Jun 27, 2022  
Undergraduate Record 2007-2008 
    
Undergraduate Record 2007-2008 [ARCHIVED RECORD]

Course Descriptions


 

Civil Engineering

  
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    CE 405 - Prestressed Concrete Design


    Analyzes prestressing materials and concepts, working stress analysis and design for flexure, strength analysis and design for flexure, prestress losses, design for shear, composite prestressed beams, continuous prestressed beams, prestressed concrete systems concepts, load balancing, and slab design. (E)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: CE 324.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    CE 410 - Water Chemistry for Environmental Engineering


    Teaches the basic principles of inorganic and organic chemistry as applied to problems in environmental engineering, including water and wastewater treatment, contaminant hydrology, and hazardous-waste management.  Specific topics include analytical instrumentation, acid-base chemistry, reaction kinetics, precipitation and dissolution, organic and surface chemistry, and chlorine chemistry for water disinfection. (Y)       

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: CHEM 151 and 151L or equivalent.   

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    CE 411 - Foundation Engineering


    Analyzes the methods and purposes of subsurface exploration; control of ground water; excavations; sheeting and bracing design; shallow foundations; bearing capacity and settlement analysis; deep foundation—piles, piers, caissons and cofferdams; underpinning; and the legal aspects of foundation engineering. (Y)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: CE 316 and 326.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    CE 420 - Experimental Analyses in Environmental Engineering


    Increases familiarity with the theory and implementation of laboratory, computational, and field procedures common to environmental engineering.  Weekly in-class laboratories alternate between hands-on-laboratory, field or computer experiments, and demonstrations of advanced analytical instrumentation or field sampling procedures.  Weekly lectures provide the theoretical background that pertains directly to the laboratory for that week.  Topics covered are relevant to water wastewater treatment operations, ground and surface-water hydrology, and the fate and transport of pollutants in the environment. (Y)   

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: CHEM 151/151L, APMA 213, ED 315, or equivalent.   

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    CE 421 - Pavement Analysis and Design


    Introduces the concepts of design, performance, and analysis of rigid and flexible pavements.  Focuses on five specific areas: review of engineering materials used for pavement construction, empirical and mechanistic design methodologies for pavement construction and rehabilitation, influence of traffic loading on pavement performance, life-cycle cost analysis techniques, and pavement management.  Students gain experience with classic pavement analysis techniques as well as state-of-the-art mechanistic modeling.  Course serves as the primary undergraduate pavements course as well as a stepping-stone for advanced study in pavements. (Y)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: CE 323

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    CE 426 - Environmental Systems Management


    Emphasizes the formulation of environmental management issues as optimization problems. Simulation models are presented and combined with optimization algorithms. Environmental systems addressed include stream quality, air quality, water supply, waste management, groundwater remediation, and reservoir operations. Optimization techniques presented include linear, integer, and separable programming, dynamic programming, nonlinear programming and genetic algorithms. (Y)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisites:  4th yr standing or instructor permission.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    CE 430 - Environmental Engineering


    Analyzes the design of unit processes used to control the quality of water and waste water associated with people and the environment. Process considerations include pump systems, mixing, sedimentation, filtration, precipitation, coagulation, disinfection, and biological oxidation.  Presents principles of design practices used in physical, chemical, and biological treatment are presented. (Y)   

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: CE 315.

    Credits: 3
  
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    CE 431 - Earth Work


    Introduces landform geometry, grading concepts and methods, with emphasis on the interrelationship between technical and design issues. Fundamental site engineering principles of drainage, the grading of walks, roads, curbs, and level areas, together with cut and fill and take-off calculations are covered in traditional and digital media. Students translate between 2-dimensional and 3-dimensional representations to produce grading plans for automated and construction processes. (Y)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: CE 201 or LAR 533.

    Credits: 4
  
  •  

    CE 436 - Stormwater Management


    Discusses management of stormwater quantity and quality, especially in urban areas.  Emphasis is on the use of basic hydrologic and water quality principles for controlling stormwater runoff quantity and equality.  The course covers discussions on current stormwater regulations; hydrologic principles and stormwater management modeling analyses; non-point pollution characteristics and impact on water quality; and the design and management of control practices. (Y)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: CE 315/CE 336 or instructor permission.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    CE 440 - Groundwater Hydrology


    Topics include Darcy’s Law, fluid potential, hydraulic conductivity, heterogeneity and anisotropy, the unsaturated zone, compressibility, transmissivity and storativity, the 3-D equation of groundwater flow, steadystate and transient regional groundwater flow, and well hydraulics, including discussions involving Theis’ Inverse Method, Jacob’s Method, slug test analyses, and the principle of superposition. Ground-water contamination and remediation techniques are introduced. (Y)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: CE 315, 336, or equivalent.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    CE 441 - Construction Engineering and Economics


