervisors


    This is a hands-on class for police managers. The course is divided into four parts. Part one is the intermediate to advanced use of Microsoft Office XP software and web mail communications. Part two is the examination of policies and procedures related to the use of department-owned digital equipment, such as laptops, desktops, MDTs, web & cell phones, PDAs and other storage devices. Part three consists of hands-on practical exercises associated to digital investigations and evidence. Part four is a hands-on introduction to EnCase and Forensic Tool Kit which includes the RCFL’s C.A.I.R. and Image Scan training. (Y)

    Credits: 3
  
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    CJ 375 - Evidentiary Photography


    Provides photographic concepts and techniques for crime scene and latent fingerprint photography. Students learn about the essential processing equipment, techniques, and legal aspects of laboratory photography. Includes practical application of classroom instruction. (Y)

    Credits: 3
  
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    CJ 377 - Seminar in Investigative Interviewing


    Examines psychosocial, technical and legal aspects related to investigative interviewing in the police environment.  The impact of contemporary issues in the filed, including false confessions, detection of deception research, media portrayals of police-citizen encounters and the electronic recording of interrogations will be explored. (Y)

    Credits: 3
  
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    CJ 381 - Ethics in Law Enforcement


    This course focuses on the current, ubiquitous ethical dilemmas faced by law enforcement leaders, and uses known best practices, student experiences and case studies to form the basis of a continuous quest to raise the bar for the most professional and highest ethical standard for the modern police agency. Dilemmas uniquely inherent to law enforcement are explored. Truth vs. justice, due process vs. crime control, and honesty vs. loyalty are examined. Topical presentations include vehicle pursuits, use of force, racial vs. criminal profiling, and police corruption. Also reviewed are the ethical policies and legal decisions that affect public privacy vs. intrusion, regulating police off-duty activities, and weighing public right/need to know vs. legitimate LEO investigative needs. (Y)

    Credits: 3
  
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    CJ 385 - Latent Fingerprint Photography


    This course explores traditional silver halide photography (analog photography) and parallels it with digital imaging technology (photography). The course introduces the student to the capture technology for latent impressions from physical evidence found at crime scenes and in crime laboratories. (Y)

    Credits: 3
  
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    CJ 392 - Educational Leadership


    This course covers principles and concepts of academic administration, specifically tailored for the law enforcement training and educational setting. The course is designed for the police manager who supervises a training function. (Y)

    Credits: 3
  
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    CJ 404 - Introduction to Counterterrorism


    An overview of terrorism and law enforcement’s counterterrorism efforts in the United States.  This course will be taught, in part, by subject matter experts from the Institute for Intergovernmental Research (IIR) and State and Local Anti-Terrorism Training (SLATT) staff.  Students will learn the role of law enforcement agencies and officers in detecting and preventing terrorist acts.  This course includes studies of recent FBI terrorism investigations and how the FBI interacts with state and local police with respect to JTTFs, the Terrorism Screening Center, and other information sharing mechanisms. (Y)

    Credits: 3
  
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    CJ 470 - Gangs, Developmental Issues, and Criminal Behavior


    Provides police administrator with a basic understanding of the applicability of behavioral science to the investigation of juvenile violence and gang behavior. This course will examine gang dynamics, causation, various types of gangs and juvenile offenders, violence in schools, crime patterns and trends, and solvability factors. Other areas to be discussed include risk predictors, and contributing factors. (Y)

    Credits: 3
  
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    CJ 473 - Overview of Forensic Science for Police Administrators and Managers


    Addresses forensic science issues, such as managing a crime scene, the role and value of different types of physical evidence, and current trends and issues. Provides a basic overview of forensic science. (Y)

    Credits: 3
  
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    CJ 475 - Stress Management in Law Enforcement


    This course introduces a holistic approach to stress management and wellness involving aspects of the mind, body, and spirit.  Intended to make law enforcement officers more cognizant of the stressors encountered on the job and in their personal lives, this course addresses stress management for the law enforcement executive from a two pronged approach: identification of one’s own individual strengths and weaknesses and the ability to recognize stressors and subsequent detrimental behaviors of subordinates. (Y)

    Credits: 3
  
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    CJ 484 - Applied Criminology


