Jun 27, 2022  
Undergraduate Record 2007-2008 
    
Undergraduate Record 2007-2008 [ARCHIVED RECORD]

Course Descriptions


 

Other Courses

  
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    ISHU 425 - Script Analysis


    Students will survey classical to contemporary plays with a focus on developing the ability to read dramatic texts intended for performance. Students will investigate structure, plot, character and imagery, and scrutinize playwrights methods of making meaning as distinct from other forms of literature. This analysis will enrich the students appreciation of the play text as a blueprint for production. (IR)

    Credits: 3

Academic, Professional, and Creative Writing

  
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    ENWR 105 - Academic Writing I


    Part I of the two-semester option for meeting the first writing requirement. Covers finding and developing topics, building academic arguments, and organizing essays and reports. Graded A+ to C- or NC. Includes a tutorial at the Writing Center. Followed by ENWR 106. (Y)

    Credits: 3
  
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    ENWR 106 - Academic Writing II


    Part II of the two-semester option for meeting the first writing requirement. Covers elements of audience analysis, cohesion, focus, and style. Graded A+ to C- or NC. . Includes a tutorial at the Writing Center. Fulfills the first writing requirement. (Y)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: ENWR 105.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ENWR 107 - Academic Writing Studio


    Designed for non-native speakers enrolled in first-year writing classes.  The course focuses on the use of correct and native-like sentence structures, standard and effective paragraph structure, and academic vocabulary. (S)

    Credits: 1
  
  •  

    ENWR 108 - Academic Writing II - ESL


    Part II of two-course sequence for non-native speakers of English.  Fulfills the first writing requirement.  Students identify and implement the conventions and expectations of academic writing.  Following a review of principles covered in ENWR 105, the course addresses methods of essay organization; research strategies; unity and coherence; use of effective vocabulary, sentence sturcture, and grammar; and editing.  In addition to class time, bi-weekly meetings with instructor for 20 minutes are required.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    ENWR 105

  
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    ENWR 110 - Accelerated Academic Writing


    A single-semester option for meeting the first writing requirement. Designed for students scoring 490-660 on the SAT II Writing Test. Covers framing and developing effective academic arguments, with an emphasis on essays and reports. Graded A+ to C- or NC. Special topics sections are listed on the English department’s web site. Students whose student I.D. numbers end in an even digit must take ENWR 110 in the fall; those with I.D. numbers ending in an odd digit take it in the spring. (S)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ENWR 210 - Advanced Academic Writing


    A single-semester option for meeting the first writing requirement. Designed for transfer students and students scoring 670-710 on the SAT II Writing Test. Covers framing and developing effective academic arguments, with an emphasis on essays and reports. Graded A+ to C- or NC. Special topics sections are listed on the English department’s Web site. (S)

    Credits: 3
  
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    ENWR 220 - Special Topics in Writing


    Includes courses on writing studies, corporate communications, and digital writing. (IR)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: Completion of first writing requirement.

    Credits: 3
  
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    ENWR 230 - Poetry Writing


    An introduction to the craft of writing poetry, with relevant readings in the genre. (S)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: First- or second-year student.

    Credits: 3
  
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    ENWR 250 - Fiction Writing


    An introduction to the craft of writing fiction, with relevant readings in the genre. (S)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: First- or second-year student.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ENWR 270 - News Writing


    Introductory course in news writing, emphasizing editorials, features, and reporting. (S)

    Credits: 3
  
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    ENWR 282 - Television Texts; Scripting and Directing


    Studies the theory and creative principles of television scripting and directing; includes analysis of form, content, and production values; and composition, writing, lighting, camera work, and performance. Cross-listed as DRAM 282. (Y)

    Credits: 3
  
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    ENWR 301 - Advanced Writing I


    Primarily for students having interest and ability in writing. Instruction in prose forms ranging from simple narration, description, and exposition to short stories and essays. Reading assignments. (IR)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: Instructor permission.

    Credits: 3
  
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    ENWR 302 - Advanced Writing II


    Primarily for students having interest and ability in writing. Instruction in prose forms ranging from simple narration, description, and exposition to short stories and essays. Reading assignments. (IR)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: Instructor permission.

    Credits: 3
  
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    ENWR 331 - Intermediate Poetry Writing I


    For students advanced beyond the level of ENWR 230. Involves workshop of student work, craft discussion, and relevant reading. May be repeated with different instructor. (Y)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: Instructor permission.