    Legal and commercial aspects of the relation between owner, engineer, architect, and contractor.  Salient features of labor law affecting the construction industry.  Job planning and scheduling construction stages and operations.  Depreciation, replacements, comparison of alternate proposals, and calculation of prospective rate of return.  Design of material handling facilities and theoretical analysis of construction equipment performance.  SEAS student cannot receive degree credit for both CE 441 and ARCH 534.  (Y)   

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite:  Civil Engineering major.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    CE 444 - Traffic Operations


    Analyzes traffic characteristics: the road user, the vehicle and roadway; traffic engineering studies: speed, volume, and delay; and intersection control, capacity, and level of service. (Y)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: CE 344 or instructor permission.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    CE 445 - Introduction to Transportation Planning


    Framework and principles of urban transportation planning; transportation decision making; transportation data and information systems; analysis and evaluation of alternatives; forecasts of population and socioeconomic activity; small area land use allocation; introduction to supply-demand equilibrium, trip generation, trip distribution, modal choice, traffic assignment; quick response model applications. (Y)       

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: CE 344 or instructor permission.

    Credits: 3
  
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    CE 446 - Introduction to Geographic Information Systems


    Introduces engineering problem-solving using geographic information systems (GIS). GIS has proven to be an effective tool in Civil Engineering applications that include a significant spatial component. Focuses on the fundamental concepts of GIS, the top-down process required to effectively use advanced information technology tools, and the acquisition of hands-on experience in GIS problem-solving using the Arc GIS package. Provides experience with the GIS application process, rather than expertise in a particular GISsoftware package. (O)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Note:  Students cannot receive credit for both CE 446 and EVSC 362.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    CE 451 - Special Topics in Civil Engineering


    Applies basic engineering principles, analytical procedures and design methodology to special problems of current interest in civil engineering.  Topic(s) for each semester are announced at the time of course enrollment. (SI)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: Fourth-year standing and instructor permission.   

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    CE 452 - Special Topics in Civil Engineering


    Applies basic engineering principles, analytical procedures and design methodology to special problems of current interest in civil engineering.  Topic(s) for each semester are announced at the time of course enrollment. (SI)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: Fourth-year standing and instructor permission.   

    Credits: 3
  
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    CE 455 - Mechanics of Composite Materials


    Introduces engineering properties and advantages of advanced fibrous composites; anisotropic, thermo-mechanical constitutive  theory for plane stress analysis; thermal mechanical stress analysis of laminates subjected to inplane and bending loads; engineering properties of laminates; test methods and material response (in the laboratory); designing with composites; computer implementation.  Cross-listed as MAE 454. (IR)   

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: CE 231.

    Credits: 3
  
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    CE 461 - Computer Applications in Civil Engineering


    Studies civil engineering problems and their solutions in a numerical context, using the digital computer; the formulation of these problems using various computational procedures; the development of typical algorithms; utilization of microcomputers, including structured programming with graphics.  Emphasizes construction of numerical models for applications and the solution of representative multidimensional problems from all areas of civil engineering. (IR)   

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite:  Fourth-year standing.

    Credits: 3
  
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    CE 462 - Advanced Structural Analysis


    The general methods of analyzing indeterminate structures; fundamentals of structural theory, including virtual work and energy theorems; introduction to concepts of stiffness and flexibility; force and displacement methods of analysis, methods of consistent deformation, slope-deflection, moment distribution; and an introduction to matrix formulation. (IR)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: CE 319.

    Credits: 3
  
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    CE 471 - Introduction to Finite Element Methods


    Review of matrix operations.  Introduces basic concepts of finite element analysis.  Weighted residual (Galerkin) approach and variational (Rayleigh-Ritz) approach.  One-dimensional and two-dimensional formulations; local vs. global coordinate systems; shape functions.  Computational implementation and applications in the areas of structural analysis, steady-state fluid flow, and heat transfer. (Y)   

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: CE 319.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    CE 490 - Civil Engineering Design and Practice


    This course will broaden a student’s exposure to professional practice issues, including project planning and management, financial and contractual relationships. The major focus of the course will be providing practical civil engineering design experience. Students will participate in one or more multi-disciplinary team design projects requiring integration of technical skills from multiple sub-areas of civil engineering (structural, environmental and transportation systems) and application of managerial skills. Extension of design projects to undergraduate thesis projects is encouraged. (Y)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: Fourth-year standing.

    Credits: 4
  
  •  

    CE 495 - Civil Engineering Research


    Study of a civil engineering problem in depth by each student using library, computer, or laboratory facilities. The project is conducted in close consultation with departmental faculty and involves survey, analysis, or project development. Progress reports and a comprehensive written report are required. May be repeated if necessary. (SI)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: Fourth-year standing.