    This course covers the theories, principles, techniques, materials, and methods commonly employed in the disciplines of criminology and criminal justice. The particular emphasis is on examining empirical bases for decision-making through examination of existing research and contributions of criminology and other social sciences to identifying “best practices” for law enforcement operations. Students are expected to complete a class project based on the course material, applying this material to issues they confront in their own departments. Both oral and written products reflecting these projects are required. (Y)

    Credits: 3
  
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    CJ 490 - Directed Study


    This undergraduate experience permits students to work under close faculty guidance on individual research projects when particular needs cannot be met by regularly scheduled courses.  The student, under the guidance of an instructor, in a formally written contractual agreement, will select a research project, the methodology and proposed resources for the research, a planned schedule for the project, and a format for the formal written report.  An oral defense is required.(Y)

    Credits: 1 to 3
  
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    CJ 501 - Human Behavior in Organizations


    Advanced course focusing on changing patterns of behavior in organizations. Identifies problem areas in organizations, how structural relationships and leadership patterns influence the climate of an agency, and how groups influence the behavior of individuals within an organizational setting. Examines the methods and strategies of organizational development with the aim of increasing effectiveness and adaptation to change. (Y)

    Credits: 3
  
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    CJ 502 - Independent Study and Research


    This graduate experience permits students to work under close faculty guidance on individual research projects when particular needs cannot be met by regularly scheduled classes.  The student, under the guidance of the instructor, in a formally written contractual agreement,will select a research project, the methodology and proposed resources for the project, and a format for the formal written report.  An oral defense is required.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: Contact instructor before enrolling.

    Credits: 3
  
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    CJ 503 - Executive Leadership


    Analysis of the leadership role and the leadership process. Emphasizes the requirements and developmental needs for current and future leadership roles. (Y)

    Credits: 3
  
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    CJ 507 - Managing Organizational Change and Development


    This seminar focuses on the effect of change and development on the behavior of employees. It studies the nature of planned change, methods of managing change, ways to diagnose changes and development, and ways to implement change in police departments and other organizations. (Y)

    Credits: 3
  
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    CJ 515 - Futuristics and Law Enforcement: Foreseeing, Managing and Creating the 21st Century


    This course is a seminar in which law enforcement managers are introduced to the study of Futuristics and the ways in which it can assist in forecasting, managing and creating preferable futures.  The course is divided into five areas:  Introduction, Where we Are/Where We’ve Been, Possible Futures, Where We Want to Go, and Getting There.  Students will complete a comprehensive project (written and oral) in which they will forecast possible futures for their agency and community, decide upon a preferable future or futures, and devise various strategies for achieving that preferable future(s).  It is expected that this project will be of sufficient quality to be of use to the student’s agency upon his/her return.  (Y)

    Credits: 3
  
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    CJ 518 - Understanding Terrorism: Mindset, Methodologies, and Response


    Designed to provide the student with an appreciation and understanding of appropriate government responses to domestic terrorism ranging from military action, to criminal prosecution, and/or civil penalties.  the student will examine the various definitions for terrorism: the effects of the media and the Internet, the history, and response from a crisis management standpoint.  The student will approach the subject matter from both a theoretical and practical perspective as they analyze case histories and apply conflict resolution strategies.  (Y)

    Credits: 3
  
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    CJ 519 - Conflict and Crisis Management: Theory and Practice


    Designed for law enforcement leaders who direct/manage resources relating to the response, management, and resolution of critical incidents such as terrorism and homeland security events; natural, manmade and transportation disasters; hostage and barricade situations; suicides; and the stress and trauma that these critical incidents may foster. Focuses on ‘best practices’ for response, management, and resolution of these  critical incidents with an emphasis on reducing and eliminating inter-agency, intra-agency, and interpersonal conflict. The underlying premise is the ability to assess verbal and non-verbal behavior as the basis for successful response, management, and resolution of critical incidents; and the development of professional and personal relationships among the various stakeholders in both internal and external organizational environments.