    Credits: 3
  
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    ENWR 332 - Intermediate Poetry Writing II


    For students advanced beyond the level of ENWR 230. Involves workshop of student work, craft discussion, and relevant reading. May be repeated with different instructor. (Y)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: Instructor permission.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ENWR 351 - Intermediate Fiction Writing


    For students advanced beyond the level of ENWR 250. Involves workshop of student work, craft discussion, and relevant reading. May be repeated with different instructor. (Y)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: Instructor permission.

    Credits: 3
  
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    ENWR 352 - Intermediate Fiction Writing


    For students advanced beyond the level of ENWR 250. Involves workshop of student work, craft discussion, and relevant reading. May be repeated with different instructor. (Y)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: Instructor permission.

    Credits: 3
  
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    ENWR 370 - Intermediate News Writing


    Writing news and feature stories for magazines and newspapers. (IR)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: ENWR 270 or instructor permission.

    Credits: 3
  
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    ENWR 371 - News Magazine Writing


    A course in weekly news magazine writing. (IR)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: Instructor permission.

    Credits: 3
  
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    ENWR 372 - Magazine Writing


    A course in writing non-fiction articles for general magazines. (S)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: Instructor permission.

    Credits: 3
  
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    ENWR 380 - Academic and Professional Writing


    Prepares students for professional or advanced academic writing; also prepares students to manage (assign, edit, supervise, and coach) the writing of others. Lectures present general principles of effective writing based on the latest research in writing studies; seminars allow students to master those principles in the context of projects keyed to their specific interests, background, and career plans. (S)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: Successful completion of at least one 300-level course in the student’s major.

    Credits: 3
  
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    ENWR 481 - Advanced Fiction Writing I


    Devoted to the writing of prose fiction, especially the short story. Student work is discussed in class and individual conferences. Parallel reading in the work of modern novelists and short story writers is required. For advanced students with prior experience in writing fiction. May be repeated with different instructor. (Y)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: Instructor permission.

    Credits: 3
  
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    ENWR 482 - Advanced Fiction Writing II


    Devoted to the writing of prose fiction, especially the short story. Student work is discussed in class and individual conferences. Parallel reading in the work of modern novelists and short story writers is required. For advanced students with prior experience in writing fiction. May be repeated with different instructor. (Y)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: Instructor permission.

    Credits: 3
  
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    ENWR 483 - Advanced Poetry Writing I


    For advanced students with prior experience in writing poetry. Student work is discussed in class and in individual conferences. Reading in contemporary poetry is also assigned. May be repeated with different instructor. (Y)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: Instructor permission.

    Credits: 3
  
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    ENWR 484 - Advanced Poetry Writing II


    For advanced students with prior experience in writing poetry. Student work is discussed in class and in individual conferences. Reading in contemporary poetry is also assigned. May be repeated with different instructor. (Y)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: Instructor permission.

    Credits: 3
  
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    ENWR 495 - Independent Project in Creative Writing


    For the student who wants to work on a creative writing project under the direction of a faculty member. (Y)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: Instructor permission.

    Credits: 3
  
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    ENWR 496 - Independent Project in Creative Writing


    For the student who wants to work on a creative writing project under the direction of a faculty member. (Y)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: Instructor permission.

    Credits: 3
  
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    ENWR 531 - Advanced Poetry Writing


    Intensive work in poetry writing, for students with prior experience. May be repeated with different instructor. (Y)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: Instructor permission; limited enrollment. Students should submit a sample of their writing well in advance of the first class meeting.

    Credits: 3
  
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    ENWR 532 - Advanced Poetry Writing


    Intensive work in poetry writing, for students with prior experience. May be repeated with different instructor. (Y)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: Instructor permission; limited enrollment. Students should submit a sample of their writing well in advance of the first class meeting.

    Credits: 3
  
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    ENWR 541 - Playwriting


    Intensive study of one-act plays by such masters as Chekhov, Pirandello, and Synge, with particular attention to character and context and to scene construction. Each student writes two one-act plays. (IR)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: Instructor permission; limited enrollment.