    Credits: 1 to 3
  
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    CE 496 - Civil Engineering Research


    Study of a civil engineering problem in depth by each student using library, computer, or laboratory facilities. The project is conducted in close consultation with departmental faculty and involves survey, analysis, or project development. Progress reports and a comprehensive written report are required. May be repeated if necessary. (SI)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: Fourth-year standing.

    Credits: 1 to 3

Classics

  
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    CLAS 201 - Greek Civilization


    Studies Greek history, literature, and art. (Y)

    Credits: 3
  
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    CLAS 202 - Roman Civilization


    Studies Roman history, literature, and art. (Y)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    CLAS 204 - Greek Mythology


    Introduces major themes of Greek mythological thought; surveys myths about the olympic pantheon and the legends of the heroes. (Y)

    Credits: 3
  
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    CLAS 304 - Women and Gender in Ancient Greece and Rome


    This course focuses on women’s roles and lives in Ancient Greece and Rome. Students are introduced to the primary material (textual and material) on women in antiquity and to current debates about it. Subjects addressed will include sexual stereotypes and ideals, power-relations of gender, familial roles, social and economic status, social and political history, visual art, medical theory, and religion. (E)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    CLAS 310 - Age of Odysseus


    Studies the literature, culture, history, art, and religion of the times of the Homeric epics (Bronze Age to circa 700 b.c.). Readings include Homer’s Iliad and Odyssey, The Homeric Hymns, and Hesiod’s Theogony and Works and Days. Some emphasis on the archaeology of Mycenaean sites. (E)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    CLAS 311 - Age of Pericles


    Studies the literature, art, architecture, history, and politics of the Periclean Age of Athens, with special emphasis on Pericles (circa 495-429 b.c.) and his accomplishments. Readings from Aeschylus, Sophocles, Euripides, Aristophanes, Thucydides, and Plutarch. (E)

    Credits: 3
  
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    CLAS 312 - Age of Alexander


    Studies the times, person, accomplishments of Alexander the Great (356-323 b.c.), the literature, art, and architecture of the period, and the influence of Alexander on the development of Greek and Western culture. Readings from Plutarch, Arrian, Demosthenes, and poets and philosophers of the early Hellenistic period. (E)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    CLAS 313 - Age of Augustus


    Studies the times, person, and accomplishments of the Roman Emperor Augustus (63 b.c.-14 a.d.), with special emphasis on the literature, art, architecture, and political developments of the period. Readings from Tacitus, Suetonius, and the poetry of Vergil, Horace, and Ovid. (E)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    CLAS 314 - Age of Augustine


    Studies cultural developments in the fourth and fifth centuries, centering on St. Augustine and the literature of the period. Readings from such works as Augustine’s Confessions and City of God, Jerome’s letters, Cassian’s Conversations, Sulpicius Severus’ biography of St. Martin, and the poetry of Claudian and Prudentius. (E)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    CLAS 321 - Tragedy and Comedy


    Analyzes readings in the tragic poets Aeschylus, Sophocles, Euripides, and Seneca; and the comic poets Aristophanes, Menander, Plautus, and Terence, together with ancient and modern discussions. (Y)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    CLAS 325 - Ancient Greek Religion


    An introduction to the religious beliefs, practices, and life of ancient Greeks of the classical period as they are found in literature, history, architecture, and art. (IR)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: Instructor permission.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    CLAS 501 - Proseminar


    Introduction to Classical philology and its methods. (SI)

    Credits: 3
  
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    CLAS 525 - Ancient Greek Religion


    An introduction to the religious beliefs, practices, and life of ancient Greeks of the classical period as they are found in literature, history, architecture, and art. (IR)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: Instructor permission.

    Credits: 3

Cognitive Science

  
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    COGS 497 - Distinguished Major Thesis


    (S)

    Credits: 3

College Science Scholars Seminar

  
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    HSCI 101 - College Science Scholar Seminar


    The seminar will introduce students to research in each of the seven UVa science departments (Astronomy, Biology, Chemistry, Environmental Science, Mathematics, Physics, and Psychology). The course will consist of weekly two-hour seminars held by science faculty members, and occasional field trips. (Y)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: Member of the College Science Scholar Program.

    Credits: 2
  
  •  

    HSCI 102 - College Science Scholar Seminar


    The seminar will introduce students to research in each of the seven UVa science departments (Astronomy, Biology, Chemistry, Environmental Science, Mathematics, Physics, and Psychology). The course will consist of weekly two-hour seminars held by science faculty members, and occasional field trips. (Y)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: Member of the College Science Scholar Program.