    Credits: 3
  
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    CJ 521 - Contemporary Issues in Law Enforcement


    Focuses on contemporary issues and leadership concerns in various areas of law enforcement, leadership and management, emphasizing problem solving and the systematic development of improvement innovations. (Y)

    Credits: 3
  
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    CJ 522 - Seminar in Organizational Communications for Law Enforcement Executives


    Highly interactive seminar designed to explore communications systems within public and private organizations, with particular focus on federal, state, and local law enforcement. This course provides organizational leaders with strategies and competencies designed to promote a communications-intensive work environment as well as hone individual interpersonal communications skills. (Y)

    Credits: 3
  
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    CJ 523 - Seminar in Media Relations for the Law Enforcement Executive


    Focuses on contemporary relations between law enforcement and the news media. Emphasizes the development of a proactive versus reactive departmental media strategy and the formation of effective media policy. (Y)

    Credits: 3
  
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    CJ 524 - Interviewing Strategies through Statement Analysis


    Hands-on seminar provides a structured method of examining verbal and written statements of suspects, victims and witnesses. Provides linguistic tools to assist investigator in gaining insight to the speaker/writer and in detecting areas of deception. (Y)

    Credits: 3
  
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    CJ 527 - Interpersonal Communications for Law Enforcement Executive


    Highly interactive course designed to acquaint the leader not only with his/her communications styles and preferences, but how the communications process influences interpersonal relationships in both social and work-related environments. Practical application a major focus. (Y)

    Credits: 3
  
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    CJ 536 - Advanced Computer Crimes for Police Supervisors


    This graduate course is designed for law enforcement managers who desire to learn and practice advanced investigative computer techniques, methods and data recovery. Students will work with desktop computer hardware, use EnCase and Forensic Toolkit software tools, and learn basic networking (TCP/IP).  In addition, FTK - Case Agent Investigative Review and Image Scan course work will be completed.  This class provides the opportunity for hands-on experience to help prepare and or enhance the police manager’s role as it applies to the investigation of computer related crimes. (Y)

    Credits: 3
  
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    CJ 544 - Forensic Mitochondrial DNA Analysis


    This course provides classroom and laboratory experience in the principles and procedures involved in typing mtDNA from evidentiary items such as hair, teeth, and bones. Classroom instruction is focused on the nature of mtDNA, molecular biology principles involved in the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and sequencing, and legal issues related to this technique. Discussions regarding scientific literature published in the area of forensic mtDNA analysis are also conducted. Laboratory procedures include DNA extraction, PCR, quantification of amplified products by capillary electrophoresis, and automated sequencing. Computer-based practice compiling sequences and database searches using appropriate software is provided and moot court exercises are conducted. (Y)

    Credits: 3
  
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    CJ 555 - Enlightened Leadership


    The curriculum for this course is designed to represent a progressive leadership development strategy focusing on human behavior, self awareness, and decision-making. A significant portion of the course will focus on ethical behavior as it relates to decision-making. Activities include student presentations, breakout groups, personality and leadership effectiveness instruments, practical exercises and case studies. (Y)

    Credits: 3
  
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    CJ 560 - Violent Behavior: A Biopsychosocial Approach


    This course for law enforcement managers examines six (6) general areas of violent behaviors which directly affect the law enforcement officer. After developing a biopsychosocial conceptual framework with which to understand violent behavior, these principles will be applied to specific topics and cases.  Topics discussed in this seminar may be occasionally supplemented with guest speakers and practitioners from varied fields, but related fields of criminal justice and mental health. Students are required to bring with them a closed, fully adjudicated case.  Cases may deal with homicides, sex offenses, suicide by cop, or a hate-related case. (Y)

    Credits: 3
  
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    CJ 565 - Intelligence Theory and Application for Law Enforcement


    This is a survey course that will cover the definitions, history and philosophy of law enforcement intelligence, the intelligence cycle, types of law enforcement and national security analysis, the development and management of law enforcement intelligence units, and innovation in law enforcement intelligence.  This course will emphasize, through active discussion, group exercises, and speakers, the importance of and the challenges in the development of the intelligence functions within law enforcement.

    Credits: 3
  
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    CJ 581 - Solving Ethical Dilemmas in Law Enforcement


    Provides the law enforcement leader/practitioner with the opportunity to examine, evaluate and research the most complex and current ethical dilemmas in the law enforcement profession.  After properly categorizing and understanding the dilemmas, the students will use existing research to diagnose, analyze, and compare existing and creative solutions, and subsequently discuss and defend their conclusions.  Within every dilemma, the themes of best practices in ethical behavior and successful decision making processes will be assessed. (Y)

     

    Credits: 3

  
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    CJ 584 - Applied Criminology


    This graduate course offering covers the theories, principles, techniques, materials, and methods commonly employed in the disciplines of criminology and criminal justice.  The particular emphasis is on examining empirical bases for decision-making through examination of existing research and contributions of criminology and other social sciences to identifying “best practices” for law enforcement operations.  Students are expected to complete a class project based on the course material and applying this material to issues they confront in their own departments.  Both oral and written products reflecting these projects are required.