    Credits: 3
  
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    ENWR 542 - Playwriting


    Intensive study of one-act plays by such masters as Chekhov, Pirandello, and Synge, with particular attention to character and context and to scene construction. Each student writes two one-act plays. (IR)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: Instructor permission; limited enrollment. 541 is prerequisite for 542.

    Credits: 3
  
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    ENWR 551 - Advanced Fiction Writing


    A course for advanced short story writers. Student manuscripts are discussed in individual conference and in class. May be repeated with different instructor. (Y)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: Instructor permission; limited enrollment. Students should submit a sample of their fiction well in advance of the first class.

    Credits: 3
  
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    ENWR 552 - Advanced Fiction Writing


    A course for advanced short story writers. Student manuscripts are discussed in individual conference and in class. May be repeated with different instructor. (Y)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: Instructor permission; limited enrollment. Students should submit a sample of their fiction well in advance of the first class.

    Credits: 3
  
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    ENWR 561 - Scriptwriting


    Explains film, television, and radio production values with weekly exercises in the grammar, composition, and writing of screenplays, radio drama, literary adaptation, documentaries, and docudrama. Selected scripts may be produced by the drama department. (IR)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: Instructor permission.

    Credits: 3

Accounting

  
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    ACCT 201 - Introductory Accounting


    Designed to introduce students to the language of business, the course begins with the role of financial data in contemporary society, proceeds to develop the accounting model for capturing financial data, and finishes with the problems of measuring and reporting income, assets, liabilities, and equities.

    Credits: 3
  
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    ACCT 202 - Introductory Accounting II


    Continuation of ACCT 201. Approximately one third of the course deals with additional financial accounting topics, emphasizing managerial considerations and financial analysis. Cost accumulation, allocation, and product cost methods are studied in a manufacturing setting. Matters such as evaluation of performance planning, cost behavior, and special decisions are emphasized.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: ACCT 201.

    Credits: 3
  
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    ACCT 311 - Intermediate Accounting I


    An intensive study of the generally accepted accounting principles for asset valuation, income measurement, and financial statement presentation for business organizations, and the processes through which these principles evolve.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: ACCT 202.

    Credits: 3
  
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    ACCT 312 - Intermediate Accounting II


    Continuation of ACCT 311, emphasizing accounting for the equities of a firm’s investors and creditors. Covers special problem areas in financial accounting including accounting for leases, pensions, and income taxes.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: ACCT 311.

    Credits: 3
  
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    ACCT 314 - Cost Accounting


    Addresses analysis of cost behavior and volume profit relationships; responsibility accounting and reporting flexible budgets; and the use of standard costs to guide and control performance.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: ACCT 202.

    Credits: 3
  
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    ACCT 445 - Federal Taxation I


    An analysis of the federal income tax law and its application to individuals. A study is made of problems covering personal and business tax situations. Several cases are assigned for which the student prepares illustrative tax returns.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: ACCT 202 or instructor permission.

    Credits: 3
  
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    ACCT 521 - Introductory Auditing


    Examines auditing methodology through a study of auditing standards. Includes the nature of evidence, program planning, work papers, internal control evaluation, types of audit tests, and audit reports.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: ACCT 312.

    Credits: 3
  
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    ACCT 525 - Advanced Auditing


    Builds on the concepts and practice examples from introductory auditing to provide students with an in-depth understanding of professional standards, the audit process, advanced audit techniques, and the auditor’s role in ensuring that publicly issued financial statements are fairly presented.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: ACCT 521.

    Credits: 3
  
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    ACCT 531 - Selected Topics in Advanced Accounting


    Studies accounting and financial reporting for partnerships, business enterprise segments, home office/branch office, foreign transactions and translation, business combinations, and other intercorporate investments and consolidated statements.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: ACCT 312.

    Credits: 3
  
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    ACCT 533 - Accounting for Non-Business Organizations


    Financial accounting for governmental and non-profit organizations. Studies the theory and techniques of accounting and reporting for various funds and groups of accounts.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: ACCT 312.

    Credits: 3
  
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    ACCT 546 - Federal Taxation II


    Analyzes of the federal income tax law and its application to corporations, shareholders, partnerships, partners, estates, and gift transactions.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: ACCT 445.

    Credits: 3
  
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    ACCT 711 - Accounting Theory


    Examines the theories underlying the financial measurement of events that affect reporting entities. Includes the historical development of accounting thought and how it has been influenced by social, political, and economic forces. Analyzes the structure and methodology of theory; examines objectives, postulates, and principles; and explores income determination and the valuation, classification, and reporting of assets and equities.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: ACCT 312.