    Credits: 2

Commerce - Accounting

  
  •  

    COMM 201 - Introduction to Financial Accounting


    An introduction to the language of business for all University students. Initially, the focus is on the accounting system, which measures, classifies, and reports economic data. Financial statements are studied in depth to gain an understanding of their underlying assumptions, limitations, and the relationships between financial elements. Students then explore how the enterprise raises capital and invests it; accounting for key operating areas such as inventory, accounts receivable, and investments are studied in depth. Finally, parent-subsidiary relationships and consolidated financial statements are explored. (S, SS)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    COMM 202 - Introduction to Management Accounting


    A continuation of COMM 201 that examines accounting’s problem-solving contributions to management. Emphasizes planning, control, performance measurement, cost behavior, ethics, and information for special decisions. (S, SS)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: COMM 201.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    COMM 311 - Intermediate Accounting I


    Intensive study of the generally accepted accounting principles for asset valuation, income measurement, and financial statement presentation for business organizations, and of the processes through which these principles evolve. Focuses on important areas in financial accounting, including accounting for leases, pensions, and income taxes. (Y)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: COMM 202 or instructor permission.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    COMM 312 - Intermediate Accounting II


    Continuation of COMM 311, with emphasis on accounting for the equities of a firm’s investors and creditors. Continues to focus on financial accounting issues including financial instruments, asset impairment and long-term debt. (Y)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: COMM 311.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    COMM 510 - Accounting Information Systems


    For fourth-year accounting concentrators, this course provides a broad overview of both manual and computerized accounting information systems. Discusses strategies and risks that a business faces and how an organization builds accounting systems and controls to help achieve those strategies and properly manage those risks. Major topics include business transactions on the Internet, electronic commerce, electronic data interchange, transaction processing, internal controls, application controls, fraud, and data security. (Y)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: COMM 311.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    COMM 514 - Strategic Cost Management


    Explores the roles of accounting information in strategically positioning the firm and in improving performance and examines cost management problems and practices in U.S. and selected foreign firms. The course primarily deals with activity-based cost management, kaizen, target costing, and the balanced scoreboard. Additional topics include the theory of constraints, the strategic value chain, the half-life metric for improvement, and the role of accounting in managing quality. (Y)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: COMM 311.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    COMM 521 - Introductory Auditing


    Includes the planning, processes (gathering evidence), and judgments required to render an opinion on an entity’s financial statements. Deals with evidence theory, risk identification, and professional judgment. Audit methodology is examined through a study of auditing standards and the concepts and procedures developed to implement those standards. Other topics include professional ethics, auditors’ liability, internal control assessment, audit program development, working papers, types of audit tests, and audit reports. (Y)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: COMM 410 and 311.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    COMM 531 - Advanced Financial Accounting


    Covers accounting and financial reporting for business combinations (including consolidated financial statements), international accounting issues, foreign currency translation, reorganizations and liquidations, accounting requirements of the Securities and Exchange Commission, and accounting for partnerships. Emphasizes the conceptual understanding of major issues and technical accounting requirements. (Y)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: COMM 311.

    Credits: 3

Commerce - Finance

  
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    COMM 273 - Personal Finance


    A survey of contemporary wealth-enhancing strategies, such as best borrowing practices; investment alternatives for short-, medium- and long-term goals; and tax and timing considerations required in the general design of an investment portfolio throughout the individual’s life cycle. Guidelines are reviewed for insurance coverage and best investment management of stocks, bonds, and mutual funds. Current tax-deferred savings opportunities, such as 401(k)s and IRAs, are explored. (S)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: Non-Commerce students.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    COMM 371N - Managerial Finance I


    The development of managerial theory and decision methodology is emphasized in evaluating the financial function of the firm. The concepts and techniques employed in the procurement of resources from financial markets and their allocation to productive investments are analyzed. (IR)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: COMM 201 and 202.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    COMM 372 - Intermediate Corporate Finance


    A rigorous introduction to the full field of finance. Students should gain an appreciation of the role of financial markets and institutions in our economy as well as an introduction to the responsibilities, concerns, and methods of analysis employed by corporate financial managers. We focus on the two fundamental aspects of financial decision-making: time value and risk (modern portfolio theory, the capital asset pricing model, and alternatives). The concepts of time value and risk are used to value the two basic financial assets, bonds and stocks, as well as real assets, investment projects, and companies. In addition, the course introduces derivative securities (options, futures) and discusses their application in a wide variety of settings (real options, contingent claims valuation of equity). The course also covers the theory and practice of capital structure decisions (Modigliani and Miller, taxes, bankruptcy costs, asymmetric information, agency) and dividend decisions. The course will include a thorough discussion of market efficiency and an introduction to the field of behavioral finance. A unifying theme of the course is how no-arbitrage conditions and the law of one price can be used to value most financial assets. The emphasis in this course (both in and out of class) will be on problem solving. (Y)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: COMM 301, 302, and 303.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    COMM 373 - Investment Banking


    Provides an understanding of the nature and function of investment banks. In particular, it examines the structure of investment banks, how deals are done, how investment banks make money, the evolution of modern investment banks, and recent trends and likely changes in investment banking. (Y)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    COMM 379 - Venture Capital and the Emerging Firm