    Credits: 3

Curriculum, Instruction and Special Education

  
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    EDIS 201 - Teaching as a Profession


    Teaching as a Profession is designed as the introductory course for the Five Year Teacher Education Program. In this survey of American education, students examine education history, philosophy in action in schools, student diversity, curriculum, effective teaching, school organization and governance, education finance, education law, sociopolitical dimensions of education, and the role of teacher as professional. (Y-SS)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: Approval of Permission to Enroll Application; corequisite: EDIS 288.

    Credits: 3
  
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    EDIS 202 - Foundations in Early Childhood and Developmental Risk


    This initial course provides an overview of early childhood special education (ECSE) and early childhood education (ECE) for children with and without disabilities birth through age 8. The course reviews the historical, philosophical, and sociological foundations of ECSE and ECE as well as current trends for service delivery. The course also addresses recommended practices for this age group (e.g. family-centered practices, culturally responsive services, inclusion, developmentally appropriate practice, collaboration). Particular attention is given to understanding the developmental characteristics, definition, and etiology of major disabling and at-risk conditions, as well as understanding federal legislation, judicial mandates, and current state regulations and procedures governing special education. (Y)

    Credits: 3
  
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    EDIS 287 - Reading, Writing, and Reasoning for College Students


    This class is designed to introduce incoming Transition Program students to the academic expectations of the College of Arts and Sciences during the summer prior to matriculation. Students build foundational skills in reading comprehension, expository writing, and critical thinking that undergird college scholarship. Students are required to take one additional course from an approved list of three-credit College courses offered by Summer Session. The second course allows students to apply the skills they learn in EDIS 287. (SS)

    Credits: 3
  
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    EDIS 288 - Field Experience


    Experiences are provided for students to observe Children in either a community or school context. A computer component focuses on word processing, telecommunications, and networking skills that are valuable tools for educators. (Y-SS)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: Approval of Permission to Enroll Application; corequisite: EDIS 201.

    Credits: 1
  
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    EDIS 289 - Strategies for Academic Achievement


    Instruction in multiple strategies for analyzing, planning, and completing academic tasks. Guidance in appropriate application and adaptation of general procedures of study to requirements and materials of specific courses. Focus on continual implementation, refinement, and evaluation of strategies to ensure that study habits are effective and efficient. (S)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: Instructor permission.

    Credits: 3
  
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    EDIS 302 - The Exceptional Learner


    Focuses on extending principles of learning and intellectual, social, emotional, and physical development to persons with disabilities, as well as the gifted. Credit may not be earned for both EDIS 302 and 500. (Y)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: Instructor permission.

    Credits: 3
  
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    EDIS 388 - Laboratory/Field Experience


    Field-based practice experiences tutoring children. (Y)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education Program.

    Credits: 1 to 2
  
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    EDIS 389 - Selected Topics


    This is a field-based course for all students enrolled in the elementary education program. This course provides opportunities to apply technology skills learned in EDLF 345. (Y)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education Program.

    Credits: 1
  
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    EDIS 488 - Field Experience


    Extensive experiences in practice teaching using various models of instruction. (S)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education Program; corequisite: EDIS 501 or 502, 503, or 508.

    Credits: 1 to 2
  
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    EDIS 493 - Directed Study


    (S)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: Instructor permission.

    Credits: 1 to 6
  
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    EDIS 500 - The Exceptional Learner


    An intensive introduction to the study of exceptional children and adults. Focuses on extending principles of learning and intellectual, socio-cultural, emotional, and physical development to persons with disabilities, as well as the gifted. Information on medical conditions which influence learning and development is also provided. Credit is not given for both EDIS 302 and 500. (Y)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: Instructor permission.

    Credits: 3
  
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    EDIS 501 - Curriculum and Instruction for Elementary and Special Education


    Study of curriculum and instructional design, and instructional strategies consistent with those designs. (Y)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education Program; corequisite: EDIS 488.

    Credits: 2
  
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    EDIS 502 - Instruction and Assessment


    Section 1: Elementary Education Extension of EDIS 501 with a focus on instructional strategies and ways of assessing learning outcomes. Section 2: Secondary Education Focuses on instructional design and strategies for teaching in secondary classrooms and assessment of student growth toward prescribed learning outcomes. (Y)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education Program; corequisite: EDIS 488.