    Credits: 3

African American Studies

  
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    AAS 101 - Introduction to African-American and African Studies I


    This introductory course surveys the histories of people of African descent in Africa, the Americas, and the Caribbean from approximately the Middle Ages to the 1880s. Emphases include the Atlantic slave trade and its complex relationship to Africa; the economic systems, cultures, and communities of Africans and African-Americans in the New World, in slavery and in freedom; the rise of anti-slavery movements; and the socio-economic systems that replaced slavery in the late 19th century. (Y)

    Credits: 4
  
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    AAS 102 - Introduction to African-American and African Studies II


    This introductory course builds upon the histories of people of African descent in Africa, the Americas, and the Caribbean surveyed in AAS 101. Drawing on disciplines such as Anthropology, History, Religious Studies, Political Science and Sociology, the course focuses on the period from the late 19th century to the present and is comparative in perspective. It examines the links and disjunctions between communities of African descent in the United States and in Latin America, the Caribbean, and Africa. The course begins with an overview of AAS, its history, assumptions, boundaries, and topics of inquiry, and then proceeds to focus on a number of inter-related themes: patterns of cultural experience; community formation; comparative racial classification; language and society; family and kinship; religion; social and political movements; arts and aesthetics; and archaeology of the African Diaspora. (Y)

    Credits: 4
  
  •  

    AAS 205 - Travel Accounts of Africa


    Reading, class discussion, and research on a special topic of African-American and African studies, intended for first- and second-year students. Subjects change from term to term, and vary with instructor. (IR)

    Credits: 3
  
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    AAS 206 - Travel Accounts of Africa


    Reading, class discussion, and research on a special topic of African-American and African studies, intended for first- and second-year students. Subjects change from term to term, and vary with instructor. (IR)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    AAS 250 - The Health of Black Folks


    An interdisciplinary course analyzing the relationship between black bodies and biomedicine both historically and in the present. The course is co-taught by Norm Oliver, M.D. (UVa Department of Family Medicine), and offers political, economic, and post-structuralist lenses with which to interpret the individual and socio/cultural health and disease of African-Americans. Readings range across several disciplines including anthropology, epidemiology/public health, folklore, history, science studies, political science, sociology and literary criticism. Topics will vary and may include: HIV/AIDS; reproductive issues; prison, crime and drugs; and body size/image and obesity; the legacy of the Tuskegee Syphilis Trials. Cross listed as ANTH 250. (SI)

    Credits: 3
  
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    AAS 305 - Travel Accounts of Africa


    Analysis of how travel accounts of Africa during the 18-19th century influence anthropological practices and contemporary representations of the Continent. (Y)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: ANTH 101 or permission of instructor

    Credits: 3
  
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    AAS 323 - Rise and Fall of the Slave South


    A history of the American South from the arrival of the first English settlers through the end of Reconstruction in 1877.  Cross-listed with HIUS 323. (Y)   

    Credits: 3
  
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    AAS 324 - Plantations in Africa and the Americas


    Comparative analysis of plantation culture, economy and polity in Africa, the US, and the Caribbean. (Y)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: ANTH 101 or permission of instructor.

    Credits: 3
  
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    AAS 401 - Independent Study


    Allows students to work on an individual research project. Students must propose a topic to an appropriate faculty member, submit a written proposal for approval, prepare an extensive annotated bibliography on relevant readings comparable to the reading list of a regular upper-level course, and complete a research paper of at least 20 pages. (S)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    AAS 405 - Advanced Seminar in African-American and African Studies


    Reading, class discussion, and research on a special topic of African-American and African studies culminating in the composition of a research paper. Topics change from term to term, and vary with the instructor. Primarily for fourth-year students but open to others. (S)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    AAS 406 - Advanced Seminar in African-American and African Studies


    Reading, class discussion, and research on a special topic of African-American and African studies culminating in the composition of a research paper. Topics change from term to term, and vary with the instructor. Primarily for fourth-year students but open to others. (S)

    Credits: 3
  
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    AAS 451 - Directed Reading and Research


    Similar in format to AAS 401, but meant to be equivalent to twice as much work (6 credits), and taken over a full year. Students in the DMP enroll under these numbers for thesis writing. (Y)