    Examines the financial concerns of small firms (under $50 million) through empirical field research. Under instructor supervision, student teams collect and analyze case descriptions of actual business problems and decisions. (IR)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: COMM 303, 304, 305, or instructor permission.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    COMM 470 - Topics in Finance


    A seminar on issues drawing current attention in the finance literature and affecting non-financial business firms, financial institutions or investment management. (IR)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: Fourth-year Commerce standing and instructor permission.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    COMM 472 - International Financial Analysis


    A case-predominant examination of the financial tools, techniques, and strategies required for understanding the financial management of the firm in the global business environment. Topics include the multinational enterprise, forecasting exchange rates, accounting and economic exposure, short- and long-term international financial markets, investment analysis, multinational capital budgeting, and political risk. (Y)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: Fourth-year Commerce standing or instructor permission.

    Credits: 3

  
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    COMM 473 - Advanced Investments


    This course considers advanced topics in investments. (Y)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: Fourth-year Commerce standing or instructor permission.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    COMM 474 - International Finance and Accounting


    Offered overseas during the summer session. Explores the international financial environment in which economic and financial policies and business decisions are made. International monetary relations are covered, emphasizing the balance of payment measure, forward exchange markets, international capital markets, and correspondent networks. (SS)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: COMM 301, 302, 303, 304, 305, 306, or instructor permission.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    COMM 475 - Intermediate Investments


    Provides an understanding of contemporary cash and derivative equity securities and markets. Both investment theory and its practical applications are considered. The primary perspective for most discussions is that of an institutional investor, although applications to personal finance are included. Both U.S. and international equity and fixed-income markets are discussed. Topics include asset allocation, portfolio theory, market efficiency, models of asset pricing, program trading, and equity options and financial futures. (Y)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: Fourth-year Commerce standing or instructor permission.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    COMM 477 - Financial Management of Financial Service Firms


    Introduction to the financial theory and management of financial service industries. A contemporary orientation, supplemented by frequent practitioner speakers, combined with recent theoretical constructs, provides insight into the place of financial service institutions in the international economy. Includes lectures, cases and a computer simulation. (IR)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: Fourth-year Commerce standing or instructor permission.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    COMM 478 - Advanced Corporate Finance


    This course considers advanced topics in corporate finance. (Y)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: Fourth-year Commerce standing or instructor permission.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    COMM 479 - Real Estate Investment and Finance


    Develops an analytical framework by which individuals and institutions can make real estate investment and financing decisions. Emphasizes theory, concept building, financial modeling, and practical real estate applications. Uses the case method to illustrate implementation of an analytical framework. (IR)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: Fourth-year Commerce standing or instructor permission.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    COMM 570 - Financial Trading


    This course examines the nature and influence of trading on financial market prices. Particular attention is directed to the role of noise in financial markets; the psychology of participants in financial markets; the identification of potential profitable trading opportunities; back office processing of trades; the management of the trading function; and artificial neural networks and AI expert trading systems. Mock pit trading sessions are held to give firsthand experience in simulated pit trading environments and illustrate some of the skills necessary for successful trading. (IR)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: Fourth-year Commerce or graduate standing, or instructor permission.

    Credits: 3

Commerce - Information Technology

  
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    COMM 420 - Project Management


    This course covers the basic processes related to the effective management of projects including feasibility assessment, resource analysis, estimation of time, effort and cost, scheduling, team management, risk management, and implementation planning. The course is taught in the context of analyzing and managing the design of business processes in support of business strategy including business requirements analysis, business process modeling, and process design. A survey of project management tools is also provided. Class work includes case analysis of real world project scenarios and a management retrospective analyzing a completed IT project. (S)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: Commerce student or instructor permission.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    COMM 422 - Database Management Systems


    Focuses on managing the information resources of an organization with a special emphasis on applications to marketing. Teaches students how to analyze the database environment of business enterprises, develop data modeling techniques, design databases to rigorous standards of independence and integrity, explore relational data models, and build databases and application programs using contemporary database management software. (S)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: Fourth year Commerce standing or instructor permission.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    COMM 423 - Financial Systems Engineering


    This course provides students with an introduction to business systems with a particular emphasis on applications in Finance and Accounting. It introduces students to the systems development process and the challenges involved in building high-quality systems efficiently and reliably while providing hands-on skills in state-of-the-art technologies (e.g., C# and Visual Studio .Net). In-class activities will focus on systems development concepts and problem solving. Homework includes hands-on exercises using the Moneyline Telerate Center for Financial Markets. Students work in teams collaboratively with finance students to develop a complex application to support decision-making that is tested in a Tournament at the end of the semester (the annual McIntire Hedging Tournament). (Y)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: Third or Fourth year Commerce standing or instructor permission.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    COMM 424 - Electronic Commerce