    Credits: 2
  
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    EDIS 503 - Classroom Management and Conflict Resolution


    Many beginning teachers report difficulties with classroom management issues. This class provides the opportunity to reflect on the importance of instructional, classroom management, and conflict resolution practices. Examines the critical issues associated with discipline and management, and develops communication and social skills that are critical for implementing a management system in the classroom. (Y)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education Program; corequisite: EDIS 502

    Credits: 3
  
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    EDIS 504 - Assessment Techniques for Exceptional Individuals


    Prepares teachers of exceptional children to administer, score, and interpret several standard educational instruments; to use informal procedures in educational assessment; and to interpret the combined results of psychological, sociological, medical, and educational assessments as they apply to the development and evaluation of individualized educational plans. (S)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite/corequisite: EDIS 510, 511, or 512.

    Credits: 3
  
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    EDIS 505 - Behavior Management


    Intensive analysis of cases in which classroom behavior management is a key issue. Using the case method, students apply knowledge of behavior management experience, and the experiences of their peers, to the solution of problems encountered by practicing teachers. (Y)

    Credits: 3
  
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    EDIS 506 - Assessment and Programming for Infants: Birth to Age Five


    This course covers assessment and programming for children birth through age 3 who are typically developing, at-risk, or have identified disabilities. The first half of the course addresses theories of child development and typical and atypical development as well as federal mandates and state regulations related to assessments for Part C programs. Students learn to select, administer, and interpret formal and informal assessments to identify the strengths and needs of infants, toddlers, and their families. The second half of the course addresses: a) service delivery options for infants and toddlers, b) selection of age-appropriate materials and equipment, c) curriculum development and implementation in the areas of self-help, motor, cognitive, social/emotional, and language, and d) IFSP development, implementation and monitoring. Particular attention is given to understanding the theories and techniques of family-centered and culturally responsive intervention as well as to methods for collaboration and consultation including service coordination, interagency coordination, and transition planning. (Y)

    Credits: 3
  
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    EDIS 508 - Methods of Collaboration & Consultation for Special Education


    Presents strategies for teaching children with special needs and focuses on cognitive and behavioral instructional approaches. Collaboration and consultation for inclusive classrooms are essential class features. Includes application of instructional modification procedures and development of individualized plans. This class is coordinated with EDIS 514. (Y)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: EDIS 302 or 500 (510, 511, 512); corequisite: EDIS 514, 488.

    Credits: 2
  
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    EDIS 510 - Characteristics of Students with Emotional Disturbances and Behavioral Disorders


    This course presents the characteristics of children and adolescents with emotional and behavior disorders within the context of special education services. On completion of this course, students will have (1) knowledge of the origins and characteristics of the primary behavioral disorders, (2) procedures for identification and assessment, and (3) approaches of programming and instruction (S-SS)

    Credits: 2
  
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    EDIS 511 - Characteristics of Learning Disabilities


    Studies the meaning and concepts associated with the field of learning disabilities and the diverse characteristics of individuals with these disabilities. Includes the nature, causes, assessment, and treatment of learning disabilities. (S-SS)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite/corequisite: EDIS 302 or 500.

    Credits: 2
  
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    EDIS 512 - Characteristics of Mental Retardation


    This course is designed to explore basic concepts and issues that pertain to persons with significant limitations in intelligence and adapted behavior. While the course primarily explores the educational implications of having mental retardation, the psychological, historical, medical, and sociological implications of this disability are also touched upon. (Y)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: EDIS 302 or 500.

    Credits: 2
  
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    EDIS 513 - Characteristics of People with Severe Disabilities


    This course is designed to explore basic concepts and issues that pertain to persons with severe disabilities including those with mental retardation, autism, and multiple disabilities who exhibit extensive or pervasive support needs. While the course primarily explores the educational implications of having mental retardation, the psychological, historical, medical, and sociological implications of this disability are also touched upon. (Y)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: EDIS 302 or 500.