    Credits: 6
  
  •  

    AAS 452 - Directed Reading and Research


    Similar in format to AAS 401, but meant to be equivalent to twice as much work (6 credits), and taken over a full year. Students in the DMP enroll under these numbers for thesis writing. (Y)

    Credits: 6
  
  •  

    AAS 528 - Topics in Race Theory


    This course examines theories and practices of race and otherness, in order to analyze and interpret constructions, deconstructions and reconstructions of race from the late 18th to the 21st centuries. The focus varies from year to year, and may include “race, ‘progress’ and the West,” “gender, race and power,” and “white supremacy.” The consistent theme is that race is neither a biological nor a cultural category, but a method and theory of social organization, an alibi for inequality, and a strategy for resistance. Cross listed as ANTH 528. Supporting Courses The AAS program’s Course Offering Directory, produced each term, lists the courses grounds-wide that fulfill the AAS major requirements for the coming term. Below is a listing of those courses which appear most consistently, but students should check the most recent AAS Directory, available at the Woodson Institute, for complete and updated information. (Y)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: ANTH 101, 301, or other introductory or middle-level social science or humanities course.

    Credits: 3

African History

  
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    HIAF 100 - Introductory Seminar in African History


    Introduces the study of history intended for first- or second-year students. Seminars involve reading, discussing, and writing about different historical topics and periods, and emphasize the enhancement of critical and communication skills. Several seminars are offered each term. Not more than two Introductory Seminars may be counted toward the major in history. (IR)

    Credits: 3
  
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    HIAF 201 - Early African History


    Studies the history of African civilizations from the iron age through the era of the slave trade, ca. 1800. Emphasizes the search for the themes of social, political, economic, and intellectual history which present African civilizations on their own terms. (Y)

    Credits: 4
  
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    HIAF 202 - Modern African History


    Studies the history of Africa and its interaction with the western world from the mid-19th century to the present. Emphasizes continuities in African civilization from imperialism to independence that transcend the colonial interlude of the 20th century. (Y)

    Credits: 4
  
  •  

    HIAF 203 - The African Diaspora


    Studies the history of African peoples and their interaction with the wider world. Emphasizes historical and cultural ties between African diasporic communities and the homeland to the mid-19th century. Cross-listed as AAS 101. (IR)

    Credits: 4
  
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    HIAF 301 - North African History from Carthage to the Algerian Revolution


    Surveys the main outlines of North African political, economic, and cultural history from the rise of Carthage as a Mediterranean power until the conclusion of the Algerian war for independence in 1962, and the creation of a system of nation-states in the region. It places the North African historical experience within the framework of both Mediterranean/European history and African history. Focuses mainly upon the area stretching from Morocco’s Atlantic coast to the Nile Delta; also considered are Andalusia and Sicily, and the ties between Northwest Africa and sub-Saharan regions, particularly West Africa. (IR)

    Credits: 3
  
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    HIAF 302 - History of Southern Africa


    Studies the history of Africa generally south of the Zambezi River. Emphasizes African institutions, creation of ethnic and racial identities, industrialization, and rural poverty, from the early formation of historical communities to recent times. (IR)

    Credits: 3
  
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    HIAF 305 - West African History


    History of West Africans in the wider context of the global past, from West Africans’ first attempts to make a living in ancient environments through the slave trades (domestic, trans-Saharan, and Atlantic), colonial overrule by outsiders, political independence, and ever-increasing globalization. (IR)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    HIAF 401 - Seminar in African History


    The major seminar is a small class (not more than 15 students) intended primarily but not exclusively for history majors who have completed two or more courses relevant to the topic of the seminar. Seminar work results primarily in the preparation of a substantial (ca. 25 pp. in standard format) research paper. Some restrictions and prerequisites apply to enrollment. See a history advisor or the director of undergraduate studies. (Y)

    Credits: 4
  
  •  

    HIAF 402 - Colloquium in African History


    The major colloquium is a small class (not more than 15 students) intended primarily but not exclusively for history majors who have completed two or more courses relevant to the topic of the colloquium. Colloquia are most frequently offered in areas of history where access to source materials or linguistic demands make seminars especially difficult. Students in colloquia prepare about 25 pages of written work distributed among various assignments. Some restrictions and prerequisites apply to enrollment. See a history advisor or the director of undergraduate studies. (Y)

    Credits: 4
  
  •  

    HIAF 403 - Topics in African History


    Topics courses are small, discussion-oriented classes available to any student with sufficient background and interest in a particular field of historical study. Offered irregularly. Open to majors or non-majors on an equal basis. (IR)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor.