    This course provides a comprehensive presentation of the concepts, technologies, and tools necessary for designing and implementing information systems that support electronic commerce initiatives. The primary objective is to familiarize students with the current literature related to e-commerce including networking basics, infrastructure architectures, security, front-end/back-end integration, development tools, emerging business models, marketing tactics, online investing, and designing interactive Web sites to enhance usability. (S)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: Fourth-year Commerce standing or instructor permission.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    COMM 425 - Innovation and Technology Management


    This course provides an understanding of the knowledge and skills that are required to leverage technological innovations to generate and sustain business growth. The particular emphasis is on the management of information technology. The course examines the nature and evolution of technological innovation, the assessment of emerging technologies, the valuation of technological innovation and ways to structure and organize firms to take advantage of new and emerging technologies. (S)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: Fourth-year Commerce standing or instructor permission.

    Credits: 3
  
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    COMM 427 - Information Technology Project Practicum


    Provides a comprehensive application of the concepts, methodologies, procedures, and tools necessary for building information systems. Approaches and techniques for system design, integration and implementation are emphasized through case study. Students gain hands-on experience with developing technologies used throughout the systems development cycle in a real world project setting. (S)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: COMM 420 and either COMM 422 or 423, or instructor permission.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    COMM 428 - Data Communications


    Focuses on understanding the strategic value of networks and data communications technologies for organizations. Introduces contemporary technologies and methodologies used in the development and administration of computer-based networks including the Internet. (S)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: Fourth year Commerce standing or instructor permission.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    COMM 429 - Selected Topics in Information Systems


    Presents the opportunity to either examine new and emerging IT concepts and techniques, or study a particular IT area in greater depth than is covered in other courses. (IR)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: Fourth-year Commerce standing or instructor permission.

    Credits: 3

Commerce - Integrated Core Experience

  
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    COMM 300 - The Integrated Core Experience


    The Integrated Core Experience (ICE) is a two-semester core program composed of 12 credits in the fall and nine credits in the spring. The two semesters are divided into six sessions. The three sessions in the fall are assigned four credits each, and the three sessions in the spring are assigned 2.5, 3.5, and 3 credits, respectively. ICE eliminates the artificial constraints imposed by the traditional, rigid, and compartmentalized functional curriculum. The course emphasizes the development of integrated analytical, strategic, and behavioral skills that address real business problems and projects. Cross-functional faculty teams deliver the carefully coordinated ICE curriculum, which eliminates overlap and redundancy and introduces critical new topics often ignored within the framework of traditional courses. (S)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: Third-year Commerce standing.

    Credits: 0
  
  •  

    COMM 301 - Strategy and Systems


    Provides an overview of a business from both a strategic process perspective and as a system and introduces a broad conceptual framework. The remaining ICE sessions provide more specific concepts and techniques. A current business, as well as cases and lecture, is used to develop the framework. Topics include the transformation of business, the role of the general manager, systems thinking and process management, strategic thinking and information systems, global strategy and culture, organizational architecture, information architecture, and the value chain. (Y)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: Third-year Commerce standing.

    Credits: 4
  
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    COMM 302 - Behavioral Issues in Marketing and Management


    Studies the interaction of human behaviors both within the organization and within the business environment. Discusses personal effectiveness and interpersonal skills and introduces the marketing management process. Topics include individual differences, leadership, conflict resolution, group decision making, creating high-performance teams, globalization of markets and measuring markets, consumer markets and consumer behavior, developing communication strategies, organizational markets, organization buying behaviors, market segmentation, management of products and services, the use of the Internet and other promotion tools, and marketing decision systems. (Y)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: Third-year Commerce standing.

    Credits: 4
  
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    COMM 303 - Quantitative and Financial Analysis


    Covers basic analytical tools used in marketing and finance. Introduces a disciplined problem-solving process to structure, analyze, and solve business problems that is used extensively in case discussions. Topics include marketing research; exploratory data analysis, financial statement analysis, basic stock and bond valuation, pro forma statement analysis, cash budgeting, capital budgeting, regression analysis, and analyzing risk and return. Excel is used extensively throughout this session. (Y)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: Third-year Commerce standing.

    Credits: 4
  
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    COMM 304 - Strategic Value Creation


    As a continuation of COMM 302, this course studies the strategic implications of international business and of organizational behavior. The course also considers communication and ethical issues corporations face as well as the effects of these issues on all aspects of the firm. (Y)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: Third-year Commerce standing.

    Credits: 3
  
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    COMM 305 - Analytical and Organizational Complexities


    Examines the interplay between key stakeholders in business and how firms balance financial performance objectives with broader societal objectives.  Students develop a better understanding of corporate communication strategies, leadership, and motivation.  Students investigate the relationships between strategic vision, organizational culture, and corporate image as an example of cross-functional thinking.  Students develop a critical awareness of larger ethical and societal aspects of business.  Class discussions highlight institutional and individual challenges affecting ethical behavior.  Students examine many of these topics in the context of nonprofit organizations.  Students will apply the strategic and tactical aspects of business to nonprofit organizations to develop an appreciation of the challenges of managing a nonprofit organization. (Y)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: Third-year Commerce standing.