    Credits: 2
  
  •  

    EDIS 514 - Instructional Strategies for Exceptional Learners


    An extension of EDIS 508, this class focuses on strategies for secondary-aged students with special needs. Emphasizes curriculum and instructional approaches related to cognitive and behavioral theories and addresses applications of transition procedures. (Y)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: EDIS 302, 510, 511, or 512.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    EDIS 515 - Collaborative Teamwork


    This course teaches strategies for building and operating collaborative interdisciplinary teams in school and community settings. These strategies are relevant to general and special educators as well as to other disciplines (e.g., School and Clinical Psychology, Communication Disorders, Counselor Education, Adapted Physical Education). Course content addresses team organization; stages of team development and team building strategies; teamwork skills (e.g., communication, problem-solving, conflict resolution); barriers to and supports for collaborative teams; extending the team to family members, students/peers, related service personnel, and paraprofessionals; the team’s role in transitioning students between programs, schools, and grades; and team evaluation. (Y)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite/corequisite: EDIS 302 or 500.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    EDIS 517 - Social Issues: Schools, Classrooms, and Families


    This course is designed to help preservice teachers develop a personal framework for teaching and identify practices that will be used in the classroom. Strategies addressed include classroom management and community building practices, strategies for working with families, transition practices, and practices related to multi-cultural education. (Y)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    EDIS 518 - Social and Affective Processes in Development


    This course provides knowledge of basic theory and research concerning social and affective processes in the development of children who are typically developing and children with special needs, with particular attention to different risk conditions in infancy and childhood. This course focuses on the role of social contexts and parent-child and family relationships in development. An understanding of general systems theory and its application to socio-emotional development is emphasized as a means of explaining linkages across social system influences on the developing child. The course also examines ways that biological, social, and psychological processes interact. Students will be taught to understand the alternate pathways of development utilized by children with special needs, and how dyadic relationships and family systems both contribute to and ameliorate problem outcomes for children with and without specific special needs. (Y)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    EDIS 521 - Introduction to Language Development


    An overview of the language acquisition and development process. This course surveys current and historical perspectives on language acquisition and development and explores those factors influencing language acquisition and development. This class is a VA-DOE approved course for use by those seeking endorsement as English as a Second Language (ESOL) teahcers. This class may also be used for certification in a number of other license adn endorsement areas as well as a course to fulfil many degree program requirements. (Y)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    EDIS 522 - Reading Development for Special Populations


    Designed for pre-service special education teachers and is the first course in the reading sequence for special education students, this course addresses the theoretical foundations of understanding how children learn to read, as well as the problems that some children encounter in learning to read. In addition, this course addresses effective reading instruction, particularly instruction effective, particularly instruction effective for students with or at risk for disabilities. (Y-SS)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    EDIS 523 - Reading Diagnosis and Remediation for Special Education Teachers


    This course focuses on the diagnosis of reading difficulties and the array of continuous assessments that a teacher may employ to appropriately develop remediation strategies. Emphasis is placed on using assessment to guide instruction and remediation. Remediation strategies and effective reading programs are also introduced. This course is the second course in the reading sequence, and follows Reading Development for Special Populations. A tutoring lab, EDIS 523L, is taken concurrently. (Y)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: EDIS 522; corequisite: EDIS 523L.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    EDIS 525 - Early Language and Literacy Development


    (Y)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    EDIS 526 - Reading in the Primary Grades


    Participants will develop an understanding of the reading process and reading disabilities. Emphasis will be on the use of effective practices in the prevention and remediation of reading disabilities. This course will include an examination of current reading theory and research and its implications for assessment, instruction, and intervention for students in grades PreK-3. (Y)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    EDIS 527 - ECDR Teaching Methods in Social Studies and Language Arts


    This course focuses on instructional strategies in science, social studies, and mathematics for use with preschool to grade 3 population. An emphasis will be on effective teaching that accommodates diverse learners. Students will gain an understanding of the knowledge, skills, and processes of history; the social science disciplines (geography, civics/economics); science (earth, life, and physical); and mathematics as defined in the Virginia Standards of Learning (SOLs). Students will learn how to a) integrate these content areas into learning experiences, b) incorporate instructional technology, and c) evaluate materials, instruction, and student achievement. Students will also learn effective instructional methods for teaching preschool and early elementary mathematics (e.g., number systems; elementary number theory, ratio, proportion and percent). Additionally, students will learn how to design active preschool and early elementary science and history/social science programs by organizing key content into meaningful units of instruction and designing instruction to reflect the Virginia SOLs. (Y)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Corequisite: EDIS 488.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    EDIS 530 - Language Skills Block


    Prepares students to teach reading and language arts in the elementary classroom. Attention shifts from “learning to read” to “reading to learn,” and from working with small groups to effective differentiation needed to work with entire classrooms of children. (Y)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: Admission to the Teacher Elementary Education Program.