    Credits: 4
  
  •  

    HIAF 404 - Independent Study in African History


    In exceptional circumstances and with the permission of a faculty member, any student may undertake a rigorous program of independent study designed to explore a subject not currently being taught or to expand upon regular offerings. Independent study projects may not be used to replace regularly scheduled classes. Open to majors or non-majors. (Y)

    Credits: 1 to 3

African Religions

  
  •  

    RELA 275 - African Religions


    Introduces the mythology, ritual, philosophy, and religious art of the traditional religions of sub-Saharan Africa, also African versions of Christianity and African-American religions in the New World. (Y)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    RELA 276 - African Religions in the Americas


    Studies the African religious heritage of North America, South America, and the Caribbean. (Y)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    RELA 389 - Christianity in Africa


    Historical and topical survey of Christianity in Africa from the second century c.e. to the present. Cross listed with RELC 389. (E)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: A course in African religions or history, Christianity, or instructor permission.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    RELA 390 - Islam in Africa


    Historical and topical introduction to Islam in Africa. Cross-listed as RELI 390. (O)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: RELA 275, RELI 207, RELI 208, or instructor permission.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    RELA 410 - Yoruba Religion


    Studies Yoruba traditional religion, ritual art, independent churches, and religious themes in contemporary literature in Africa and the Americas. (IR)

    Credits: 3

Air Science

  
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    AIRS A - Leadership Laboratory


    A mandatory laboratory in leadership and followership development for AFROTC cadets. As a complement to the air science classes, this laboratory focuses on applying leadership principles and understanding leaders’ responsibilities while emphasizing the benefits of practical experience. (2 hrs.) (S)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: Enrollment in Air Force ROTC.

    Credits: 0
  
  •  

    AIRS 110 - The Foundations of the U.S. Air Force


    Introduces the United States Air Force and Air Force Reserve Officers’ Training Corps. Topics include mission and organization of the Air Force, officership and professionalism, military customs and courtesies, Air Force officer career opportunities. (S)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Corequisite: AIRS A. (2 hrs)

    Credits: 1
  
  •  

    AIRS 120 - The Foundations of the U.S. Air Force


    Introduces the United States Air Force and Air Force Reserve Officers’ Training Corps. Topics include Air Force core values, leadership team building and communication skills. (S)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Corequisite: AIRS A. (2 hrs.)

    Credits: 1
  
  •  

    AIRS 210 - The Evolution of Air and Space Power


    Examines general aspects of air and space power through a historical perspective, from the first balloons and dirigibles through the Korean War. Presents historical examples of the development of Air Force capabilities and missions to demonstrate the evolution of what has become today’s USAF air and space power. Investigates several fundamental truths associated with war in the third dimension (e.g., Principles of War and Tenets of Air and Space Power). Considers the general element and employment of air and space power from institutional, doctrinal, and historical perspectives. Discusses the importance of Air Force core values using operational examples and historical Air Force leaders. Continues to develop communication skills. (S)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Corequisite: AIRS A. (2 hrs.)

    Credits: 1
  
  •  

    AIRS 220 - The Evolution of Air and Space Power


    Examines general aspects of air and space power through a historical perspective, from the Vietnam Conflict to the space-age global positioning systems used in today’s conflicts. Presents historical examples of the development of Air Force capabilities and missions to demonstrate the evolution of what has become today’s USAF air and space power. Investigates several fundamental truths associated with war in the third dimension (e.g., Principles of War and Tenets of Air and Space Power). Considers the general element and employment of air and space power from institutional, doctrinal, and historical perspectives. Discusses the importance of Air Force core values using operational examples and historical Air Force leaders. Continues to develop communication skills. (S)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Corequisite: AIRS A. (2 hrs.)   