    Credits: 3
  
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    COMM 306 - Creating Business Value in the Global Community


    Study of the importance of global consolidation and competitiveness as firms attempt to compete across the world.  Key topics include 1) anticipating and preparing for the next phase of global competition, 2) understanding international trade theory and differences in the political economy, 3) reviewing global and regional economic integration, 4) considering international market entry processes, and 5) examining key cross-cultural issues affecting business.  To better understand the global business environment, students will enhance analytical thinking processes and quantitative analysis skills. (Y)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: Third-year Commerce standing.

    Credits: 3

Commerce - Interdisciplinary Courses

  
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    COMM 180 - Making Business Work


    A Commerce course designed for students without previous business courses. It introduces basic, useful, and useable concepts that under gird American business practice. Basic theory and skills in the areas of strategy, finance, accounting, and marketing will be covered. Lecture and case study approach will allow students to hone critical thinking, problem solving and analytical skills while addressing emergent issues in business practice. Students will be exposed to Microsoft Excel and Access as tools to structure and solve business problems. Specific topics include defining the business model, understanding financial statements, formulating a marketing strategy, and analyzing consumer behavior. The goal of this course is to provide useful tools for students interested in business and to provide a platform for subsequent commerce coursework. (S)

    Credits: 3
  
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    COMM 200 - Business Skills in Todays Workplace


    A one-credit course taken on a Pass/Fail basis.  Enrollment is limited to 2nd year students in the fall semester and 1st year students in the spring semester.  The objective of the course is to better prepare students for the changing demographic structure in the U.S. and increased global competition, to increase students’ business skills and career preparation as they enter this increasingly diverse and competitive market and to provide students with opportunities to develop deeper understanding of problem solving, leadership and organizational management skills needed for success in today’s organizations.

    Credits: 1
  
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    COMM 380 - Business, Government, and Society


    Reviews the ways in which business and government, particularly at the federal level, are related to each other and to society as a whole. (IR)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: ECON 201, 202.

    Credits: 3
  
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    COMM 381 - Business Ethics


    Examines major moral issues in contemporary business through the study and application of foundational concepts from philosophical ethics. Emphasizes directed discussion of case studies and readings from business and non-business literature. (IR)

    Credits: 3
  
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    COMM 382 - History of International Business


    Examines international business history, focusing on the individual business firm. (IR)

    Credits: 3
  
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    COMM 383 - Introduction to Business Speaking


    Introduction to the foundations of successful speaking by preparing presentations, organizing material, dealing with anxiety, developing delivery skills, working with visual aids, adjusting to a range of speaking demands, speaking collaboratively and communicating intercultural. Students will develop expertise in speaking in a variety of professional situations. (Y)

    Credits: 3
  
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    COMM 386 - The Business of Saving Nature


    Human activities are currently resulting in an unprecedented decline in the biological diversity of our planet. The conversion of natural lands for agriculture and urbanization, together with the alteration of wetlands and aquatic ecosystems, is resulting in the extinction of species that depend on these ecosystems as essential habitat. Recognition of the impacts of human activity on biological diversity has led to a growing international environmental movement to promote the preservation of natural ecosystems. The preservation of biological diversity is dependent on the integration of conservation objectives into the framework of regional economic development, which will require a blending of our scientific and economic understanding about these issues. This course focuses on the scientific and economic issues related to the conservation and preservation of natural ecosystems via an in situ learning experience. (IR)

    Credits: 3
  
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    COMM 388 - Environmental Choices in the 21st Century


    This interdisciplinary course will explore the complex choices in environmental policy and management by examining and integrating three relevant perspectives: environmental science, ethics and economics. Environmental science provides a basic understanding of the impacts of human activities on the environment. Economic analysis focuses on the relevant benefits and costs. Ethics addresses the conflicts of values involved in decisions about the environment. The balancing of environmental and economic costs and benefits, coupled with human beliefs about what is “right” or “wrong,” is at the heart of the environmental decision-making process. The process is complex because it involves a diverse set of stakeholders with differing perspectives and objectives. A case study approach will be used to examine the wide range of scientific, historical, cultural, ethical and legal dimensions of environmental issues. (IR)

    Credits: 3
  
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    COMM 499 - Independent Study in Commerce


    Independent study under the supervision of a Commerce instructor. A project directly related to business must be submitted to, and approved by, the supervising instructor prior to the Commerce School add date. Students may take COMM 499 only once. (S)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: Fourth-year Commerce standing.