    Credits: 6
  
  •  

    EDIS 531 - Children’s Literature


    Studies children’s literature and its importance as an integral part of the school curriculum. Emphasizes the treatment in books of contemporary social problems and conditions. (Y)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    EDIS 532 - Teaching Mathematics in the Elementary School


    Designed to prepare preservice teachers in understanding PreK-6 elementary topics in mathematics, teaching these topics, and how children learn mathematics developmentally. Examines ways to reason mathematically, make connections, and communicate mathematics through the use of literature, manipulatives, technology, and classroom discourse. (SS-E)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education Program.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    EDIS 533 - Teaching Science in the Elementary School


    Designed for pre-service teachers, this course coalesces theories of how people learn and practical experiences teaching science to children. Not intended to be a science content course, rather, students will learn and practice pedagogy focused on the teaching and learning of science across several science content areas and elementary grade levels. (S)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    EDIS 534 - Teaching Social Studies in the Elementary School


    This course is designed to develop the knowledge, skills, and understandings needed to teach social studies in the elementary classroom. The class sessions will focus upon a comprehensive overview of the most effective approaches to planning, implementing, managing, and assessing successful social studies learning experiences for students. (S)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    EDIS 540 - Teaching English


    Translates theory and research into practice by designing, enacting, and evaluating instructional units with a variety of teaching methodologies. Students individualize instruction; construct appropriate learning objectives; develop evaluation tools; and use cooperative learning groups, micro-teaching, and reflective processes. (Y-SS)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: EDIS 541, 542, 543, and instructor permission.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    EDIS 541 - Literature for Adolescents


    Students read the latest and greatest in adolescent literature, learn to motivate reluctant readers, and develop individualized multi-genre and multicultural reading programs. (Y)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    EDIS 542 - Language, Literacy, and Culture


    Considers the relationships among language, literacy, culture, and schooling. Students learn to investigate language as teachers of language, research current issues, and design effective strategies for teaching various aspects of the English language. (Y)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    EDIS 543 - Teaching Composition K-12


    Students study, practice, and evaluate theories and methods of writing and teaching writing. They prepare a personal writing project, criticize a writing program, or create a writing program for students. (Y-SS)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    EDIS 545 - Teaching Secondary School Mathematics


    Considers objectives, subject matter, teaching materials, classroom instructional procedures, pupil experiences, and evaluative procedures for mathematics classes. Emphasizes organization of courses and programs in mathematics education. (Y-SS)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: Instructor permission.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    EDIS 547 - ESL Assessment and Curriculum Design


    The purpose of this course is to prepare teachers to work with students (K-12) for whom English is not their native language. Work will include examining instruments used to assess English proficiency and the interpretation of those assessments. The curriculum design aspect of the course will be based on a differentiation model and will include methods aimed at helping students gain English language skills necessary for success in general content areas. Discussions will include topics such as cultural differences in personal interactions, strategies for working with families, and effective strategies for facilitating the learning of English by speakers of other languages and dialects. Practical experience will be gained through observations and fieldwork in public schools. Projects will be assigned according to the age-level with which the teacher hopes to work. (Y)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    EDIS 548 - Second Language Acquisition and Modern Language Teaching Methods: PreK-12


    Considers theory and research in second language acquisition; classroom instructional procedures that follow the National Standards, which incorporate interpersonal, interpretive, and presentational modes and foster successful communication in foreign languages; and selection of appropriate materials, realia, visuals, and media for instructional purposes. (Y)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: Instructor permission.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    EDIS 549 - Planning Foreign Language Instruction


    Considers specific objectives; setting long and short-term goals, planning and outcomes, assessment and testing, grading, record keeping, and communication with parents. (Y)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: EDIS 548 or instructor permission.

    Credits: 2
  
  •  

    EDIS 550 - Teaching Secondary School Science


    Considers objectives, subject matter, teaching materials, classroom instructional procedures, pupil experiences, and evaluative procedures for science classes. Emphasizes organization of courses and programs in science education. (Y)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: Instructor permission.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    EDIS 555 - Models of Instruction


    Focuses on instructional design and delivery. A range of instructional models are introduced, most emphasizing cognition and the processing of information. Students practice planning and implementing instruction using several selected models. (Y)

    Credits: 3
 

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