    Credits: 1
  
  •  

    AIRS 310 - Concepts of Air Force Leadership and Management


    Focuses on the study of leadership, management fundamentals, professional knowledge, and communication skills required of an Air Force junior officer. Case studies are used to examine Air Force leadership and management situations as a means of demonstrating and exercising practical application of the concepts being studied. (Y)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: Officer Field Training attendance; corequisite: AIRS A. (2 hrs.)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    AIRS 320 - Concepts of Air Force Leadership and Management


    Focuses on the study of leadership, management fundamentals, professional knowledge, Air Force personnel and evaluation systems, leadership ethics, and communication skills required of an Air Force junior officer. Case studies are used to examine Air Force leadership, core values, and military ethics as a means of demonstrating and exercising practical application of the concepts being studied. (Y)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: Officer Field Training attendance; corequisite: AIRS A. (2 hrs.)

    Credits: 3
  
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    AIRS 410 - National Security Affairs/Preparation for Active Duty


    Examines the national security process, constitutional provisions, advanced leadership ethics, joint operations, and Air Force doctrine. Topics include the military as a profession, officership, civilian control of the military, and current issues affecting the military. Emphasizes refining communication skills through cadet briefings. (Y)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: AIRS 310 and/or 320; corequisite: AIRS A. (2 hrs.)

    Credits: 3
  
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    AIRS 420 - National Security Affairs/Preparation for Active Duty


    Examines military law, regional studies, advanced leadership ethics, and Air Force doctrine. Topics include the military as a profession, officership, preparation for active duty, and current issues affecting the military. Emphasizes refining communication skills through cadet presentations. (Y)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: AIRS 310 and/or 320; corequisite: AIRS A. (2 hrs.)

    Credits: 3

American Literature to 1900

  
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    ENAM 311 - American Literature to 1865


    Surveys American literature from the Colonial Era to the Age of Emerson and Melville. (IR)

    Credits: 3
  
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    ENAM 312 - American Literature Since 1865


    Surveys American literature, both prose and poetry, from the Civil War to the present. (IR)

    Credits: 3
  
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    ENAM 313 - African-American Survey I


    Analyzes the earliest examples of African-American literature, emphasizing African cultural themes and techniques that were transformed by the experience of slavery as that experience met European cultural and religious practices. Studies essays, speeches, pamphlets, poetry, and songs. (IR)

    Credits: 3
  
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    ENAM 314 - African-American Survey II


    Continuation of ENAM 313, this course begins with the career of Richard Wright and brings the Afro-American literary and performing tradition up to the present day. (IR)

    Credits: 3
  
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    ENAM 315 - The American Renaissance


    Analyzes the major writings of Poe, Emerson, Hawthorne, Melville, Whitman, Thoreau, and Dickinson. (IR)

    Credits: 3
  
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    ENAM 316 - Realism and Naturalism in America


    Analyzes American literary realism and naturalism, its sociological, philosophical, and literary origins as well as its relation to other contemporaneous literary movements (IR)

    Credits: 3
  
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    ENAM 322 - Major American Authors


    Studies the work of one or two major authors. (IR)

    Credits: 3
  
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    ENAM 330 - American Poetry


    Studies theme and technique in major American poets. (IR)

    Credits: 3
  
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    ENAM 345 - American Short Novel


    Examines American short novels since 1840 by such authors as Poe, Melville, James, Jewett, Crane, Larsen, Faulkner, Reed, MacLean, Auster, and Chang. (IR)

    Credits: 3
  
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    ENAM 355 - American Sentimentalism


    Focuses on the rise of sentimental literature between the American Revolution and the Civil War. (IR)

    Credits: 3
  
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    ENAM 357 - Women in American Art


    Analyzes the roles played by women as artists and as the subjects of representation in American art from the colonial period to the present. Some background in either art history or gender studies is desirable. (IR)

    Credits: 3
  
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    ENAM 358 - Science and Identity in American Literature


    Studies literary representations of science, pseudo-science and technology in nineteenth century America, particularly works that explore the possible effects of science on personal, civic, and social identity. (IR)

    Credits: 3
  
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    ENAM 381 - Studies in African-American Literature and Culture


    Intensive study of African-American writers and cultural figures in a diversity of genres. Includes artists from across the African diaspora in comparative American perspective. (IR)

    Credits: 3
  
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    ENAM 383 - American Introspection (1770-1990)


    Analyzes the nature and identity of America, real and imaginary, as perceived by major writers in various genres. Emphasizes the relation of forms to ideas, and recurring myths and motifs. (IR)

    Credits: 3
 

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