    Credits: 1 to 3
  
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    COMM 530 - Selected Topics in Commerce


    Seminar on current issues in commerce. Independent Study (IR)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: Fourth-year Commerce or graduate standing, or instructor permission.

    Credits: 3

Commerce - International Business

  
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    COMM 384N - Foundations of International Business


    An introduction to the field of international business through an examination of the practice and theory of international business, focusing on managerial, operational, strategic, ethical, and environmental factors. The student develops an understanding of global trade theory and the various forms of global and regional economic integration; examines the major functions of managing an international business; becomes familiar with the instruments, procedures, and processes of international business; ascertains the modes of international market entry and foreign direct investment; generates an appreciation of the importance of culture on international business; and evaluates ethical issues in international business. (Y)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: Non-Commerce students. Note: See course descriptions for other international courses available for a concentration in international business. These courses include: COMM 451 International Marketing; COMM 465 Business, Politics, and Culture in the European Union.

    Credits: 3

Commerce - Management

  
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    COMM 460 - Selected Topics in Management


    Seminar on critical thinking about current issues in management. (IR)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: Fourth-year Commerce standing or instructor permission.

    Credits: 1 to 3
  
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    COMM 462 - Topics in Organizational Behavior


    Courses focusing on specific topics in organizational behavior—for example, “Managing and Leading” and “Managing the Knowledge-Based Organization.” (S)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: Fourth-year Commerce standing or instructor permission.

    Credits: 1 to 3
  
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    COMM 463 - Human Resource Management


    Examines the fundamentals of human resource management. Topics include job analysis, recruitment and selection, training and development, performance management, compensation, and employee and labor relations. Explores the implications of increasing legal pressures (e.g., equal employment opportunity laws, sexual harassment liability) and the complexities of managing a global work force. (Y)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: Fourth-year Commerce standing or instructor permission.

    Credits: 3
  
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    COMM 464 - Advanced Managerial Communication


    Develops writing and speaking skills while increasing student understanding of how managers communicate with diverse audiences. Covers communication with the public, investors, and employees. Special topics will include media relations, communication ethics, and crisis communications. Students practice for communication events such as speaking at a press conference, briefing a small group, telling professional anecdotes, and preparing for a media interview. (Y)

    Credits: 3
  
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    COMM 465 - Business, Politics, and Culture in the European Union


    Classes are held in England, Belgium, and France. Focuses on political and management issues related to European integration. Activities include classroom lectures at the University of Bath, briefings by government and business officials in London and Brussels, and cultural side trips in all three countries. (SS)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: Third- or fourth-year Commerce standing.

    Credits: 3
  
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    COMM 466 - Strategic Management Consulting


    Develops practical, strategic-thinking and behavioral skills with focus on identifying, diagnosing, and resolving client issues. Introduces students to strategy, process, technology, and change-management methodologies as well as the dynamics of a consulting career. Integrates readings, case studies, guest speakers, group activities, and client-focused work to simulate what it feels like to be a consultant. (Y)

    Credits: 3
  
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    COMM 467 - Organizational Change and Development


    Develops an in-depth understanding of key concepts and theories in organizational behavior and development. Focuses on developing the diagnostic skills necessary for effective management of organizational change. (Y)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: Fourth-year standing or instructor permission.

    Credits: 3
  
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    COMM 468 - Entrepreneurship


    Deals with the formation of a new enterprise and certain special aspects of managing a small enterprise. Considers the characteristics of the successful entrepreneur, methods of identifying new opportunity areas, starting a new enterprise, tax and legal aspects of new business, and financing for initial capital and growth. (IR)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: Fourth-year Commerce standing or instructor permission.

    Credits: 3
  
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    COMM 469 - International Management


    Explores the strong influence of culture on business practices and cultivates skills for developing and implementing strategies in multicultural environments. Topics include culture and its implications, interpersonal effectiveness, organizational systems, political and economic environments, and corporate social responsibility. (Y)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: Fourth-year Commerce standing or instructor permission.

    Credits: 3

Commerce - Taxation and Law

  
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    COMM 341 - Commercial Law I


    Introduces the American legal system, emphasizing contracts, torts, agency, corporations, and partnerships. May be taken prior to enrollment in the McIntire School. (S, SS)

    Credits: 3
  
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    COMM 342 - Commercial Law II


    Further introduces the American legal system, emphasizing debtor-creditor law, bankruptcy, product liability, and sale of goods, property, and commercial paper. (S, SS)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: COMM 341.

    Credits: 3
  
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    COMM 444 - Tax Factors in Business Decisions


    For non-accounting concentrators who want to learn enough about the federal tax system to recognize the tax problems and planning opportunities inherent in common business and financial transactions. (Y)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: Non-accounting concentration.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    COMM 545 - Federal Taxation I


    Analyzes the federal income tax law and its application to business, investment, and personal transactions. (Y)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: COMM 202 or instructor permission.

    Credits: 3
 

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